Posts tagged with "inclusion"

General Motors teams with Black Automotive Media Group for The Driving Force Internship Program at HBCU via 360 MAGAZINE

GM × BAMG – TDF

General Motors [GM] and Black Automotive Media Group [BAMG] Internship Returns for Year Two with Clark Atlanta University – Promoting Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Across Automotive Media

The Driving Force [TDF] internship program provides HBCU students with multimedia career development, enhancing the automobile industry’s diversity, equity and inclusion.

A unique internship was created in 2020 and is now returning for fall 2022 between the Department of Mass Media Arts at Clark Atlanta University, automobile manufacturer General Motors, and the Black Automotive Media Group.

Dubbed The Driving Force (TDF), the 10-week internship is designed for students interested in covering the automobile industry; and incorporates instruction in editorial content, video content production, and social media outreach, augmented by GM executive presentations.

TDF evolved following discussions between automakers and BAMG related to increased diversity, equity and inclusion for Black media in the automotive sphere. These efforts have created additional opportunities to help prepare the next generation of automotive media professionals.

TDF is led by respected automotive media experts Kimatni D. Rawlins, BAMG founder and publisher of Automotive Rhythms Communications; Greg Morrison of Bumper2Bumpertv; and other key journalists and publishers including Marcus Amick and Teia B. Collier.

“The goal of TDF is to extend educational opportunities to HBCU students who may not be aware of the myriad media paths in automotive communications … My automotive journalism career began with an internship with a major auto manufacturer, so I am thankful for the opportunity to share my knowledge and experience, and the experiences of fellow BAMG members with Clark Atlanta interns,” said Rawlins.

Supported by General Motors, the TDF internship, kicking off September 28th, is designed to highlight career opportunities as journalists, videographers, photographers, publicists, marketers, and digital and social media pundits covering the auto industry. Participants will showcase their work on various platforms at the end of the internship, and will also liaise with GM communications executives, designers, and product planners through a series of presentations and interviews.

“We are excited to enter into a second year of partnership with BAMG to support the amazing students of  Clark Atlanta University,” said Michelle Malcho, vice president Product and Brand Communications, General Motors. “We look forward to learning together and helping to prepare them for exciting careers in communications and journalism.”

TDF’s mission parallels that of the Department of Mass Media Arts at Clark Atlanta University, which provides students with rigorous academic and professional training, complemented by a strong liberal arts education.

“We continue to move with momentum to ensure our scholars at Clark Atlanta University have access to a world-class education and that mission includes offering initiatives that focus on technology and enhancing their analytical thinking skills,” said Clark Atlanta University president, George T. French, Jr., Ph.D. “We want our students to exercise their creativity, be competitive in the world of technology and be included in the technology career pipeline. Initiatives such as this bring them one step closer to that goal.”

Clark Atlanta student, Joshua Paul Williams was a participant in the inaugural TDF session. “The business experience I inherited from participating in The Driving Force Multimedia Internship was far more than I could have imagined,” said Williams. “The program focused on individually developing each student’s communications and networking skills which has given me lifelong connections, practical lessons, and an expanded perspective.”

ABOUT GENERAL MOTORS

Based in Detroit, General Motors is a global company focused on advancing an all-electric future that is inclusive and accessible to all. At the heart of this strategy is the Ultium battery platform, which powers everything from mass-market to high-performance vehicles. General Motors, its subsidiaries and its joint venture entities sell vehicles under the Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, CadillacBaojun and Wuling brands. More information on the company and its subsidiaries, including OnStar, a global leader in vehicle safety and security services, can be found HERE.

ABOUT CLARK ATLANTA UNIVERSITY

Established in 1988 by the historic consolidation of Atlanta University (1865) and Clark College (1869), Clark Atlanta University continues a 152-year legacy rooted in African-American tradition and focused on the future. Through global innovation, transformative educational experiences, and high-value engagement, CAU cultivates lifted lives that transform the world. To learn more about Clark Atlanta University, visit HERE.

ABOUT BLACK AUTOMOTIVE MEDIA GROUP

BAMG is a distinguished group of Black reporters, publishers, writers, and entrepreneurs representing over 100 years of combined experience in automotive journalism within radio, television, print, experiential marketing, and social media. BAMG members either work for or own various automotive media platforms targeting diverse audiences. BAMG’s primary objective is to bring equity and equality to Black professionals who work in and around the automotive industry. For additional details regarding The Driving Force HBCU internship program, please go HERE.

 

Gold House Gold Gala via Newswire for use by 360 Magazine

Gold House Gold Gala

 Gold House—the leading Asian and Pacific Islander (API) changemaker community that unites, invests in, and promotes API creatives and companies— debuted its first-ever Gold Gala, a historic gathering of API leaders and allies, on May 21, 2022. 

The Gala celebrated 2022’s A100 List, the definitive honor that recognizes the 100 APIs who have most significantly impacted American culture and society in the last year. The evening was hosted in collaboration with Meta — to further a long-standing partnership with Gold House thathonors and supports the API community through innovative programming, such as Meta Gold Talks, and convenes distinguished API voices in conversation as well as trains API-led start-ups in-depth. 

500+ API celebrities, cultural leaders, and business executives rounded out the guest list, including: Mindy KalingMichelle YeohHenry GoldingDaniel Dae KimAshley ParkStephanie HsuAuli’i CravalhoJimmy O. YangKelly Marie TranHarry Shum Jr.Bella PoarchLisa Ling, Prabal GurungJeannie Mai JenkinsPhillip Lim, Musa TariqChloe KimJay ShettyVersha Sharma, Michelle Phan, Andrew Yang, the casts of Never Have I Ever and Pachinkothe CEOs and founders of DoorDash, Match Group (Match/Tinder/Hinge), Hulu, Twitch, Classpass, Patreon, Airtable, Forbes, P&G, Brooks Brothers, Ancestry, Droga5, Publicis Groupe, Paramount, East West Bank, and more. 

