Posts tagged with "lyrics"

ANUEL RELEASES BROTHER SONG INSIDE 360 MAGAZINE

Anuel AA – Brother

Anuel releases new single and music video Brother. The artist breaks down musical barriers and experiments with different sounds.

Anuel, one of the great leaders of Latin music, releases his new single Brother a song that promises to surprise the urban genre industry with its masterful fusion of Spanish, Trap, and alternative music. The song and its music video are now available on all digital platforms.

Anuel is an integral artist, composer, and successful businessman who is unquestionably one of the great references to Latin music. The singer, who has long been associated with the urban genre, now presents a new theme that combines Latin Trap, alternative music, and R&B sounds. This innovative rhythm fusion featured production from Hydemiyabi, Dim Cruz, and EQ, as well as lyrics about personal and emotional empowerment.

“Brother” debuts with its official music video, which was shot in the historic city of Madrid, Spain, by Conteni2 Media Group and directed by Anuel himself in collaboration with Tru Views.

“I am very happy with the outcome of this video; it is exciting to work as a director on my own music videos.” “I hope my fans enjoy this production and listen to this rhythm fusion that combines the best of two worlds,” Anuel said.

In addition to representing the lifestyle of a music star like Anuel, the audiovisual piece is full of bright colors, gold, European architecture, and a lot of “bling bling.”

Anuel AA – Brother (Video Oficial)

Anuel × Reebok Collaboration HERE

Natalie Jane "Mentally Cheating" single cover art via UMusic for use by 360 Magazine

Natalie Jane – Mentally Cheating

Today, rising 18-year-old pop star Natalie Jane releases her hotly anticipated new single, Mentally Cheating.” Listen HERE via Capitol Records and 10K Projects.

The hugely relatable anthem, which finds the newcomer grappling with temptation, is already a phenomenon on TikTok via multiple teasers, resulting in more than 6M likes, 115K pre-saves, and 25K shares.

A piano-driven vocal and songwriting showcase for “Mentally Cheating” is about the beginning of the end of a relationship. “I think I shouldnt be looking in those eyes, why do they give me butterflies?” the New Jersey teenager ponders over striking chords. On the chorus, which has resonated with listeners across social media platforms, she admits that somebody else has caught her attention, “I think Im mentally cheating.”

“Mentally Cheating”follows a series of hit independent releases from Natalie that includes Kind of Love(7M+ Spotify streams), Bloodline,” and Red Flag.” Those songs established the breakout star’s knack for brutally honest, unfiltered lyrics and irresistible pop hooks. It’s a skill set she has acquired through years of experience.

Most recently, the talented singer/songwriter has built momentum by focusing on authentically engaging with fans on social media. Natalie is particularly active on TikTok, where her raw, heartfelt original songs and stunning cover versions have earned her more than 1.5M followers and over 40M likes. With “Mentally Cheating,”she is destined to expand her audience even further, taking another step towards seemingly inevitable pop stardom.

ABOUT NATALIE JANE:

Natalie Jane has always been passionate about music. At just 18 years old, she has already created a distinct sound for herself characterized by bold, fearless lyrics that express the pain of heartbreak and the frustrating search for meaning in an increasingly overindulgent world. Natalie’s dedication to music and a desire to hone her craft has taken her from her early childhood singing and songwriting, all while following her passion for transforming abstract concepts into music giving a voice to those almost indescribable moments. She has graced fans’ screens all over the TikTok FYP, reaching over 1.5M followers on the app and achieving over 40M likes across her videos. From covers to her original songs, Natalie Jane’s vocal versatility and emotional vulnerability shines through, creating a musical narrative to universal experiences.

Bahari group photo via Epic Records Publicity for use by 360 MAGAZINE

BAHARI – “Way of Love” Music Video

Iconic pop duo Bahari released the music video for their coveted single “Ways of Love,” and you’ll want to take a look. The steamy video can be viewed HERE.

The compassionate lyrics captivate all audiences, “You give me these feelings, I don’t understand, Take control of my body, I’m in your hands.”

“‘Ways of Love’ is about that moment and feeling right before you finally give in to falling in love with someone. It’s about that decision to trust someone with your heart and to learn the way that they love,” says Bahari considering the message behind the single.

You can stream “Ways of LoveHERE.

