Posts tagged with "anti-bullying"

Gigi Vega illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rising Star Gigi Vega

360 Magazine had the opportunity to ask rising star, Gigi Vega, questions that her fans would want to know. Gigi Vega debuted her hit song “Mistletoe Kiss” taking the holiday music charts by storm. She went viral on TikTok with 10 million views and 15k videos. In addition to writing and producing, GiGi is a dancer and choreographer. Read on to learn more about Gigi!

GIGI VEGA INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: 

1. How has your family inspired you and your music?

GV: I would always do little shows and auditions. My father is a jazz musician. He would play the piano, so I was always surrounded by music, and theater as well. 

2. What or who inspired your song “Watchu Tryna Do?”

GV: It just happened. Actually, had it for a while, but was finally able to come back to it. Originally, the lyrics were supposed to be “in the club”, instead of “in the crib”. But I had to make adjustments due to COVID 19

3. Talk about your producer on this song? 

GV: Jack London. He has worked with the Chainsmokers.

4. Where do you get your ideas for songwriting? 

GV: Melodies just come to me. Melodies come first for me. Lyrics come from everyday life experiences. I’ve always been into dancing and singing. It’s something that just clicked for me, but I got more into it once I started composing my own songs.

5. What charities are you aligned with and why? 

GV: Anti-bullying programs.

6. What acting projects will you be involved with in the future?

GV: I will be in The Drone That Saved Christmas. Production begins in March. After that, I hope the COVID situation improves, so I can be touring.

7. Who are your biggest influences?

GV: Janet Jackson. Definitely into anyone who is super full out, and she is one of them.

8. What advice would you give to a singer starting out?

GV: Don’t let anyone steer you in the direction of what they want you to be – it is not worth it, ever.

9. Talk about your training as a triple threat, what do you do to stay on top? 

GV: Just take a look at my Music video, it is all there. Acting, dancing, singing. I have trained in all three disciplines since I was very young. My dance training was focused on modern dance, but I am schooled in all disciplines. I have always been on stage or behind the camera, so it is second nature.

10. How do you take care of your voice? 

GV: Regular training, like an athlete. Lots of lemon and pineapple juice, as well.

11. If you could collaborate with another artist, who would it be?

GV: Chris Brown or Jason Derulo. Dancer/singer like I am. Janet – anyone who is full out, as mentioned before.

12. What is on your playlist right now?

GV: Omarion, Michael Jackson, Ariana Grande, Billie Eilish, Pop Smoke, Jason Derulo.

13. Who are you currently watching on TikTok?

GV: Everything that comes across my feed.:)

14. When did you know you wanted to be an entertainer? 

GV: Never thought about anything else. I was on stage from an early age. I made the move from stage to commercial work in my teens. Once I learned how to write solid music, I knew I wanted to record music. It was a process. I spent hundreds of hours in the studio as a kid.

15. What artist did you admire as a child?

 GV: I loved watching Janet Jackson, Michael Jackson is my absolute favorite.

16. Do you play any instruments? 

GV: I pluck out notes on the piano and guitar to help my melodies. Had many lessons and music theory, but I won’t be accompanying myself just yet.

17. What’s your fashion style?

GV: I like more tropical vibes, or casual, put-together vibes, but I always like to switch it up. I can be glam or a Tomboy. Get a girl who can do both.

18. What do you do to relax?

GV: I love fashion, always putting fashion pieces together. I learned to sew as a child, went to classes and camps for years. I was one of those kids who got a new shirt, and then I would go to my room and change the shape and design. I love listening to music and writing. Honestly, writing is my happy space.

19. What other businesses do you plan on starting to promote your brand?

GV: I am very into sneakers and shoes. I have so many different designs in my head that need to come out.

20. What’s the one thing you think everyone could do to make the world a more positive place?

GV: Less judgment of others, especially strangers.

Image courtesy of Jodi Jackson
ReverbNation winner Isabelle Dubroy image by Isabelle Dubroy for use by 360 Magazine

ReverbNation Winner – Isabelle Dubroy

Isabelle Dubroy is a 14 year-old singer/songwriter, actress, model, dancer, author and philanthropist from Greenville, North Carolina.

She began singing at the age of four, and by six, Isabelle wrote her first song, “Coconut Mama.” A YouTube channel was created for Isabelle at age seven so that she could share her music. Isabelle even stared in a web series, “Microchip Jones,” in which she wrote and performed all the featured songs.

Between filming a series, releasing music videos and hosting her own talk show, Isabelle found time to write a children’s book titled, “Stuffy The Lucky Puppy,” with special thanks to her second grade teacher, Ms. Shiva Salehpour. Isabelle has proven to be a multi-faceted talent at a very young age and her craft is continuing to evolve.

Isabelle has dedicated her life to being an inspiration for the younger generation and hopes to help stop bullying. She even started a foundation called Isabelle’s Heart Foundation where she has donates supplies to homeless shelters, hosts her own food drives and gives back to less fortunate children and families in her community. Isabelle’s passion to help others has no boundaries.