These guests are at the forefront of “The New Gold Age,” the evening’s theme, which represents unparalleled API brilliance and defiance amidst continued violence and racism against the community. The theme was embodied in the modern Asian couture attire, which featured several custom outfits created specifically for the gala.

A100 A1 honorees Henry Golding, Simu Liu, Chloe Kim, Michelle Wu, and Payal Kadakia were recognized for being the most impactful individuals in their respective industries over the past year.

A major highlight of the Gold Gala was Mindy Kaling accepting the A100 Legend award for her lifelong dedication to creating and embodying affirming API characters and content. Maitreyi Ramakrishnan presented the award to her mentor in a heartfelt speech.

To round out the historic evening, A100 Legend Michelle Yeoh was the first-ever recipient of the SeeHer award at the Gold Gala for defying gender stereotypes throughout her career. SeeHer, the leading global movement of media, marketing and entertainment leaders committed to the accurate depiction of women and girls in advertising and media, presented the award along with filmmakers Jon M. Chu, Destin Daniel Cretton, and Jonathan Wang

The awards were custom designed by artist Maia Ruth Lee, an inaugural Gold Art Prize Awardee.

Throughout the evening, Gold House unveiled a suite of new initiatives to further its focus on uniting, promoting, and investing in API creatives and companies including:

  • Unity Marchin partnership with Asian Americans Advancing Justice, APIAVote, and a dozen other major nationwide organizations, Gold House announced a historic slate of policies and a convening event in Washington, D.C. on June 25, 2022.
  • Gold Storybook: Gold House launched the definitive guide and resource hub on authentic API portrayals in media, based on years of cultural consultation expertise with every major studio, streamer, and network. The guide was created with support from key partners like The Walt Disney Company and features additional resources through work with SeeHerP&G, and more. 
  • #WriteHerRight AAPI: SeeHer and Gold House also announced a major partnership to develop a guide focused on the importance of increasing accurate portrayals of AAPI women and girls in advertising and entertainment. A number of studios and networks, including AMC Networks and Paramount, are committed to participating in the guide, which will launch later this year.
  • Gold House Venture Networkon the heels of launching its $30M fund, Gold House Ventures, Gold House announced a new vehicle for executives, cultural leaders, and founders to invest in sought-after venture deals and procure prominent Board Director and Advisor positions.
  • Gold Rush Accelerator Food & Beverage and Women Tracks: as part of their community-leading accelerator, Gold Rush (whose alumni have raised $400 million+ in follow-on capital), presented two new tracks that provide funding, promotion, and distribution to culinary and women founders in partnership with Panda Express and Julia Gouw, respectively.

Gold House specially recognized Meta as a long-time supporter of advancing opportunity for all, and shared updates regarding their ongoing partnership to amplify, educate and grow influential voices across the Asian diaspora with a focus on unlocking economic opportunity. This included the launch of Meta’s SMB-focused channel — Meta Prosper — a new program to empower and uplift AAPI small businesses.

“We are proud to partner with Gold House on inspiring a new generation of API voices. It’s an honor to be a part of the inaugural Gold Gala and recognize some of the most influential change-makers in the community,” said Cat Coddington, Head of North American Gaming Creator Partnerships at Meta. 

Onsite experiences for attendees showcased an array of cross-industry excellence, featuring: an exclusive Super Bowl Vince Lombardi trophy viewing (generously loaned by the NFL in celebration with Taylor Rapp); crafted drinks, afterparty, and a towering ice bar hosted by Hennessy X.O; curated playlists spotlighting API artists by Spotify; interactive programming and special announcements with longtime partners like Disney; and meaningful resources to highlight the importance of API names from Procter & Gamble‘s pg.com/names campaign. Guests also got to watch the 2022 APAHM video featuring A100 honorees, produced by Gold House and Google as part of Google’s efforts to put Asian community and culture in focus.

After the gala, guests stayed on for the afterparty, hosted in collaboration with Hennessy X.O, with a curated late-night bites menu from Panda Restaurant Group and custom boba drinks from Bopomofo Cafe.

Both the gala and the afterparty were held at the historic Vibiana in downtown Los Angeles. Accommodations for award recipients were provided by Hotel Indigo Los Angeles Downtown and exclusive rides by BMW. The gala partnered with We Can Do This to amplify their vaccine and booster resources, without which, an in-person event would have been impossible. The evening was also made possible by Nordstrom, East West Bank, Warner Bros. Discovery, AMC Networks, and other partners featured HERE.

About Gold House

Gold House is the leading Asian and Pacific Islander (API) changemaker community, fighting together for socioeconomic equity. Through a suite of innovative programs and platforms, the organization unites, invests in, and promotes API creatives and companies. To learn more, visit HERE or follow @GoldHouseCo on InstagramFacebookTwitter, and LinkedIn.

Mindy Kaling and Maitreyi Ramakrishnan attend the House Gold Gala via Newswire for use by 360 Magazine
Auli'i Cravalho, Chloe Kim and Kelly Marie Tran Gold attend the House Gold Gala via Newswire for use by 360 Magazine
Photos courtesy of Newswire
Health clipboard graphic via Rita Azar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Special Olympics NY × ACA/NY

Special Olympics New York and Advance Care Alliance of New York (ACA/NY) come together to guarantee proper retrieval of healthcare services for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The groups come together to declare their objective of diminishing health inequalities for these groups of people by generating new opportunities.

Stacey Hengsterman, President and CEO of Special Olympics New York spoke on the partnership, stating, “This is one of our most exciting health collaborations yet. Through extensive cross-promotion, support, and more, we plan to improve our already outstanding health care for individuals with disabilities in New York.”

