Posts tagged with "illustrations"

Oprah Winfrey Virtual Town Halls

Oprah Winfrey announced plans Monday to host virtual town halls in states that look to play a large role in the upcoming election.

As part of OWN’s OWN YOUR VOTE get-out-the-vote initiative, the town halls will be a non-partisan effort to encourage, inspire and support voters across the country before Nov. 3.

The events are free and open to the public, and you can register in advance by clicking right here.

She will host an event for voters in Wisconsin Oct. 26, voters in North Carolina Oct. 27, voters in Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Pennsylvania Oct. 28 and voters in South Carolina Oct. 29. All of the town halls will begin at 8 p.m. ET.

Winfrey will speak with local voters in an effort to acquire adequate resources, information and inspiration to create a more informed voting base. Local voters, national thought leaders, voting rights experts and others who can provide insight and resources to voters will join her.

Speakers at the town halls include Brittany Packnett Cunningham, Representative Gwen Moore, Kristen Clarke, Vi Lyles, Kamilia Landrum, Andrea Hailey, Tameika Isaac Devine, Arisha Hatch, Tamika D. Mallory and Sherrilyn Ifill.

Representatives from women’s organizations will also attend, like Dr. Glenda Glover, Beverly E. Smith, Melanie Campbell, Glynda Carr, Dr. Johnnetta Betsch Cole, Dr. Kimberly Leonard, Rasheeda S. Liberty and Valerie Hollingsworth Baker.

For this event, OWN YOUR VOTE has partnered with the following organizations: 

Advancement Project National Office

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

AME Church Social Action Commission

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated

Fair Fight Action

Higher Heights Leadership Fund

Joseph and Evelyn Lowery Institute for Justice and Human Rights

The Kapor Center

The King Center (Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, Inc.)

Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

The Links, Incorporated

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF)

National Council of Negro Women

National Urban League

Power Rising

Power to the Polls

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Incorporated

Sistahs in Business Expo

Vote Run Lead

Vote.org

VoteAsIf.org

When We All Vote

Woke Vote

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated

You can also learn more about OWN YOUR VOTE by clicking right here.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates an Article about Skai Jackson for 360 MAGAZINE

Skai Jackson × DWTS

Skai Jackson, the 18-year-old television and social media star, hit the cover of 360 MAGAZINE.

A competitor on the 29th season of ABC’s hit television series “Dancing with the Stars,” Jackson is mostly known for her role as Zuri Ross in the Disney Channel show “Jessie” and its spin-off series “Bunk’d,” as well as her social media presence. Her cover with 360 MAGAZINE was featured on “Dancing with the Stars,” and you can see it right here.

Now, she is partnered with Alan Bersten in the popular ballroom dancing competition.

She danced the tango with Bersten to Nicki Minaj‘s “Super Bass” in the first week of the show and scored a 21 out of 30 from the three judges.

In the second week, she danced the samba to Ne-Yo‘s “Miss Independent.” The duo scored their lowest score up to this point in the competition with a 15, but they were saved while Charles Oakley and Emma Slater were eliminated.

Jackson and Bersten then danced the jive to “Almost There” from “The Princess and the Frog.” They scored an 18 and moved on to the next round.

Week four saw the two dance the foxtrot to John Legend‘s “Ordinary People.” Jackson dedicated the dance to her “Jessie” co-star Cameron Boyce, who died at the age of 20 in 2019.

She spread the word about dedicating the dance on Twitter.

“Just got off stage…I did my thing for Cameron tonight,” she tweeted.

She also encouraged viewers to donate to the Cameron Boyce Foundation, a program that honors Boyce with a goal to end gun violence and cure epilepsy. Combining an issue that affected Boyce personally with an issue he was passionate about, the foundation aims to be the bridge for people who want to help but don’t know how.

To help, you can follow the Cameron Boyce Foundation on Instagram, donate and encourage others to get involved.

The dance scored the first ten of the year from Carrie Ann Inaba. It also received nines from Derek Hough and Bruno Tonioli, giving it a total score of 28, the highest score of the season at the time.

The two danced jazz in the fifth week to “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis & The News for the show’s 80’s night. Set to a “Back to the Future” backdrop, the costumes completed the feel of the movie and the dance scored a 24.

Week 6 will air Wednesday night on ABC, and Jackson and Bersten will dance the cha-cha-cha.

