Posts tagged with "Teens"

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Virtual Teens Take the MET

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will host the first Virtual Teens Take The Met! which will be held online on Friday May 29, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Teens will have the opportunity to digitally immerse themselves in hands-on experiences created by over 30 New York City cultural and community organizations and institutions, who have partnered with The Met for this day-long online festival. This event is free with registration encouraged, and will be accessible through several platforms including YouTube, Zoom, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and TikTok.

“Teens Take The Met!” has been held at the Museum bi-annually since 2014 and over the years has brought together over 30,000 young people for what has become one of the most dynamic events in New York City for teens. This spring, while the Museum is temporarily closed, the online event will offer a variety of activities, such as art-making, writing and poetry prompts, dance and movement workshops, as well as opportunities for teens to practice self-care and communication about COVID-19 while in isolation.

Led by The Met (@MetTeens) along with partner institutions, there will be new programming and activities every half-hour throughout the day, culminating with a Zoom party with DJ’s from Building Beats. Highlights include an art tour and talk with New York City Writing Project; a step tutorial with the Panthers Step Team from Bard High School Early College; collage and printmaking with El Museo del Barrio; ‘NamaShakespeare’ yoga with Titan Theatre Company; digital zine-making and an exploration of the impact of COVID-19 on incarcerated youth with Art and Resistance Through Education (ARTE); Poetry writing with Urban Word NYC; a fashion party with The Studio Museum in Harlem; and The Met will have a variety of art-making activities including flower crowns and tote bag DIY, ‘Teens Meme The Met’ activity and the Museum’s popular “Balcony Bar at Home,” with the quartet ETHEL, will feature teen musicians. A full schedule is below.

Teens can register

Virtual Teens Take The Met! complements the Museum’s existing selection of online materials, live and interactive programming, performances, and conversations with curators, educators, and artists, as well as #MetAnywhere social media initiatives. The Museum’s Art at Home hub is a resource for MetPublications, Primers, videos, 360-degree gallery tours, and educational materials, and the Virtual Events page is updated regularly. New highlights include a digital exhibition tour of Sahel: Art and Empires on the Shores of the Sahara and the launch of an innovative AR audio experience with the zemí cohoba stand.

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars – Young Designers Competition

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars is extending the deadline for entries in its Young Designers Competition to Monday 1 June 2020.

This gives aspiring designers up to the age of 16 an additional two weeks to create and submit their dream Rolls-Royce of the future.

Launched in early April, the competition has already attracted more than 2,000 entries from children in more than 70 countries worldwide. Its aim was to stimulate design talent and provide an educational distraction for children from self-quarantine and social-distancing measures. Although some countries are starting to ease their lock-down restrictions, many children are still unable to attend school, and their normal interactions and activities are likely to remain curtailed for some weeks to come.

The overall winner will receive a once-in-a-lifetime prize: a fully rendered illustration of their design. Runners-up will receive a certificate individually hand-signed by Torsten Müller-Ötvös, the Chief Executive Officer of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars.

“We’re delighted by the sheer inventiveness, vision and detail we’re seeing in the children’s designs. Some of the ideas are truly extraordinary and have really got us thinking; it’s inspiring us as a design team to see things differently and challenge our own notions of what’s possible. We’re really looking forward to the judging process, but it’s going to be a huge challenge to pick our winners,” — Gavin Hartley, Head of Bespoke Design, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, will be judging the entries together with members of his team.

SUBMIT HERE

Teens and Screens During COVID-19

12 TIPS FROM THE EXPERTS FOR PARENTING TEENS ON SCREENS DURING COVID-19

This week, Children and Screens asked our experts to share their best advice for parents raising adolescents in the midst of the global pandemic. Just when parents thought that their teens couldn’t be on their devices for more hours in the day, initial data indicates that screen time among youth has increased dramatically during this time. Like younger kids, teens need guidance in managing their cognitive, emotional and physical health during this challenging and uncertain time, as well as boundaries and schedules for staying connected both on and offline. This age group is particularly susceptible to developing bad habits and addictions, so it’s more important than ever to continue encouraging a healthy relationship with screens and to give them the support they need.

