Posts tagged with "Bob Dylan"

Sheri Miller for use by 360 Magazine

INTERVIEW WITH SHERI MILLER

Singer-songwriter Sheri Miller releases her new single “Born To Love,” a tender, instant classic from her 6-song collection, Waking Up To This Miracle Life, out November 19. Recorded with GRAMMY-winning producer Jeff Bova, Miller’s timeless collection is at once ecstatic and incisive, brimming with joy even as it reckons with struggle and heartache.

The songs here are radical acts of self-love and empowerment fueled by raw emotion and explosive energy, and Miller’s mesmerizing performances are utterly transcendent to match, her voice shifting from hushed intimacy to soaring grandeur with the preternatural ease of Ann Wilson or Brandi Carlile. Add it all up and you’ve got a rich, cinematic masterpiece about embracing the beauty and magic of being alive, a celebratory ode to love itself from an artist who passionately lives to create. I got the opportunity to speak with Sheri Miller about her upcoming EP.

  1. What inspired this album?

When writing this record, ‘Waking Up To This Miracle Life,’ I felt inspired how it’s a miracle to be alive; especially at this time. To wake up every morning with a heart beating of its own independent accord, lungs breathing oxygen without us turning on a power switch, seeing beautiful blue skies with our open eyes, smelling delicious fragrances of trees, roses, jasmine, freshly-baked soft chocolate chip cookies, hearing glorious notes resounding from orchestras, brass bands or finely crafted pianos, guitars, drums, listening to golden-throated voices, touching luxurious silk fabrics, and feeling magnificent emotions of love, appreciation, happiness, fun, exhilaration!

How being alive in our physical bodies is such a gift; what an extraordinary miracle we have our genius cells working symbiotically in mysterious harmony. Though I don’t understand electricity or the miracle of being born, I’m glad to be here! This record celebrates life passionately. Especially after pandemic, it feels so good to focus on the magnificence of being alive. We did it! We made it. How blessed and lucky we are. No matter what struggles you’ve gone through (we all have), there’s always hope, fun, and even joy waiting closely; You’re never alone. If you believe in yourself, trusting there’s unseen help available to us- closed doors open, our timing gets good, and avalanches of beautiful opportunities flow like rivers into our experience. Your tiny extra bit of optimism cracks the door open to success, love, and more of your dreams realized. I choose to keep waking up to this miracle life.

  1. When did you start making music?

I started making music at eight, taking classical piano lessons with a strict teacher. My free, wild, creative spirit rebelled against the boring confines of practicing already written music, when I wanted to compose and paint new melodies, paired with new words and lyrics, creating new musical paintings. So, I spent much of my practice time composing dozens of new songs, pouring out complete melodies, lyrics, chords. Anthems about rocking the nation, songs about eternal, everlasting, pure love and world peace, love songs to my mother, and “The Lost Tribe,” a song about a wandering tribe in the desert, buffalo and surviving. I still have these handwritten 8-year-old songbooks, and I’ve written hundreds of songs since age 8. I consider myself a ‘music lifer,’ writing songs and performing for the sheer feeling of joy and pleasure; as I evolve as a human, so does my music, songs, and art. I am my best masterpiece.

  1. Who are your musical inspirations? 

My musical inspirations started with my mom, who’s a magnificent opera singer, classical pianist, composer, and storyteller. I love the Beatles, Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Joni Mitchell, Ray Charles, Etta James, Ella Fitzgerald, Stevie Wonder, Carole King, Paul Simon, Rodger & Hart, Duke Ellington, Beach Boys, Rickie Lee Jones, Bob Dylan, Coldplay, Mozart, Tchaichovsky, Piazolla, Alicia Keys, India.Arie, Prince, Queen, Freddy Mercury, Tom Petty, Bob Marley, James Brown, Gershwins, Rumi, and brilliant musicians I work with Jeff Bova, Kate Baker, Will Lee, Tim Pierce, Chris Lord-Alge, Frank Filipetti, Joe Zook, Dave Eggar, Paul Shaffer, Steve Cropper. There are endless musicians who inspire me, flowing through every time I create. I appreciate all who’ve come before, paving this golden trail of delights.

  1. Did any of these musical influences specifically inspire this album?

Writing “Gold Hearted Man” on my big acoustic-electric 1969 sunburst Guild hollow body guitar, I felt the presence of blues legend John Lee Hooker. It almost felt like he was guiding my hands and heart to new undiscovered places within me, creating a song ship sailing to unchartered territories in my musical landscape. There are traces of Joni Mitchell in “Empty Sky” and hints of the Beatles in “Everybody Feels This Way Sometimes.” Honestly, I believe every note, sound, visual, smell, every idea that’s ever touched us, is interwoven into the gorgeous colorful, rainbow fabric quilt of art, we create.

  1. What made you decide to become a singer songwriter?

I never made a conscious decision to ‘become’ a singer-songwriter. Thank God, for me it was a natural, easy, gradual, ‘gentle push’ of spirit; my soul led me to this choice. It chose me, I chose it, I decided to answer the calling. I believe we are all called to something, and it’s never too late, no matter what age, circumstances, to answer this calling, following your bliss. My story is magical, powerful synchronicity at work. While in college, I was secretly writing lyrics in my bedroom and taking jazz piano lessons 20 minutes away. I started receiving the thought ‘wouldn’t it be nice to have a little keyboard in my bedroom, so I could write songs easily? I can’t fit a piano, I don’t have lots of money, wouldn’t a little keyboard be nice?’

I started dreaming up this idea for months, until it exploded vividly one Sunday morning. I woke up in a surreal, groggy state, having passionately dreamt of owning a little Casio keyboard the night before. Instead of walking to the library, taking the faster, straight-shot city street path, I felt magnetically drawn, with a strong impulse, to take the longer, beautiful, winding path across campus. While on this scenic route, I passed a one-day church sale, selling the exact Casio keyboard I dreamt the night before!  It was $20, and ecstatic by this little miracle, I began joyfully composing songs in my bedroom on this Casio keyboard. It felt like my soul gave me the gentlest, loving push and wink, to trust myself; sometimes the longer, winding path has magic. Faster isn’t always more rewarding or satisfying. From that day forward, I’ve been composing and performing. The Casio keyboard manifesting was a tiny miracle of magic. Miracles exist everywhere, if you choose to open your eyes, and allow yourself to dream.

  1. Are there any special moments you’d like to share while making this EP?

For “Gold Hearted Man” basking in the afterglow of a soulful kiss, inspiration poured through me, and I composed this song in a hurricane flood of emotion. Initially I felt uncomfortable channeling this sensuality in the studio, but when the recording light blinked, BOOM, we cut vocals lightning speed. I’m proud of how we captured the passionate feeling in this recording.

For “Born To Love,” Day 1, I thought we had the “perfect” vocal after comping. The next day, after singing for 5 hours, the producer asked me to sing one last take. I said “sure” to humor him, though thinking “there’s no way we can use it, I’m too tired.” So I let go, singing effortlessly, easily, naturally, without trying. I got out of my own way, allowing the song to speak, my soul to speak. When I opened my eyes, thinking everyone would say it’s a throwaway vocal, instead they said “that was a Grammy-Award winning performance!” Stunned, I listened back, and realized MAGIC HAD FLOWED, when I surrendered, letting go of getting an “amazing vocal.” This live vocal became our “final vocal.” I learned sometimes “magic” is better than “perfect.” I trust the magic now.

  1. Is there a specific flow/genre to this EP that you’d like the audience to follow?

However your heart and soul calls you to listen. Follow your instincts.

  1. If you had to describe the “story of this release” in one paragraph, what would you say?

“Luminous, passionate, triumphant, love-filled collection of artistic songs inspires the hearts, connects with the souls of many, to remember and awaken to the brilliant, magnificent miracles in their own lives.”

  1. What’s next for you?

I’m thrilled with the new, inspired songs I’ve been composing and writing. I have endless new records in me, and I am happily, eagerly anticipating recording the new songs, and performing them. What’s next? More fun. More joy. More treasure chests of glittering new songs. More inspired new records. More exhilarating live performances. More artistic discoveries of wonder. More magnificent miracles revealing themselves, as we keep waking up to this miracle life.

Presave Waking Up To This Miracle Life here.

