Posts tagged with "film"

Illustration of a Booker by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Turf Shifts Modeling World

By Dana Feeney

The modeling industry has two very different faces. One side are supermodels, like Gigi and Bella Hadid, glamorously modeling, making millions of dollars, and traveling the world. The other are the unknown models working job to job, facing exploitation and manipulation by their agencies and clients, and trying to make their name in the industry. The mistreatment of models is as old as the industry itself. Skinny, cis, and white models experience this brutal reality. Working as a model is only worse for people of color [POC], LGBTQA+, and immigrants because of the lack of transparency or regulation and rampant misconduct.

New Players

The current push for diversity and inclusion has caused a much higher demand for POC, and LGBTQA+ models with different body types. In recent months, a few new players in the game are building their reputations on accountability and proper treatment of the models and creatives they represent. Three small agencies and one superpower are disrupting the model representation world: New Pandemics, Zandwagon, Community New York, and film and television power player Creative Artists Agency (CAA).
The way modeling deals traditionally work is that a model signs to an agency, such as Next Models, Ford Models, IMG Models, or Wilhelmina Models. The agency provides its models with certain services such as housing, transportation, portfolio shoots, and more. In most cases, anything an agency provides for a model they have to pay back to the agency, often at a high-interest rate. The interest rate means the longer they take to pay it back, the more they owe to the agency.

Although models sign contracts to agencies, they are not considered employees of those agencies and instead are independent contractors who the agency aids in booking jobs. The agencies do not keep models on their payroll. They do control the money that the models earn on a job and how their money models earn is distributed. Bad payment practices reach far beyond the agencies. The agencies are responsible for billing the client right after the model completes their job. Payment for jobs by agencies to their models is notoriously sketchy because clients are not required to pay upfront before shoots and can legally take up to 90 days to settle up. Most agencies take at least a 20% fee out of any money their models make and charge clients a “booking fee,” so for a $1000 job, they would charge $1200 but only pay the model $800. Worst of all, if a client does not pay the agency for work a model did, the agency does not owe the model the money they earned. The common practice in the industry is that the model only gets paid if the agency gets paid.

The film and television management world contrasts the modeling world in many ways. The modeling industry as a whole is riddled with misconduct, manipulation, and poor treatment of models by their agencies and brands. Many modeling agencies use contracts that include fees and costs they can pull out of the model paychecks and use debt, housing, and visas to keep their models dependent.

Agencies in other media such as film, only make money if their clients make money. In film, the percentage is around 10% because of unions. Although, none of these industries are flawless especially considering scandals in the film and tv world with predators like Harvey Weinstein and Matt Lauer.
Creative Artists Agency (CAA) has a long history of representing talents across film, tv, music, and more. In August of 2020, CAA announced their partnership with KCD Worldwide, a fashion services agency, which signaled CAA’s entrance into fashion model management for the first time in the agency’s history. CAA has a strong legacy of representing high-profile individuals and building their careers. They have also stated that they only take a 10% fee out of their models’ earnings, half of the general standard of 20%. Despite their claims for better treatment of models, CAA is not blemish-free when it comes to allegations of abuse and sexual misconduct. Multiple former CAA agents have faced lawsuits.

Additionally, CAA has previously represented multiple people accused of misconduct, including Shia LaBeouf, Chris D’Elia, and Marilyn Mason; all of whom are no longer represented by CAA.
On the opposite end of the spectrum are the smaller boutique agencies mentioned earlier, New Pandemics, Zandwagon, and Community New York. New Pandemics is “a casting and management agency dedicated to increasing LBGTQ+ visibility.”

Zandwagon is “a talent management company that could guide everyday life individuals who are breaking beauty standards daily” according to their website. Community New York is run by Butterfly Cayley, Moe Lamstein, and Richie Keoall, three first-generation immigrants from Laos, and “is founded on inclusivity and progressive values by changing not only the style but the very structure of management.” Cayley, Lamstein, and Keoall have impressive experience at agencies including DNA and Elite Model Management. Community New York now represents stars such as Hunter Schafer, who is well known for her work on the hit HBO show “Euphoria” and is now a brand ambassador for Shiseido.

