Posts tagged with "community"

wonderquest image for use by 360 magazine

ALISON WONDERLAND – WONDERQUEST

Australian EDM producer and DJ Alison Wonderland (AW) ventures into the realm on NFTs (non-fungible tokens) with her blockchain project, The WonderQuest. The project launched on Sunday, July 25 on Decentraland, a blockchain-based 3D virtual reality platform. The fantasy-inspired project allows investors to purchase a dragon egg as an NFT from the WonderTown market. A ‘hatching event’ will occur at the end of the on-sale period this coming Tuesday, August 3 at 3pm PT.

Each egg is .0888 Ethereum (Eth) and over 6,500 have been sold. 3,500 eggs are left to be minted. All eggs will be sold before The Hatching event. After the hatching event, the egg owner has the option to either hatch the egg or not to hatch, allowing owners to interact with the fantasy realm.

Many first-time NFT and crypto holders’ purchases have been made by AW fans to participate. Many large NFT owners who have not heard of AW have also been drawn to this project because of its utility. Some large crypto holders have even purchased eggs for AW fans who can’t afford an egg. It’s been positive experience, and a new community has been built regarding the project’s discord.

So far, sales for the NFT are at $1.7 million. The full extent of the WonderQuest earnings are to be revealed after the project ends.

“It starts with an egg. ‘What’s inside?’ ‘Do I hatch it?’ Questions only you can answer. Each egg is unique with its own ERC-721 Ethereum blockchain based token. The egg is an NFT, but so is what’s inside. You can either collect the NFT as a rare egg, or hatch it and reveal what’s within This is real and happening now. This project is not a placeholder for unfinished artwork. We’ve been designing and developing this project over hundreds of thousands of hours, and every detail has been carefully selected to bring to life the mystery of The Wonderquest.”

The WonderQuest is Alison Wonderland’s odyssey of exploration in the blockchain/digital world, a treasure hunt of experiences in the Metaverse. An opportunity awaits you to embark on a journey of epic proportions, incorporating virtual gift quests, discussions, and musical performances. For the first time ever, join AW’s odyssey, which features her music in a virtual landscape powered by blockchain technology. The adventure ahead will not only allow you to explore never-before-seen parts of the Metaverse, but also to interact with it in ways that were previously impossible.

Join Alison Wonderland by purchasing from a series of 10,000 unique, mysterious, and mystical eggs. Minting is totally random. There are 12 different breeds of differing rarity, all individual dragons. Hatch your egg or wait – the choice is yours. Unleash your creation upon this world or keep the power within.

The egg is the beginning of a long and wonderful journey. Together we quest. WonderQuest.

Find out more about WonderQuest via Decentraland.

Black Girl Duo Debate Team Harvard illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Black Girl Duo Wins International Debate Competition at Harvard

For the first time in the history of the Harvard Debate Council, two Black girls from Atlanta have made history as the first Black female duo to win the annual summer debate competition at Harvard University.

Each summer, the Harvard Debate Council, one of the oldest campus organizations at Harvard University, hosts a summer residential program for hundreds of gifted youths from over 15 countries around the world who converge on campus for two weeks of intensive study, which culminates in a program-wide debate tournament. This year’s residency and competition were held virtually due to COVID-19 protocols.

Jayla Jackson, 16, is a rising junior at Holy Innocence Episcopal School. Emani Stanton, 17, is a rising senior at North Atlanta High School. Both girls are current members of the Atlanta-based Harvard Diversity Project, an initiative founded by Harvard’s award-winning debate coach and author Brandon P. Fleming. In 2017, Harvard accepted Fleming’s proposal to establish the Diversity Project as a means to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion on campus.

Fleming recruits underserved Black youth in Atlanta with little to no prior debate experience. He trains them every weekend for one year in Atlanta leading up to the Harvard summer program, exposing them to higher-level academic disciplines. In four years, Fleming has raised over one million dollars to enroll over 100 African-American students into the Harvard debate residency on full scholarship. All four cohorts trained by Fleming’s unique curriculum have gone on to win the international debate competition at Harvard.

