Posts tagged with "debate"

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

California Recall Candidates Debate at Nixon Library

Candidates competing to replace Gavin Newsom as Governor of California will face off in a televised debate at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda on Wednesday, August 4, 2021, from 6:00 – 7:30 PM PT.

John Cox, Kevin Faulconer, Kevin Kiley, and Doug Ose will take the stage in a debate that will be broadcast live by Fox 11 Los Angeles.

Hugh Hewitt, president of the Richard Nixon Foundation, will moderate the debate along with panelists Christine Devine and Elex Michaelson of Fox 11 News and former U.S. National Security Adviser Ambassador Robert C. O’Brien.

Governor Gavin Newsom was invited to participate but did not respond to the invitation. Candidate Caitlyn Jenner was invited to participate but is unable to attend due to a prior commitment. Candidate Larry Elder’s campaign cleared the date but subsequently identified a conflict. The invitation to all three remains open and organizers are hopeful one or more will make the debate. The debate is being aired on Fox 11 Los Angeles, KTVU Fox 2 San Francisco, other Fox TV affiliates statewide, and on the Salem Radio Network and other radio stations. 

The Nixon Foundation is holding spots for Newsom, Jenner, and Elder if any of those candidates decide to participate.

California voters will head to the polls on September 14 to decide whether Newsom should remain in office as Governor of California.

The Nixon Foundation is planning a second debate during the week of August 23 and has invited the same candidates to participate.

Debate participants were selected by applying the Richard Nixon Foundation’s proprietary internal metrics that the Foundation has used to select speakers and debate participants at the Nixon Library for more than 30 years. 

Press must be credentialed to cover the debate. Audience tickets are limited and only available from the Nixon Foundation by request. There will be a designated press gallery room with Wi-FI and TVs to watch the debate. That space will double as a spin room if the candidates or campaigns choose to make themselves available for press.

The Richard Nixon Foundation, a nonprofit educational institution that co-operates the Nixon Library, is hosting both debates as a civic service to voters in order to highlight issues facing California today. Questions and topics will be decided among the moderator and panelists and will not be shared with the candidates in advance.

Black Girl Duo Debate Team Harvard illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Black Girl Duo Wins International Debate Competition at Harvard

For the first time in the history of the Harvard Debate Council, two Black girls from Atlanta have made history as the first Black female duo to win the annual summer debate competition at Harvard University.

Each summer, the Harvard Debate Council, one of the oldest campus organizations at Harvard University, hosts a summer residential program for hundreds of gifted youths from over 15 countries around the world who converge on campus for two weeks of intensive study, which culminates in a program-wide debate tournament. This year’s residency and competition were held virtually due to COVID-19 protocols.

Jayla Jackson, 16, is a rising junior at Holy Innocence Episcopal School. Emani Stanton, 17, is a rising senior at North Atlanta High School. Both girls are current members of the Atlanta-based Harvard Diversity Project, an initiative founded by Harvard’s award-winning debate coach and author Brandon P. Fleming. In 2017, Harvard accepted Fleming’s proposal to establish the Diversity Project as a means to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion on campus.

Fleming recruits underserved Black youth in Atlanta with little to no prior debate experience. He trains them every weekend for one year in Atlanta leading up to the Harvard summer program, exposing them to higher-level academic disciplines. In four years, Fleming has raised over one million dollars to enroll over 100 African-American students into the Harvard debate residency on full scholarship. All four cohorts trained by Fleming’s unique curriculum have gone on to win the international debate competition at Harvard.

This year, Jackson and Stanton secured the 4th consecutive championship for the Atlanta-based team with an undefeated 10-0 record. The topic of debate was, “Resolved: The North Atlantic Treaty Organization should substantially increase its defense commitments in the Baltic States.”

Fleming emphasizes to his students that the program is “bigger than debate.” He states, “The achievements of this program and our scholars reveals to the world the power of educational equity.” Jackson remarks about the historic win, “We want to use our platform to show people what’s possible when the playing field is leveled for those who need it most.”