Mina Tocalini illustration for mental health article inside 360 magazine

Non-Immigrant Kids Respond Differently When Immigrant Children Are Bullied

A recent study finds that, while youth think all bullying is bad, non-immigrant adolescents object less to bullying when the victim is an immigrant. However, the study found that the more contact immigrant and non-immigrant children had with each other, the more strongly they objected to bullying.

“We know that bystanders can play a key role in stopping bullying, and wanted to better understand bystander responses to bias-based bullying,” says Seçil Gönültaş, first author of the study and a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University. “What role does a victim’s background play? What role does the bystander’s background play? Are children more or less likely to intervene if they come from different backgrounds?”

To explore these questions, the researchers conducted a study with 179 children, all of whom were in either sixth grade or ninth grade. Seventy-nine of the study participants were of immigrant origin, meaning that at least one of their parents was born outside of the United States. Researchers categorized the remaining 100 participants as non-immigrants for the purposes of this study, meaning both of their parents had been born in the U.S.

Study participants read three different scenarios and were then asked a range of questions to assess what they thought of the interactions in each scenario and how they would have responded in each situation.

In the first scenario, a non-immigrant child socially bullies an immigrant child because of his or her immigrant status. In the second scenario, a non-immigrant child socially bullies another non-immigrant child for being shy. And in the third scenario, a non-immigrant child socially bullies an immigrant child for being shy. Social bullying involves verbal or emotional abuse, rather than physical abuse. Immigrant youth in the fictional scenarios were born outside of the U.S.

“In general, the kids thought bullying was not acceptable,” says Kelly Lynn Mulvey, co-author of the study and an associate professor of psychology at NC State. “But non-immigrant youth thought bullying immigrant peers was more acceptable than bullying of other non-immigrant peers. Immigrant origin youth thought bullying any of the kids was equally wrong.”

“On a positive note, we found that there were two things that made a difference,” Gönültaş says. “First, we found that the more contact children in one group had with children in another group, the less accepting they were of bullying and the more likely they were to intervene to stop the bullying. That was true for immigrant origin and non-immigrant youth.”

“We also found that children who scored higher on ‘Theory of Mind’ were more likely to intervene,” Mulvey says. “Theory of Mind is an important part of understanding other people’s perspectives, so we suspect this is likely tied to a child’s ability to place themselves in the victim’s shoes.

“Ultimately, we think this study is valuable because it can help us develop more effective anti-bullying interventions,” Mulvey adds. “For example, these findings suggest that finding ways to encourage and facilitate more positive interactions between groups can help kids to understand that all bullying is harmful and to encourage kids to step in when they see it.”

The paper, “The Role of Immigration Background, Intergroup Processes, and Social-Cognitive Skills in Bystanders’ Responses to Bias-Based Bullying Toward Immigrants During Adolescence,” is published in the journal Child Development. The work was done with support from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues’ Grants-In-Aid Program.

Abstract

This study examined how intergroup processes and social-cognitive factors shape bystander responses to bias-based and general bullying. Participants included 6th and 9th graders (N=179, M=13.23) who evaluated how likely they would be to intervene if they observed bullying of immigrant-origin and nonimmigrant-origin peers. Adolescents’ grade, intergroup attitudes, and social-cognitive abilities were evaluated as predictors of bystander responses. Nonimmigrant-origin adolescents reported that they expect they would be less likely to intervene when the victim is an immigrant-origin peer. Further, participants with more intergroup contact and higher Theory of Mind were more likely to expect they would intervene in response to bias-based bullying. Findings have important implications for understanding factors that inform anti-bullying interventions that aim to tackle bias-based bullying against immigrants.

Sarah Silva New Track


Sarah Silva is set to drop the next single “Somebody Like Me,” from her upcoming album which is set for release in September 2020, via Black Rabbit Entertainment.

“’Somebody Like Me’ about knowing that you are exactly what a certain someone needs. Their past experiences didn’t work out, but now they don’t need to look anymore because you’re here for them,” comments Sarah. “It’s also about feeling empowered with yourself, feeling so confident that you know you can do anything.”

Pre-save “Somebody Like Me” here

A perfect follow-up to Sarah’s “False Illusions,” which was released in November, “Somebody Like Me,” pairs catchy pop lyrics with her sassy Latin vibe.

A household name in South and Central America, the bilingual singer has teamed up with producer, A-dubb (Anthony West), on an upcoming album. Inspired by artists like Rosalía with hints of Becky G, Sarah is ready to make a splash in the U.S. with her own unique brand of Latin pop music.

MORE ABOUT SARAH SILVA:
Sarah’s journey truly began after taking 2nd place in the Mexican version of America Idol, La Academia Kids, at only 11 years old. The experience immersed her in six months of extensive training in singing, dancing and acting with some of the best teachers in the industry. After her participation in La Academia Kids she was casted as the namesake character in the theater play Miranda y Sus Dos Papas, where she was critically recognized for her enormous talent as a musical theater actress.