New efforts have begun commencement, while members from ACA/NY assisted at the Special Olympics New York’s floor hockey tournament, the Winter Classic. The tournament took place at the Jacob K. Javits Center in Manhattan which cultivated an energetic event for all those involved.

Jaime Madden, Chief Administrative Officer of ACA/NY recalls attending the Winter Classic, declaring, “It was a tremendous opportunity for ACA/NY to be a part of Special Olympics New York’s Winter Classic. What a sight it was to watch the extraordinary examples of teamwork and athleticism displayed by the athletes and coaches.”

While the joint partnership continues, Special Olympics NY promises to publicize crucial health info through ACA/NY’s Family Forum program, urging education of individuals throughout the region. ACA/NY has announced their commitment to many Downstate Special Olympics NY events during the course of the course of 2022. Moreover, ACA/NY has announced they will supply volunteers for Special Olympic NY’s Healthy Athletes projects, which aim to provide free health screenings and education.

“As we continue to grow our relationship with one another, ACA/NY looks forward to many more events of inclusion with Special Olympics New York,” says Madden. The groups co-hosted a Family Forum conference to discuss Special Olympics NY curriculum opportunities to ACA/NY families.

Shoes Illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Tenth Annual Municipal Equality Index Released

In tenth edition of Municipal Equality Index, a record-setting number of 100 point scores and the highest-ever national average show that localities continue to lead the way on LGBTQ+ inclusion

Today, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation, the educational arm of the nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) civil rights organization, in partnership with The Equality Federation, released its 10th annual Municipal Equality Index (MEI), the only nationwide assessment of LGBTQ+ equality regarding municipal policies, laws and services. This year, a record-breaking 110 cities earned the highest score of 100, which is up from 11 in 2012, the MEI’s inaugural year, illustrating the striking advancements municipalities have made over the past 10 years.

In North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro and Winston-Salem are setting a true example for equality and inclusion by earning one of HRC’s MEI “All-Star” designations. MEI All-Stars earned over 85 points despite hailing from a state without statewide non-discrimination statutes that explicitly include sexual orientation and gender identity. The average score for cities in North Carolina is 71 out of 100 points, which falls 4 above the national average of 67.

“LGBTQ+ people are everywhere—in every city, county and ZIP code. These All-Star cities are blazing the path forward for equality and fighting back against extreme unrelenting attacks on the LGBTQ+ community.” said JoDee Winterhof, Human Rights Campaign Senior Vice President of Policy and Political Affairs. “This year, state-wide lawmakers have zeroed in on attacking transgender and non-binary children—for no clear reason other than bigotry and hate. Adopting the policies outlined in the MEI have not only fostered safer and more inclusive communities, but it has also spurred economic growth by showcasing to residents, visitors and outside investors that their city is open to everyone.”

“In reflecting on the Municipal Equality Index’s 10-year history, it feels as though these past few years have been the most challenging, and yet the most critical, to advancing LGBTQ+ equality. Despite the increasing attacks we are seeing on transgender youth in state legislatures, the important work to advance protections for LGBTQ+ people continues at the local level,” said Fran Hutchins, Executive Director of Equality Federation Institute. “As we face the upcoming attacks by opponents of equality, we know the state-based movement is stronger than ever and ready to fight for the millions of LGBTQ+ Americans who need us in the towns and cities across this country.”

The report also contains an issue brief for policymakers that covers how municipalities can support transgender and non-binary individuals, as well as the types of challenges they face, ways that a city can support them, and guidance on forming an anti-transgender and non-binary violence prevention task force. Additionally, the report includes HRC’s Pledge for Local Elected Leaders to End Violence Against Black and Brown Transgender Women.

“For 10 incredible years, the MEI has helped guide, shape and inspire more inclusive laws and policies in cities of all sizes in all parts of the country,” said Cathryn Oakley, State Legislative Director & Senior Counsel for the Human Rights Campaign and Founding Author of the Municipal Equality Index. “This program is one of the key ways HRC is able to impact the daily lives of our members, supporters and allies. Being able to personally witness these communities continue to push themselves to better serve their LGBTQ+ communities over the years has been one of my greatest joys. I am incredibly proud of this project and of the MEI team who have made this report a vehicle of enduring change and of our partners in communities around the country who have enthusiastically embraced its possibilities.” 

Other significant findings from the 2021 MEI include:

  • This year, 181 cities have transgender-inclusive healthcare benefits for municipal employees—up from 179 in 2020, despite more rigorous standards this year, and only five at the start of the MEI.
  • The national city score average jumped to an all-time high of 67 points, up from 64 last year and 59 in 2012, marking both the fourth consecutive year of national average increases as well as the highest year-over-year national average growth ever.
    • As a marker of the change that ten editions of the MEI have brought, cities rated by the MEI in 2012 averaged 59 points then; in 2021, those cities averaged 85 points. 
    • 11 cities scored 100 points in the 2012 MEI; ten times that number did so in 2021, the tenth edition.
  • Cities around the country saw progress, with every region of the country seeing a higher average score than last year.
  • 43 municipalities have anti-conversion therapy ordinances in states with no state-level protections, up from 38 last year.
  • The tenth edition of the MEI tells a story of sustained, transformational growth in cities of every size in every region of the country.  While state legislatures attacked LGBTQ+ people in a historically difficult legislative session, cities focused on solving actual problems.

Even though local leaders continue to pave the way forward on equality, there remains an unacceptable patchwork of laws for LGBTQ+ people across the country. This reinforces the need for the federal Equality Act that would provide consistent and explicit non-discrimination protections for LGBTQ+ people across key areas of life, including employment, housing, credit, education, public spaces and services, federally funded programs, and jury service.