You can follow Skai Jackson on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Farm Animal Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Faunalytics x Farm Sanctuary

A new study from Faunalytics suggests that people who interact with farm animals at sanctuaries are more likely to consume fewer animal products.

Farm Sanctuary, America’s premier farm animal sanctuary and advocacy organization, joined Faunalytics to release the study, which showed that 70% of non-vegans who went on a tour through Farm Sanctuary said they would make dietary changes to reduce consumption of animal products. Comparatively, only 53% said they would change their diets prior to taking the tour.

You can see the study by clicking right here.

Farm Sanctuary followed up with participants in the survey two months later, and non-vegans reported eating less chicken, turkey, beef, pork, fish, shellfish, eggs and dairy, with many correspondents crediting the tour for that change.

Tourists didn’t only make active lifestyle changes. They also changed opinions. While 52% of participants said humans contribute to farm animal suffering before the tour, that number went up to 69% after the tour.

78% of omnivores said they were willing to cook vegetarian or vegan meals, which is up 12% from the 66% who were willing before the tour. 48% also said they were willing to discuss veganism and vegetarianism with others, but 73% said they’d had conversations with others about the subject at the time of the two month check-in.

The study took place at Farm Sanctuary locations in New York and California with over 1,200 subjects, and Farm Sanctuary hopes to continue progress by showing that tours can be both fun and effective.

Tom Beggs, a Faunalytics research scientist and the lead author of the study, said the public is becoming more aware of the way animals are treated in the food system, and a global shift is happening.

“The results from our study confirm something that most farm animal sanctuaries are already aware of: having meaningful interactions with farmed animals encourages people to empathize with them, and more importantly, to consider them as sentient individuals and not food,” Beggs said.

The study also shows that it’s important to find a balance between light-hearted and educational when sending a message about animal cruelty. The best way to spread the word is to make it easy to take immediate action by doing things like providing recipes, selling plant-based ingredients and foods and offering opportunities to get more involved in the cause.

Megan Watkins, CEO of Farm Sanctuary, said industrial agriculture is a major threat to our current world.

“The critical role that farm sanctuaries play in modeling a compassionate relationship with animals and inspiring positive lifestyle change cannot be overstated,” Watkins said. “Whether you visit in-person or virtually, the best way to glimpse the future is to visit a farm sanctuary.”

Faunalytics’ recent Animal Product Impact Scales list revealed the products causing the most suffering to animals in the United States. You can see that list by clicking right here

To learn more about Faunlytics, you can click right here, and to learn more about Farm Sanctuary, you can click right here.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Dental Health Article for 360 MAGAZINE

At-Home Dentistry: Dos & Don’ts

By Justin Lyons

What are some of the craziest things you’ve done with your teeth at home? Have you tied one end of a string to your loose tooth and the other end of a string to your front door, then slammed it to pull the tooth out? Have you used pliers to pull a tooth? How about bleaching your teeth?

With viral TikTok and YouTube videos popularizing these practices, healthcare professionals are reasonably and rightfully concerned.

Dentist and author of Age With Style: Your Guide To A Youthful Smile & Healthy Living Dr. Nammy Patel wonders why anyone would perform self-surgery and risk trauma.

“Even before the pandemic, some people were resorting to DIY measures while trying to be cost-effective, but many of these actions bring significant risk to the teeth and gums,” Patel said. “People aren’t realizing that while it may be interesting and cheaper to try these dental actions on their own, it’s going to cost you more money, time, and pain before the mistakes are corrected by a professional.”

She specifically cites three at-home procedures people have taken up after losing insurance or while staying home. You should NOT be trying these three things at home:

1. Pulling a tooth: Dr. Patel says to never do this yourself. It can cause cavitation and infections in the bone that used to hold the tooth. Dental tools are designed to clean the area and remove the tooth, and trying to pull your tooth at home can lead to a snapped root, infection and surgical procedure. Just don’t do it because it might lead you to the dentist’s office anyways.

2. Bleaching: Dr. Patel says bleaching can lead to gum damage, burning in the gums, gum recession, tooth loss, enamel damage and tooth sensitivity.

“Some of the people you see doing this on social media are using hydrogen peroxide purchased online that has many times the amount allowed in regulated online teeth-whitening products,” Patel said.

3. Filing: First of all, ouch. Second of all, Dr. Patel says you can remove too much of your tooth if you try to smooth rough edges or adjust shape. It can change the way you bite and even cause jaw problems, specifically TMJ disorders.