Tracklist
1. Gold Hearted Man
2. Waking Up To This Miracle Life
3. Born To Love
4. Joyful Love
5. Everybody Feels This Way Sometimes
6. Empty Sky
7. Gold Hearted Man (Chris Lord-Alge Radio Edit)
8. Gold Hearted Man (Joe Zook Radio Edit)
9. Waking Up To This Miracle Life (Chris Lord-Alge Radio Edit)
10. Empty Sky (Radio Edit)

filmfest via Gabrielle Archuletta for use by 360 Magazine

Why would Anyone Leave Hollywood?

Why would anyone leave working on movies with Marlon Brando, Johnny Depp, Jim Carrey, or the voice of Marge on the Simpsons?

Why would anyone leave behind working on music videos with Madonna, R.E.M, Randy Travis, and The Rolling Stones?

Why would anyone leave behind “hobnobbing” at the homes of Sting, Roseanne Barr, or Joan Rivers?

The sheer romance of Hollywood, and hype, the luscious frivolity and gorgeous glamor, all ensconced like a movie within a movie—the Southern California of it all. Like Icarus flying high above the drudge and turmoil of everyday life, just knowing your wings would never melt. The rubbing elbows with the insanely famous, or very famous, or just famous movie stars. Crashing the ubiquitous Oscar parties strewn all over “the strip”—the famous Sunset Boulevard.  The bright lights that draw you to it like a moth to a flame.

I worked on it all. I worked on the movies and the music videos.  And the TV shows, the MOW’s (movies of the week), and the pilot shows during pilot season.  I worked on food commercials, car commercials, and clothing commercials.  I worked low-budget, no-budget, and dream budget shows. My job?  The art department. I was a set dresser, lead man, painter, prop guy, and even drove the 5-ton trucks because I had a CDL (commercial driver’s license).  (My credit nickname on some of my IMDB credits is “Big Ton.”)

My entre to Hollywood was the world-renowned UCLA film school, where I studied screenwriting, directing, and producing with my fellow students, Academy Award-winning directors Gore Verbinski and Alexander Payne, director Shane Black and noted television producer Jeffrey Bell.  Friends of mine who work “below the line” (in the art department, or as grips, gaffers, painters, transportation, etc.) all have IMDB credits a mile long.

There are two ways to enter Hollywood from film school—from the top or from the bottom. From the top means your film or script hyperjumps you directly into an “above the line” directing gig, or screenwriting offer, or both.

But if you’re like the majority of film school grads, you start again at the bottom. You work on every low-budget film, TV show, and commercial you can get your hands on. And you don’t let them know you graduated from film school. No, siree. Not unless you wanted yourself laughed out of work.  Because the real work is learning the craft of making films. The very long hours (minimum 12 hours a day). Learning who all the behind-the-scenes players are and who knows what, when, and where.  Learning from the old-timers all of the million tricks that go on to a screen and the politics behind the scenes. Learning how to segue from show to show, so that you can continue to work.

Then the magic moment arrives.  All the grunt work and long hours finally pays off.  You are handed that obscenely rare gold Willy-Wonka ticket to Wonkaland—the ultimate movie pass of all time to anyone who wants to work Hollywood—the Motion Picture Union Card.  And the only way to get is by working on a film that goes from non-union to union.  Even the stars can’t wheedle their offspring into this part of “the industry.”  You earn this one with a lot of sweat, grit, and determination.  Then you begin to make real money.  And work on the “big” films—the big features.  Or work at the studios, on a hit TV show, or endless pilots.  Great medical, retirement, benefits up the ying-yang.  You are now part of the legacy and lottery that is the Hollywood film family.  You truly have made it to the land of the silver screen.

Was it great? Was it fun? Was it wild? Yes, and yes, and yes.

But something was amiss in the land of forever happiness. I began to notice cracks in the gold façade. I saw hidden hints of unhappiness I hadn’t noticed before. I began to understand how easily the golden handcuffs of money and prestige could be so easily slipped on over one’s wrist until one day you realize that the dreaming is over, and now you are locked into the Hollywood grind.

How fleeting the luscious frivolity and gorgeous glamor. The elbow-rubbing with all that famous fame and fortune.  The seductiveness of being the insider in star land. That thirty years later you would wake up from the dream and realize it was all spent in dreamland. That’s the writing I saw upon the wall.

But as with all good screenplays, there arrives the pivotal moment upon which the destiny of the entire universe resides in the action of one person.

One day a friend of mine at Universal Studios, a guy who had worked on sets for a million years, a guy whose stories about the business were endless and fascinating—I asked him. “Was it all worth it?” Well, that was the million-dollar question you never ask because the answer did not fill you with awe.  It scared the living bejesus out of you.  “Nope. I never saw my kids grow up. I divorced twice. I made a lot of money. I owned a lot of toys.  But what do I have to show for it after 35 years? My kids barely talk to me.  I’m mostly alone and I’ll retire alone.”

Crap and wow. That’s when the Hollywood dreamed ended for me.  That was THE wake-up call of wake-up calls.  That’s when I knew it was time to get out. I was only five years in. I did not want to end up with the self-chosen burden of unhappiness to haunt me in Hollywood for the rest of my life.

That’s when I took to the road and headed west. Not to actual west of the Pacific Ocean but the west of America, where people lose themselves to find themselves.  And that’s what I did.  A “drive-about.” Where one can meditate upon endless miles of blacktop, the engine purring a constant tone poem like the drone of a Tibetan chant. This blue-highway contemplation forcing the quintessential questions of mortality—why am I here and what is my purpose?

After a few thousand miles, I ended up in a 3-bar town on the Arizona/Mexican border.  I asked for work and the universe handed it to me in the guise of a local cowboy.  My new job? Putting up a fence on a nearby ranch—a barbed-wire fence.  Hammering in fence poles with a pole pounder for as far as the eye could see.  When I was done, he’d come out and we’d string up wire. How fitting. Having been raised around ranches as a kid, I had returned to my roots.

My home was the back of my pickup truck. My shower, an old horse trough filled with water. I cooked by camp stove and ate by campfire.  The stars were brilliant and there was not a human light to be seen.   This was my new existence. I couldn’t imagine going back and was terrified at going forward.   It was here, amidst this desolation and aloneness, I had truly leapt off the cliff of Hollywood, into the great abyss of the west, praying for the universe to somehow catch me. And it did.

A slow miracle appeared. An idea that was born of this life transition. I picked up the pen again, and the pen roared back to life.

After having published in my early twenties, I had not written a book in years. Now I began to write as if my life depended on it.  The premise?  A father who would never live to see his kids, leaves behind a compendium of practical, moral, and spiritual letters that would eventually be a guidebook to life.  How fitting that the universe brought me here, writing on the back of my pickup by lantern light, to begin my real life’s work.

But the book, to eventually be called, The Legacy Letters, and its awards, were still years in the future. Now I would have to finish the fence. And then work as a cowboy on a small nearby ranch. And then meet my wife-to-be, while working as a wrangler for a friend of mine. And then get married at the ranch. And have a son together. And all the while, in this Walden Pond time of life, I would continue to write and ride, and ride and write until I finished the book.

Now far from the delusions of glitz and glamor, fame and fortune that would have beguiled me into a life of golden unhappiness. What an amazing and strange journey to happiness and contentment.

I remember reading many years ago about a prayer the Buddhist monks would intone, and that in my spiritual infancy, I could never quite understand. “Please Lord Buddha, give me a problem so that I may overcome it.”  Finally, I’ve grown up enough to understand why anyone would want a problem to overcome.  And why we must leave to find out how to return.

ABOUT CAREW PAPRITZ

Carew truly lives the central message of The Legacy Letters to “live life to the fullest,” creating such innovative and adventurous one-of-kind events as his “First-Ever Book Signings”–on top of Mt. St. Helens in Washington State, the Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska, and on horseback at a Barnes & Noble in Tucson, Arizona (amongst many others).  Before Amazon, Carew’s First-Ever Delivery of a Book by Drone made headline news.  Carew’s YouTube “I Love to Read” series and his annual literacy-driven charity event, “The Great Book Balloon Launch,” inspire kids and adults to rediscover the joy of reading!  And to inspire more kindness and civility in the world, Carew started National Thank You Letter Day–Nov.14th, in which he created the world’s largest handwritten thank you letter, stamp, and envelope–the size of a high school gym–to help spread the word about writing thank you letters!