Sarah’s love of music is extensive and eclectic. She has been given the opportunity to perform a wide variety of songs from regional Mexican to R&B. In 2017, Sarah joined a social media incubator, Dosogas Team, through which she watched her socials skyrocket from tens of thousands to more than 800k in under a year. Known as the singer of the group, the incubator works to expose the young beauty to their millions of fans worldwide. She went on a world tour performing in top venues in Argentina, Paraguay, Mexico, Chile, and many others in Latin America.

She uses her music as part of her anti-bullying campaign that emphasizes the acceptance of all races, gender, sexual orientations, and other social constructs that divide teens. Sarah is currently a student at The Colburn School of the performing arts in Los Angeles, California.

SODY × BULLYING

EVEN POP STARS GET BULLIED – SODY SHARES HER STORY IN NEW SINGLE

Sporting long blonde hair, blue eyes, and pink sweater, SODY is not your conventional victim of bullying and has since turned it into a positive and personal experience by becoming a vocal advocate for anti-bullying in new single “The Bully.”  PRESS HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO

Featuring a range of unenthusiastic schoolchildren posing for their school photos, “The Bully” presents itself as an ode to anyone picked on or feeling alone. “For my sanity, I needed to try to move on and find the positive in a negative situation to accept what happened and move on,” SODY told Celeb Mix. “I found my way to heal in the lyric ‘I’m glad it happened to me and not to you,’ and I hope it helps others find theirs too.”

Known to speak bluntly and honestly, SODY expresses raw emotion that allows audiences to relate. “It’s always going to be hard to show that vulnerability and be honest about yourself but the more people that show their authentic self, the more people will be confident to do so,” SODY told Thomas Bleach.

With a passion for standing against injustice, bullying and hate crime, SODY is just beginning to use her platforms to highlight the issues she cares about and plans to keep addressing these passions to help make the world a little less mean one song at a time.

Follow SODY: 
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

The Diana Award

The Diana Award launches Anti-Bullying Campaign #Back2School and reveals new bullying survey statistics

This September sees over 10 million children going back to school, with many feeling anxious about being bullied. To kick-off the month’s #Back2School campaign, The Diana Award Anti-Bullying Campaign is encouraging everyone to get involved across social media channels by posting/sharing a picture of them back at school with their advice and if they choose to, text a donation to support the training of young Anti-Bullying Ambassadors in every school.  
A new survey, released today, of over 2,000 adults and 500 young people about their experiences of bullying in school, conducted by YouGov for The Diana Award, reveals:

  • Almost half (47%) of GB adults say they were bullied at school
  • 64% of young people, 8-15yrs, say at least one of their friends has been bullied at school
  • Nearly a quarter, 24% of 15 year olds say their friends are worried about going back to school due to bullying
  • 34% of GB adults and 31% of young people say that Anti-Bullying Ambassadors would have reduced bullying in their schools

As well as reliving their personal experiences of being bullied, celebrities will give their advice and raise awareness of the need for Anti-Bullying Ambassadors in every school. The Diana Award is also providing #Back2School advice and support online and through their social media channels.

Jimmy Wong – Actor + Musician

James “Jimmy” Wong, is an American actor and musician best known for his 2011 music video, “Ching Chong: Asians in the Library Song” and for his role as Ted in the web series Video Game High School. His newest project with Disney XD, Polaris Primetime will debut July 2017.

 

Wong garnered national news coverage in March 2011, when he uploaded his music video, “Ching Chong: Asians in the Library Song” to YouTube. He created the video as a response to a UCLA student’s vlog rant against Asian students using mobile phones in the UCLA library, one which MSNBC qualified as “offensive.” NPR suggested that Wong’s video response was one that “effectively turned the tables on the original rant,” offering an alternative method of defense against cyberbullying. Wong later said in an MSNBC interview that while he was initially frustrated by the video rant, he realized that humor offered a better response, as he hoped to “put a positive spin on all of it.” The video has seen a resurgence due to the current political climate. Wong is very passionate about social issues and politics and is something that drives him to create every day. He aims to create justice for all and especially for representation in Hollywood as an Asian American.

 

Prior to releasing the video, Wong began spearheading the YouTube world, collaborating with other largescale YouTubers, including the very successful Joey Graceffa. This period proved to be invaluable. At the end of 2010, the web series Feast of Fiction was born, a cooking show dedicated to making food from movies, TV shows, cartoons, video games, and other fictional properties. The show kicked off strongly with the first video passing the 100,000-subscriber mark almost immediately. Due to it’s success, media company Tastemade partnered with the successful web series which allowed for guests like Grace Helbig, Hannah Hart, Anthony Padilla from Smosh, and Rosanna Pansino from Nerdy Nummies.

 

In 2016 Wong was asked to host the pilot for a gaming show, Polaris Primetime, on Disney XD. Disney XD is creating a new channel  block, similar to Adult Swim or Teen Nick, called Disney XP that will air this show and others like it exclusively daily from 9PM to 3AM. Polaris Primetime is a gaming variety show with guests from all across the YouTube and TV world. Special guests that have already been on the show include Nolan Gould (Modern Family) and Marcus Scribner (Blackish).

 Twitter.com/jfwong