There is dental care you can provide for yourself at home. In fact, Dr. Patel encourages three things. You SHOULD be doing these things at home:

1. Make your own toothpaste: Dentists provide suggested lists of ingredients as well as lists of toxic ingredients.

“By making toothpaste yourself you can create a better product, one without dangerous chemicals, and it’s cost-effective, too,” Dr. Patel said, adding that her toothpaste contains coconut oil and other natural oils and spices like cinnamon and peppermint.

2. Make your own mouthwash: Over-the-counter mouthwash typically contains alcohol, which is bad for the gums and can dry the mouth. Dr. Patel’s mouthwash is composed of peppermint oil, On Guard, distilled water and salt.

3. Power up your daily oral care: Dr. Patel suggests a water flosser, as it reaches cracks and crevices that typical floss does not.

“It’s easier to use than floss and provides a deeper clean with a pressurized stream of water, which pulsates to blast away food particles and built-up plaque,” Patel said.

She also suggested using a sonic toothbrush over an electric toothbrush to eliminate more bacteria.

It’s important to be careful and knowledgeable when it comes to arm-chair dentistry. If you try to avoid a seat in the dentist’s chair, you might not have a choice if you cause damage irreparable without surgery.

To learn more about Dr. Nammy Patel, you can click right here.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Dental Health Article for 360 MAGAZINE

COVID Stress x Teeth

By Justin Lyons

Coronavirus obviously affects all-around health, but it’s also taking a toll on mental health.

With a pandemic, a recession, social injustice and a majorly impactful presidential election coming in just over a month, who isn’t stressed and tense?

Dr. Cathy Hung says headaches, jaw pain or severe discomfort near the ears can all be connected to TMJ disorders. These symptoms can be brought upon by stress and tension at a time during which either of those would be easily forgiven, if not already expected.

TMJ, or the temporomandibular joint, is the joint connecting the jaw to the skull. There is one on each side of the head, and they’re used extensively for everything we open our jaws for. They’re incredibly important, but that importance can make them severe sources of pain when something goes wrong.

Hung, oral surgeon and author of Pulling Wisdom: Filling Gaps of Cross-Cultural Communication for Healthcare Providers, said there are many causes of TMJ disorders, but stress is one of the biggest.

“I have seen patients with TMJ due to stress from the pandemic. When people are tense, they often clench or grind their teeth, tightening their jaw muscles and putting stress on the TM joints. Sometimes severe clenching also can lead to a cracked tooth or cracked dental crown,” Hung said.

She also offers some tips for those with TMJ disorder-causing habits.

Teeth grinding: Known as bruxism, this can be grinding, gnashing or clenching of teeth. Hung said these can all happen unconsciously while awake or even while asleep. Grinding can lead to TMJ, headaches and damage to teeth, and the best treatments are stress relievers or doctor-prescribed relaxants. Dentists and oral surgeons can also fit teeth grinders for a protective mouthpiece to wear while sleeping.

Tension headaches: Hung said tension headaches feel like a band wrapped around the temples. These can come from clenching, but they can also be associated with pain in the jaw. Hung says over-the-counter medication can help, but it isn’t fail-proof. If they don’t work, you should schedule a visit with a medical professional.

Other TMJ symptoms: Hung says there are a few ways to tell if a person is suffering from a TMJ disorder.

“You may have a misaligned bite, or pain and a clicking or grating noise when you open your mouth,” Hung said. “Or, you may have trouble opening your mouth wide.”

Again, stress relief and mouth guards can help in these scenarios. Physical therapy can also help. Hung says surgery can be needed in the most severe cases.

It’s a stressful time in the world, but Hung offers some hope to those who have acquired TMJ disorders through stress.

“Certainly, treatment can take time to be effective,” Hung said. “But you’ll be glad to know that problems associated with TMJ disorder are more easily diagnosed and treated than they were in the past.”

For more information or to contact Dr. Cathy Hung, you can click right here.

Allison Christensen Illustrates a Skin Care Article for 360 MAGAZINE

COCOOIL

While on a trip to Fafa Island in 2011, the creators of COCOOIL had an idea. They wanted to create a a luxury skincare product made with certified fair trade cold-pressed organic coconut oil. Here in 2020, they have it in COCOOIL, which only uses sustainably produced coconut oil from the Pacific Islands.

COCOOIL can guard against UV rays using their protective products like COCOOIL Tanning Oil SPF6COCOOIL Beach’n’Body Oil SPF15 and COCOOIL Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF30.