With small diversity forward agencies up and coming, the existing modeling industry is under attack from all sides. All three of these agencies emphasize how much they value representation and inclusivity in this industry that has avoided breaking societal beauty standards for so long. They also claim they will be different from other agencies and provide better treatment for their clients. These agencies are sending the message that you’re either with them or against them, and they’re willing to think outside of the box to get proper treatment and equity for models from all walks of life.

Same Old Problems

Many of the biggest fashion houses in the world are still reckoning with the #MeToo movement. The fashion industry is known as a highly predatory business. Many of even the largest names in modeling have had to survive people abusing their power on sets and behind the scenes to become who they are. Household names, such as Kate Upton, Coco Rocha, and Cameron Russel, have all spoken out about their experiences with the abuse they’ve experienced while working as models.

Kate Upton spoke out against Paul Marciano in 2018, which led to a total of $500,000 in settlement agreements involving five individuals. He has remained an active participant at GUESS as a board member and chief creative officer, despite resigning from his position as an executive. At the beginning of February, the news broke that Marciano is once again being sued over sexual assault allegations by a woman who has chosen to remain anonymous. The allegations against Marciano are not an isolated incident. Similarly, allegations were brought against Alexander Wang in December of 2020 but began as early as 2017, yet some still chose his side despite the overwhelming corroboration of multiple individuals. If the word of a woman as successful as Kate Upton is not enough to oust a predator from power, it’s unclear what realistically can protect vulnerable individuals with less acclaim from the same experiences or worse.

The silver lining of these allegations coming to light is the industry supporting the individuals coming forward more than ever before. In the past, many models lost their careers before they had even begun due to the actions of predators and the mechanisms powerful people use to silence their victims. Accounts such as @shitmodelmgmt and @dietprada have been using their online platforms to expose predators and condemn their actions openly across Instagram and Twitter. Additionally, the Model Alliance, an organization dedicated to giving models a voice in their work, has also spoken out against Wang on their Instagram saying, “We stand with David Casavant, Owen Mooney, Gia Garison, and all the accusers of @alexanderwangny in their pursuit towards justice.”

The upheaval that began in 2006 with survivor and activist Tarana Burke’s creation of the #MeToo movement has continued into 2021. Slowly but surely survivors are taking their power back and pushing to create real change in media industries that have exploited them for far too long.

Illustration of models by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Paolo Canevari, ThANKS (2009) e J.M.B. (2007), installation view at Cardi Gallery London for use by 360 Magazine

PAOLO CANEVARI SELF-PORTRAIT

PAOLO CANEVARI
SELF-PORTRAIT / AUTORITRATTO

22nd February – 17th April, 2021

While the London venue is currently under lockdown in keeping with current government regulations, we recommend you the video tours of Paolo Canevari’s exhibition.

Cardi Gallery London

22 Grafton Street | London W1S 4EX

Italian contemporary artist Paolo Canevari is best known for transforming everyday materials and icons into large-scale sculptures that confront his audience with stark, political and philosophical commentary. Throughout his career, Canevari has worked in a variety of media, most notably tyres and inner tubes, painting, drawing, performance, animation and film.

The provocative nature of his works, his connections to contemporary scene, and his active role within the art scene in New York–where he lived and worked for many years–has kept Canevari in the spotlight of both American and Italian media.

Cardi Gallery is proud to present the first major solo show of Canevari’s work in the UK, an extensive survey exploring thirty years of the artist’s practice, the culmination of a decades-long collaboration with the gallery. A museum-scale exhibition occupying four floors at Cardi London in Mayfair, ‘Self-portrait / Autoritratto’ brings together over 30 works including sculptures, drawings and installation that range from the artist’s notorious 1990s rubber sculptures through to his most recent ongoing series ‘Monuments of the Memory: Landscape’ and ‘Constellations’. Many of the exhibits are shown here for the first time.

‘Self-portrait / Autoritratto’ aims to illustrate Canevari’s worldview through the artist’s deeply introspective creative process. It brings to the fore not only a reflection on the self but also, in the artist’s words “…a political reading of making art, intended to measure what Pasolini had defined “the injustice of the world”.

“Art is a democratic, progressive force, so it should ideally serve society, not the powers that be. In my work, the use of icons, symbols, and forms from various cultures is a way of drawing attention to their true meaning, tied to dogmas or other forms of power; they’re a way to open up a dialogue with the viewer and stimulate a reaction.
[…] The “political” character of my work is just one of many possible interpretations of what I do.”