This year, Jackson and Stanton secured the 4th consecutive championship for the Atlanta-based team with an undefeated 10-0 record. The topic of debate was, “Resolved: The North Atlantic Treaty Organization should substantially increase its defense commitments in the Baltic States.”

Fleming emphasizes to his students that the program is “bigger than debate.” He states, “The achievements of this program and our scholars reveals to the world the power of educational equity.” Jackson remarks about the historic win, “We want to use our platform to show people what’s possible when the playing field is leveled for those who need it most.”

The Harvard Diversity Project has already accepted a new cohort who will begin training in preparation for the Harvard debate residency of 2022.

You can read more about the story of the program and its founder in Brandon P. Fleming’s bestselling book, MISEDUCATED: A Memoir.

Check Out This Behind the Scenes Footage of Jayla Jackson and Emani Stanton.

Keep Up With The Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project:

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ABOUT BRANDON P. FLEMING:

Brandon P. Fleming is an award-winning, Harvard educator and author of MISDUCATED: A Memoir. His story of struggle, success, and service has inspired millions around the world. An at-risk youth and college dropout turned award-winning educator, Fleming is Assistant Debate Coach at Harvard University and Founder/CEO of the Harvard Diversity Project. Fleming was recruited to join the Harvard debate faculty at the age of 27. Harvard later approved Fleming’s proposal to establish a new department within the university system called the Harvard Diversity Project – an unprecedented pipeline program of the Harvard Debate Council. For four years, Fleming has led an executive staff and board that has raised over a million dollars to enroll over 100 students of color into Harvard’s international summer debate residency on full scholarship. Fleming recruits underserved youth with no prior debate experience whom he then trains to compete against hundreds of elite debaters from over 25 different countries around the world. Since the program’s inception in 2017, every cohort trained by Fleming has won the international competition. In 2020, Fleming was named to the Forbes 30 under 30 list, and The Root magazine recognized Fleming as one of the top 100 most influential African Americans in the United States. In 2021, Fleming received an honorary doctorate from North Carolina Wesleyan College designating him, Dr. Fleming, Doctor of Humanities.

ABOUT THE HARVARD DEBATE COUNCIL DIVERSITY PROJECT:

A subsidiary of the Harvard Debate Council, Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project (HDP) is an Atlanta-based pipeline program that recruits, trains, and matriculates highly motivated black youth into a summer debate residency at Harvard College. HDP cultivates scholars seeking to further their education at elite colleges & universities.

The goal of the Harvard Diversity Project is to promote educational equity by creating opportunities for underserved youth to gain exposure and access to academic training that will distinguish them as top candidates in the college admissions process. Beyond the classroom, the HDP builds integrity-filled leaders who contribute to the community and value service.

What's Your Black? by Nyame Brown for use by 360 Magazine

Nyame Brown Featured at Oakland Museum of California

Nyame Brown Large-scale Blackboard Painting What’s Your Black? in Mothership: Voyage Into Afrofuturism at the Oakland Museum of California

Exhibition Opening Saturday, August 7, 2021

Nyame Brown will be featured in Mothership: Voyage Into Afrofuturism at the Oakland Museum of California, opening August 7, 2021 and on view through February 27, 2022. The exhibition explores Afrofuturism as a strategy that imagines the world through a Black cultural lens and strives for a more just present and future. Curated by OMCA Curator Rhonda Pagnozzi and Consulting Curator Essence Harden, the exhibition celebrates Black imagination and includes the work of over 50 artists—including Wangechi MutuDavid Huffman, and Chelle Barbour, among others—historians, musicians, and collaborators. The show highlights the key role that the fantasy and science fiction of Afrofuturism has, as a strategy for Black community building by envisioning the African Diaspora and Black culture as central in a technically advanced and culturally rich civilization.