COCOOIL Tanning Oil SPF6 protects from harmful UV rays and delivers a beautiful tan while laying on the beach or next to the pool. COCOOIL Beach’n’Body Oil SPF15 and COCOOIL Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF30 offer even more protection against UV rays and come in packages that fit just right in your purse or travel pack.

They also have the COCOOIL SPF50 Broad Spectrum, which is made with natural botanical oils to hydrate and nourish skin.

The protective products are complimented by COCOOIL Face Oil with RosehipCOCOOIL Body OilCOCOOIL Baby Oil with Lavender and COCOOIL Ocean Spray.

COCOOIL Face Oil with Roseship leaves your face feeling luxurious and non-greasy. COCOOIL Body Oil is the perfect daily moisturizer while COCOOIL Baby Oil with Lavender will nourish your little one’s skin and provide a calming scent. COCOOIL Ocean Spray gives your hair waves, volume and texture.

Products come in regular size 200 mL bottles or in mini 100 mL bottles. They even have bundles that come with a COCOOIL tote, perfect for your next trip to the beach.

COCOOIL also has a cruelty free policy, meaning that they don’t buy any products or ingredients that have been tested on animals. In place of animal testing, they test all of their products on human volunteers in Australia.

They say they will not use any sources who are not just as committed as they are to their code of ethics, morals and standards.

To see all COCOOIL products, you can click right here. You can also read their story and learn more about their mission by clicking right here.

Allison Christensen Illustrates a Sports Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Tyrod Taylor

By Justin Lyons

Justin Herbert lined up under center on the first drive Sunday for the Los Angeles Chargers, which was a surprise.

Herbert was selected with the sixth overall pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, but Tyrod Taylor was supposed to be the starter while Herbert learned from the bench. Herbert had a successful day, scoring on his first drive and going on to throw for 311 yards and a touchdown, but he came up a bit short of the Patrick Mahomes-led Chiefs in overtime.

It’s now clear why Taylor didn’t play quarterback Sunday. Chargers head coach Anthony Lynn told ESPN’s Shelley Smith that Taylor’s lung was punctured by a team doctor attempting to administer a pain relief injection just before kickoff.

Lynn told Smith that the injury is not career-threatening, and Taylor isn’t mad or upset. Lynn appeared to reaffirm Taylor’s status as a starter when he is cleared to return, saying there was a lot the Chargers didn’t get done with Herbert as their quarterback and that Herbert is a backup “for a reason.”

George Atallah, the assistant executive director of external affairs for the NFL Players Association, tweeted that the union’s medical and legal teams are looking into the incident. He also confirmed that the NFLPA has initiated an investigation.

According to ESPN, the injection is not uncommon, but the doctor is unable to see where the needle is going, which can be difficult. Though the procedure is standard, it is rare that a player’s lung is punctured.

Lynn said Herbert will start Sunday at home against the Carolina Panthers, as Taylor won’t be fully healthy.

“I am looking forward to seeing him play with a week of preparation and knowing he is the starter,” Lynn said.

The Panthers and Chargers will kick off at 1:05 p.m. local time Sunday.

Rita Azar Illustrates a Football Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Gale Sayers

By Justin Lyons

Hall of Fame running back and Chicago Bears legend Gale Sayers died Wednesday at the age of 77.

Sayers played seven seasons, all as a Chicago Bear, racking up 4,956 rushing yards and 39 rushing touchdowns. He played his final regular season game in 1971, retired in 1972 and became the youngest Hall of Fame inductee in NFL history in 1977 at the age of 34.

The news comes via a statement from David Baker, the president of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

“All those who love the game of football mourn the loss of one of the greatest to ever play this game with the passing of Chicago Bears legend Gale Sayers. He was the very essence of a team player – quiet, unassuming and always ready to compliment a teammate for a key block,” Baker said. “Gale was an extraordinary man who overcame a great deal of adversity during his NFL career and life.”

Nicknamed the “Kansas Comet,” Sayers was an easy selection for the Hall of Fame despite injuries shortening his career.

Current NFL commissioner Roger Goodell also released a statement saying Sayers will be remembered for his inspiration and kindness.

“We send our heartfelt condolences to his wife Ardie and their family. Our thoughts are with his teammates, the Bears organization, the many fans who remember him as a football player and the many more people who were touched by Gale’s spirit and generosity,” Goodell said.

The story of Sayers’ friendship with teammate Brian Piccolo was told in the 1971 film “Brian’s Song,” which starred James Caan and Billy Dee Williams.