Bahari

A match made in heaven, this alt-pop woman duo consists of singer/keyboarder Ruby Carr and singer/bassist Natalia Panzarella. The two artists came together by random chance one day when they were both at the same songwriting session. They knew they stuck gold from that moment and continued to generate music together.

Their first and perhaps most noteworthy hit came in 2014 with “Wild Ones,” accumulating a total of over 40 million Spotify streams. They continued with their successes in 2016 with the release of their EP Dancing on the Sun and singles “Get Together” and “Fucked Up.” They even hit the stage on tours with Selena Gomez and Birdy and joined forces with Zedd, ILLENIUM and Grey on collabs.

Bahari produced another newsy hit in 2018 with “Savage,” which was later revamped into a remix in 2020 featuring BIA. “Savage” amasses over 100 million streams/views and now serves as promo content for “American Horror Stories.” In 2021, the duo’s “CRASHING” in cooperation with ILLENIUM joined the To All The Boys: P.S. I Still Love You Original Soundtrack. Follow along as Bahari takes on 2022 with more electrifying projects to come.

Paul Thom (Cash Money Records) for use by 360 Magazine

YoungBoy & Birdman × From The Bayou

December 10, 2021, YoungBoy and Birdman released their joint mixtape, From The Bayou. Listen HERE.

Both popular rap stars came together and created ten new tracks together. Their music, together, fuses “magnetically melodic hooks with diamond-encrusted lyrical flexes.” From The Bayou joins together contrasting eras and fashions of Louisiana rap with two of the most prominent and influential to come out of the state on one jointed project.

The tape starts off with “100 Rounds,” and then moves to Birdman handing off to YoungBoy on “Young Stunna,” and the tape finishes on the Southern rap masterclass that is “How Ya Kno.”

From The Bayou Track List

  1. 100 Rounds
  2. We Ride
  3. Choppa Boy
  4. Open Arms
  5. Alligator Walk
  6. The Bigger End
  7. Young Stunna
  8. Safe Than Sorry
  9. Heart & Soul
  10. How Ya Kno
  11. Achievements
  12. Black Ball
  13. Stuck With Me
Mike Mattison via Kailey Wolcott for use by 360 Magazine

POETIC SONG VERSE: Blues Based Popular Music and Poetry

While accepting the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016, Bob Dylan quoted The Odyssey: “Sing in me, muse, and through me tell the story.” In their new book, POETIC SONG VERSE: Blues Based Popular Music and Poetry (University Press of Mississippi, November 9, 2021), renowned musician Mike Mattison and literary historian and beloved Catholic University professor Ernest Suarez offer an enlightening look at the artform that artists like Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, Gil Scott-Heron, Lucinda Williams and others used to tell their stories. Mattison and Suarez lay out the contours of what they see as a unique literary genre they dub ‘poetic song verse.’ This form was inspired by blues music and poetry, nurtured in the beat coffee houses of the 50’s and 60’s, and fully bloomed as it cross-pollinated with rock and roll. It goes far beyond the borders of popular entertainment, using voice, instrumentation, arrangement, and production to highlight evocative lyrics that resemble poetry. 

Synthesizing a wide range of writing and thinking, as well as their own experiences, (Mattison is a vocalist and songwriter for the Grammy-Award-winning Tedeschi Trucks Band; he wrote hits like “Midnight in Harlem,” “Bound for Glory”), the authors train a powerful lens on some of the most well-known songs of the 20th and 21st centuries. By demonstrating how the blues and poetry came together to birth a whole new genre of artistic expression, they shift the thinking on how we categorize lyrics—as literature, as music, or as a combined, innovative, new art form.

Q&A W/ Mike Mattison × Ernest Suarez 

What is poetic song verse, and how has studying and writing about it changed your appreciation of the artists who practice it?

We use the term “poetic” to describe lyrics that have literary intent and that consciously strive for aesthetic impact: linguistically rich compositions that operate on many levels simultaneously, incorporating image, metaphor, narrative, and play in ways that often deliberately correlate to broader cultural conversations. We’re talking about lyrics that seek to transcend the grasp-and-release mechanism of pure entertainment, lyrics that prick our curiosity and invite repeated visits and renewed scrutiny. Poetic song verse isn’t poetry set to music, like the Beats’ poetry with jazz accompaniment, but it sometimes takes a hybrid form in recordings like Gil Scott-Heron’s or Leonard Cohen’s. The distinction we draw rests on the symbiotic relationship that most often occurs when potent lyrics and sonics are developed together. By “sonics” we mean every aural dimension of song, including voice, instrumentation, arrangement, and production. In poetic song verse, sonics combine with verbal techniques often associated with poetry—imagery, line breaks, wordplay, point of view, character, story, tone, and other qualities—to create a semantically and emotionally textured dynamic.