Brown—an Afrofuturist installation artist working in the media of painting, drawing, cut paper, blackboards, augmented reality, gaming, and fashion—addresses the Black imagination as a site for new ways to perceive the Diaspora as trans-Atlantic, psychic, and imagined—not just through unity and similarity, but by looking at the dynamics of difference. What’s Your Black?, part of his larger series of blackboard paintings, is envisioned as a tool to combat racial oppression, using a cultural production of the Black community to offer a space to create a new Black mythology. Building narratives like scaffolding around art historical references, hip hop, and personal history, he draws on these precedents as a fluid source of reference, rather than a fixed and linear projection. Reimagining contemporary notions of Blackness in visual culture, he challenges traditional representation and subverts it for a richer surreal language found in folklore and African American hyperbole. His depictions provide different ways to access African American culture through an approach that seeks social transformation and community revolution.

About Nyame Brown

Nyame Oulynji Brown received his BFA from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago, and MFA from Yale School of Art and Architecture. He has been the recipient of the Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Award, and the Richard Dreihaus Foundation Individual Artist Award, as well as a site-specific public commission for the Malcolm X Memorial Foundation, for which he executed a double portrait of Malcolm X and the artist Jack Whitten. His participation in Theaster Gates’ Black Artist Retreat in Chicago was followed by residencies at the Headlands Center for the Arts (for work on his project The Mapping of Aaron, a model for radical Blackness), Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans. Brown was honored with a solo exhibition at The Museum of the African Diaspora, and has held solo exhibitions across the U.S., notably at the Hearst Museum at St. Mary’s College (John Henry’s adventures in a Post Black world) and the West Virginia University Art Museum. He has actively participated in group exhibitions in a variety of spaces in California, Illinois, Michigan and New York, and his work has been curated for inclusion at the Museum of Harlem, NY, and the Prizm Art Fair at the Mana Contemporary in Miami. He also took part with Carrie Mae Weems in the symposium The Interrogation of Forms: The Changing Culture in America at The Armory in New York. Brown was selected as the 2020 Tosa Studio Award recipient and was awarded a studio at Minnesota Street Project through 2021.

WYN 317’s new “Mystery in Little Haiti” Mural by SONNI from Quinn Edgar for use by 360 Magazine

WYN 317 Hosting Two Artists – CHNK × Sonni

WYN 317 debuted the latest works of not one, but two iconic artists this past Saturday night, July 10. CHNK and Sonni, presented at this double feature gallery opening. While munching on Frankenfurters Gourmet Dogs and drinking Deep Eddy Vodka the attendees got to experience two very different artists.

CHNK, a local artist, who takes everyday objects and adds his own twist with bright colors to add emotions and movement to the art, opened a pop-up retail experience, adding collectible merch and whimsy to WYN’s hip corner in Little Haiti.

Sprinkling in a little mystery, WYN 317 welcomed Argentina native Sonni, presenting “Mystery in Little Haiti ” a story of isolation, with the help of dry wit, humor, and pop culture references.

This boldly colorful double-feature will be running through Summer at WYN 317 and we would love to have visit the gallery to tour the two new installations at WYN 317.

About CHNK:

CHNK is a prolific mixed media artist from South Florida bringing complex illustrations, fresh color and an emotional perspective to deteriorating everyday objects. After his portfolio submission was rejected six years ago by Maryland Institute College of Arts, he decided to dedicate his energy to being the most active and self-improved creative he could be. Today his work has been featured in over 50 group shows and live art events nationally. CHNK has been a resident of Bailey Contemporary Arts (BaCA) since August of 2016. CHNK is influenced by graffiti aesthetics, classic comic books, typography, grotesque raw emotional imagery, and social human interaction.