George_OHanlon from Madison Florence. Capitol Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

GEORGE O’HANLON RELEASES HIS DEBUT EP – THE STORM

One of the UK’s most promising young songwriters, George O’Hanlon releases his debut EP, The Storm, and the brand-new feature single “This Town,” out now via Harvest Records. Listen to the full EP here.

Starting with a plaintive electric guitar-line and O’Hanlon’s soothing vocal, “This Town” slowly transforms into a taut rocker exploding into an emotive crescendo.

“’This Town’ was written about growing up in a certain kind of place and when it feels like there’s a certain path laid out for you and all you want to do is go the other way.” George elaborates.

“Years of work have gone into releasing this EP. the people I’ve met and worked with along the way have been incredible. For me the EP isn’t so much about the songs as it is me reaching a point in my life and doing something, I never thought I would,” he continues.

Featuring previous singles “The Weight” and “The Storm,” George’s debut EP is a stunning, sonic calling card for the 21-year-old songwriter. Each of the four tracks is an emotional vignette that demonstrates George’s ability to weave the pieces of everyday life into his evocative music.

Already winning fans at radio, George is picking up early support from the likes of Abi McMcarthy at BBC Introducing and Jack Saunders at Radio 1.

Inspired by the likes of Bob Dylan, Jeff Buckley and Thom Yorke, O’Hanlon’s song-writing is both literary and deeply personal, incorporating his own life experiences into his work while framing them from different perspectives.

Over the last few years O’Hanlon has been refining his playing and song writing and is now ready to share his music with the world. Following a few early gigs on the college circuit, George expanded out into a series of shows at grassroots venues, adding additional players to his live show and honing his live performance. He’s recently announced dates for his first ever UK tour in September.

Given the sheer power of his music, O’Hanlon looks set to establish himself as an exciting new talent to watch throughout 2021!

image by Sara Davidson for use by 360 Magazine

Third Man announces Bob Dylan – Springtime In New York

Third Man Records is excited to announce Vault Package #49: Bob Dylan – Springtime In New York: The Bootleg Series, Vol. 16 (1980-1985). In conjunction with Sony/Legacy, Third Man will release this 4xLP collection (pressed at Third Man Pressing in Detroit) full of previously unreleased outtakes, mixes and more, complete with a 16-page booklet of liner notes and track notations and four uniquely-colored LPs in their own individual LP sleeves, all housed together in an impressive custom slipcase. The songs on the Third Man Vault will be the ONLY vinyl release of those 42 songs. There is NO material overlap between the 2xLP version from Sony/Legacy and the 4xLP release from Third Man. Sign up is open now through July 31 at midnight CT.

In the early 1980s, while the music industry was grappling with the arrival of new trends and technology, from MTV to compact discs to digital recording, Bob Dylan was writing and recording new songs for a new decade, creating an essential new chapter in his studio catalog. The latest in Columbia/Legacy’s highly acclaimed Bob Dylan Bootleg Series revisits an often-forgotten, rich vein in Dylan’s vast and complex catalog, shining fresh light on the provocative new musical directions Dylan was taking as a songwriter and a recording artist from 1980 through 1985. Bob Dylan – Springtime In New York (1980-1985) celebrates the rich creative period surrounding Dylan’s albums Shot Of Love, Infidels, and Empire Burlesque with previously unreleased outtakes, alternate takes, rehearsal recordings, live performances and more.

Third Man Records, in conjunction with Sony/Legacy, is humbled to release a limited edition 4LP vinyl collection of Bob Dylan – Springtime In New York: The Bootleg Series Vol. 16 (1980-1985) as their 49th Vault package. Pressed on gold, violet, orange and purple discs at the state-of-the-art Third Man Pressing facility in Detroit, the set includes a 16-page booklet of liner notes and track notations, as well as individual LP sleeves all housed together in an impressive slipcase.

Bob Dylan – Springtime In New York: The Bootleg Series Vol. 16 (1980-1985) is also available in a deluxe 5xCD boxset as well as 2xCD and 2xLP 12” vinyl highlight packages. The songs on the Third Man Vault will be the ONLY vinyl release of those 42 songs. There is NO material overlap between the 2xLP version from Sony/Legacy and the 4xLP release from Third Man.

LP One of Bob Dylan – Springtime In New York: The Bootleg Series Vol. 16 (1980-1985) was recorded in 1980 and 1981 and finds Dylan rehearsing a variety of his own catalog compositions (“Señor (Tales of Yankee Power)”), rearranging some traditional folk tunes (“Jesus Met the Woman at the Well,” “Mary of the Wild Moor”) and revving up a selection of surprising covers (“Mystery Train” featuring Ringo Starr, “Fever,” “Abraham, Martin and John”) with a group of musicians including Frank Fred Tackett (guitar), David Mansfield (mandolin), Willie Smith (keyboards), Tim Drummond (bass), Jim Keltner (drums) and background vocals by Clydie King, Carolyn Dennis, Gwen Evans, and Regina McCrary.

LP Two of Bob Dylan – Springtime In New York (1980-1985) is devoted to outtakes and alternate takes of recordings, produced by Chuck Plotkin for Shot of Love, as well as material Bob Dylan wrote for Infidels, performed by the all-star band assembled for the album, produced by Bob Dylan and Mark Knopfler, which featured Knopfler (guitar), Mick Taylor (guitar), Alan Clark (keyboards), Robbie Shakespeare (bass) and Sly Dunbar (drums).

LP Four of the album includes live tracks (“Enough Is Enough” from Slane Castle, Ireland, and “License to Kill” from Late Night with David Letterman, March 22, 1984) alongside alternate takes and outtakes from the Empire Burlesque sessions, produced by Bob Dylan, including the premiere of the new song “Straight A’s in Love.”

According to the Producer’s Note in the album: “The alternate takes selected for this set are different than the ones released on previous volumes of The Bootleg Series. They are included here to illustrate the musical journey Bob Dylan undertook during these years.”

In his liner notes for Bob Dylan – Springtime In New York, Damien Love writes, “And that’s the real story of this gloriously untrammeled collection. The songs. The songs stripped free of trappings, tampering, passing tastes, and judgements. The songs broken down to the sound of people really doing this, right now, acting on instinct. The songs rough and rowdy, bruised and tender, joking and crying, nagging and striving and yearning. The songs were always there, and here they are still, keeping pace with us.”

Fans have only until July 31st to subscribe to Third Man Records Vault, where they will automatically receive this package. Visit here to sign up.

Bob Dylan

Springtime In New York: The Bootleg Series, Vol. 16 (1980-1985)

Third Man Records 4-LP Set

Track List: 

LP-1

  1. Señor (Tales of Yankee Power) – Rehearsal
  2. Jesus Met the Woman at the Well – Rehearsal
  3. Mary of the Wild Moor – Rehearsal
  4. A Couple More Years – Rehearsal
  5. This Night Won’t Last Forever – Rehearsal
  6. Mystery Train – Shot of Love outtake
  7. We Just Disagree – Rehearsal
  8. Let’s Keep It Between Us – Rehearsal
  9. Fever – Rehearsal
  10. Abraham, Martin and John – Rehearsal
  11. Angelina – Shot of Love outtake

LP-2

  1. Price of Love – Shot of Love outtake
  2. I Wish It Would Rain – Shot of Love outtake
  3. Let It Be Me – International 7” Single B-side*
  4. Donߣt Ever Take Yourself Away – Shot of Love outtake*
  5. Cold, Cold Heart – Shot of Love outtake
  6. Is It Worth It? – Shot of Love outtake
  7. Borrowed Time – Shot of Love outtake
  8. Yes Sir, No Sir – Shot of Love outtake
  9. This Was My Love – Infidels outtake
  10. Donߣt Fall Apart on Me Tonight [version 2] – Infidels alternate take
  11. Neighborhood Bully – Infidels alternate take

LP-3

  1. Too Late [acoustic version] – Infidels outtake
  2. Clean Cut Kid – Infidels outtake
  3. Baby What You Want Me to Do – Infidels outtake
  4. Foot of Pride – Infidels outtake
  5. I and I – Infidels alternate take
  6. Green, Green Grass of Home – Infidels outtake
  7. Union Sundown – Infidels alternate take
  8. Lord Protect My Child – Infidels outtake
  9. Tell Me – Infidels outtake