The MEI rated 506 cities including the 50 state capitals, the 200 largest cities in the U.S., the five largest cities or municipalities in each state, the cities home to the state’s two largest public universities, the 75 municipalities that have high proportions of same-sex couples and 98 cities selected by HRC and Equality Federation state group members and supporters. It assesses each city on 49 criteria covering citywide non-discrimination protections, policies for municipal employees, city services, law enforcement and the city’s leadership on LGBTQ+ equality.

Carrboro North Carolina 84
Cary North Carolina 12
Chapel Hill North Carolina 100
Charlotte North Carolina 86
Durham North Carolina 100
Fayetteville North Carolina 39
Greensboro North Carolina 100
Raleigh North Carolina 69
Wilmington North Carolina 36
Winston-Salem North Carolina 87

The full report, including detailed scorecards for every city, as well as a searchable database, is available online here.

ABOUT HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN 

The Human Rights Campaign Foundation is the educational arm of the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), America’s largest civil rights organization working to achieve equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) people. Through its programs, the HRC Foundation seeks to make transformational change in the everyday lives of LGBTQ+ people, shedding light on inequity and deepening the public’s understanding of LGBTQ+ issues, with a clear focus on advancing transgender and racial justice. Its work has transformed the landscape for more than 15 million workers, 11 million students, 1 million clients in the adoption and foster care system and so much more. The HRC Foundation provides direct consultation and technical assistance to institutions and communities, driving the advancement of inclusive policies and practices; it builds the capacity of future leaders and allies through fellowship and training programs; and, with the firm belief that we are stronger working together, it forges partnerships with advocates in the U.S. and around the globe to increase our impact and shape the future of our work.

Women Comic Artists are Here #VISIBLEWOMEN

by: Jamia Garrett

On August 5th, 2021 thousands of women took to twitter to share their art portfolios with potential clients and the public using the hashtag #VISIBLEWOMEN. Originally, the tag was targeted at sequential artists by Kelly Sue DeConnick, to shed light to the fact that women in comic art are present in the world and are doing an amazing job at it. The hashtag eventually grew to include women from all artistic fields making the tag a space for creative women from all backgrounds to share pieces themselves to grow their audience. The comic art industry, like so many others is typically a cis-male dominated space with women instead making up a large percentage of children’s and YA graphic novels.

This hashtag was an act of protest due to the fact that women in this field are often overlooked and underrepresented. They are instead passed over for their male counterparts and, like in any field, paid significantly less. In 2018, from July-December both Marvel and DC Comics ran a study on their credited creators. During those months DC Comics released 391 new comics. Only 17.2% of the credited staff were women. Marvel Comics released 486 new comics with only 16.3% of their credited creators being women. These percentages don’t include the considerably small amount of non-Binary creators included.

It doesn’t help that people in this field are freelancers. This means they don’t have to be provided healthcare by the companies they’re freelancing for. Women freelancers with extensive resumes are often overlooked for males with half of their experience leading women to pursue different revenue streams in addition to their comic art. The harassment is another factor which alienates women from keeping a career in comics. Women in the industry have been harassed out of jobs by their peers and by “fans” of those comics determined to keep the industry from evolving. There are noted examples of this happening in major comic companies. There have even been allegations of sexual abuse by men of power in the industry.

Ms. Marvel writer Willow Wilson previously spoke about how hard it was for women to gain professional experience. She said there was a “casting couch” atmosphere to navigating the industry if you were a woman, while men had a very different experience. Men were submitted to the regular trials of networking, knowing the right people and having an ounce of talent.

Historically women with big roles have even been blocked out from conversations in and about the industry. Marie Severin, for example, played a vital part in shaping Marvel Comics into what it is today and still felt left out of conversations while in meetings with men. She acknowledged the “boys club” exists, even in this trade. Marie started out her career as a colorist for EC Comics where it was said by her male peers that she kept the sexualization of female characters from going too far. While there, she was known for using one color on a page, a technique used to put emphasis on the action in a scene that is still used today.

The first documented piece of published sequential art was done by Rose O’Neil in 1896. It was added to a book done by cartoonist Trina Robbins, a notable founder of the underground comic scene who made it her mission to uncover buried women cartoonists. While men were away during WWII women were able to work as comic artists, writing adventure and romance comics only to be replaced by men as they returned home from the war. This erased the legacy that so many women had built for themselves and in some, if not most, cases reduced them to housewives.  Trina Robbins was also openly critical of the sexualization of women in comic production. She’s noted for criticizing work done by Robert Crumbs, being one of few to comment on his choice to display sexual violence against women in a joking manner.

Bottom line, we need this representation in the comic and art world. When women are left out it leads to men being the voice in the room and the unrealistic portrayals of women in them. #VISIBLEWOMEN is encouraging all women to be seen in a space that celebrates and acknowledges their contributions to the art world. With the hashtag animators, 2D artists, concept artists, jewelry makers, and others have the potential to be scouted for their talent and to shape the future of art. This hashtag is part of a longer and deeper legacy for inclusion in the art world. Women make up just about half of comic fans and less than a quarter of women are employed by major comic companies today.

Black Girl Duo Debate Team Harvard illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Black Girl Duo Wins International Debate Competition at Harvard

For the first time in the history of the Harvard Debate Council, two Black girls from Atlanta have made history as the first Black female duo to win the annual summer debate competition at Harvard University.

Each summer, the Harvard Debate Council, one of the oldest campus organizations at Harvard University, hosts a summer residential program for hundreds of gifted youths from over 15 countries around the world who converge on campus for two weeks of intensive study, which culminates in a program-wide debate tournament. This year’s residency and competition were held virtually due to COVID-19 protocols.

Jayla Jackson, 16, is a rising junior at Holy Innocence Episcopal School. Emani Stanton, 17, is a rising senior at North Atlanta High School. Both girls are current members of the Atlanta-based Harvard Diversity Project, an initiative founded by Harvard’s award-winning debate coach and author Brandon P. Fleming. In 2017, Harvard accepted Fleming’s proposal to establish the Diversity Project as a means to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion on campus.