About Sonni:

Sonni was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he studied graphic design and worked as an Art Director for animation and film companies, he resides in Brooklyn, New York. In his art, he is constantly searching for that lost moment in adolescence where adventure makes dreams a reality, where the imagination and playing develop invisible forces to re-capture those lost memories from your childhood. He works with different mediums that include paper and pencil, illustrator, acrylic on canvas, and wooden sculptures. Yet, his passion is to paint murals in public spaces, finding that dialogue with the public through primary colors and playfulness!

He was dubbed CHNK by his father at the age of 11 during a graffiti jam in Fort Lauderdale. His works generally consist of spray paint, acrylic, ink, enamel, textiles and found objects. CHNK’s vibrant murals and commissioned artworks can be found throughout South Florida and online.

ABOUT WYN 317:

WYN 317 is a gallery designed to spotlight Miami’s unique urban landscape by providing a local’s touch. It’s an authentic space where fresh, up-and-coming, mid-career, and established native and international artists intersect with local legends. Highlighting aesthetics ranging from the area’s graffiti culture to a wide array of vibrant pop art influences, this exhibition and event venue takes pride in delivering art cultivated in Miami neighborhoods. WYN 317 provides a perspective that keeps you connected to the community.

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Q×A

Reese Sherman is a talented photographer who creates stunning portraiture. The photographer has been featured by the likes of Town & Country, Essence, Ambassador Digital Magazine, W Magazine, Muze, and more. The vibrant portfolio of Sherman’s evocative, striking, beautiful photographs can be viewed on their website or Instagram. Sherman looks to empower viewers with their photography and highlight gender-neutral inclusivity and LGBT+ acceptance. During this pride month, we sat down with the artist to discuss their latest photography project, which involves self-exploration, unity, and love.

Could you tell us about your photographic approach to this project?

This all came about during the BLM and Trans Lives Matter movement, where I was noticing so many people were standing up and showing up as themselves. Such an array of different people showed off their style and spoke loud and proud about who they are. [It] really inspired me to pick up my camera and shoot my husband wearing masculine clothes mixed with feminine jewelry against bright, bold and colorful backdrops. [These photos] showcase[ed] him being 100% comfortable within the style of art and fashion. I wanted to explore incorporating feminine elements within a masculine framework in a way that transcends sexuality. This is all about style and freedom and identity that goes beyond any pre-conceived category.

“This is all about style, freedom, and identity…” Was your model, Jamarr, a part of the creative process as well? 

Jamarr is a creative individual… I love to collaborate with him and have him give his input into projects, especially this one, where we both styled the wardrobe and jewelry. Also having my husband a part of this, I wanted the story to stay true to his own authentic style, since his normal everyday accessory wear isn’t geared towards feminine pieces. But, styling him with a pink beaded necklace, yellow roses and eyeliner really took him out of his norm—but he was confident in wearing it all.

Did photographing your partner make this project more intimate/personal?  

Absolutely! We just know each other so well to the point when we first started to talk about this project, we spoke about the issues the LGBTQ+ community was going through. The issues that the Black community was dealing with made this personal to us. Seeing Jamarr model and stay grounded in his sexuality was inspiring to me. This made us both proud of what we’re hoping to accomplish, which is gender-neutral inclusivity.  

Some of your images are more detailed and some of them not, could you tell us what this mean/how you would like the viewers to interpret your photos?

I want the viewers to see timeless, intimate and non-conforming pictures. I want viewers to feel confident to do whatever is it that makes them happy. if you want to pile on a bunch of jewelry head-to-toe, do it! If you’re a man and you come across an accessory that is traditionally feminine, wear it and be proud! If you’re a woman, same thing applies, if you want to wear clothing that’s traditionally male. Be proud of how you present yourself. I just want people to feel empowered.

What is the most important component of this collection of work?
Two words: unity and love.

What is the most challenging component of this collection of work? 

The challenge was putting this all together and hoping the result would match what we envisioned in our minds.