LP-4

  1. Enough is Enough [live] – Slane Castle, Ireland
  2. License to Kill [live] – Late Night with David Letterman, March 22, 1984
  3. Angel Flying Too Close to the Ground – Infidels outtake
  4. Julius and Ethel – Infidels outtake
  5. I’ll Remember You – Empire Burlesque alternate take
  6. When the Night Comes Falling from the Sky [slow version] – Empire Burlesque alternate take
  1. Tight Connection to My Heart (Has Anybody Seen My Love) – Empire Burlesque alternate mix
  2. Emotionally Yours – Empire Burlesque alternate take
  3. Clean Cut Kid – Empire Burlesque alternate take,
  4. Straight A’s in Love – Empire Burlesque outtake
  5. When the Night Comes Falling from the Sky [fast version] – Empire Burlesque alternate take

All tracks previously unreleased except *

George Harrison — All Things Must Pass Remixed from Jim Merlis for use by 360 Magazine

GEORGE HARRISON — ALL THINGS MUST PASS REMIXED

“Even before I started, I knew I was gonna make a good album because I had so many songs and I had so much energy. For me to do my own album after all that—it was joyous. Dream of dreams.”  George Harrison

Recorded and released in the wake of The Beatles’ April 1970 dissolution, George Harrison’s landmark solo album, All Things Must Pass, is a fully realized statement by a bold and audacious artist. Produced by Harrison and Phil Spector, the 23-track All Things Must Pass stands tall a half-century later as an epic, ambitious expression of Harrison’s remarkable gift for sheer song-craft, powerful spirituality and a celebration of both his inimitable individuality and unique camaraderie with his fellow musicians.

All Things Must Pass was an overdue artistic release for George as a songwriter and musician. The first-ever triple studio album, All Things Must Pass overflows with a voluminous range of ideas, musical styles and influences, spanning rock ’n’ roll, country, gospel, blues, pop, folk, R&B, Indian classical music and devotional songs. Despite the album being wildly successful and Harrison’s affection for it, he would write in the liner notes for the 30th anniversary remaster, released in 2001, “I still like the songs on the album and believe they can continue to outlive the style in which they were recorded,” adding, however, “it was difficult to resist re-mixing every track. All these years later I would like to liberate some of the songs from the big production that seemed appropriate at the time.”

Decades in the making and lovingly crafted by the Harrison family, All Things Must Pass has now been completely remixed from the original tapes for a stunning suite of 50th-anniversary releases that fulfills Harrison’s longtime desire. Executive produced by Dhani Harrison, a product produced by David Zonshine and mixed by triple GRAMMY Award-winning engineer Paul Hicks (The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, John Lennon), the new mix transforms the album by sonically upgrading it—making it sound brighter, fuller and better than ever before. You can watch the album trailer HERE. You can preorder the album HERE.

Releasing August 6 via Capitol/UMe, All Things Must Pass 50th Anniversary Edition will be available in a variety of formats:

UBER DELUXE EDITION

Exclusive to GeorgeHarrison.com, uDiscover, and Sound of Vinyl, All Things Must Pass 50th Anniversary Edition will be available as a very limited Uber Deluxe Edition box set, which includes the album on 8LP (180g) and 5CD + 1 Blu-ray audio disc housed in an artisan designed wooden crate (approx. 12.4” X 12.4” X 17.5”). The collection explores the 1970 album sessions through 47 (42 previously unreleased) demos and outtakes, offering an inside look into the creative process. The Blu-ray allows fans to experience the main album in a high-res stereo, enveloping 5.1 surround sound and Dolby Atmos mixes.

The crate contains two books, an elaborate and expanded 96-page scrapbook curated by Olivia Harrison, with unseen imagery and memorabilia from the era, handwritten lyrics, diary entries, studio notes, tape box images, a comprehensive track-by-track and more; while a second 44-page book chronicling the making of All Things Must Pass through extensive archival interviews with notes is also contained herein. The elegantly designed book pays homage to Harrison’s love of gardening and nature. The book also contains a wooden bookmark made from a felled Oak tree (Quercus Robur) in George’s Friar Park. This truly unique box will also contain 1/6 scale replica figurines of Harrison and the gnomes featured on the iconic album cover, a limited edition illustration by musician and artist Klaus Voormann, as well as a copy of Paramahansa Yogananda’s “Light from the Great Ones” and Rudraksha beads, contained in individual custom-made boxes.

SUPER DELUXE EDITION

The Super Deluxe Edition box set, presented on 8LP (180g) or 5CD + 1 Blu-ray audio disc, explores the 1970 album sessions through 47 (42 previously unreleased) demos and outtakes. The Blu-ray allows fans to experience the main album in a high-res stereo, enveloping 5.1 surround sound and Dolby Atmos mixes. The collection contains a beautiful 60-page scrapbook curated by Olivia Harrison, with unseen imagery and memorabilia from the era, handwritten lyrics, diary entries, studio notes, tape box images, a comprehensive track-by-track and more. It also includes a replica of the original album poster.

All Things Must Pass will be released in multiple physical and digital configurations, including as a 5LP or 3CD Deluxe Edition that pairs the main album with the session’s outtakes and jams. The main album will be available on its own as 2CD, 3LP or limited edition 3LP color vinyl. All versions are available for pre-order now.

“Since the 50th-anniversary stereo mix release of the title track to my father’s legendary All Things Must Pass album in 2020, my dear pal Paul Hicks and I have continued to dig through mountains of tapes to restore and present the rest of this newly remixed and expanded edition of the album you now see and hear before you,” says Dhani Harrison. “Bringing greater sonic clarity to this record was always one of my father’s wishes and it was something we were working on together right up until he passed in 2001. Now, 20 years later, with the help of new technology and the extensive work of Paul Hicks we have realized this wish and present to you this very special 50th Anniversary release of perhaps his greatest work of art. Every wish will be fulfilled.”

The All Things Must Pass sessions began just six weeks after the April 1970 announcement of The Beatles’ break-up. Two days were spent recording thirty demos in Studio Three at EMI Studios, Abbey Road in St. John’s Wood, London. The first day, May 26, saw Harrison record fifteen songs backed by Ringo Starr and his longtime friend, bassist Klaus Voormann, beginning with “All Things Must Pass.” The next day, May 27, George played an additional fifteen songs for co-producer Phil Spector. The All Things Must Pass Uber and Super Deluxe Editions collect all 30 of these remarkable demo recordings, including 26 tracks never before officially released and several songs that didn’t make the album like “Cosmic Empire,” “Going Down To Golders Green ,” “Dehra Dun,“Sour Milk Seaand “Mother Divine.

The scope of Harrison’s songwriting remains breathtaking—his deeply personal introspection and striking wit are matched by the album’s boldly extravagant production. With its densely orchestrated textures and eclectic embrace of myriad genres, Harrison and Phil Spector’s groundbreaking sonic approach set a grand blueprint for countless artists to follow.

George had been stockpiling material for nearly half a decade, with a number of song—including “Isn’t It A Pityand the title track—rehearsed with, but not recorded by, The Beatles. Further songs evinced Harrison’s growing frustration over those preceding years, including “Wah-Wah,” the dramatic “Beware of Darknessand “Run Of The Mill,the latter named by both George and Olivia Harrison as one of their all-time favorites. You can watch “Run Of The Mill (Take 36)” HERE.

Written by George while producing Billy Preston’s 1969 Apple Records solo debut but saved for his own album a year later, the glorious “What Is Life” highlights the artist at his most exultant. At the album’s heart were songs like “My Sweet Lord,“Awaiting On You Alland the impassioned “Hear Me Lord,” each of which epitomized Harrison’s lifelong inner journey.

An anthem weaving a chant of the Hare Krishna mantra and “hallelujah,” “My Sweet Lordproved a worldwide smash upon its November 1970 single release, making history as the first solo single by a former Beatle to reach #1 in the UK or the US. Inducted into the GRAMMY Hall of Fame in 2014, the indelible anthem of spiritual and religious unity has remained one of the world’s most beloved songs, named among the “Greatest Songs of All Time” by both Rolling Stone and NME . Last year saw a limited edition clear vinyl 7” “My Sweet Lord” released by the George Harrison Estate in partnership with Record Store Day’s Black Friday event on November 27, 2020—the official 50th anniversary of All Things Must Pass original release.