Read on to learn the best ways to talk with your kids about technology and share beneficial screen time with your family; and, be sure to tune in to the next installment of our upcoming interactive popular webinar series this coming Tuesday, May 12th, at noon EDT, when our panel of experts will chat about healthy screen habits for teenagers and answer your questions via Zoom. RSVP here.

THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS

While it’s important to monitor the amount of time your child spends with screens, it’s even more important to monitor what they’re actually doing with that time. Talking with friends? Encourage it. Writing a journal? Experimenting with music? Wonderful. Support your child’s need for friendship and creativity while also helping them understand that time away from distractions, time for solitude and mind-wandering, is something you value. Screens open our worlds except when they take us away from ourselves. Getting this balance right means you and your children are talking, and in my view, if that’s happening, the rest will follow. And what really helps: no screens at dinner. Consider dinner to be a sacred space, a place for conversation. – Sherry Turkle, Professor, MIT. Author, Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less from Each Other and Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age.

LEAD THE WAY

With everyone cooped up at home, now is a great time for parents to play video games, watch movies and TV shows, and explore the world of social media with their kids. This kind of active media supervision allows parents to guide their children through the world of screens, and it’s been shown to have tremendous benefits in terms of behavior, academic success, and even physical health. This process also allows parents to understand more about the fantasy world of their kids, and it offers the chance for a healthy role reversal, one in which the child becomes the teacher and the parent can model good learning practices. – Paul Weigle, MD, child and adolescent psychiatrist, associate medical director of Natchaug Hospital, Hartford HealthCare

TURN OFF THE NEWS

Daily smartphone use has skyrocketed since mid-March, and students have noted that their largest increases come with apps devoted to communication and the news. One makes kids happy; the other scares them. In order to focus on the positive, older children should reach out to others through Zoom, Skype, FaceTime, etc. for at least an hour a day. Neuroscientists say this calms an overloaded brain. In order to limit the negative, try setting limits on their time reading news apps. At a certain point, they’re more likely to raise their blood pressure and increase their anxiety by mindlessly bingeing the news than they are to actually learn anything. – Dr. Larry Rosen, Professor Emeritus of Psychology

ROUTINES FOR TEENS

The world feels like a chaotic and unpredictable place right now. Trying to maintain a routine can give children and families a sense of normalcy.  This is especially important since, by necessity, schools have shifted a lot of the responsibility for education to students and families. Right now, schoolwork and entertainment are often happening on the same devices.  Structure and routine can help kids prioritize schoolwork, so they take care of those responsibilities before shifting to entertainment or socializing with friends.  It’s also important to maintain routines around bedtime and to encourage kids to turn off their electronics at least an hour before bed.  A good night’s sleep does wonders for mood and anxiety.  –  Dr. Dale Peeples, Associate Professor at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University

EMBRACE THE ANALOG

More time at home means more time for valuable family activities such as cooking, home repair, spring cleaning, yard work, gardening, and landscaping. Adolescents can also unleash their creativity via painting, making music, or crafts. For those with access, the dearth of cars allows for safer and more enjoyable bike rides and long walks. This is also a special opportunity to learn about family history. Teens can interview their extended relatives and create memorabilia such as scrapbooks or cookbooks. – Kristopher Kaliebe, MD, Associate Professor, University of South Florida

TAKE A BREAK

Don’t feel guilty about the increase in your child’s screen time. As the New York Times recently reported: Coronavirus ended the screen time debate, and screens won. It’s not just children’s screen time that’s surged lately, though. Parents rely on screens to follow the news, buy groceries, teach their children, talk with colleagues and friends, and keep up with elderly family members, who they’re no longer allowed to see in person. That means kids and parents alike face increased risk for physical side effects, including nearsightedness, computer vision syndrome, and neck and back problems. Although it’s difficult to limit total screen time at the moment, parents should insist on regular breaks, both for their kids and themselves. – Professor Patti M. Valkenburg, University of Amsterdam