“What I wish to express is a radical, subversive attitude towards art and the idea of art as it has been conceived and conveyed by globalised consumeristic society, therefore raising the level of moral and ethical perception of the world.”

The ambiguity of Canevari’s artworks, suspended in their brutalist aesthetic between irony and disquiet, is a successful result of both conceptual and formal transformation of industrial materials. Oil and its applications (synthetic rubber, exhaust motor oil, etc) are at the heart of his vocabulary; in his hands they become ambiguous symbols of the systemic violence that permeates today’s declining world where the threat of war–whether in the name of spiritual or monetary values–is constant, and humankind’s memory is tragically too short.

“To me, an artwork is profoundly important when it does not recoil into a one-way structure­–whether ideological or technical–but when it opens up to different perspectives for the viewer, therefore broadening their thought.”
-Paolo Canevari

“Cardi Gallery believes that art and culture are key for a healthy society and a ray of hope in these tragic times. I am absolutely delighted to bring to London these incredible works by Paolo Canevari, opening an exciting exhibition season for the gallery.”
-Nicolo Cardi

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue with an essay by the eminent American curator Robert Storr; an interview with Iranian artist Shirin Neshat and a homage to Canevari by the acclaimed Italian novelist, Andrea Camilleri. A series of artist talks, and exhibition tours will be held in conjunction with the show.

Open: Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm & Saturday 11am – 5pm

Manuel Cirauqui, curator; Alex Reynols, artist ana Juan Ignacio Vidarte, Director General of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao ©FMGB, Guggenheim Bilbao Museoa, Bilbao 2021 for 360 Magazine

New Exhibition From Alex Reynolds

Dates: February 19–June 13, 2021

Curator: Manuel Cirauqui

Film & Video gallery (103)

Alex Reynolds – There is a Law, There is a Hand, There is a Song.

From February 19 to June 13, 2021, the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao will be presenting Alex Reynolds. There is a Law, There is a Hand, There is a Song, the first exhibition of 2021 in the Film & Video gallery, a space that the Museum reserves for key works in video art, film, and the artistic languages associated with the moving image.

This time, three recent works by Alex Reynolds (b. 1978, Bilbao) will be featured. Reynolds is known for her constant exploration of our modes of relation and affection, especially in their manifestations through cinematic language. The work The Hand that Sings (2021), recently co-produced by the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, will be shown in an international premiere in the main gallery as part of this exhibition.

Created by Reynolds in collaboration with Swedish choreographer Alma Södeberg, The Hand that Sings builds a web of connecting gestures, voices, and images in time. These elements seem to mimic each other in open sequences and chain reactions: from the almost ritual-like extraction of oak bark in Extremadura during the annual cork harvest, to the act of peeling an orange before a small fire or the act of washing someone’s hand; from the tremor of leaves to the trembling of a voice, along with the flapping of a bird’s wings in the distance, or again, the feedback loop between the performer’s chant and hand movements. Words in Spanish and English are traded on a rooftop as we get a glimpse of the Palace of Justice in the Brussels skyline. The Hand that Sings is an evocative, sensorial work that focuses on details and contemplation. Bodies, the landscape, and the camera act in reciprocal harmony.

Alex Reynolds Alma SOderberg La mano que cant for use by 360 Magazine

lex Reynolds Alma SOderberg La mano que canta for use by 360 Magazine

3 Alex Reynolds Alma SOderberg La mano que canta for use by 360 Magazine

The New Blade

By: Catherine Martin

With the reboot of Marvel’s Blade expected to arrive to theaters in 2022, many fans of the original 1998 superhero movie speculate whether Wesley Snipes will reprise his role in the film. Snipes played the role of the eponymous half-vampire/half-human hybrid, Blade, who has the duties of a superhero and a vampire hunter. He played Blade throughout all three of the Blade franchise movies, yet, he is not expected to be cast in this iconic role again for the new reboot. Instead, Oscar-winning Mahershala Ali will be playing the role of this flawed hero. Keep in touch with what Ali is up to HERE.