Harrison’s close friendship with Bob Dylan begat two songs: the album-opening “I’d Have You Anytimewas co-written with Dylan, while the classic “If Not For You” was at the time an unreleased Dylan composition. The All Things Must Pass Super Deluxe Edition includes previously unreleased demo recordings of both songs as well as “Nowhere To Go” and “I Don’t Want To Do It,” another original Dylan song later recorded by George for a 1985 soundtrack but remains unrecorded by Dylan himself.

George brought together a stunning roster of friends and fellow musicians to record All Things Must Pass, including Ringo Starr, Klaus Voormann and Billy Preston, along with Eric Clapton and his new American bandmates, Carl Radle, Bobby Whitlock and Jim Gordon (soon to be known collectively as Derek and the Dominoes). Badfinger’s Pete Ham, Tom Evans, Joey Molland and Mike Gibbons contributed additional acoustics and percussion. Phil Spector’s desire for multiple pianos, layers of acoustic guitars and more drums saw the addition of Peter Frampton and Jerry Shirley from Humble Pie, Spooky Tooth’s Gary Wright, Plastic Ono Band veteran and future Yes drummer Alan White, Traffic’s Dave Mason, Procol Harum’s Gary Brooker and the in-demand horn section of Bobby Keys and Jim Price. Pete Drake, legendary Nashville session musician provided pedal steel guitar on several tracks. Arrangements for strings and horns came from longtime collaborator John Barham.

The original release of All Things Must Pass collected 18 songs over two LPs alongside a third LP—dubbed “Apple Jam”—showcasing four improvised instrumentals including a pair recorded as part of Derek and the Dominoes’ first-ever official recording session in June 1970. In addition, the “Apple Jamdisc includes “It’s Johnny’s Birthday,” sung to the tune of Cliff Richard’s 1968 hit “Congratulations” and recorded as a gift from Harrison to mark John Lennon’s 30th birthday.

The All Things Must Pass session tapes created in 1970 include over twenty-five hours of music on forty-nine 1” eight-track tapes, four 2” sixteen-track tapes, and forty-four stereo tapes. Richard Radford, Archivist for the George Harrison Estate, oversaw the preservation of the tape collection, with the original analog multi-track and stereo tapes transferred to 192 KHz/24bit digital preservation copies.

Hailed by Rolling Stone as “the War and Peace of rock and roll” and “an intensely personal statement and a grandiose gesture,” All Things Must Pass was met by unanimous critical acclaim and spectacular commercial success, spending seven weeks at #1 on Billboards “Top LPs” chart and eight weeks atop the UK’s official albums chart (though chart records until 2006 mistakenly stated that it had peaked at #4). Currently certified 6x platinum by the RIAA, All Things Must Pass later received a 1972 GRAMMY Award nomination for “Album of the Year,” while “My Sweet Lord” earned a GRAMMY nod for “Record of the Year.” “What Is Life,” the album’s second single, also became an international hit, reaching the top 10 in the US and Canada as well as #1 in Australia and Switzerland.

All Things Must Pass has only grown in influence and stature in the half-century since its initial release, including induction in the GRAMMY Hall of Fame and inclusion on The Times of London‘s “The 100 Best Albums of All Time” and Rolling Stone‘s 2020 listing of “The Top 500 Albums of All Time.” Pitchfork declared it to have changed the terms of what an album could be.

ALL THINGS MUST PASS SUPER DELUXE EDITION (Capitol/UMe)

TRACKLISTING (5CD/BR)

Disc One (Main Album)

1. I’d Have You Anytime

2. My Sweet Lord

3. Wah-Wah

4. Isn’t It A Pity (Version One)

5. What Is Life

6. If Not For You

7. Behind That Locked Door

8. Let It Down

9. Run Of The Mill

Disc Two (Main Album Cont.)

1. Beware Of Darkness

2. Apple Scruffs

3. Ballad Of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)

4. Awaiting On You All

5. All Things Must Pass

6. I Dig Love

7. Art Of Dying

8. Isn’t It A Pity (Version Two)

9. Hear Me Lord

10. Out Of The Blue

11. It’s Johnny’s Birthday

12. Plug Me In *

13. I Remember Jeep *

14. Thanks For The Pepperoni *

* Newly Remastered/Original Mix

Disc Three (Day 1 Demos—Tuesday 26 May 1970)

1. All Things Must Pass (Take 1)

2. Behind That Locked Door (Take 2)

3. I Live For You (Take 1)

4. Apple Scruffs (Take 1)

5. What Is Life (Take 3)

6. Awaiting On You All (Take 1)

7. Isn’t It A Pity (Take 2)

8. I’d Have You Anytime (Take 1)

9. I Dig Love (Take 1)

10. Going Down To Golders Green (Take 1)

11. Dehra Dun (Take 2)

12. Om Hare Om (Gopala Krishna) (Take 1)

13. Ballad Of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll) (Take 2)

14. My Sweet Lord (Take 1)

15. Sour Milk Sea (Take 1)

Disc Four (Day 2 Demos—Tuesday 27 May 1970)

1. Run Of The Mill (Take 1)

2. Art Of Dying (Take 1)

3. Everybody/Nobody (Take 1)

4. Wah-Wah (Take 1)

5. Window Window (Take 1)

6. Beautiful Girl (Take 1)

7. Beware Of Darkness (Take 1)

8. Let It Down (Take 1)

9. Tell Me What Has Happened To You (Take 1)

10. Hear Me Lord (Take 1)

11. Nowhere To Go (Take 1)

12. Cosmic Empire (Take 1)

13. Mother Divine (Take 1)

Disc Five (Session Outtakes and Jams)

1. Isn’t It A Pity (Take 14)

2. Wah-Wah (Take 1)

3. I’d Have You Anytime (Take 5)

4. Art Of Dying (Take 1)

5. Isn’t It A Pity (Take 27)

6. If Not For You (Take 2)

7. Wedding Bells (Are Breaking Up That Old Gang Of Mine) (Take 1)

8. What Is Life (Take 1)

9. Beware Of Darkness (Take 8)

10. Hear Me Lord (Take 5)

11. Let It Down (Take 1)

12. Run Of The Mill (Take 36)

13. Down To the River (Rocking Chair Jam) (Take 1)

14. Get Back (Take 1)

15. Almost 12 Bar Honky Tonk (Take 1)

16. It’s Johnny’s Birthday (Take 1)

17. Woman Don’t You Cry For Me (Take 5)

Blu-ray Audio Disc (Main Album Only; Surround, Atmos, Hi-Res)

1. I’d Have You Anytime

2. My Sweet Lord

3. Wah-Wah

4. Isn’t It A Pity (Version One)

5. What Is Life

6. If Not For You

7. Behind That Locked Door

8. Let It Down

9. Run Of The Mill

10. Beware Of Darkness

11. Apple Scruffs

12. Ballad Of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)

13. Awaiting On You All

14. All Things Must Pass

15. I Dig Love

16. Art Of Dying

17. Isn’t It A Pity (Version Two)

18. Hear Me Lord

19. Out Of The Blue

20. It’s Johnny’s Birthday

21. Plug Me In

22. I Remember Jeep

23. Thanks For The Pepperoni

50th ANNIVERSARY CREDITS

Executive Producer: Dhani Harrison

Product Producer: David Zonshine

2020 Re-Mixed & Produced in Stereo & Atmos by: Paul Hicks Design

Creative Director: Dhani Harrison

Book curated by: Olivia Harrison and Rachel Cooper

Art Direction: Darren Evans

Archive Research: Don Fleming, Richard Radford and Ryan Williams

George Harrison — All Things Must Pass Remixed from Jim Merlis for use by 360 Magazine

Uber Deluxe Edition

George Harrison — All Things Must Pass Remixed from Jim Merlis for use by 360 Magazine

Super Deluxe Edition

George Harrison — All Things Must Pass Remixed from Jim Merlis for use by 360 Magazine

Super Deluxe Edition

Kailee Sparks image via Jodi Jackson at JJ Entertainment for use by 360 Magazine

Kailee Spark QxA

Indie artist Kailee Spark recently released her song, “Passageways” and is set to release her debut album Savor This come June 2021. The rising starlet’s poignant lyricism and angelic voice are highlighted on her most recent release, earning her nearly 200k followers online and comparisons to Taylor Swift and Jewel. However, Spark’s music is emotive, sensitive, visceral, and completely her own. Here at 360 Magazine, we spoke with Kailee Spark to discuss her background as a musician, inspiration behind “Passageways”, her future musical bucket list, and more.