The book argues that artists like Dylan, Joni Mitchell, and Jimi Hendrix were transformative in the development of poetic song verse, but there were allusions and poetic phrasing in lyrics long before them. What did they do that wasn’t being done previously?

Songs from many periods and in different styles contain compelling verse, but in the late fifties and the sixties blues-based popular music and the new American poetry—especially the work of the Beats—came into close contact, resulting in a concentration of songwriters who transformed songwriting from entertainment to art-that-entertains. 

Poetic song verse sprung from a confluence of the blues and contemporary poetry.  Both forms emphasize the sound of the human voice.  Poetry’s turn toward more accessible language and the blues’ origins in the sound of the human voice helped rock absorb poetic language and techniques, and provided a catalyst for Dylan and others to change rock into a more lyrically and sonically sophisticated art form. Think about it this way: If you were a reasonably intellectual young musician who had been turned on to the blues, traditional metrical verse, or high modernist poetry such as T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, this might provide an idea of how to use allusions in a song, or provide strategies for intermingling certain types of imagery (as in some of Dylan’s, Van Morrison’s, and Joni Mitchell’s verse). But the language in most traditional and modern poetry tends to be very different from the type of language that characterizes blues-based popular music. However, when that same blues-enthralled young musician heard Howlin’ Wolf or Willie Dixon and read and heard Beat and other contemporary poets, he or she was exposed to rich, sophisticated language based on rhythms of speech (i.e., material that could serve as a powerful source for lyrics). With different twists and turns this essentially was the case for Dylan, Mick Jagger, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Jim Morrison, and many others.  By examining the confluence of blues and poetry in various artists’ work, and by considering the creative practices of various seminal artists and the cultural conditions and landscapes in which they worked, we identify a relatively specific subgenre of song that’s also a form of literature.

What role did the coffee houses of the 50’s play in creating this genre? What does instrumentation add to the artform?

In the late fifties and the sixties Beat coffee houses, bookstores, and nightclubs sprang up across the United States and spread to Western Europe. Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Van Morrison, Jim Morrison, Joni Mitchell, David Crosby, Neil Young, Stephen Stills, and others embraced the blues and Beat coffeehouse culture, where they encountered contemporary poetry, rural blues, and folk music.  After putting rock ’n’ roll of their youth aside for a handful of years, many sixties songwriters returned to the rebellious rhythms of fifties rock ’n’ roll and wedded it with verse inspired by contemporary poetry. In the mid-sixties Dylan’s rock ’n’ roll–Beat poet persona strengthened his already active sense of the possibilities between poetry and music and led to Bringing It All Back Home (1965), Highway 61 Revisited (1965), and Blonde on Blonde (1966), albums that ignited an explosion of poetic song verse. Instead of portraying themselves as the descendants of Woody Guthrie, Bukka White, and Pete Seeger, artists returned to the theatrics of Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Jerry Lee Lewis but retained the cerebral, self-consciously artistic emphasis that characterized songs and poetry in Beat coffeehouses. This combination released Dylan and others from songwriting conventions that ranged from the length of individual songs to how albums were conceptualized, recorded, and produced. In essence, the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, the Doors, the Who, Jimi Hendrix, the Kinks, and others followed Dylan’s lead and expanded fifties rock ’n’ rollers’ sounds and emphasis on performance, assuming often extravagant yet artistically resonant personae that resulted in songs and albums replete with ambitious wordplay and sonic arrangements.

Is poetic song verse a uniquely American invention? How did America’s history of slavery, Jim Crow, war, and sexism affect its creation?

Poetic song verse sprung from a confluence of the blues—a quintessential American art form—and various types of contemporary poetry that developed in the United States.  That said, artists around the world quickly started to write songs in this mode, largely due to blues artists’ popularity in England and other countries, and to Dylan’s influence on the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and others.