Williams, who played Sayers in the film, tweeted, “My heart is broken over the loss of my dear friend, Gale Sayers. Portraying Gale in ‘Brian’s Song’ was a true honor and one of the nightlights of my career. He was an extraordinary human being with the the kindest heart. My sincerest condolences to his family.”

Caan, who played Piccolo, tweeted that he was proud to have known Sayers and also offered his love and condolences to the family.

The New York Times reported in 2017 that Sayers had been battling dementia, but that didn’t stop him from attending the 100th year anniversary celebration of the Chicago Bears in June 2019.

Teammate Dick Butkus, who joined Sayers on stage at that celebration, said,”[I] will miss a great friend who helped me become the player I became because after practicing and scrimmaging against Gale I knew I could play against anybody. We lost one of the best Bears ever, and more importantly, we lost a great person.”

The Bears have added a banner with a photo of Sayers to their website and have changed their Twitter profile picture to Sayers’ famous number 40.

“The Tax Collector”

by Justin Lyons

2020 sure has been an interesting year for movies. We’ve missed our fair share of big releases, but here we are in September with a new film from David Ayer, a director who has seemingly taken nothing but criticism over the past half decade. Maybe some of that has been warranted, maybe some of it hasn’t, but here he stands with a new movie available for rent.

Ayer is re-teaming with Shia LaBeouf, whom he directed in one of the best performances of his career in 2014’s “Fury.” LaBeouf is past the point of only being recognized for the “Transformers” series. He’s truly one of the most gifted actors working right now, and this nice, little roll he’s found himself on since exiting Michael Bay’s billion dollar franchise has solidified him as a top tier talent.

He’s coming off a fantastic 2019 with “Honey Boy” and “The Peanut Butter Falcon,” so it was no surprise seeing him marketed as a co-lead in “The Tax Collector.” It was, however, a shock to see him in a supporting role in the film itself, and that’s the movie’s biggest problem.

It might be better said that the movie’s biggest problem is that none of the characters, aside from LaBeouf’s character, called Creeper, are very interesting. Each and every one is built upon a foundation that we’re familiar with, including those in other David Ayer movies. Their principles and motivations never sincerely stand out.

David, the main character played by Bobby Soto, drives around Los Angeles collecting a percentage of gang profits for his boss, a man called Wizard. He does it to protect and provide for his non-gang-affiliated family, who are in fact good. When Wizard’s ex-rival returns to town, dead set on taking over Los Angeles, David’s allegiances and strength are put to the test.

Again, we’ve seen that before, so viewing it again, in a mostly predictable manner that doesn’t make “The Tax Collector” stand out among memories of other gang movies and stories, doesn’t let it resonate. It never pushes for that emotional connection to the characters or story that I was looking for. Possibly the most unfortunate part is that there’s evidence of potential here. There is potential in these characters and in this world that makes me think there’s a decent movie in here somewhere, but it needed more time to give the characters the life and development they deserved.

The story itself also feels disjointed in an effort to develop the relationships with characters, even though those relationships don’t benefit from the sacrificing of story. Most beats, particularly toward the end of the film, seem to just happen without express purpose. There is a guiding narrative pushing David against the rival gang leader, but most events in the story don’t have the build up that I had hoped for. Things just kind of occur without any rhyme or reason. We have a character whom we’re supposed to immediately latch onto and a character whom we’re supposed to immediately hate, and none of the story beats ever allow the characters to breathe and change.

Each scene is also played at the highest possible level. Subtlety isn’t always a synonym for high quality, but constant high octane sequences never helped David’s character. Despite being a lover of action sequences, I found myself more intrigued by David’s moments with his family. He shows the struggle of balancing his roles as a protector and as a “tax collector,” but it’s never enough to round out the character.

It feels like Ayer is going through the motions, which is disappointing from a director who has obvious talent. He didn’t fall into the screenplay for “Training Day,” and he surely didn’t accidentally direct “Fury” and “End of Watch” with the skill and charisma of those films. That filmmaking talent is in there, but in going back to a story reminiscent of his earlier work, it appears he is recycling his own techniques. Even the visual look of the movie, which Ayer typically excels with, feels bland. He does pull a couple of visual tricks from his repertoire in flashbacks and high-intensity action sequences, but the flashbacks feel played out, and one specific moment of slow motion was enough to pull me out of a movie that appeared to go for gritty reality.