The Harvard Diversity Project has already accepted a new cohort who will begin training in preparation for the Harvard debate residency of 2022.

You can read more about the story of the program and its founder in Brandon P. Fleming’s bestselling book, MISEDUCATED: A Memoir.

Check Out This Behind the Scenes Footage of Jayla Jackson and Emani Stanton.

Keep Up With The Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project:

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ABOUT BRANDON P. FLEMING:

Brandon P. Fleming is an award-winning, Harvard educator and author of MISDUCATED: A Memoir. His story of struggle, success, and service has inspired millions around the world. An at-risk youth and college dropout turned award-winning educator, Fleming is Assistant Debate Coach at Harvard University and Founder/CEO of the Harvard Diversity Project. Fleming was recruited to join the Harvard debate faculty at the age of 27. Harvard later approved Fleming’s proposal to establish a new department within the university system called the Harvard Diversity Project – an unprecedented pipeline program of the Harvard Debate Council. For four years, Fleming has led an executive staff and board that has raised over a million dollars to enroll over 100 students of color into Harvard’s international summer debate residency on full scholarship. Fleming recruits underserved youth with no prior debate experience whom he then trains to compete against hundreds of elite debaters from over 25 different countries around the world. Since the program’s inception in 2017, every cohort trained by Fleming has won the international competition. In 2020, Fleming was named to the Forbes 30 under 30 list, and The Root magazine recognized Fleming as one of the top 100 most influential African Americans in the United States. In 2021, Fleming received an honorary doctorate from North Carolina Wesleyan College designating him, Dr. Fleming, Doctor of Humanities.

ABOUT THE HARVARD DEBATE COUNCIL DIVERSITY PROJECT:

A subsidiary of the Harvard Debate Council, Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project (HDP) is an Atlanta-based pipeline program that recruits, trains, and matriculates highly motivated black youth into a summer debate residency at Harvard College. HDP cultivates scholars seeking to further their education at elite colleges & universities.

The goal of the Harvard Diversity Project is to promote educational equity by creating opportunities for underserved youth to gain exposure and access to academic training that will distinguish them as top candidates in the college admissions process. Beyond the classroom, the HDP builds integrity-filled leaders who contribute to the community and value service.

Jaime Harrison criticizes Sen. Lindsey Graham on SiriusXM

Today, Jaime Harrison, candidate for U.S. Senate from South Carolina was a guest on SiriusXM’s “The Laura Coates Show,” where he discussed his feelings regarding the recently postponed debate with Sen. Lindsey Graham.

During the interview, Harrison told host, Laura Coates: “This is probably the most historic Senate Race in the history of this state, and to have Senator Graham ducking and dodge [the debate], is really sad, but it’s a testament to who he is.”

Audiogram below with transcript. If used, please credit SiriusXM’s “The Laura Coates Show.”

The interview with Harrison is on SiriusXM’s “The Laura Coates Show.”

Transcript from SiriusXM’s “The Laura Coates Show”—

“Well, you know, he’s saying scheduling, and then he even said something about September debate. This is October, you know, I can send the Senator a calendar if he doesn’t have one. I know he doesn’t have a smartphone, he still uses a flip phone, but this is October. We are two weeks away from the election and the people in South Carolina want to hear from their Senator and the candidates about this particular race. This is probably the most historic Senate race in the history of this state, and to have Senator Graham ducking and dodge [the debate], is really sad, but it’s a testament to who he is. He believes that he represents the interest in Washington, D.C. Instead of representing the interests of the people in South Carolina. And that’s why he’s on the verge of getting that one way ticket back home. We are building something because we are focusing like a laser on the people in the state. As I said, so many times on this campaign trail, we’re about to close the chapter on ‘the old south’ and write a brand new book called ‘the new south,’ one that is bold, that is inclusive and diverse. And it’s a movement that we have spawned here in South Carolina, and it’s one that I hope people continue to invest in. Volunteers, sign up, go to Jamieharrison.com if you want to be a part of this movement and to give Lindsey Graham his one way ticket home back to Seneca, South Carolina.”