The history of slavery had a profound influence on the blues, which grew out of nineteenth-century spirituals and work songs, much like those styles grew out of various African musical traditions.  Nineteenth century work songs and blues songs written during the era of Jim Crow often contained “coded” lyrics that indirectly commented on topics that would have raised the ire of their oppressors.  This practice melded with techniques employed by contemporary poets in the work of songwriters from Dylan to Joni Mitchell to Marvin Gaye to Bruce Springsteen to Grandmaster Flash to Lucinda Williams.

The War in Vietnam also had a strong influence on many songwriters.  They often combined surrealistic imagery that they encountered in contemporary poetry with imagery from various African and Western metaphysical traditions.  This combination led to songs like the Stones’s “Gimme Shelter.”

What artists do you see as the contemporary and future upholders of this new tradition? 

Lucinda Williams, Steve Earle, Kendrick Lamar, Norah Jones, Dave Grohl, Fiona Apple, Lorde, Aimee Mann, Fantastic Negrito, Josh Ritter, Lyle Lovett, Luther Dickinson, Jason Isbell.

Elena Brody "Rock Steady" image via Jon Bleicher for use by 360 Magazine

Elana Brody Q×A

By: Emily Bunn

Celebrating the beauty of human experience and the universality of dance, Elana Brody enchants fans with her exhilarating dance-pop music. Her most recent single, “Rock Steady,” showcases the singer’s joyous choreography and passionate songwriting ability. The “Rock Steady” music video can be viewed HERE. The bold, emotional ballad was produced by Max Martin protégé, Dominic Fallacaro. Brody spoke with 360 Magazine about the spirituality that courses through her songs, her music production process, and upcoming releases.

Your recent material was written during the pandemic. How did you manage to find inspiration during lockdown?

As a songwriter, lockdown – with all its grief and deep, life-changing themes- was a very fertile time for me. For one, I retreated from NYC to my childhood homestead in Virginia – in one of the most remote places East of the Mississippi. While there in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, with the music world at a stand-still, I found myself with very little to do but be in nature and play music. My then-partner had come with me, and we spent much of our time playing music together. I also felt called to offer musical prayer services online for those who needed inspiration and connection to Spirit. Because of this, I began by writing new prayer music – which felt right for the time. But, after my partner decided to split with me, as you can imagine – the folk songs started pouring out. This break-up, combined with being my original creative habitat, the pandemic, the Black Lives Matter uprising, the political election-year insanity, and a life far from community, took me the deepest I’ve been in my writing for a long time – especially as a lyricist. I think some of the lyrics you will hear on my upcoming EP are possibly my best yet.

What does your songwriting process look like?

It depends on the song. Sometimes snippets of lyrics, with a bit of their melody, come first. Sometimes a really awesome piano hook comes first. Over the last many years, I have found my songwriting process to be mostly a long-winded jam session where I sing out my heart for hours, creating spontaneous free-style lyrics. Many of those lyrics disappear forever, but at least a few of them make the cut! Once I get a sense of the general narrative of the song, I think about phrases that will help move the story along, and then build new lyrics around the original “spontaneous-gems” to flesh it out. Over the pandemic, lyrics were everything – and I found myself caring more about them than the music. The music could have been 3 chords, and I’d be totally okay with that, as long as the lyrics were telling the story. But, in other phases of my life as a writer, I would basically compose a piano concerto! And then, lyrics come in afterwards. I love and live music. And honestly, I don’t have to work hard to have music flow through me. I have found the best music and lyrics that I have written, have written themselves. It’s actually that simple. “Rock Steady” was a bit like that.

Are you still looking to release your EP eventually, or have you decided to shelve it in favor of tracks like “Rock Steady”?

Yes, to the EP! If all works out with piecing it together (because it was recorded in many different settings over the pandemic) then I would really like to release it in the late fall. But! Because “Rock Steady” is such a banger and I want to make more songs like that, I decided to quickly write and record a new song called “Quicksand,” which is another pop-influenced song, to release as a follow up – before I transition into my folk music.

Why did you choose Costa Rica as the location for the “Rock Steady” music video?

It chose me! My friend lives there and she invited me to come out to visit. I said I would, but under the one condition – that we film a music video! She is a great networker and knows so many people to reach out to and work with. She also happens to be an ecstatic dance facilitator and DJ and was planning a dance on the weekend of my visit. So, naturally, we organized to film the dance party at an already scheduled and high-vibe (to use a very Costa Rican term) dance party! It couldn’t have been more perfect. We also did all our beach filming at a beach called Roca Beach – aka Rock (Steady) beach!