KEEP SCREEN TIME AND BEDTIME SEPARATE

Don’t let your child’s normal bedtime shift too much later during this quarantine period. One way to enforce bedtime is to shut off screens at least one hour before lights out. When kids (and adults) use screens before bedtime, they’re more likely to want to “watch another episode,” further delaying their bedtime. They also may become psychologically stimulated by something they read or see, which may make it harder for them to fall asleep, even if they go to bed on time. In addition, bright light from screens can suppress the natural release of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin. In other words, protect bedtime by reducing evening screen time. – Lauren Hale, Ph.D. – Professor, Department of Family, Population and Preventive Medicine Program, Program in Public Health, Renaissance School of Medicine, Stony Brook University

THIS TOO SHALL PASS

Both you and your adolescent may find yourselves feeling anxious right now. Emphasize that regular life is sometimes interrupted in unexpected ways, but that things will eventually go back to normal. Help them avoid bingeing on COVID-19 news by steering them toward more healthy and enriching content, and remind them that now is a time for everyone to come together and help each other out. – Elizabeth K. Englander, PhD Director, Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center, Bridgewater State University

HIT THE RESET BUTTON

Everyone’s a bit stressed these days, and kids can sense it. Many will turn to their favorite passive activities, especially those involving screens, as a way of managing their fears. If your children suddenly can’t tear themselves away from YouTube, more frequent check-ins with a gradual decrease in daily screen time may help to reset their “digital programming.” – Meredith Gansner, MD, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Cambridge Health Alliance

APPRECIATE THE LITTLE THINGS

Recognize that during this time, you will not be as efficient at your job, and your child will likely not learn as much as they would if they were physically attending school. This is all okay. The greatest lesson you can teach your teen, and learn with them, is that you are resilient. You can take a scary and chaotic situation and find beauty, purpose, and connection. – Colleen Kraft, MD

ASK FOR HELP

Now is a time when those teens who already struggle with their screen use are at risk of seriously losing control. Once an adolescent has fallen into addiction, tremendous family conflict is likely to ensue as parents try to take control. With families confined in their homes without a ready way to ease the tension, the situation may become volatile. Following the suggestions found here to create structure, build connections and encourage creative and social uses of tech and non-tech time may salvage the situation. But, if parents do find themselves dealing with an out-of-control teen and can’t seem to lead them onto healthier ground, there are counselors and coaches who specialize in internet addiction. Telehealth is not an ideal way to begin a helping relationship, but it may be what saves your sanity. – Dr. Hilarie Cash, Chief Clinical Officer and Co-Founder of reSTART Life, PLLC

DANGER AND OPPORTUNITY

Compared to adults, children and adolescents are typically less future-oriented, so present-moment experiences are particularly salient for them. As such, children and adolescents may be more inclined during the pandemic to turn to the internet for immediate gratification. There is potential danger in this: kids can get into patterns of gaming or social media consumption that may involve many hours of screen time, generate habits that may be problematic or difficult to break once the pandemic subsides, or engage in boundary-pushing or risky behavior without parental knowledge. However, there is also the opportunity here to involve youth in more adaptive patterns of internet use. For example, in the coming weeks and months, families may be foregoing in-person meetings in favor of remote holiday gatherings over the internet. Encouraging adolescents to help arrange and organize such events may provide opportunities for empowering youth to engage in more healthy forms of internet use. – Marc N Potenza, MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Child Study and Neuroscience, Yale School of Medicine

As kids get older, their needs continue to evolve, but as our experts point out, many of the basic tenets of parenting in the digital age remain the same. With the independence of college and adulthood on the horizon, it’s important to reinforce thoughtful decision-making and responsible online behavior, and we hope these tips can help guide you and your family towards a healthy future together.