Fleming recruits underserved Black youth in Atlanta with little to no prior debate experience. He trains them every weekend for one year in Atlanta leading up to the Harvard summer program, exposing them to higher-level academic disciplines. In four years, Fleming has raised over one million dollars to enroll over 100 African-American students into the Harvard debate residency on full scholarship. All four cohorts trained by Fleming’s unique curriculum have gone on to win the international debate competition at Harvard.

This year, Jackson and Stanton secured the 4th consecutive championship for the Atlanta-based team with an undefeated 10-0 record. The topic of debate was, “Resolved: The North Atlantic Treaty Organization should substantially increase its defense commitments in the Baltic States.”

Fleming emphasizes to his students that the program is “bigger than debate.” He states, “The achievements of this program and our scholars reveals to the world the power of educational equity.” Jackson remarks about the historic win, “We want to use our platform to show people what’s possible when the playing field is leveled for those who need it most.”

The Harvard Diversity Project has already accepted a new cohort who will begin training in preparation for the Harvard debate residency of 2022.

You can read more about the story of the program and its founder in Brandon P. Fleming’s bestselling book, MISEDUCATED: A Memoir.

Check Out This Behind the Scenes Footage of Jayla Jackson and Emani Stanton.

Keep Up With The Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project:

Instagram | Twitter

ABOUT BRANDON P. FLEMING:

Brandon P. Fleming is an award-winning, Harvard educator and author of MISDUCATED: A Memoir. His story of struggle, success, and service has inspired millions around the world. An at-risk youth and college dropout turned award-winning educator, Fleming is Assistant Debate Coach at Harvard University and Founder/CEO of the Harvard Diversity Project. Fleming was recruited to join the Harvard debate faculty at the age of 27. Harvard later approved Fleming’s proposal to establish a new department within the university system called the Harvard Diversity Project – an unprecedented pipeline program of the Harvard Debate Council. For four years, Fleming has led an executive staff and board that has raised over a million dollars to enroll over 100 students of color into Harvard’s international summer debate residency on full scholarship. Fleming recruits underserved youth with no prior debate experience whom he then trains to compete against hundreds of elite debaters from over 25 different countries around the world. Since the program’s inception in 2017, every cohort trained by Fleming has won the international competition. In 2020, Fleming was named to the Forbes 30 under 30 list, and The Root magazine recognized Fleming as one of the top 100 most influential African Americans in the United States. In 2021, Fleming received an honorary doctorate from North Carolina Wesleyan College designating him, Dr. Fleming, Doctor of Humanities.

ABOUT THE HARVARD DEBATE COUNCIL DIVERSITY PROJECT:

A subsidiary of the Harvard Debate Council, Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project (HDP) is an Atlanta-based pipeline program that recruits, trains, and matriculates highly motivated black youth into a summer debate residency at Harvard College. HDP cultivates scholars seeking to further their education at elite colleges & universities.

The goal of the Harvard Diversity Project is to promote educational equity by creating opportunities for underserved youth to gain exposure and access to academic training that will distinguish them as top candidates in the college admissions process. Beyond the classroom, the HDP builds integrity-filled leaders who contribute to the community and value service.

Image via The Purple Agency for 360 Magazine

Crowns & Hops Brewing Co. Launches Crowdfunding Campaign

Black-Owned Crowns & Hops Brewing Co Launches Equity Crowdfunding Campaign Inviting The Community To Be Owners With Crowns

Today Crowns & Hops Brewing Co, the first Black-owned craft beer brand in Inglewood, CA, launches their equity crowdfunding campaign OWN CROWNS to invite the community to invest in the brand’s mission and success. The capital raised will go directly to the buildout of the new flagship restaurant/brewpub Crowns Inglewood, secured at 3200 W Manchester Blvd, Inglewood, CA. In an effort to collaborate with the community of Inglewood and those who champion racial equity in the U.S., co-founders Beny Ashburn & Teo Hunter believe this opportunity will allow for the community to invest in the city’s development while supporting Black-owned businesses in the region.

Crowns Inglewood will be a community establishment based in the heart of Inglewood and will provide a safe family-friendly space to gather, dine and have delicious independent craft beer. During a time where most Black & Brown communities feel left out of the development of their own neighborhoods, this investment opportunity allows for the community to participate in the revitalization efforts of the city. Crowns & Hops will offer locals and visitors alike an opportunity to publicly connect in Inglewood/South L.A. to enjoy premium products produced in Inglewood.

This Crowns & Hops early-stage investment opportunity is made possible by the efforts of the Obama Administration who passed the JOBS Act (2012), allowing cited Americans from all walks of life to invest in start-up businesses, not just the wealthy and well connected.

As stated by Beny Ashburn, CEO, Our brand started with the community, now we want to offer the community an opportunity to own a part of Crowns in the City of Champions and wherever we expand.

We have always celebrated the mission of community and ownership in the craft beer industry. We’re excited to bring these concepts of investment and equity to a region that has been starved of resources for generations, said Teo Hunter, COO & Head of Beer Operations.

WHAT

Crowns & Hops Brewing Co launching an equity crowdfunding campaign for the community to invest in the Crowns & Hops brand. Capital will be used for the completion of the flagship restaurant/brewpub Crowns Inglewood

WHEN

Starting Tuesday, 7.20.21

HOW

Through equity crowdfunding platform Start Engine was also successfully used by U.K.-based BrewDog. The JOBS Act, allowing all Americans to invest in start-up businesses, not just accredited Investors

WHERE

To learn more about the Crowns & Hops Brewing Company’s equity crowdfunding campaign and to invest, please visit their website.