Fans of the original Blade trilogy were uncertain about how to feel about the new casting, but Welsey Snipes has since told his fans to “chillaaxx.” Although he has told his fans to calm down, it has not stopped him from being adamant about how he is, and always will be, Blade. On January 7th he quote tweeted a message to him asking, “Wes, can you be Blade again?” and in response stated, “I AM BLADE…forever.” After spending so much time as Blade, there is no doubt that Wesley Snipes has a deep connection with this role and that it will always be a part of him.

The details of Blade are still being kept from the masses, and the only confirmed detail known, right now, is Ali’s attachment to the project. Back in 2019 Snipes made a comment about his opinion of Ali’s casting for the role of Blade:

“People are very, very sneaky. They try to make it about the actors,” Snipes told AP. “It’s not about me and him. I’m happy for him to be considered. I’m happy for them looking at him. Flattery… what do they say? Imitation is the best form of flattery. It’s something that he has acknowledged that he wanted to do and his family wanted him to do it, so I’m appreciative of him getting the love that I’ve created something that others want to carry on and make their own stamp on.”

Wesley Snipes response was not only calm and collected, but extremely supportive as well. More support can be noted in a more recent interview with Den of Geek (read more about it HERE), and we can see where the two stand in regards to each other and if they have kept in contact since the announcement of Ali’s new role as Blade. So, the suspicions people have about Snipes being upset with Ali can be erased once and for all.

“No, he hasn’t called me. We haven’t talked about characterizations or how he should play it or anything like that. I can’t imagine that call ever coming in. That would be really strange. But we did communicate about how much we appreciate each other’s work, and how I’m comfortable with saying, ‘Hey man, go rock it, baby. If you got it, do it.”

Though, Wesley Snipes will not be playing his iconic role as Blade, he will always carry the attachment and fond memories of his time with this character. In addition, his part has inspired many people, Mahershala Ali included (you can hear his thoughts on Wesley Snipes HERE), and will remain the marker and epitome of, Blade.

WESLEY SNIPES’ OTHER ENDEAVORS

There are many ways to keep up with the actor through his other endeavors. He recently played General Izzie in Coming 2 America, starring Eddie Murphy. The comedy/rom-com will be available to watch on Amazon Prime March 5, 2021. Watch the trailer HERE. Additionally, outside the realm of acting, Snipes has now coauthored a dark fantasy novel with Ray Norman, Talon of God. So, for all fans of Wesley Snipes, you can continue to keep up with the actor, film producer, martial artist and author through the multitude of content he continues to produce.

KEEP UP WITH WESLEY SNIPES

Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

Essence Magazine article for 360 Magazine coverage for Coming to America

Coming 2 America

ESSENCE MARCH+APRIL TRIPLE COVERS FEATURE STAR-STUDDED CAST OF THE HIGHLY-ANTICIPATED COMING 2 AMERICA – INCLUDING EDDIE MURPHY, ARSENIO HALL, JERMAINE FOWLER, KIKI LAYNE AND BELLA MURPHY 

Prepare the royal jet! Coming 2 America is finally arriving, with Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall and an all-star cast of returning and new faces—including Jermaine Fowler, KiKi Layne and Bella Murphy. It’s been more than three decades since the beloved original Coming to America hit theaters and became a true cult classic that has spanned multiple generations and demographics. Now, in the ESSENCEMarch/April issue triple cover article, The Fresh Princes of Zamunda, Regina R. Robertson talks to the cast about why this was the right time to do the sequel, their fave moments and what the film means to the culture: 