About Children and Screens

Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development is a 501C(3) national non-profit organization founded by Dr. Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra. Children and Screens advances interdisciplinary research, supports human capital in the field, informs and educates the public, and advocates for sound public policy for child health and wellness.

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Teens Take The Met

The Met will welcome thousands of teens from New York’s five boroughs for Teens Take The Met!, a night of performances, hands-on activities, dancing, and giveaways. Since the program’s launch in 2014, the event has brought together over 28,000 young people for what has become one of the most dynamic events in New York City for teens. In partnership with over 40 youth and cultural organizations, the event encourages teens—many of whom are visiting The Met for the first time—to immerse themselves in hands-on experiences while exploring the Museum. Teens Take The Met! is free for all teens (age 13 or older) with a middle school or high school ID. 

The event is made possible by the Gray Foundation. 

“The Museum always looks forward to Teens Take The Met! with great anticipation,” commented Sandra Jackson-Dumont, the Museum’s Frederick P. and Sandra P. Rose Chairman of Education. “It is core to The Met’s mission to create safer spaces for all young people to be able to be themselves in big and beautiful ways.”

A wide and engaging variety of interactive stations, performances, and activities have been created for the event. There will be activities inspired by The Met’s inaugural annual facade commission by Kenyan-American artist Wangechi Mutu, The NewOnes, will free Us, including a power pose workshop led by Martha Graham’s Teens@Graham and a sun print activity with Met Teen Interns. 

Stations that offer art-making, hands-on learning, and thought-provoking discussions led by The Met and partner institutions will be scattered throughout the galleries. Some highlights: Art and Resistance Through Education (ARTE) will invite teens to create collages centered around the question “What does social justice mean to you?”; The Met’s Digital team will provide tips and tools on how to explore hundreds of thousands of open access artworks from the Museum’s collection online; the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian will teach teens how to create their own calendars that reflect the personal rituals in their lives, while learning about Indigenous calendars and timekeeping systems;  The Center for Anti Violence Education—a new partner for the event-will lead a self-defense demonstration followed by a session on self-care tips and breathing exercises; and The Door—also a new partner-will engage a station centered around the life and work of legendary artist, Keith Haring. 

Sign Language interpretation, assistive listening devices, sighted guides, large print and braille programs, and a designated quiet space will be available, along with free snacks and photo opportunities.

To participate, teens will need a special-event wristband, which they can pick up at either of the Museum’s two Fifth Avenue entrances (at 81st and 83rd Streets), where a pop-up performance by Bard High School Early College Panther Team Steppers will entertain the crowds during check-in. The wristbands will provide access to teen-only activities throughout the building. 

The event will be featured on The Met’s website, as well as on  Facebook,  Instagram, and Twitter via the hashtag #metteens.

Community Partners 

92Y Center for Arts Learning & Leadership; Art and Resistance Through Education (ARTE); ArtsConnection; Bard High School Early College Manhattan; The Bronx Museum of the Arts; Brooklyn Museum; Brooklyn Public Library; Building Beats; The Center for Anti-Violence Education; The Center for Book Arts; The Dedalus Foundation; The Door; El Museo del Barrio; Epic Theatre Ensemble; FICA New York; Free Arts NYC; Games for Change; Girls for Gender Equity; Hill Art Foundation; Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum; Latimer Heights; Lewis Latimer House Museum; Lincoln Center Education; Manhattan Theatre Club; Museum of Arts and Design; Museum of Chinese in America; MyLibraryNYC; New York City Writing Project; New York Film Academy; New York Public Library; New-York Historical Society; No Longer Empty; The Noguchi Museum; NYC Department of Youth & Community Development; Planned Parenthood of New York City; Poster House; Pratt Institute Community Engagement Board; Roundabout Youth Ensemble; The Rubin Museum of Art; Scholastic Art & Writing Awards; Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian; The Studio Museum in Harlem; Teens@Graham; Titan Theatre Company; Urban Word NYC; UrbanGlass; Wave Hill; Writopia Lab; YWCA NYC 