Find Crowns and Hops Brewing Company via Instagram, Twitter, official website, Facebook and to invest

ABOUT CROWNS & HOPS BREWING COMPANY

In 6-years, Co-Founders Teo Hunter & Beny Ashburn have become the leaders and voices of a craft beer movement bringing much-needed diversity and inclusion to the industry. Hunter & Ashburn disrupted the status quo of the craft beer industry and built a brand that is bigger than beer. Through their global social movement #BlackPeopleLoveBeer & #BrownPeopleLoveBeer, they have been able to galvanize the voice of people of color in craft beer. Crowns & Hops Brewery Co. will be the first Black-owned brewery in Inglewood, CA, a few short miles from the new Rams/Chargers Stadium.

Crowns & Hops Brewing Co’s mission is to create spaces that are community-centric driving diversity, racial equity, economic growth, and influencing inclusion. This creates jobs and new career paths for people of color in and around the beer industry. Crowns & Hops Brewing Co. is the first-ever craft beer brand that bridges lifestyle, communities of color, dope culture, and delicious craft beer. Welcome to The New Now of craft beer. #OWNCROWNS

Things You Say presents Expression image by Things You Say for use by 360 Magazine

Things You Say presents Expression

Things You Say invites you to join us for a bi-weekly evening of disco and house music at “Things You Say presents Expression.” This performance will debut Thursday, July 15th at The Queensberry in Los Angeles. The free event intends to bring LA’s music community together to celebrate local artists.

“Things You Say presents Expression” is a space of acceptance, camaraderie and liberation. Things You Say presents Expression promotes an open-door policy that celebrates inclusion, intersectionality, and the rich traditions of club culture. In this way, Things You Say provides a unique space that is the “Expression” platform.

“Things You Say presents Expression” hosts artists, musicians and tastemakers from around the world to share their perspective and to explore love with positivity through movement in an embellished multi-sensory environment.

On their Spotify account, Things You Say describes their music as such:

“We are Things You Say. We come from club culture, it’s embedded in us. It’s where we met. It’s where we found ourselves and each other. We want to make you dance. Despite our name, we hope that you’ll say less and dance more.”

The group’s most recent release in collaboration with Arama, “Angel,” celebrates the same feel-good, groovy attitude of club culture. The track illustrates feeling “weightless” while spending time with a lover. Things You Say melodically sings:

“All I wanna do is see the world with you/ the stars/ the moon/ floating with you./ it’s you, I think I found an angel.”

Things You Say has just released a remix for Tiana Major9 out now on Motown listen here. Other remixes from the band features Grimes’ “Miss Anthropocene (Rave Edition.)” The band has 18,550 monthly listeners, the majority of which are based in London, Los Angeles, and New York City. As Things You Say’s influence continues to grow, they are surely a musical group to watch!

Listen to Things You Say on Spotify, Apple Music, and Soundcloud.

“Things You Say presents Expression” will take place from 9pm-2am at 819 S. Flower Street, Los Angeles, CA 90017.

Joel Peterson photo via Deseret News for use by 360 Magazine

Joel Peterson x My Road to Cancellation

Joel Peterson, Stanford Professor and former JetBlue Chairman, writes about his experience navigating the minefield of woke hostility in his piece My Road to Cancellation:

“Wokeism,” America’s new civil religion, draws on elements of neo-Marxism, critical race theory, social justice and identity politics. Its adherents believe it will lead to a more just society. Its detractors, on the other hand, believe its “cancel culture” will push civil society to the brink. And, for the “woke,” either will do.

The roots of my own unlikely cancelation go as far back as 1987, when Jesse Jackson marched Stanford students up Palm Drive to a rhythmic chant of “Hey, hey, ho, ho! Western Civ has got to go!” The next year, I joined the advisory council of its Graduate School of Business where I was soon invited to fill a one-year faculty vacancy. To everyone’s surprise (including my own), I returned every fall for the next three decades to teach four courses to a generation of exceptional MBA candidates.

Then, last year, before a student-politician boldly posted that “White people need to be eradicated,” I was summoned to respond to an equally disturbing complaint over having “triggered” woke students. Because I didn’t think I’d done anything worthy of the summons and because I had received the distinguished teaching award from students, a “Silver Apple Award” from alumni and been appointed to a faculty chair, I wasn’t worried. Alas, I’d misjudged my peril.

Years after Jackson’s campaign to eliminate Stanford’s requirement to study Western civilization, an Iowa-born, New York Times reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, developed what she titled “The 1619 Project.” In it, she presented America as founded on slavery and stained by perpetual bigotry.

With boosts from the Pulitzer Foundation and from George Floyd’s tragic death, her social justice message struck a nerve. However, when a number of historians debunked the pseudo-history, Hannah-Jones repositioned her essay as “a work of journalism that explicitly seeks to challenge the national narrative.” She followed up with a New York Times Magazine article headlined “What is Owed” making a case for reparations, consistent with her 1995 letter to the editor in Notre Dame’s “The Observer,” in which she likened Christopher Columbus to Hitler.

With police departments defunded, monuments vandalized and cities torched, Dr. Seuss was soon condemned as racist, Mr. Potato Head scheduled for gender reassignment, and free speech restricted by social media oligarchs. So, it wasn’t a surprise to see social justice warriors on the previously welcoming Graduate School of Business campus.

Content of character vs. color of skin

In a class I teach, students objected when guest CEOs claimed to have been “color blind.” When I volunteered that I, too, had resisted hiring based on skin color, gender or quotas, and had relied, instead, on character, competence and commitment, some students were offended. To understand why those “triggered” would object to standards of character and competence being added to the emergent holy grail of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), I turned to one of my own daughters.