Presidents Illustration for 360 Magazine by Maria Soloman

Biden vs. Trump: First Debate

The first presidential debate took place on September 29 and it made waves on social media. The dispute was borderline chaotic with candidates shouting over each other and quite frankly immaturity from each party. 

Moderator Chris Wallace tried to keep things civil, but with minimal success. From coronavirus to white supremacy, topics were covered that everyone should know each candidate’s stance on. Although summarizing the entire debate would be nearly impossible, some of the most notable moments are recapped below. 

One of the most memorable parts of the night was when Trump refused to condemn white supremacy. Wallace asked Trump if he was specifically ready to call out this group of terrorists and Trump said he was prepared to do so but immediately blamed recent violence on “the left-wing.” Wallace and Biden continued to encourage Trump to criticize “right supremacists and right-wing militia” to which Trump responded, “proud boys, stand back and stand by.” This comment only fueled the Proud Boys organization and group lead Joe Biggs commented on the social media platform Parler that the comment “makes me so happy.” 

Biden did not shy away from calling out Trump’s racism. “This is a President who has used everything as a dog whistle to try to generate racist hatred, racist division,” said Biden. However, supporters of Trump have been brushing the Proud Boys comment off as a misinterpretation. The president’s son, Donald Trump Jr. vindicated his father’s comment. “I don’t know if that was a misspeak, but he was talking about having them stand down,” Trump Jr. explained to CBS News’ Gayle King. 

An unavoidable debate topic is the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and the steps Trump has taken to combat the disease. When asked about a reopening plan Biden commented that he “would know what the plan is,” for a safe reopening when the time is right. He was interrupted by Trump who said “he [Biden] wants to shut down this country and I want to keep it open.” Trump continued to bash democratic governors for shutting down states and claimed this was only for political reasons. 

Although Trump has been seen in public various times not wearing a mask, despite the advice of health professionals, during the debate he said “I’m okay with masks. I’m not fighting masks.” Trump also mentioned how Dr. Anthony Fauci agreed Trump saved thousands of lives. Trump continued to attack Biden for all of the losses the country endured during the Swine Flu.

Through the debate, Biden remained composed during Trump’s offense comments and interruptions. Instead of losing it, he made small remarks that established his thoughts on Trump as a candidate. Biden also exchanged a fair share of side glares and head shakes to many of Trump’s points. “You’re the worst president America has ever had. Come on,” said Biden later in the debate. 

One quote by Biden, “Will you shut up man?” was a popular line from the debate that has been reposted on social media. This saying has already been plastered across a t-shirt that advocates for Biden. One post by @thefeministvibe on Instagram received over twelve thousand likes for posting this quote and their opinion on it. 

Another debate topic voters have been eager to hear the two candidates debate is the plan to replace late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Badar Ginsburg. Trump has recently nominated Amy Coney Barrett to take the place of Ginsburg. Nevertheless, there has been controversy surrounding Trump’s selection of a supreme court justice due to the rules implemented when Obama was still in office. 

Biden tried to lead the discussion about the supreme court into a conversation about health care. He mentioned that a Supreme Court with a 6-3 conservative majority would overturn many decisions that have already been made. This includes the Affordable Care Act and Roe V. Wade that made abortion legal nationally. 

The next presidential debate will be at 9 p.m. on Thursday, October 15. There is suspicion that the moderator will be able to cut the microphones of the candidates if they don’t obey the rules. Hopefully, the next debate will be less of a shouting match and a little more contained.

Kaelen Felix illustrates a political article for 360 MAGAZINE

Black Male Leaders x Biden

USA Today reported Monday that Black male leaders penned an open letter to presidential candidate Joe Biden to say that he will lose the election if he does not select a Black woman as his running mate.

According to USA Today, the letter came from more than 100 activists, leaders, preachers and celebrities. Some candidates on an unofficial shortlist of possible VPs include Sen. Kamala Harris, Rep. Karen Bass and Susan Rice, the former Ambassador to the United Nations and National Security Advisor during Barack Obama‘s presidency.