How does your spirituality factor into the way you create music?

Once, after I auditioned for the first season of USA’s XFactor, I left the stage (a story for another time!) and was interviewed by a faceless producer speaking to me from behind a black curtain. This producer asked me, “When you sing, it seems as if you are connecting to some higher power. Is this true for you? And what is that higher power?” At the time, I wouldn’t have considered myself a prayer-leader or religious at all, but I knew the answer to that right away. I said, “Yes. God.”

God can bring up a lot for people. And for me too. Growing up in rural Virginia, the idea of “God” sometimes felt like some kind of angry, repressive, overpowering righteousness. But – in my family – and in my own experience – God was gentler than that. The spirit between things. As a youth, I was surrounded by the most beautiful, untouched nature – and witness to the seasons in their full force. With below-zero cold and windy winters, slow-to-pop springs, abundant green summers with my folks’ organic gardens in full bloom, and then the rainbows of colorful Appalachian autumns – I knew what Spirit had to offer us humans. And music had always been my human way to offer Spirit back to Spirit, if that makes sense. It’s a giving and receiving from the big, wild wonders of creation, and then music is my way to return it back. Now that I have dived into my Jewish roots, and studied the traditions, I would say that song is the modern equivalent of sending burnt offerings up to the Creator. Instead of smoke, we let our voices rise. And I don’t see prayer music and pop music as all that different. Different themes, different stories, but ultimately, what we sing or speak is all prayer. And, especially now that I am very involved in prayer-leadership, as I create more songs, I do think about that in my writing.

What do you anticipate the reaction to “Rock Steady” will be like?

A fun one! Hopefully one that makes people dance and dance some more! Because I haven’t released much of my other music yet on the bigger platforms, most people won’t know the difference. Like, how did that happen? All of a sudden, I’m a pop star! The truth is, I’ve always been a pop star. Christina Aguilera and Celine Dion were my first vocal idols, and all of the first music I ever wrote sounded like it could have been in a Disney Channel original movie. Anyhow, I had this thought that I should go about my career in the opposite way of other folk artists, a la Jewel circa “Intuition,” and drop in with the fun and danceable stuff first. I don’t see myself ever being too genre-confined, anyway. Life is too short not to write whatever you feel and whatever is coming through you! I did think, “oh, maybe I should sell this song to Rhianna or another artist who could do it amazingly.” But honestly, this route of self-producing is very fun, and maybe even better. Now I get to be heard singing like a pop star too!

What other artists, musicians, or bands serve as inspirations for your music?

It’s a long list…

Joni Mitchell is my in-utero and post-utero,songwriting teacher. I used to call her my piano teacher, because I learned to play by playing so many of her songs. Several other musicians of my parents’ 60s/70s era also come in close as primary inspirations – including Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, Carole King, and the Beatles. They have shaped what a well-written song could be for me.

It’s hard to decipher what is an influence now because it’s just one big, long-cooked stew or spicy mole at this point.

I have always liked lyric-forward music, with bands like Of Montreal (his candidness in writing was life-changing for me!) and Death Cab for Cutie (the simple metaphors and speaking-style of his writing) and the Decemberists (storytelling, bard-like songs.) And the orchestral and lyrical artistry of the Fleet Foxes is stellar.

I have also always liked some good classic, chunky, Rock’n’roll and music that gets ya’ dancing, like Led Zeppelin and CCR. And the blues, especially blues piano music, has played a role in my music education since early childhood.

Then, there’s the eternal list of female influences. My most listened to, other than Joni, from the beginning are Ani DiFranco and Sarah McLachlan. Then: Jesca Hoop, My Brightest Diamond, Regina Spektor and Kate Bush. And now: artists like Gillian Welch, Brandi Carlile, Sylvan Esso, and Sarah Jarosz have taken up a lot of my listening time. Sarah Jarosz’s album World on the Ground was really powerful to listen to last year during the pandemic. I hope that I can achieve that level of presence and intelligence in the instrumentation when I go to make my full-length album next year!