Could you comment on the styling of choice and what inspired you to choose these colors in particular? (Apart from the colors of the pride flag!)

The unapologetic energy of the model, the juxtaposition of the traditionally feminine jewelry against his body hair, the structured clothing made of shiny, flowing fabrics—they all promote the idea that masculinity is what you make it. Initially the pink just felt fun and exciting. Yellow felt like sun kissed skin plus it reminded us of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” The orange/red was striking and sexy. And a lot of the jewelry was my grandmother’s, so that added an even more personal aspect to the work.

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Reese Sherman Spectrum 1 photograph for use by 360 Magazine

Kaylynn Sanchez image for use by 360 Magazine

Kaylynn Sanchez Q×A

Kaylynn Sanchez, aka Kay Lindaa, is a talented tattoo artist based out of the Brooklyn, New York. 360 Magazine first had the pleasure of meeting Kay when she tattooed at the Bodega, our pop culture and design pop-up shop. At the event, Kay impressed all of the guests with her dazzling artistry. With over four thousand followers on her thriving Instagram, Kay is a Brooklyn tattoo artist who is quickly on the rise. She spoke with us about how she got into the tattoo industry, her participation in the Bodega, and her favorite parts of the profession.

When did you first start tattooing?

I first started professionally tattooing at the age of 19, about two years ago. But the first time I picked up a machine was about 14 years old. I always knew I wanted to be a tattoo artist at the age of 13, so ever since then I just stuck with it.

What styles do you predominantly tattoo?

I predominantly do Polynesian/tribal, anime, and black & grey realism.

Do you prefer working in black and white or color?

I prefer working in black & grey because I like the depth that it brings out in realism. It reminds me of drawing and sketching–which is something I always enjoyed doing– [I] use pencil and sketch out anything that comes to mind or inspires me.

What is your favorite part of being a tattoo artist?

The art, clientele, environment, and the satisfaction of seeing the final piece–all while making my customers happy. I would say my favorite part of being a tattoo artist is everything that it consists of.

Do you offer flash sheets of your work? Where is the best place for prospective clients to view your tattooing portfolio?

I don’t have any flash sheets made yet, but I do share all of my work on social media platforms, such as Instagram.

What was your favorite tattoo design you worked on at The Bodega?

My favorite tattoo design that I worked on at The Bodega was a 616 tattoo. It was my favorite because it was different to me and no one else had that style tattoo, so it was original.

If readers are interested in booking a tattoo appointment with you, how is the best way to do so?

The best way for anyone to book a tattoo appointment with me is to reach me through my Instagram and DM me. Or, contact me through my business card where my business phone can be reached at (332) 216-5256

Town & Country’s 8th Philanthropy Summit – Pharrell Williams × José Andrés

The 8th annual Town & Country Philanthropy Summit kicked off today with an amazing conversation between Pharrell Williams and José Andrés, moderated by Soledad O’Brien.

See below for highlights from the panel as well as a link to view the interview in its entirety:

Pharrell Williams on how he thinks about philanthropy and what his goals are: 

“When we think about the African diaspora and people of color and what people who are deemed ‘minorities’ – which we are actually not—but that’s just the saying. There are three pillars that affect us the most—disproportionate access to education, disproportionate access to healthcare, and also disproportionate access to legislation. I think the first two are the ones that I want to focus on because they’re the ones that I feel like I can, through my resources and even my likenesses whenever needed, that I can actually make a difference in education and healthcare. These are the things that hurt us the most.”