The letter also expressed concern that Black women were being unfairly criticized as potential running mates for Biden. USA Today mentions a POLITICO report that said Sen. Chris Dodd criticized Sen. Harris for comments on Biden’s voting record regarding civil rights. The article also mentions a CNBC report saying Biden allies found Harris to be too focused on becoming president herself to hold the vice presidential office.

Signees of the letter included Sean “Diddy” Combs, Charlamagne Tha God and civil rights lawyer Benjamin Crump, who represented George Floyd’s family.

“We don’t want to choose between the lesser of two evils, and we don’t want to vote for the devil we know versus the devil we don’t because we are tired of voting for devils,” the letter said.

The New York Times reported Monday that Biden’s VP selection committee has been disbanded and that the only thing left was a decision from Biden, also calling the pick “imminent.”

The New York Times also said Biden’s campaign has a virtual event planned to introduce the vice presidential candidate, and the event is sponsored by Women for Biden.

Mask illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Indiana School Quarantines on First Day

By Eamonn Burke

Greenfield Central Junior High School in Indiana opened on Thursday, as one of the first high schools to do so in the country. Within hours, the school had to quarantine when a student tested positive for the COVID-19 virus. It appears that the student was tested days before and went to school without knowing the results.

The emergency “Positive COVID-19 Test Protocol” that went into action following the testing involved isolating the student and a two week quarantine order for those who had come in contact. The schools superintendent, Harold E. Olin, knew the situation was coming but was “shocked it was on Day 1.” Nonetheless, Olin said in a letter that “It was very evident today that nearly all of our families and students were prepared to properly follow the safety protocols we have established”.

This comes amidst a national debate over the re-opening of schools in the fall. While most major school districts have announced a remote start, some in places like Texas and Florida, where the virus is running rampant, plan to open in the fall. Teachers unions have been vehemently opposing an in-person opening, threatening and executing lawsuits and strikes to make their point. They put pressure on Trump’s administration, who is urging for children to get back to school.

Further complicating matters is a study from Northwestern and a Chicago Pediatric Hospital found that children five years and younger carry the virus in high concentrations, although a study on their transmission rate has not been conducted.

On top of all the virus concerns is that of the mental health and success of students who are learning virtually. This spans everything from eye health to sleep patterns to ability to socialize. In addition, it can be harder for many students to pay attention and retain material when studying from home.

All Hail the Driverless Car!

Aurora CEO Chris Urmson and SAFE Autuomous Vehicles VP Amitai Bin-Nun won a recent Intelligence Squared U.S. debate on the motion “All Hail the Driverless Car!” by convincing more of the live NYC audience that a self-driving future would lead to fewer accidents, less traffic congestion and carbon emissions, and greater accessibility.

Their opponents, arguing that driverless cars might never be truly safe or affordable to anyone beyond the wealthy, were NYU data journalism professor Meredith Broussard and MIT transportation researcher Ashley Nunes.

Hear the complete debate as a podcast now here (or on all podcasting platforms under “Intelligence Squared U.S.”): http://www.intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/all-hail-driverless-car

Read selections from all four debaters’ remarks in the new issue of Automotive News: http://www.autonews.com/debate-all-hail-driverless-car

The Economist x Midterms

Today The Economist launched its first real-time midterm model, which uses statistical forecasting to predict how many seats in the House of Representatives each party is likely to win in this year’s US midterm elections.

View the model here:

Applying cutting-edge machine-learning techniques to political science, the model combines information from polling, past elections, special elections, fundraising, ideology and “fundamental” factors like the economy and incumbency.  It has been trained on every election cycle since 1942 and nearly 6,500 historical district races. The model will conduct 4.35 million simulated elections every day until the vote, live-updating to incorporate up-to-the-minute data.

The Economist’s midterm model currently predicts that Democrats have a 2 in 3 (or 65%) chance of taking the House, and holding an average of 222 seats, or 4 more than is needed for a majority.  It shows that there is a 95% chance that the Democrats will hold between 206 and 241 seats.

The Economist’s data team plans to launch a similar model to forecast Senate results later in the year once primaries are complete and more polls become available.

Find out more about The Economist’s midterm model here.