There are positives to take away from “The Tax Collector.” Again, Shia LaBeouf is immensely talented, and that shows in this film. Every single time he’s on-screen, it’s tough to look away. He does take a supporting role in the movie, but he steals the show right out of Bobby Soto’s hands. Some of that is due to the writing as Creeper is a far more compellingly written character than David, but LaBeouf commits so hard to every single word, and he’s an absolute blast to watch.

The scenes in which David and Creeper drive around Los Angeles, spewing mostly throwaway dialogue, are easily the most fun in the film. Creeper is the muscle of the duo, but I enjoyed his humanity. I have to credit LaBeouf because when Creeper is thinking, it’s easy to watch the wheels in his brain spin. He has these survival instincts, and he’s skilled with weapons and intimidation tactics, but he’s not a robot. He diets, meditates and wants to be included in David’s personal life.

“The Tax Collector” isn’t memorably bad. It’s just not memorable at all, and that is the most frustrating thing about the film. There is potential in the story, the characters and the story world, but it’s so easy to think of scenes that should have been cut in favor of scenes that should have been added. There’s also so much inspiration behind Creeper, but he’s not the focus of the film, which I think would have made the movie much more engaging.

There comes a certain point in the film where nothing is left to care about, and the story revisits a relationship that doesn’t feel earned. Had it spent more time developing that relationship, I might have been invested in the final act, but one short sequence and one small show of good faith wasn’t enough to make me believe that some of these characters would show the support they’re asked to show. Nevertheless, I’m happy to discuss Shia LaBeouf in a positive way. Maybe with that tattoo on his chest forever he’d be better suited in a similar role as a lead performer.

“The Tax Collector” is streaming now on Amazon.

Rita Azar Illustrates a Basketball Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Jaylen Brown x George Floyd Bill

by Justin Lyons

Jaylen Brown, Boston Celtics wing, in a press conference Sunday said he would like to see the city of Boston pass the George Floyd bill.

Brown, who has been one of the more active players in social justice conversations throughout the NBA, was asked about the Celtics’ commitment to spend $25 million over the next ten years to fight social injustice.

He said it was a great step, and that change happens over a period of time, but he thinks there are things that can be catalysts for change right now.

“One thing I would like to see in Boston is the George Floyd bill enacted,” Brown said, adding that conversations need to be had about police and qualified immunity. “Some things just need to be held accountable, and hopefully Boston can be a place where a tone is set that can be transpired in other cities.”

Brown went on to say that he thinks Boston is moving in the right direction, but he would still like to see more companies and organizations be diversified as well as more opportunities for people of color.

“I’m proud to be a part of the Celtics organization. I’m proud to have an ownership group, or a leadership group, that’s willing to take these steps because they recognize that we need to live in a better, more forward progressing world.”

The George Floyd bill, or H.R.7120, aims to achieve a few goals.

First, it would lower the criminal intent standard to convict an officer of law enforcement. The standard currently requires that officers act willfully, while H.R.7120 would only necessitate that officers act knowingly or recklessly.

Second, it would limit qualified immunity, which grants officers immunity in lawsuits regarding violations of constitutional rights of civilians.

Third, it would allow the Department of Justice to issue authorizations to investigate departments demonstrating patterns of discriminatory practices.

It would also create a national registry of police misconduct, lay the bricks for prohibition of racial profiling and implement new standards for training regarding racial profiling and use of body cameras.

It passed in the House of Representatives by a vote of 236-181, and it will move to the Senate.

Brown’s comments come just weeks after NBA players boycotted games on behalf of Jacob Blake, whom was shot seven times by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and victims of police brutality everywhere.

A reporter asked Brown if he thought the boycott’s message was still effective even as players returned to the court.

“These issues have been here for a very, very long time, and they’re still going to be here regardless of if we protest or not or boycott or not. I think sports plays a huge role in society, and I’m very aware of that, so using our platform is something I’m always going to support,” Brown answered.

While he said the cure for racism might not come from the NBA, the players can always use their platform to let the world know that these issues are important.

Brown, who wears the word “Liberation” on the back of his jersey, scored 21 points and picked up eight rebounds to help the Celtics defeat the Toronto Raptors Friday by a score of 92-87. They advanced to the Eastern Conference Finals where they will meet up with the Miami Heat, who are playing on six days of rest after eliminating the Milwaukee Bucks in just five games.

The first game of the series begins Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. EST with the Celtics favored by a point and a half.