José Andrés on why he focuses on food insecurity:

“I am one more cook in the universe of people that feed people in America or around the world. But people like me, we only feed the few. I am in the power, when you began thinking, we can also be a part of feeding the many. And where we can join forces to the many around America, and around many places in the world, in the most difficult moments, to be able to bring solutions. For me, food is my way of doing it, but what we do is only a drop of water in an ocean of empathy. It requires a lot of props of empathy to make things happen. Obviously what I do is more focused on emergencies, I don’t like to see people in mayhem; people who, already in the good times forgotten, that are voiceless, that nobody takes care of. It’s even worse when a hurricane, an earthquake, an explosion of fire, a pandemic, hits their communities even further. That’s the moment that I feel the urgency of now being yesterday, and I love to bring my community and try to be nice to as many people as we can in these moments of mayhem. At the end of the day, one plate of food at a time won’t solve every problem but at least you buy time. And you give hope to people who need it the most.”

Pharrell on how he and Jose met and joined forces: 

“Catherine Kimmel – the great connector – took me to an event. Here’s a guy that you really need to meet because, like you, he takes what it is he does and puts it to better usage and thinks about others… [at an event in New York] I was so impressed because there were so many chefs there but this guy – it was different. Yes, he’s a chef and he’s all about his ingredients and recipes, but his greatest meal was his operation and people and his ability to galvanize. It was really apparent that everyone was centered around him and all he wanted to do was feed people and bring people together and help people see that through our differences and our challenges are actually a lot of solutions and we can make the world a better place and I was really blown away… Then we met and we realized there were a lot of things he was doing that I could be instrumental in helping him.”

José on meeting Pharrell and what attracted him to Pharrell:

“I go and meet Pharrell and he’s even better, he’s the better half. What you get is a good vibe – it’s very difficult to describe. You know, you read about people, NBA players, amazing musicians and I’m not only looking for the amazing things they do, which I love, but what’s behind. When you see that behind is something very powerful that they’re putting at the service of others – their power, their money, their contacts but something even more powerful is their brain connecting with their empathy within their hearts… We wouldn’t be able to do what we do without people like them. Pharrell knows and more importantly loves his community. We were able to do it in Virginia Beach and be there because Pharrell opened to us the doors of being that community without being foreigners. We were able to partner with local people, with local restaurants.”

José on how his family impacted his values and his metaphor on life:

“My mom and dad always believed in longer tables, not higher ones. The table will always be ready for whoever showed up… My father would put me in charge of making the fire. I did that since I was young, and I would become very good at making the fire. But my father was very particular, and he would never let me near the chicken… [he would say] ‘My son I know you wanted to do the cooking, but actually doing the fire and controlling the fire is the most important thing, everyone wants to do the cooking without understand the fire. My son you already have the biggest gift. Control the fire, master the fire, and then you can do any cooking you want.’ (I don’t know if my father told me that story with that idea or I’m making it more romantic along the way as the years pass by). My father was giving me a mantra for life itself: find your fire, control your fire, master your fire, and then you can do any cooking you want in your life.”

Pharrell on his foundation YELLOW:

“For us, we want to even the odds. I know that I was a very lucky person who benefitted from my teachers seeing something in me. They didn’t know what they were telling me or which way the way to go but they kept telling me to keep going. I think that had a profound effect on me because essentially education is the toolbox that every human being is going to need out in the world just to function… What we wanted to do is look at a curriculum that could assess these children and figure out how they comprehend information best. Then eventually make a curriculum that is sensory based and not sensory biased. If you learn differently than how the curriculum is being taught, then automatically you’re deemed as remedial… with the YELLOW hub, it’s the space where kids can learn based on their way they process their information.”

Pharrell on the education system:

“I love public school teachers and you know, love the unions as well, but the education the educational system is antiquated. I mean just ask your favorite Fortune 500 CEO – they might not be the best, they might not be well read, but that does not stop their genius. And this is what we want. We want to make sure that we reach every child by properly assessing their learning potential and comprehension preferences, and making sure that they have a curriculum that is based for them. Sensory bias is an issue, but sensory based learning special educational systems is the future. That’s how every child slip through the cracks and we get to eventually even the odds.”