I also derive a LOT of influence from pop music. I can’t help it. I definitely fell in love with Ariana Grande’s album positions this year, and right now I am going down a Dua Lipa rabbit hole. I would say Rhianna is my number one, though. And I finally fell in love with Lady Gaga after seeing A Star is Born and listening to Joanne. Her belt has inspired me a lot. And I love vocalists in general. I have spent a lot of time really listening to vocalists like Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Judy Collins, Barbra Streisand. These days, Elvis is my number one!

I will also never not want to listen to albums of bands like Nickel Creek, the [Dixie] Chicks, Bela Fleck, Mandolin Orange/Watchhouse, or the band Solas, to bring me the feeling of my early mountain roots and make me feel good.

I am truly a world music fan. I love to listen to the magic of music across the world. I am really inspired to hear virtuosity, no matter what genre. I love vocal virtuosos and am listening right now to the artist Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. I am curious as to when I’ll be able to imitate him. (I’m really good at imitating!) Bobby McFerrin has also been a teacher in real life. He inspires me to become more accurate in my improvisations.

I also listen to prayer music, but mostly of the Sikh or Kundalini yoga genre. Sometimes you’ll find me jamming out to Jewish artists (many of them friends of mine) or Gospel music. Anita Wilson, a modern gospel singer, has been a vocal inspiration for me because she really sings with the lows of her range.

Musical theater music is also a major influence. That Roger and Hammerstein stuff pours out of me like it were an extension of my soul! Lastly, at this point, after spending time at Berklee College of Music, I have been greatly inspired by jazz and R&B.

Besides “Rock Steady” and the EP, can fans look forward to any other releases to come in 2021-2022?

Yes! I mentioned that I am wanting to get cracking on my full-length album that will be mostly in the Americana, New Orleans blues, Rock-and-Roll, and folk pop styles. I am really, really excited about it. But I’m not sure yet who I will work with on it. An exciting unknown. I imagine it will end up feeling like a magnum opus when it is finished because I’ve been with these songs for so long. Nothing will be more amazing than when they are out in the world surrounded by strings, the right instrumentation and arrangements. I also would like to produce my song “City of Man” in a big vaudevillian, brassy style. [I want to] make a little music-video theater piece out of it. I have also been sitting on this one for a long time. It sort of harkens to the fall of capitalism…that is going on in our world and the post-Trump era– it’s due time that I get that one out. Look out for it all!

AViVA “Melancholy” image shot by Matais C from Lisa DiAngelo at Capitol Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

AViVA – MELANCHOLY

AViVA PREMIERES NEW SINGLE “MELANCHOLY” LISTEN HERE 

WATCH THE OFFICIAL VIDEO FOR “MELANCHOLY” HERE

AUSTRALIAN ARTIST’S DEBUT NOVEL SELF/LESS DUE OUT 9/28

Today, Australia-born artist AViVA makes her Capitol Records debut with ”Melancholy” : a new single and video spotlighting her immersive and electrifying brand of alt-pop. An unfiltered look at the downward pull of depression, “Melancholy” also showcases the uncompromising originality that’s earned AViVA a passionate global following in recent years. Go HERE to download/stream “Melancholy,” and check out the video HERE.

With its moody backdrop of minimalist beats, “Melancholy” sets its emotionally vivid lyrics to an infectious sing-song melody (“One, two, three, four/Vicious, knocking at my door/Seven, eight, nine, ten/Burn the candle at both ends”). Throughout the track, AViVA delivers a captivating vocal performance, flaunting her effortless flow and fierce yet vulnerable presence. 360 Magazine loves AViVA’s vibrant energy and passionate lyricism.

On the single, AViVA says, “Seemingly cheerful and upbeat from the outside, it doesn’t matter what makes you feel that way, sometimes feeling down is the only way you can feel, but the power of the last line ‘it will never be the same’ is where the core message of the song lies. Even though after negative experiences things often aren’t the same, we are always free to learn and grow from our experiences. Feeling melancholy, like so many feelings, is just a temporary state. Things will, as they always do, get better.”

The video for “Melancholy,” co-directed by AViVA and long-time collaborator Jeffeton James, amplifies the song’s raw and powerful intimacy. To that end, the wildly colorful visual places AViVA in a series of isolated situations: lying in a hospital bed, trapped behind a school desk, singing to her own reflection inside the room of an abandoned and decaying home. As the song unfolds, the 27-year-old artist reveals her unapologetically punk spirit, inhabiting each frame with a feverish intensity.