About the Gray Foundation 

The Gray Foundation is committed to improving the lives of low income children in New York City. The Foundation partners with leading nonprofits to provide access to education, healthcare and opportunity for children across all five boroughs. In addition, the Foundation is focused on accelerating research, improving treatment and raising awareness for individuals who have inherited BRCA mutations. Jon and Mindy Gray founded the Gray Foundation in 2014. 

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Cars.com – Best New Cars for Teens

Cars.com Aids Parents of Teen Drivers with the Best New Cars and Worry-Free Tech Features to Promote Safe Driving

National Teen Driver Safety Week (Oct. 20-26) Aims to Educate Parents about Core Driving Dangers for Teens;

Cars.com Offers Solutions to Encourage Responsible Driving

The leading cause of death for teens 15–18 years old in the U.S. is motor vehicle crashes1. With today’s advanced technology, parents now have more access to safety features that help combat the most common dangers for teen drivers, which include not wearing seat belts, distracted driving and speeding. The experts at Cars.comTM assembled recommendations for the best vehicle technology and top cars for new teen drivers for National Teen Driver Safety Week, Oct. 20-26. 

“Teen drivers are most at risk because they are excited about the independence and still learning how to navigate the rules of the road and safely operate a vehicle,” said Jenni Newman, Cars.com editor-in-chief and mother of a new teen driver. “As a mom, teaching my teenager to drive is a nerve-wracking experience. Parents need to educate themselves on the best cars for their teen drivers based on what safety features are available, crash-test ratings, affordability and more before their teen gets behind the wheel.”

The experts at Cars.com identified the best new cars for teen drivers based on available in-car technology, affordability and safety scores2:

  • 2019 Hyundai Kona SEL SUV has stellar crash-test scores and is equipped with the SmartSense safety suite, which bundles forward collision warning with emergency braking, lane keep assist and driver attention warning systems. Starting price: $22,895
  • 2019 Kia Forte EX (with Launch Edition Package) is a compact sedan that impresses on many levels, with a sporty design, a more refined interior and features such as forward collision warning, rear cross-traffic alert, blind spot collision warning, lane keep assist and more. Starting price: $26,125
  • 2019 Mazda3 (front-wheel drive with Select Package) is a compact sedan equipped with Mazda’s i-ActivSense safety system, which adds emergency braking, blind spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, lane departure warning and lane keep assist, and driver attention alert. Starting price: $23,520
  • Honorable mention: 2020 Nissan Versa SVis an affordable subcompact with safety features including front automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, automatic reverse braking, a lane departure warning system, blind spot warning, automatic headlights and high beams. Starting price: $18,535

“Each year, automakers are adding more safety features to new models, giving today’s parents better access to advanced technology to help their teens avoid potentially fatal errors,” said Newman. She advises parents to look out for the following safety tech features as they shop for their new teen driver:

  • Forward collision warningmonitors a vehicle’s speed, the speed of the car in front of it and the distance between vehicles. If the vehicles get too close, this technology will warn the teen driver to slow down and move to a safe distance between vehicles.
  • Automatic emergency brakingsystems detect an impending forward crash and alert teen drivers to take action. If the driver doesn’t respond, the system automatically applies the brakes. This technology is critical in avoiding a forward crash and reducing the severity of an impending collision.
  • Apple CarPlay and Android Autoconnect smartphones to the car’s infotainment system. This feature allows teens to use some features from their smartphone but still limit their distractions while driving.
  • Lane keep assist and lane departure warningsystems alert teenage drivers when the vehicle begins to move out of its lane. For teens still learning how to navigate the dimensions of a car, these features will help keep them from drifting into other lanes or alert them when they do.
  • Rear cross-traffic alertdetects cars passing behind a vehicle when backing up. For teens learning to drive, backing up is one of the most challenging tasks. This technology allows them to back out of parking spaces more safely.
  • Blind spot warning systemssense other vehicles located in the driver’s blind spots. For teen drivers, learning a vehicle’s blind spots and how to check for other vehicles properly takes time; this can help them learn that skill.
  • Ford’s MyKey and Chevrolet’s Teen Drivermodes allow parents to control vehicle safety settings such as speed, radio volume or seat belt alerts. For teen drivers, this feature reduces distracted driving, speeding and ensures they are safely buckled in.