Who is someone that doesn’t listen to your music that you think should?

So, I’d say my music could be liked by anyone who enjoys poppy radio stations. I think my music is very uplifting for the most part and that younger people would enjoy it.

 What’s your ideal press headline 12 months from now?

Something that talks about my unique style and that it’s playing all over the radio.

 What’s your background?

I grew up in the Bay Area, raised Mormon, left the church at age 22 and moved to Big Island Hawaii shortly after, where I’ve lived since. Finished my bachelor’s degree in anthropology at UH-Hilo, then decided to get my MA just for the hell of it [and] applied cultural anthropology at Humboldt State University in Northern California.

I’ve been primarily self-employed since living in Hawaii. I used to sell crystals at the farmer’s market and then got into the car rental business with an ex-boyfriend.

I love traveling and have spent a lot of time in India and can speak a little bit of Hindi.

What motivates you to get up everyday to do what you do?

Having fun and constantly learning new things. I like thinking that through my music or entertainment I inspire others.  

How has your family inspired you and your music?

My parents are big into classic rock and stuff like Bob Dylan, Cat Stevens, etc. So, I grew up listening to a lot of music. I started piano lessons around age 8 and wrote my first real song at age 12 which I performed at school functions. At age 15, a random man from my church brought over a guitar on Christmas morning for me. I had wanted a guitar for a long time and I was stoked, I began teaching myself right away and writing songs.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in San Jose, CA. My sister and I spent a lot of time in the backyard climbing trees, or riding our rollerblades around the neighborhood.

What made you move to Hawaii?

I wanted to learn about permaculture and raw food diets and on a forum somewhere I read about a community on the Big Island. So, I first came here to do an internship at this bizarre community for three months – it was clothing optional kind of hippie commune. I decided on my third day in Hawaii I would be moving here – it just felt right.

How does Hawaii inspire your music?

Yes, it definitely inspires a lot of nature themes. Many of my songs include some element of nature in them. I live in a really peaceful setting, and my house is on an acre of mostly jungle. I wake up in the mornings to the sound of birds singing and I fall asleep to a chorus of frogs and crickets. Sometimes the stars are so magnificent and bright, and the lava, the ocean, and the aloha 

Who inspired you to make music?

I can’t think of a specific person, but I just always loved music. At one point I was obsessed with this CD my parents had called “Wacky favorites” which had songs like “The auctioneer boy” and “Tie me kangaroo down sport”. I’d listen to it over and over. I remember sitting on the floor listening to this CD when I decided that I wanted to do music someday, I must have been around 6 or 7.

What or who inspired your song “Passageways”?

When I first started writing the song it wasn’t about anyone specific, just a feeling I had like I knew that someone was out there that I’d feel that way about. A bit later I met someone and I said oh that’s who this song was for, let me finish it.

Talk about your producer on this song?

Bub Pratt is a talented musician and our styles vibe together. I was confident he could produce my song and record with the sound I wanted. The engineer Keli’i is also very talented.

Talk about the lyrics to this song?

This song is about that intense curiosity you get when falling in love with someone. You want to know everything about them, everything that made them who they are today. Who are they? What are the pains they experienced? Wanting to feel them fully and surrender yourself to loving them. The beginning of the song refers to me having traveled around a lot. I’ve traveled and done so many things, but now I want to explore this person and who they are.  

Where do you get your ideas for song writing?

I don’t usually ever think okay today I’m going to write a song about…. Sometimes I’m able to get into a flow and words just come to me. I usually start by messing around with the guitar and humming out melodies, until I come up with something I like. Then I feel the vibe of the song and wait for some words to float into my consciousness while I play it over and over. Sometimes I’ll just record guitar on its own and listen to it while I drive or whatever and come up with words and themes that way.

What’s your ultimate message to your fans?

That you are powerful and can create the life you want for yourself. Don’t take life so seriously.

What charities are you aligned with?

I used to actually work at a nonprofit here on the island that assisted the homeless in finding housing. Wow I had some crazy experiences there!

I was pretty interested in an organization that helps build squat compost toilets in rural parts of India (open defecation is a big issue which ends up resulting in babies with malnutrition and being stunted), but I don’t know if that’s a glamorous thing to talk about.

What projects will you be involved with in the future? 

Would love to write some more songs and start working on another album at the end of the year or next year.

 Who are your biggest influences?

Jewel, Laura Veirs, Bright Eyes, Emily Wells. I love Bright Eyes/Conor Oberst, his songwriting is splendid. He’s a good example of someone who doesn’t really have a great voice, but people love his music because of the emotion and depth to his songs. I love his lyrics “I could’ve been a famous singer if I had someone else’s voice. But failures always sounded better, let’s live it up boys, make some noise!”

How have you developed your career?

As a musician…well, I just only recently started making money off it. I wasn’t really trying to be a musician for a while, and went through some wild depression and didn’t pick up the guitar for long stretches of time.  But recently in the past year I started playing a little bit and was surprised to find that people loved it. People kept asking me to play, and then I kept getting asked where they could download my music. This led to me searching for a place to record and that’s when I found Kukuau Studio (May 2020).

What kind of singer would you classify yourself as?

Not quite sure how to classify it. I have a soprano voice, but I sing kind of like Bob Dylan/Conor Oberst but female. I have my first voice lessons tomorrow, so let’s see what my instructor says. I wouldn’t really call myself a singer, more of a musician singer/songwriter. I don’t have a super great voice.  But I kind of think my unique voice is an asset to me rather than a hindrance, because I don’t sound like everyone else. I try to really convey emotions through my voice, and I think that’s why people like my voice. Oh, but I do love yodeling. Maybe call me a yodeler.

What skills have you learned that will help you in your singing career?

To relax, it’s okay to not be perfect.

What is the best advice you’ve been given?

I’d say that the fun really is in the journey, not the destination…That’s where my idea for the album name came, “Savor This”, it’s like savor the moment. Right now is where all the fun is. The destination is fun too, for a little while. But then I’ll want the next thing…happiness is an inside job.

What advice would you give to a singer starting out?

Keep practicing and writing but don’t be too hard on yourself, it should be fun.

How did you get started with your manager?

It just kind of worked out…he offered to help me by being project manager for my album release. I know I need help with other things too, so I’m like why not just [have a] manager? We get along really well, and he is very good with people.

Which famous musicians do you admire?

Jewel, Katy Perry, Bright Eyes, KT Tunstall, Michelle Branch, Avril Lavigne, Taylor Swift, Laura Veirs, Dolly Parton, and Eminem. 

What would you be doing right now, if it wasn’t for your music career?

Writing, I like to write about my travels and what not.

Do you like that you’re being compared to Taylor Swift?

Sure, she is a talented songwriter.

What’s next for you in 2021?

My album release, making some cool music videos, and I’d like to do some traveling if possible, too.

How do you take care of your voice?

I try not to overdo it; I went through a phase where I was singing and playing online like 4-6 hours a day most days, and I think it strained my voice. I try to give it time to rest and don’t push it if my voice is just not feeling good that day. I also stopped eating dairy for the most part.

What’s your health regime?

I eat pretty healthy and go on regular walks and do stretching and weightlifting a couple times a week. I got my yoga teacher training certificate at a training center in India, but I’ve never taught yoga.

If you could collaborate with another artist, who would it be?

Conor Oberst, Laura Veirs, and Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

 What’s the one take away you want your fans to feel after they listen to your music?

Feel self-empowered and playful.  

What is on your playlist right now?

Bub Pratt’s latest album, I love it, also been listening to Emily Wells.

When did you know you wanted to be an entertainer?

When I was a kid.

What’s on your musical bucket list?

Would love to be on billboard charts, nominated for Grammy someday, would be sweet. Have a song on the radio. It should be pretty cool to get my “Universe at your fingertips” song into an iPad commercial or something.

Any plans for future touring?