A multidisciplinary artist, AViVA will release her debut novel SELF/LESS via Macmillan on September 28. Set in a dystopian society in which all forms of self-expression and creativity are outlawed, the book follows its 17-year-old protagonist Teddy as she rebels against her upbringing and discovers a secret world beneath the walled-in city where she was raised. According to AViVA, SELF/LESS fulfills a longtime mission of creating her own distinct multiverse that seamlessly merges music and literature.

*Photo Credit: Matais C

AViVA “Melancholy” image shot by Matais C from Lisa DiAngelo at Capitol Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

BTR illustration by Alex Bodgan for use by 360 Magazine

Big Time Rush’s Big Time Reunion

By: Ally Brewster

Big Time Rush is an American boyband that got its start on Nickelodeon from 2009-2013. The band is comprised of Kendall Schmidt, James Maslow, Logan Henderson, and Carlos PenaVega. The Big Time Rush show followed “4 hockey players from Minnesota that get the opportunity of a lifetime.” The show was an instant hit among children, garnering a cult-like following from the young audience. The success lead to the four seasons of the show, three albums and the band going on worldwide tours, breaking out of that “Disney/Nickelodeon children’s television band” trope that many children-show artists get stuck in.

Since 2013, the band-members parted ways, each going onto their respective solo careers. Kendall has a band named Heffron Drive with bandmate Dustin Belt that he released the album Happy Mistakes with in 2014, as well as singles after that. James has been modeling and has released singes such as “Love U Sober” and “Falling.” Logan has had a solo career in music, releasing two studio album Echoes of Departure and the Endless Street of Dreams – Pt. 1 and Pt. 2, as well as a number of singles. Carlos has had a successful acting career, being a voice actor on Nickelodeon’s The Loud House and in Hallmark’s Picture Perfect Mysteries series.

As the bandmates went their separate ways into their successful careers, they still were friends; as shown by their countless Instagram posts of them hanging out and singing together over the years, warming the hearts of fans worldwide and creating a glimmer of hope that one day they could all find their way back together.

In 2021, twelve years later after their premiere, the band still has die-hard fans, now all grown up and keeping the band relevant years after their Nickelodeon departure. Their song “Big Time Rush” became a trending sound on TikTok at the beginning of 2020. Stephen Kramer Glickman, who played Gustavo Rocque their songwriter on the show, sold handwritten Big Time Rush song lyrics in June 2021, posting on his TikTok how much he loves interacting with the Big Time Rush fans. People have been asking and hoping for new music, a tour, a movie, for them to reunite one last time, and it looks like fans have had their wish come true.

At the beginning of 2020 the Big Time Rush Instagram became active for the first time in years. Fans went crazy over it. Does this mean they’re reuniting? Are they getting a reboot show like other beloved 2000s children shows such as iCarly and That’s So Raven? The question never was truly answered as the pandemic came in full force, halting any plans if there were any.

With the revival of the Instagram, the band-members reunited for a quick reunion video, to talk about what’s going on, something that many celebrities did as a way to give to the fans during the uncertain and scary times. Fans couldn’t contain their excitement as everyone thought that the video meant they were reuniting, especially once Carlos said the phrase, “and who knows, a lot to look forward to at the end of this.” Fans took this as a hint that something big was going to happen with them. Perhaps a new album or tour? The answer remained a mystery as the band posted throwbacks and shared what each member was doing throughout the pandemic, never even acknowledging the questions that filled their comment section.

Finally, in July 2021, fans got their answers. The Big Time Rush Instagram was wiped, no posts public. The profile picture was turned to red, as were the members of the band and Stephen Kramer Glickman. Fans went wild. They knew what this meant. The color profile picture and wiped social media, a classic marketing tactic of musicians in the digital age: rebrand yourself for what’s next; get people talking about what it means.

And their fan’s intuition proved correct, as on July 19, 2021, the band made a Big Time Announcement: they’re reuniting for two live performances, one in New York City, the other in Chicago. The announcement was filled with a bunch of inside jokes from the television show, from the voiceover, Kendall by his name on the tv show, to calling James “bandana man,” asking Carlos where his helmet was, referencing Logan’s PhD seeking character from the show, and declaring that they are going to once again “live it Big Time.”

Tour Dates

Dec. 15, 2021 – Chicago, IL – The Chicago Theatre

Dec. 18, 2021 – New York, NY – Manhattan Center Hammerstein Ballroom

Tickets

Sign-up for pre-sale ticket access here.