To learn more about the top vehicles for teens and the latest active safety features, visit Best 2019 Cars for Teen Drivers.

¹National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

2Models received a score of Top Safety Pick or Top Safety Pick Plus from the Insurance Institue for Highway Safety.

32020 model has not undergone crash tests by IIHS, but has all the pertinent features and comes in under $20,000.

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Savannah May

Actress Savannah May can next be seen leading the cast of the Lifetime original movie,
“The Secret Lives of Cheerleaders” opposite Denise Richards. In the movie, Savannah plays ‘Ava’ an incoming transfer student, reluctantly tries out for the cheerleading team at the insistence of her overly-ambitious mother, Candice (Richards). Katrina (Allie DeBerry, A.N.T Farm), the head cheerleader and most popular girl in school, unexpectedly cozies up to Ava who makes the squad and instantly becomes high school royalty. As she transitions into her new life, Ava discovers becoming part of the squad comes at a price. “The Secret Lives of Cheerleaders” is produced by HYBRID. Additionally, Peter Sullivan serves as the director and Anna White serves as the writer. The show airs September 2nd at 8pm PST / EST.

The nineteen-year-old actress is best known for her role one Nickelodeon’s series “Knight Squad” where she played the series regular role of “Buttercup.”

Savannah was born on August 12, 2000 in Sugarland, Texas. At the age of 4, she caught the acting bug after seeing her first musical with her family. She would go on to explore her talents to become a triple threat in singing, dancing and acting. At 11-years-old, Savannah started training at the Theater Under the Stars (TUTS), Humphrey School of Musical Theater where she trained for over 5 years to develop her craft. She has performed alongside multiple respected Broadway alumni through TUTS and performed for iTheatrics in New York City. Through iTheatrics, Savannah had the opportunity to perform on Broadway with the cast of “Chicago” for a special tribute (what year did this happen). Cast performers at the time included Chita Rivera (Sweet Charity), Bebe Neuwirth (Cheers, Jumanji), Joel Grey (Cabaret) and more to celebrate John Kander’s 90th birthday. Years later she would move to Los Angeles to pursue acting, booking her first full-time gig on the pilot of Nickelodeon’s “Knight Squad,” which debuted in the Spring of 2018. Savannah also appeared in Nickelodeon’s “School of Rock” (2017), Disney’s “Bizaardvark” (2016) playing Jade, and now she’s filming season 2 of Nickelodeon’s “Knight Squad,” premiere in early 2019.

Savannah is a supporter of the fine arts. She regular supports the River Performing and Visual Arts Center in Texas, amongst others. Currently she resides in Burbank California.

Photo by Amanda Elkins

AT&T and REESE WITHERSPOON’S HELLO SUNSHINE

Though women make up 50% of moviegoers, they represent only 17% of creators in Hollywood, outnumbered by men in most roles within film and TV production, from writing and cinematography to production and editing jobs.  To address the gender imbalance and bring more diversity to the screen, AT&T, Hello Sunshine, and Fresh Films have joined forces to create the AT&T Hello Sunshine Filmmaker Lab, an unforgettable opportunity for young women to immerse themselves in a professional film production and learn from industry experts, including Reese herself.