Not immediate plans, but it would be great if I had the opportunity to do so. I love traveling. Traveling and music combined sounds awesome.

What is your first musical memory as a child?

A church song “Popcorn popping on the apricot tree”

Do you play any instruments?

Guitar, piano, and kind of drums (haven’t played regularly for a few years). I want to add some more to the list soon.

What’s your typical day like?

Wake up around 8am, have some tea and coffee, listen to inspirational YouTube videos or music, go for a walk with a dog, write in a journal and a to-do list.

What’s your fashion style?

Kind of neutral colors and reds, I love leather boots and my converse sneakers. I don’t know how to describe my style. Sometimes skirts but mostly jeans or leggings.

What do you do to relax?

Take a bubble bath, meditate, listen to self-hypnosis, go on walks, and massage.

What are your hobbies?

Playing instruments, reading about all kinds of things, especially travel memoirs and funny stuff like David Sedaris, hiking, spending time in nature, and traveling.

What’s your favorite type of food? Do you cook?

Thai, Mexican, Japanese, and Korean. I do cook; I like to make a lot of soups and simple but tasty and healthy things.

How has the pandemic impacted your life?

Started making more money. Had to cancel some big travel plans to go to India with a good friend to go shopping for her wedding saree.

 What’s the one thing you think everyone could do to make the world a more positive place?

To not hold anyone else responsible for their happiness, also to follow your passions.

If there was one recording artist you wanted to meet, who would that be?

Dolly Parton seems cool…or Jewel.

What is the best part about being famous?

I’m not famous yet, but I do enjoy having an audience of fans who resonate with my music, and hearing from them how I have positively impacted their lives feels really good.

Heather Skovlund Music illustration 360 Magazine

The Don Was Motor City Playlist

Music Icon Don Was to Launch Weekly Show, “The Don Was Motor City Playlist,” on Detroit’s NPR Station, 101.9 WDET-FM and streaming worldwide beginning 10 pm, April 16, 2021.

“The Don Was Motor City Playlist,” hosted by Don Was and WDET Music Host Ann Delisi will feature playlists curated by Was and tales from his more than 30-year career as a musician and producer.

Blue Note Records President, six-time Grammy Award Winner and music industry powerhouse Don Was is launching a weekly broadcast program Friday, April 16 in his hometown of Detroit. On the new two-hour show, The Don Was Motor City Playlist, Was will dig deep into his music archives to curate playlists and share personal stories about the artists whose songs he features. The show will pay homage to the Motor City and artists with whom he works and loves. It will be broadcast on Detroit’s NPR station, WDET 101.9 FM and available to stream on WDET’s website, the WDET mobile app, and on smart speakers.

The show will air every Friday from 10 pm–midnight and will be hosted by Was along with producer and co-host, Detroit radio personality Ann Delisi.

“This show is really different in that it is completely freeform,” says Was. “The format will be an old school stream of consciousness; diverse with songs that I love and want to share with listeners. It’s been really fun to make the playlists. I get to do this show from my birthplace of Detroit with the great Ann Delisi. You will hear stories about The Stones. Stories about Dylan. Stories about Bonnie Raitt and Iggy Pop. Stories about Detroit.”

The name of every playlist will be inspired by Don Was’ history in Detroit. As listeners tune in from around the world, they will hear commentary about the Motor City and its rich musical and cultural histories. Dubbed, “the most exciting city in America” by the New York Times, Detroit is the birthplace of Was, Jack White, Big Sean, Alice Cooper, Eminem, Elvin Jones, Pepper Adams, Marcus Belgrave, James Carter, Carl Craig, Alberta Adams and many others.

“Don Was is a genuine and fascinating storyteller who will give listeners intimate insight into music makers. Don is a Detroit treasure and so is Ann Delisi. We are thrilled that Don and Ann will be teaming up to create The Don Was Motor City Playlist on WDET,” says Mary Zatina, General Manager of WDET. It’s a perfect trio — “Don’s energy and talent in the music industry is in a league of its own. Ann, whose ear is to the ground in music of every genre, both share the ability to deeply engage listeners as they narrate stories and anecdotes about music making. The third leg of the formula is WDET — a one-of-a-kind radio station known for innovation and eclectic offerings that inform and delight audiences in metro Detroit and around the globe.” WDET, which has been on the air for 73 years, is Detroit’s flagship National Public Radio Station.

Delisi has been a Detroit broadcaster and producer for more than 35 years. Her show Essential Music is a treasured go-to for listeners to discover new music as well as look back at landmark albums, musical moments and the musicians who created them. She has interviewed everyone from David Bowie to Adele to White House Photographer Pete Souza. Dedicated to exploring the creative spirit that drives artists, Delisi said the idea to partner with Was came up in one of their many conversations over dinner.

Ann recounts the story of how the Don Was Motor City Playlist came about–“We were having dinner in Detroit when he was in town for the Concert of Colors global music festival. He talked about listening to WDET and the late night show “Jazz Today” hosted by Bud Spangler. He said that his dream was to do a show like that and play songs that were his personal favorites – from any genre and from era. Months later, I suggested to my WDET colleagues that Don should host a show on WDET and everyone loved the idea.”

WDET Program Director Joan Isabella says, “Don and Ann have a deep love of music and reverence for the artists who create it. Ann is a savvy interviewer and as his co-host, she will ask questions about his work that listeners will relish. The Don Was Motor City Playlist provides a platform for Don to share his life experiences as a musician, producer and record label president. Having heard many of Don’s stories throughout the years, I know it’s going to be a blast for the listeners.”

A pivotal moment in developing the show’s potential occurred years ago when Was visited WDET to be interviewed by Delisi, only for the show to be preempted due to a national emergency press conference.

“Back in 2012, our live interview was preempted, so we ended up recording a lengthy interview in a small studio sharing stories and talking about music. In the years that followed, I began working with Don on the Concert of Colors and we would always talk about music. Little did we know that all of those conversations were preparing us for this show,” says Delisi.

“I’ve been going through my record collection, music from Detroit and beyond, on and off Blue Note,” says Was. “Maybe some music that hasn’t been released from Was (Not Was), but I’m modest with this show, I haven’t decided that part yet.”

Fans can hope.

For more than 70 years, from our Midtown Detroit location on the campus of Wayne State University, WDET-FM 101.9, Detroit’s NPR station, has delivered a unique mix of news, conversation, special programs and music programming. Our 48,000-watt broadcast signal reaches a 70-mile radius across all of southeast Michigan, northwest Ohio and southwest Ontario. It expands nationally through our live stream, website, mobile app and podcasts. WDET-FM 101.9 is a community service of Wayne State University. Support for WDET comes from Wayne State, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, local foundations, and through private donors and corporate underwriting.

Instrument illustration by Ivory Rowen for 360 Magazine

Bob Dylan – “Rough and Rowdy Ways”

Bob Dylan’s new album, Rough and Rowdy Ways has debuted in the Top Ten in 13 countries, including #1 chart entries in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Norway, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Germany and Switzerland, #2 positions in The United States, Australia and Belgium, #3 in Sweden, and #4 in France and Italy. The album’s #2 entry in the U.S. on Billboard’s Top 200 is Dylan’s highest chart debut in this country since 2009 and marks the artist’s 18th studio album to debut in the U.S. Top 10. Rough And Rowdy Ways has also debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Top Album Sales Chart.

The 10-track Rough and Rowdy Ways is Bob Dylan’s first album of new songs since becoming the only songwriter to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016; an award bestowed upon him by the Swedish Academy “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.” Critical response to Rough and Rowdy Ways has been rapturous, with many calling the album a masterpiece and one of the strongest works in Dylan’s canon.

Bob Dylan has released seven studio albums within the past 23-years; a creative span that also included the recording of an Oscar- and Golden Globe-winning composition, “Things Have Changed,” from the film Wonder Boys, in 2001; a worldwide best-selling memoir, Chronicles Vol. 1, which spent 19 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller List, in 2004 and was recently named the greatest rock memoir of all time by Rolling Stone. He is the recipient of the Officier de la Legion d’honneur in 2013, Sweden’s Polar Music Award in 2000, a Doctorate from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, and numerous other honors.

Bob Dylan has sold more than 125 million records around the world. Rough and Rowdy Ways is the artist’s 39th studio album.