José on how the pandemic affected and influenced his philanthropy:

“I think this year has changed all of us profoundly… Fundamentally has changed me. First, obviously take care of your family. I tried to be a father who took care of his daughters and my wife and trying to keep them safe. Every mother and father tried to do that. But then I began thinking that to take care of my daughters, it’s not putting them behind walls, to take care of my daughters, is bringing down those walls and trying to work as hard to provide for the other daughters and sons of other people I don’t know that they are trying to achieve the same for their children. The way I’m going to keep my daughters safer is not behind walls but with longer tables, where I work as hard to provide for my daughters as I’m going to work to provide for the daughters I don’t know. Fundamentally this is what changed me.”

José on what people get wrong about philanthropy:

“Robert Egger, my favorite food fighter, he said that it seems philanthropy is usually about the redemption of the giver, when philanthropy essentially needs to be about the liberation of the receiver. It’s nothing wrong to give and donate time or money or your brain and feel good about it, but fundamentally in this pandemic, I learned that to give, it’s not good enough, that we must do good, yes, but we must do smart good.”

Pharrell on the changes he has noticed this year:

“Empathy is at an all-time low. It’s not where it needs to be. There’s a lot of sympathy and pity, but there’s not empathy. And we need more of that, we need more empathy, we need more humility, we need more gratitude. I think the pandemic, for me, has taken me to that place where that’s the only thing I can think about.”

View the summit here.

The T&C Summit continues tomorrow (June 22, 2021 @ 12:30-1:30 PM EDT) with a panel between the power media couple Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue. Register directly here.

Juneteenth Image via Rita Azar for use by 360 Magazine

TIDAL x Angela Rye – Triumph Over Trauma

TIDAL, in partnership with influential politico, lawyer and advocate Angela Rye, is announcing the premiere of “Triumph Over Trauma: Black Wall Street Then and Now” – a one-hour long special commemorating the centennial of one of the worst attacks of racial violence in American history: the Tulsa Race Massacre. The special will premiere on Saturday, June 19 at 6 pm ET to also honor the Juneteenth holiday, which celebrates the effective end of slavery in the United States.

The Tulsa Race Massacre devastated the prosperous African-American business community in Tulsa, Oklahoma’s Greenwood District known as “Black Wall Street” and claimed hundreds of lives. Viewers will hear from three living survivors of the massacre – Mother Fletcher, Mother Randle, and Uncle Red – who will discuss memories of Black Wall Street, escaping the night of the massacre, their legacy, and much more. The hour-long special will also feature local politicians, business leaders, Black youth of Tusla, activists, writers, and more reflecting, learning, inspiring, and growing – and most importantly shedding light on untold history.

The special will be broadcast simultaneously on TIDAL’s YouTube channel as well as in-app – both members and non-members alike will be able to view. You can find a preview HERE.

Highlighting the historical moments that impact society is an integral part of TIDAL’s DNA. By celebrating how integral all voices are to culture and community, TIDAL continues its commitment to providing its members with culture-shifting content.

Community illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Brotherhood Crusade Hosts Juneteenth Event

The Brotherhood Crusade invites the community to join us as we celebrate Juneteenth on June 18, 10:30 am 1:30 pm at Crete Academy.

In honor of the historic Juneteenth event, Brotherhood Crusade will host fun and exciting health and wellness activities and provide families with food baskets, backpacks, school supplies, COVID testing and COVID vaccinations to continue our support for the most vulnerable in our community.

The event is free for the whole family. Guests are requested to wear masks and practice social distancing.

For more information on activities, see flyer below or contact Otesha Mosley Bremond at omosley-bremond@brotherhoodcrusade.org or Stacy Hill Williams at 323-846-1649.

Will-Claye Press-Pic from Alex John from Red Bull Records for use by 360

Will Claye – Wee Hours

Today, hip-hop artist and Olympic medalist Will Claye releases his latest single, “Wee Hours,” out now via Red Bull Records. Written by Claye, “Wee Hours” was produced by Grammy-winning songwriter and producer DJ Khalil, best known for his work with Jay-Z, Kanye West, Drake, Kendrick Lamar, and more.