“Everyone at Hello Sunshine is ecstatic about this program where we can share our resources with young female storytellers and filmmakers,” says Witherspoon, “Hopefully, it will provide young women with the tools to tell their own stories , and ultimately, start a chain reaction that leads to continued access and opportunity for them in our industry. “

“AT&T is excited to collaborate with Hello Sunshine and Fresh Films to support the next generation of female filmmakers,” said Charlene Lake, senior vice president, corporate social responsibility, AT&T.  “It is critical that we develop a pipeline of talent who will create content that captures diverse perspectives and stories.  We’re looking forward to working with the exceptional young women selected for this program and supporting their journey as storytellers.”

Through the AT&T Hello Sunshine Filmmaker Lab, which will be held in Los Angeles July 30-Aug. 6, teen girls will learn the ins-and-outs of storytelling and production as they rotate through all key filmmaking positions – from camera and editing to sound and costume – while being mentored by professionals from Fresh Films, AT&T and Hello Sunshine. Hello Sunshine was launched in November 2016 by Reese Witherspoon in partnership with The Chernin Group and AT&T under Otter Media’s growing portfolio.

Girls 13-18 with a passion for storytelling and creating videos can apply online at www.att.com/filmmakerlab now through June 10 to become one of 20 teen girls selected for the experience.

The program is free and open to teen girls of any experience level.  And like in all Fresh Films programs, teen girls in the AT&T Hello Sunshine Filmmaker Lab program will gain career skills and practical experience on a real project.  This hands-on, on-set experience will grow the teen’s problem solving, communication, collaboration and tech skills.

Fresh Films’ past summer programs for teens have produced feature film “The Stream” featuring Mario Lopez and Rainn Wilson as well as Emmy-nominated kids’ TV show “Detectives Club.”

“Fresh Films was a great program to work with. I thought the skills they were offering to teach were so priceless,” said Maya Brown, a Fresh Films alum who participated in the summer program sponsored by AT&T in 2017. “AT&T did a great job by sponsoring this program through influencing young minds to invest their time in something productive and magical.”

Future employers of these female movie makers can take note:  according to research compiled by Women and Hollywood, the inclusion of more female perspectives at all levels within the film industry results in more diverse and interesting storytelling. Additionally, female directors consistently employ more diverse production teams and casts, and films with diverse cast enjoy the highest median global box office. In short, bringing voices of women to the industry means making better and higher grossing movies.

About Fresh Films:  Fresh Films has been engaging youth behind the camera and creating youth-targeted TV shows, films and original content since 2002 – all purposed to make a difference in young lives.  Teen creatives have worked on over 150 short films, documentaries and features, including recent productions  “The Stream,” a coming-of-age family comedy created by teens, benefitting Boys & Girls Clubs of America and featuring Mario Lopez (Extra), Kelly Rutherford (Gossip Girl), Christopher Gorham (Covert Affairs) and Rainn Wilson; “Detectives Club,” a science TV show for kids featuring Tim Kazurinsky; “Traveling Without Moving” starring Steve Guttenberg and Harry Lennix; and season two of “Detectives Club,” which will debut in late 2017.  Fresh Films is the non-profit arm of Dreaming Tree Films with info at www.fresh-films.com

Fresh Films is now located on-campus of Augustana College, a top-tier liberal arts college located on the beautiful Mississippi River in Rock Island, IL.

*About AT&T

AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) helps millions around the globe connect with leading entertainment, business, mobile and high speed internet services. We have the nation’s largest and most reliable network** and the best global coverage of any U.S. wireless provider. We’re one of the world’s largest providers of pay TV. We have TV customers in the U.S. and 11 Latin American countries. More than 3 million companies, from small to large businesses around the globe, turn to AT&T for our highly secure smart solutions.

AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc. Additional information about AT&T products and services is available at about.att.com. Follow our news on Twitter at @ATT, on Facebook at facebook.com/att and on YouTube at youtube.com/att.