Sensing my bafflement at the outrage, she immediately wrote back:

“I have known you my entire life, and I know by your words and deeds that you value all people of all races, ethnicities, and genders. I know you are constantly impressed and inspired by immigrants and their amazing stories of courage and perseverance. I’m proud of the work you’ve done. If this younger, ‘triggered’ generation pushes out of their lives all who seek to improve their understanding, teach them, and open their minds to broader ways of thinking, it will be to their detriment.”

I’d taught my kids – and, until now, my students — that talent, character, and competence are evenly distributed across every demographic. In response to my determination to be on the lookout for leaders without regard to identity, an offended gender-studies major wrote that she’d not known “whether to scream or throw up.” After all, it had been nearly 60 years since Martin Luther King had dreamt of the day when the content of one’s character mattered more than the color of one’s skin. But, by the time that day happily arrived, “wokeism” had hijacked his dream, re-elevating skin color over character.

As demands for skin-color diversity were broadened to include gender and sexual orientation, a student notified me that I’d called on more men than women in two (of four) classes. Knowing that I was no respecter of persons — whether by gender, race, sexual orientation, or anything else — I moved ahead with the course, suddenly aware that my interactions with students were being catalogued by identity.

Soon, a Black Lives Matter advocate asked, of all things, whether I would stand for the American flag. To provide context for my decision, I shared a story. As a toddler, I’d seen my mother take a call from the Department of Defense announcing that her fighter-pilot brother had been killed. Honoring her grief, I’d chosen to stand for the flag under which my only uncle had offered the ultimate sacrifice. The student’s response was presented as an irrefutable argument; my choice was “racist.”

Furthermore, in this woke new world, my professional experience was no longer relevant because of the race and gender I’d been assigned at birth. Despite having created tens of thousands of jobs, promoted women and minorities, and coached scores of entrepreneurs, I was deemed an “oppressor” in the catechism of “wokeism.” Furthermore, the penance for being raised in a “systemically racist” society — founded on millennia of Greek, Roman and Judeo-Christian antecedents, no less — was submission, and, if resisted, cancelation.

The reason behind such tyranny came into focus for me when Condolezza Rice, former secretary of state and current director of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, told me she’d shared with her students that the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (9/11’s architect) had felt like “having Erwin Rommel under lock and key.” The blank looks on the faces of her very bright students revealed that they had never heard of WWII’s famous Desert Fox.

Until then, I’d traced the enmity to activists like Jackson and Hannah-Jones. Now, I could see that it also stemmed from students having swapped an education for indoctrination. Those enlisted as social justice warriors had avoided the lessons of history, missed out on refining skills that might have allowed them to judge assertions, and denied themselves the insights required to make wise trade-offs.

Because such uninformed activism brought with it a minefield of woke hostility, I kept to myself any reservations I harbored about critical race theory, gender fluidity, and climate alarm. And, when Stanford’s math department proposed achieving “racial equity” by eliminating AP math (as racist, no less), I also kept quiet. Instead, I hoped my hardscrabble climb to CEO might inspire those who saw themselves as victims of inequity. Ironically, those who strained to label my uphill journey a product of “white supremacy” were often the very beneficiaries of woke preferences.

Oppressor-victim

To understand this recipe for canceling predecessor generations, I spoke next with Stanford military historian Victor Davis Hanson. Because Hanson had written the following, I wanted his help in gracefully handling the oppressor-victim theme:

“We should not… allow a current affluent, leisure, and pampered generation to hijack the past, and damn it to perdition. (They have) not earned the right to… cancel… those of the past who won Gettysburg, or built the Hoover Dam, or produced a Liberty ship every week.”

While Stanford had long nurtured a remarkably diverse and admirably inclusive community, it nonetheless rejected Hanson’s counsel in favor of a now fashionable “institutional racism.”

When Graduate School of Business faculty were further instructed to avoid “racist and xenophobic rhetoric and actions against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community,” I found myself wondering if the addendum were a virtue-signaling accusation, or if it were based on something I’d simply never encountered in all my years at Stanford. And, when the facts behind subsequent murders (of a Capitol police officer and 10 Colorado shoppers) contradicted de rigueur narratives, I wondered if the time had come to move beyond racial memes.

Apparently not. With free markets also labeled “racist,” those of us with responsibilities outside the ivory tower began to feel our “diversity of optic” (based on long experience) had been dismissed in favor of a “diversity of identity” (rooted in ideology). So, while I care deeply about Stanford University, and like and admire its president, provost, and business school dean, I was beginning to feel isolated.

Their deference to selective diversity led me to reflect upon a meeting I’d conducted in Berlin as chairman of JetBlue Airways. After the meeting, I’d taken a stroll down Unter den Linden to the Bebelplatz, 500 yards to the east of Berlin’s famous Brandenburg Gate. It was at that plaza, on May 10, 1933, that newly empowered Nazi officials had orchestrated the burning of “objectionable” books. Later dubbed “The Night of Shame,” the conflagration eventually contributed to Germany’s liberal democracy turning a blind eye to Kristallnacht, the Holocaust and an appalling rationale for war.

While loath to compare such a long-ago shame with how I was currently feeling in Palo Alto, of all places, I remembered being impressed that, in Berlin, the survivors of that era’s cancelation had later inserted “stumbling stones” between pavers to ensure that all who followed neither forget, nor repeat, that calamity.

As I traversed the once-riven capital city, the ground-level reminders had provoked in me a surge of optimism. Surely, the world would avoid the sort of conflict for which my own father had gone to war. Surely, everyone realized by now that banning books, restricting free speech and stoking fear would lead to tragedy. And, just as surely, America would eventually reject totalitarianism, even in its “wokest” form.

Yet, here I was, only three years later, 6,000 miles to the west of Berlin, sensing I was perilously connected to a prior generation’s intolerance. Adding to my anxiety was a discovery that my grandchildren’s generation were being scheduled to view an honorable heritage through a lens cleverly manufactured to provoke shame.