Drawing from his own experiences, the strength of “Wee Hours” lies in Claye’s introspective and poignant lyrics, which he delivers with a West Coast-influenced flair. As the opening melodies and subtle instrumentations float in and out of focus, the single’s smooth production is effortlessly juxtaposed against Claye’s heavy-hitting flow.

“This track is inspired by my city, my people, and the kids who are growing up where I come from,” says Claye of the release. “I wanted to speak for people whose voices have been suppressed. I want to inspire my people and show them that even through all the horrific things we have gone through as a people, we can make it through and rise above it all.”

The release of “Wee Hours” follows the announcement of Elevate, the forthcoming documentary from Red Bull, set for release on Tuesday, June 8. The short film follows Claye as he trains for the Olympics and records new music, working to make his mark on the world. As his moment in the spotlight parallels a cultural boiling point surrounding racial injustice, Claye seeks to use his voice to inspire his community’s youth, serving as a positive role model for the next generation. Watch the trailer here.

About Will Claye
Three-time Olympic medalist Will Claye started his path as a world-class athlete. By way of track and field, he was able to move into starting his brand ELEVATE, music, and philanthropy. Will’s brand grew largely at the London Games in 2012, where he earned a bronze medal in the long jump and a silver medal in the triple jump to become the first man since 1936 and the first American since 1904 to obtain medals in both events. The Phoenix, AZ native of Sierra Leone-descent solidified himself as the #3 triple jumper of all time in 2019 and at the same time released an EP, WEST SIDE STORY, and single “TMS.”

The catalyst for Will’s music career came from artist YG inviting him to the studio and them creating “IDGAF,” what is now known as a classic West Coast record. From there, Will began to create his own lane and his own sound, taking inspiration from Bob Marley, Andre 3000, Snoop Dogg, DJ Quick, Pharrell, Jay Z, Nipsey Hussle, Kendrick Lamar, and Nate Dogg. With a wide array of influences, Will has created a sound that is eclectic and diverse, based on how he is feeling and what is going on in life. He is a rare combination of talent and genuine humility, recognizing that he can use his status as an artist and professional athlete to help others.

About DJ Khalil
DJ Khalil is a thirteen-time Grammy nominee and three-time Grammy award-winning songwriter and producer from Los Angeles, CA. His career started as one-half of the acclaimed underground hip-hop duo Self Scientific alongside rapper Chace Infinite. After catching the ear of mega-producer Dr. Dre early on in his career, Dre signed him as an in-house producer to Aftermath Records, where he continued to develop and hone his skills. Over the years, he has gone on to write and produce songs and albums with Eminem, Jay-Z, Kanye West, Drake, Kendrick Lamar, Usher, Big Sean, Pink, Gwen Stefani, Logic, Anderson .Paak, A$AP Rocky, Celine Dion, and many others, winning his first Grammy for his work on Eminem’s 2010 album, Recovery.

Continuing his run of success, Khalil co-wrote and produced Aloe Blacc’s Top 5 pop worldwide single “The Man,” which has sold over six million units worldwide, and won a Clio Award for music innovation through its inclusion in the 2013-2014 Beats by Dre campaign that was featured in the Super Bowl broadcast as well as the NBA finals. In 2018, Khalil created the end title song “Elevate” for Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse. The film won the Academy Award for Best Animated Film, and the soundtrack album has sold over two million units, which has made him one of the most sought-after producers for film and television synchronization. Khalil recently topped the pop charts with two songs on Logic’s #1 album Bobby Tarantino II (“Iconic” and “Everybody Dies”), four songs on Nipsey Hussle’s Top 5 album Victory Lap, Eminem’s #1 album Revival, and two songs on Big Sean’s #1 album, Detroit 2.
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