© 2018 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, the Globe logo and other marks are trademarks and service marks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.

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ABOUT HELLO SUNSHINE

Hello Sunshine is a media brand and content company dedicated to female authorship and storytelling across all platforms. Hello Sunshine is producing feature films, television shows as well as unscripted series, audio storytelling and social series under the Hello Sunshine brand, all anchored by a singular mission: to change the narrative for women. Hello Sunshine is also the home for Reese’s Book Club, fast-growing in reach and influence. Some of the film and TV projects that have already been announced by Hello Sunshine include the highly-anticipated limited series from Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington, based on Celeste Ng’s 2017 bestseller Little Fires Everywhere, as a Hulu Original Series, a 10-episode comedy series for Apple executive produced by and starring Kristen Wiig that was created by Colleen McGuinness (30 Rock) and inspired by Curtis Sittenfeld’s upcoming short-story collection You Think It, I’ll Say It; Are You Sleeping, executive produced by and starring Octavia Spencer, which is based on the true-crime novel by Kathleen Barber that is created and written by Nichelle Tramble Spellman (The Good Wife, Justified) for Apple; an Untitled Morning Show Project produced by and starring Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon, which was given a two-season, straight-to-series order by Apple with Kerry Ehrin (Bates Motel) serving as showrunner; a film for Fox 2000 based on Catherine Steadman’s novel Something in the Water, being adapted by Julia Cox; and A White Lie, a psychological thriller for TriStar Pictures produced by and starring Zendaya based on Karin Tanabe’s critically-acclaimed novel The Gilded Years, which will be adapted by Monica Beletsky (Fargo, The Leftovers). Hello Sunshine recently launched its first original podcast series, How It Is, which features powerful, personal stories told by a diverse group of high-profile women and hosted by actor and author Diane Guerrero (Orange Is The New Black, Jane the Virgin). The content company most recently launched the podcast How It Is, which features powerful, personal stories told by a diverse group of high-profile women and is hosted by actor and author, Diane Guerrero.

ALISON WONDERLAND x NEW MUSIC VIDEO

With less than three weeks to go until the release of Alison Wonderland’s new album, AWAKE, comes the ambient single High; featuring Ohio rapper Trippie Redd. The track is accompanied by a mood-enhancing video featuring Wonderland and Trippie Redd and animation by Jayme Lemperle and Evan Red Borja. It was self-directed by Alison Wonderland, with cinematography from Jeffrey Zoss. View HERE.
Wonderland said, “It was a real pleasure to work with Trippie. It is important to vibe with an artist before we collaborate. When he heard this song, it was very organic, and he jumped in the booth and we walked out feeling that we had something special. I felt like this song had a certain spirit and wanted people to feel like they were going on a journey with us….just like when watching the music video.”

HUMAN TRAFFICKING AWARENESS MONTH

Sex Trafficking is considered the New American slavery and the U.S. Justice Department estimates that 14,00-17,500 people are trafficked in the US every year. The 2016 Global Slavery Index estimates that 57,700 people are victims of human trafficking and most of those that are impacted are young children, teens and women. Each year 244,000 American Children and youth are at risk for sex trafficking each year.

 

Jan is an upcoming national leader and she is getting program certified with the American Emergency Nurses Association so they can lead the course for Trauma, ER and Pediatric Nurses and she just got her first request from a Doctor so that she can train their staff.

 

Jan Edwards is the founder and CEO of Paving the Way, an organization committed to being a fierce disruption in the cycle of child trafficking around the globe. This is accomplished through educational and training programs that empower communities to break the cycle.  She’s been featured in the Huffington Post, Marie Claire UK, on iHeart Radio as an expert in prevention and was recently awarded Humanitarian of the Year. Jan is also the writer and producer of the award-winning film, Trapped in the Trade, which was featured on CNN.

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Watch Jan on CNN herehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_us4TF9wB4