Forced to consider moving to a less hostile teaching environment, I heard from former students. One female “of color” offered that, of all her professors, I’d been the most supportive of women and minorities. Another confirmed that the majority of his classmates felt silenced by the threats of a racist label. One student even scolded me for having allowed “the slings and arrows” of the woke to achieve their hoped-for effect.

I smiled wanly to see that Prince Hamlet had somehow survived Jesse Jackson. I, on the other hand, had failed utterly to anticipate the distorting polemics of identity politics. The script advanced during America’s annus horribilis had pitted race against race, gender against gender, and generation against generation, all risking a degradation of spirit worse than any virus.

As a former CEO, it seemed to me that the narrative had gone well beyond gaining political or market advantage. It had even exceeded antifa’s hope for French-Revolution-style anarchy. In fact, by 2021, it looked like a bold attempt at a hostile takeover of mankind’s best hope for peace and prosperity.

This conclusion led me to contrast two Americans best known for their connections to societal breakdown — a mid-19th-century Abraham Lincoln and a mid-20th-century Saul Alinsky. I selected Lincoln because he’d guided America through a civil war, and Alinsky because his dream had been to provoke civil unrest by inciting those he called the “have-nots” against those whom he called the “haves.”

President Lincoln’s observation of America’s vulnerability mirrored community organizer Alinsky’s precondition for a successful revolution. Thus, the warning attributed to Lincoln that “America will never be destroyed from the outside; if we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves” was the basis for the race and class warfare Alinsky welcomed by rewriting history, inciting envy and “canceling” a large portion of the population.

Whereas Martin Luther King had called upon our “better angels” to subordinate our differences to shared values and, thus, to overcome what Condi Rice called our nation’s “birth defect,” Alinsky chose to repudiate King’s redemptive dream. If he could get people to ignore e pluribus unum (America’s motto since 1782), he might be able to overcome the spirit under which the nation had thrived.

By 2020, the pandemic had offered activists a unique opportunity to cleave the nation along identity and tribal lines, skirting the 238-year-old aspiration that had been Alinsky’s steepest obstacle. Using a fear of cancellation to silence half the population, SJWs dismissed the steady social progress that was the trademark of the world’s most successful multicultural society. Instead of celebrating the progress flowing from our commonalities, they fomented division by pointing to historical injustices.

Between a pandemic, racial tensions and the absence of a Lincolnesque figure to bind up our wounds and bring us together, America was, indeed, vulnerable. As its citizens awakened to the soft tyranny promoted during the pandemic, many felt betrayed by institutions they’d once admired and leaders they’d once trusted. And, for my part, I discovered that the experience I’d had with cancellation in the academy was being repeated all across the nation.

While I may well survive, America will not survive the rewriting of its history, the violation of its Constitution and the abandonment of the freedoms it has promised to citizens of all political persuasions, ethnicities, genders and orientations. No matter our differences, unless we preserve free speech, secure our Constitution and re-enthrone individual responsibility over victimhood, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men will be unable to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.

And Alinsky’s vision will have canceled Lincoln’s.

Joel Peterson Bio

Joel Peterson is the Robert L. Joss Professor of Management at Stanford University, the former managing partner of the Trammell Crow Company, the former chairman of the board of Overseers of the Hoover Institution, the former chairman of JetBlue Airways and the founder and chairman of Peterson Partners, a sponsor for a quarter century of more than a dozen funds covering private equity, venture and real estate investments in hundreds of companies and real estate projects across the nation and throughout the world.

Analytics Illustration by Ivory Nguyen for use by 360 Magazine

Diversity & Inclusion Research Conference

Diversity & Inclusion Research Conference to return for its fourth year.

Researchers, practitioners, corporate leaders and philanthropists share findings and best practices to address today’s most pressing societal issues.

The fourth annual Diversity & Inclusion Research Conference (DIRC21) will take place as a virtual event on November 17-19, 2021. DIRC21 brings together researchers, practitioners, corporate leaders, philanthropists and policymakers to share findings and best practices for today’s most pressing societal issues related to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI), ranging from health and wealth inequities, to social justice and workplace DEI.

“The inequities highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic and by the murder of George Floyd have raised global awareness of the profound impact of one’s personal traits on virtually every facet of our society” said DIRC co-creator Paolo Gaudiano. “DIRC fills a unique and much needed niche, elevating the discourse about DEI beyond qualitative, narrative approaches.”

DIRC21, organized by DEI research nonprofit Aleria Research Corp (ARC) in partnership with the New York University Office of Global Inclusion, Diversity and Strategic Innovation, will be hosted on the Socio virtual event platform, and all content will be available at the DIRC website info page.

Taking full advantage of its virtual format, DIRC21 will combine pre-recorded and live content to give the audience maximum flexibility in accessing the information that is most interesting and useful to them. In addition to a full roster of talks and panels, DIRC21 will feature live workshops, interactive experiences, immersive videos, fireside chats and Q&A sessions, offering every attendee the opportunity to focus on topics of interest to them.

“Our virtual format, which was originally developed out of necessity, has proven to be superior to in-person events in many ways” said Toni Shoola, DIRC co-organizer. “We learned a lot last year, and for DIRC21 we are unveiling even more ways for the audience to gain invaluable knowledge about DEI.”

DIRC will showcase an impressive lineup of speakers and panelists from corporations, foundations, academic institutions, government agencies and other sectors, who will discuss the importance of research as a way of addressing a wide range of societal problems related to DEI, while sharing key findings and best practices.

In alignment with its mission, DIRC21 will introduce novel approaches to share its proceeds equitably with presenters, and will also donate a portion of its revenues to a select group of charitable organizations supporting greater inclusion and equity in our society. For additional information or to purchase single or bulk tickets, please visit the DIRC website.