Pre-sale tickets go on sale Wednesday, July 21st at 10:00 AM local time.

Tickets go on sale Friday, July 23rd at 10:00AM local time.

The Big Time Rush tv show and the Big Time Movie can be watched on Netflix.

Image courtesy of The Oriel Company for use by 360 Magazine

Jimmy Jam × Terry Lewis × Mariah Carey – Somewhat Loved

THE ROOT PREMIERES LYRIC VIDEO FOR JIMMY JAM & TERRY LEWIS’ NEWEST SINGLE Somewhat Loved (There You Go Breakin’ My Heart) with MARIAH CAREY, DEBUT ALBUM JAM & LEWIS VOLUME ONE PRE-ORDER NOW AVAILABLE SET FOR RELEASE JULY 9th

The Grammy-Award winning production duo recently turned artists, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis have debuted their latest single Somewhat Loved (There You Go Breakin’ My Heart) with Mariah Carey TODAY. Check out The Root’s lyric video premiere of Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis x Mariah Carey’s Somewhat Loved (There You Go Breakin’ My Heart) HERE. Experience Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis like Never Before on their Debut Album Jam & Lewis Volume One set for release July 9th. Pre-order the album HERE.

Click HERE to listen to Somewhat Loved (There You Go Breakin’ My Heart)

Click HERE to watch the Somewhat Loved (There You Go Breakin’ My Heart) lyric video

For Somewhat Loved (There You Go Breakin My Heart) Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis team up with the multi-platinum, multiple Grammy award winning, New York Times #1 Best Selling author and global superstar Mariah Carey. The track continues a long history of collaboration between the producers and Carey, which includes the Billboard Hot 100 #1 smash Thank God I Found You. Together, they deliver another anthem punctuated by Carey’s legendary soaring vocals and the pair’s inimitable musicality.

Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis have had an unprecedented career as producers, with five GRAMMY Awards, over 100 Platinum certifications, and 16 Billboard Hot 100 Number Ones. They’ve worked with legendary artists including Elton John, Lionel Richie, and Patti LaBelle, composed music for TBS and TNT networks’ NBA basketball broadcasts, as well as the theme to the opening ceremonies of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. The duo has been inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame, received an NAACP Image Award, star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame and were recently nominated for a Primetime EMMY Award in Outstanding Music Direction.

Follow Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis via their Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and TikTok.

SLEEPY HALLOW DEBUT ALBUM - STILL SLEEP? illustration by Nick Baran from RCA Records for use by 360 Magazine

SLEEPY HALLOW DEBUT ALBUM – STILL SLEEP?

Today, Winners Circle’s Sleepy Hallow drops his debut album Still Sleep? via Winners Circle Entertainment/RCA Records. Producer Great John lays down the foundation on the 14 tracks, while Sleepy’s hard-hitting lyrics takes center stage. Click here to listen.

Still Sleep? Track list:

  1. Basketball Dreams (Intro)
  2. 2 Sauce
  3. 4or Daze
  4. 2055
  5. Make You (Snake Proof)
  6. Equal
  7. Scrub
  8. Sleepy Freestyle
  9. Chicken
  10. Mi No Sabe
  11. 1999
  12. Murda She Wrote (Outro)
  13. Lowkey
  14. Tip Toe

Hailing from East Flatbush, Brooklyn and one of the breakout stars of the Brooklyn Drill hip-hop scene, Sleepy Hallow came to prominence in 2020 with the RIAA Gold-certified hit “Deep End Freestyle” which featured vocals by Fousheé. Recently selected as one of HipHopDX Rising Stars 2021 and BET Amplified Artist of the Month (January), Hallow’s impressive repertoire of EPs – Sleepy Hallow Presents: Sleepy For President, The Black House, Don’t Sleep – has earned him coveted “best of” lists recognition from XXL, Complex, UpRoxx and more.

ABOUT WINNERS CIRCLE ENTERTAINMENT

Incorporated in 2019, Winners Circle Entertainment includes label co-owners Sheff G and Sleepy Hallow, Eli Fross and producer Great John, who handles a majority of the label’s music production. Co-owned and operated by a solid management conglomerate which is made up of Jeremy “Jerm” Soto and Karel “White” Jorge.

STILL SLEEP? ALBUM LINK

Cover Artwork Created by Nick Baran