Stream Rough and Rowdy Ways: Apple Music, Spotify, YouTube

The Critics Have Listened:

“A testament to his eternal greatness…. Rough and Rowdy Ways might well be Bob Dylan’s most consistently brilliant set of songs in years: the die-hards can spend months unravelling the knottier lyrics, but you don’t need a PhD in Dylanology to appreciate its singular quality and power.” — Alexis Petridis, The Guardian

“True to form, Dylan surprises yet again by delivering a late-career masterpiece with Rough and Rowdy Ways.  It’s a moody, reflective, meditative, befuddling, funny and awe-inspiring turn for the Nobel Prize winner. Rich with biblical and pop culture references, at its core Rough and Rowdy Ways is a record on the borderline of this world and the next, wherever or whatever that may be….The wait was worth it.” — Scott Bauer, AP

“It’s not merely the novelty of new Bob songs that offers comfort in this black swan moment, it’s a set of songs that provides inspiration when it’s in short supply. Call it a vaccine against culture’s shrinking expectations and the subsequent sapping of spirit. or just call it great music….Contradiction has always lived comfortably in Bob Dylan’s work – more evidence of the vast scope of his artistic vision. What’s extraordinary is how it continues to expand, containing multitudes no one else thought of.” — Michael Simmons, Mojo

“A savage pulp-noir masterpiece….A word of advice: Don’t mess with Bob Dylan, who, at 79, rips, snorts and cackles through his new album like a man with something — or absolutely nothing — to prove….Rough and Rowdy Ways rolls out one marvel after another.” — Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times

“When Dylan embarked on his musical journey as a young man in the Sixties, he forged an almost completely new type of song, open and multifarious, that became a new kind of standard…songs that defiantly inhabit his own myth, shifting perspective between his idiosyncratic views on the world and the world’s views on him.  Almost 60 years since we first heard from him, the old protest singer is still composing extraordinary anthems for our changing times.” — Neil McCormick, The Telegraph

Rough and Rowdy Ways is his first batch of new songs in 8 years, and it’s an absolute classic—it has the bleak majesty of latter-day Dylan albums like Modern Times and Tempest, yet it goes beyond them, tapping even deeper into cosmic American mysteries….his creative vitality remains startling—and a little frightening….But he refuses to rest on his legend. While the world keeps trying to celebrate him as an institution, pin him down, cast him in the Nobel Prize canon, embalm his past, this drifter always keeps on making his next escape. On Rough and Rowdy Ways, Dylan is exploring terrain nobody else has reached before—yet he just keeps pushing on into the future.” — Rob Sheffield, Rolling Stone

“With Rough and Rowdy Ways, he’s produced arguably his grandest poetic statement yet, a sweeping panorama of culture, history and philosophy peering back through assassinations, world wars, the births of nations, crusades and Biblical myths in order to plot his place in the great eternal scheme…. It would be foolish indeed to assume that Rough and Rowdy Ways is Dylan’s last word, but it’s certainly a historic address.” — Mark Beaumont, NME

“Truth is the talisman, tell it like it is. And that is what Dylan does….Rough and Rowdy Ways is exceptional.  If it were a painting, I’d call it a masterpiece.” — Will Gompertz, BBC

Rough and Rowdy Ways, an album that somehow manages to sound like nothing [Dylan] has ever done before, and that looks back across a long and hard-fought life while still insisting on always looking forward….The songs reveal an astonishing intensity and hunger, and a consistency that marks the album as one of Dylan’s major works….What leaps off of Rough and Rowdy Ways is Dylan’s blazing sense of purpose and focus. The man is not bullshitting. It comes through, full of humor and rage and heartbreak, in every word as they are written and sung.” — Alan Light, Esquire

Rough and Rowdy Ways hits hard.  [It’s] a gruesome, crowded, marauding album that feels unusually attuned to its moment….Dylan’s vast and intersectional understanding of the American mythos feels so plainly and uniquely relevant to the grimness and magnitude of these past few months. As the country attempts to metabolize the murder of George Floyd, it is also attempting to reckon with every crooked, brutal, odious, or unjust murder of a black person—to understand a cycle that began centuries ago and somehow continues apace. What is American racism? It’s everything, Dylan insists. Indiana Jones and J.F.K. and Elvis Presley and Jimmy Reed—nothing exists without the rest of it. None of us are absolved, and none of us are spared. Amanda Petrusich – New Yorker  Bob Dylan is a heavyweight champion. Five stars aren’t enough for his new album, Rough and Rowdy Ways. The album is a masterpiece, and a masterclass in lyric-writing in league with Dylan’s – and therefore anyone’s – best….Dylan is on fire lyrically throughout Rough and Rowdy Ways, offering up ten songs as dense in imagery and flawless in craftsmanship and quality as any of his long career….Perhaps the lesson in Rough and Rowdy Ways is that inestimable light can come from the dark places, once again making Dylan the voice we need to hear, just when we need it most.” — Jeff Slate, The Daily Beast

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CLOVES Releases Cover of “Blowin’ In The Wind”

 Critically acclaimed singer/songwriter CLOVES releases a cover version of Bob Dylan’s classic “Blowin’ In The Wind” on Interscope Records.  “Blowin’ In The Wind” is available now at all digital retailers.  Listen to “Blowin’ In The Wind” HERE.

“Blowin’ In The Wind” by CLOVES is featured in Budweiser’s new “Wind Never Felt Better” campaign.  The campaign celebrates Budweiser’s use of renewable energy to power all of its breweries. 

Watch the clip here.

“As a songwriter I’ve always admired Bob Dylan’s ability to write songs that become timeless classics,” says CLOVES.  “It was an absolute honor for me to cover this song.  Bob Dylan is a true icon.” 

CLOVES released her acclaimed debut album One Big Nothing in the fall of 2018 on Interscope Records. With One Big Nothing, CLOVES demonstrates a musical assurance and maturity beyond her years; an impressive progression from her acclaimed 2015 EP XIII. Fans and critics alike have taken notice – KCRW called her music “moody and haunting,” while Harper’s BAZAAR raved, “get ready to fall in love,” and Twitter Musicdeclared, “if you’re a fan of Radio Head or DJ Shadow…add her to your playlists.”  CLOVES spent most of 2018 in America gracing the stages of major U.S. music festivals including Panorama and XPoNential and supporting Greta Van Fleet on their sold-out U.S. tour.  She also appeared at international festivals including London’s All Points East Festival, Norway’s Bergenfest PinkPop and Electric Picnic in Ireland and in October embarked on a European headlining tour with stops in the UK, France, Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands. CLOVES made her U.S. television debut on NBC’s Late Night with Seth Meyers singing the album’s title track, “One Big Nothing,” CLOVES lit up the screen with her striking performance.  Watch the performance HERE.

Juke Ross Shares New Single “Hey Lil’ Mama”

Today, Guyanese singer/songwriter JUKE ROSS shares his brand new single “Hey Lil’ Mama.” It’s available now via Republic Records.

Get it HERE.

“Hey Lil Mama” arrives on the heels of his recent release “Fresh Roses” and debut EP Grey. Carried by wistful melodies, wonderfully nostalgic lyrics, and lithe acoustic guitar, “Hey Lil’ Mama” illuminates his songwriting skills and smooth delivery on the breathy and bright hook. It’s emblematic of his delicate emotionality and ability to serve up a gorgeous anthem every time he hits the studio.

“Hey lil’ Mama is a song about reflecting on a past relationship and ultimately hoping the best for that someone. I started the song back in 2016 right in the middle of moving from Guyana to Atlanta and finished it in the middle of 2017 just after moving to NY and truly realizing how huge the world truly is,” explains Juke

Located on South America’s northern mainland, the celebratory and life-affirming spirit of Guyana remains an undercurrent of JUKE ROSS’s songwriting. The youngest of 14 siblings, he can recall falling in love with music at a young age. The family radio played everything from Caribbean standards to Bob Dylan and Michael Jackson, and he would sit and listen for hours on end. Inspired by his nurse mom, he enrolled in medical school. In the midst of his studies, guitar beckoned to him. JUKE feverishly began penning music. Among those early compositions, he created “Colour Me,” which became an independent phenomenon, landed him a deal with Republic Records, and positioned him as one of 2017’s most exciting artists to watch!