  • EDDIE MURPHY ON WHAT THE FILM MEANS TO THE CULTURE: “Coming to America is one of my films that has really worked its way into the culture. People get dressed up as the characters for Halloween, and they still walk around saying catchphrases like ‘Sexual Chocolate.’ So many people grew up with Coming to America and have a lot invested in it, so I didn’t want to taint that…Once the ideas started coming together, it took about four or five years to get the script all the way right. Once we got it right, I knew it was time…” 
  • ARSENIO HALL ON DOING THE SEQUEL: “A lot of people have posted about Coming to America and said things like, ‘Please don’t mess with my movie’ or ‘I don’t want no sequel!’ We’ve been pitched all kinds of ideas, but I remember reading the script in Eddie’s backyard and it was all making sense. That’s when I knew that this was going to be the sequel…”  
  • KIKI LAYNE ON PLAYING MEEKA: “Meeka is loyal to her family. I’m interested in showcasing strong Black women— and being a part of this film was an opportunity to play in such a classic world and also to work with straight-up legends, all the way around…”  
  • BELLA MURPHY ON PLAYING OMMA AND WORKING WITH HER DAD: “Omma is super-smart, a little bit of a badass, and she’s super-cool. Being able to do my first film with my dad is really special…I’m over the moon…”  
  • JERMAINE ON PLAYING LAVELLE—AND WATCHING HIS DREAM COME TRUE: “In some ways, Lavelle reminds me a lot of myself when I was growing up and trying to figure out life. As a fan of the original film, I was honored to be a part of this whole world—but when they told me how Lavelle becomes part of the story, I just laughed my ass off and thought, All right, let’s do it…” 
  • SHARI HEADLEY ON WHAT AUDIENCES WILL LOVE: “I’m as excited as the audience and have no doubt that this will be a film that people will love. I’ll venture to say they’ll love it even more than the first one…” 
  • WESLEY SNIPES ON JOINING THE FILM: “I was like, ‘Whatever the role is, I want to be in it.’ Later, I was told that I was going to be a General—but really, I could have played a zebra and been just fine…”  

For more on this issue, visit ESSENCE.com or pick up the March/April issue on newsstands next week.

Film festival illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Planet Classroom Reflects on The Holocaust

In the new Planet Classroom podcast, young filmmakers reflect on the Holocaust and lessons to be learned about anti-semitism, racism and dehumanizing people of different races, religions and sexual identities.

The Holocaust survivors somehow got through one of the darkest periods in human history. Six million Jewish people were killed. GenZ are the last generation with the privilege to meet survivors. Young filmmakers Eva Suissa, Hank Schoen and Ian Kim joined Planet Classroom’s virtual host, Orb, to speak about lessons learned while making their film, “Hold the Sun in Your Hands: The Erika Jacoby Story”. The film, which won the Best Student Documentary at The American Pavilion Emerging Filmmaker Showcase at the Cannes Film Festival, is now screening on the Planet Classroom Network YouTube Channel.

Filmmaker Eva Suissa struggles with how anyone could have let the Holocaust actually happen, and believes that only art has “the unique capability” to express this “traumatic and horrible” chapter in human history. Her Co-Director, Hank Schoen, says the rise of white supremacists and politicians who support them scares him because people “still haven’t learned the lessons about anti-semitism and racism, about scapegoating and dehumanizing people of different races, religions or sexual identities.” Schoen believes however that their film offers “hope” and “a belief in people’s ability to change and redeem themselves.”

About The Planet Classroom Network

The Planet Classroom Network, organized by CMRubinWorld, brings together musicians, dancers, video game creators, filmmakers, learning innovators and emerging technologists from all over the world to entertain, educate and engage youth, and to provide a rich cultural experience at a time when art and learning institutions everywhere are not accessible. Curators and content contributors include Global Nomads, Global Oneness, the Martha Graham Dance Company, Commffest, KIDS FIRST!, Dream a Dream Foundation, OddWorld Inhabitants, Psyon Games, Challenge 59, LXL Ideas, Alliance for Young Artists & Writers/Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, Creative Visions Foundation, Battery Dance, SIMA Classroom, Young Voices for the Planet, Bard Conservatory, Taking It Global, Materials for the Arts, Book Creator, XTalks, NFFTY, Young People’s Chorus of New York City, The International Forum for the Literature and Culture of Peace, Ryan Wong Classroom, The Global Search for Education, Voice America, Rocketium and Brandartica. Young people from around the world played a significant role in conceptualizing, creating, and producing the network’s vision and programming.

Visit the Planet Classroom Network YouTube channel

ANDRE GAINES OF CINEMATION STUDIOS TEAMS BRING THE RIVETING STORY OF ELIZABETH CARMICHAEL TO HBO

When independent producers Andre Gaines and Allen Bain got an email from then
screenwriter Nick Cammilleri about a project called “The Lady and The Dale,” following the rise and fall of 1970’s transgender entrepreneur Elizabeth Carmichael and her radical fuel-efficient, three-
wheeled car known as The Dale, they knew it was the type of project they had to get their hands on.

“It is the only unsolicited inquiry that either of us have ever responded to,” says Gaines. “I have always
loved true crime. Next to sci-fi, and biographical, it’s my favorite genre. Liz Carmichael’s story was
incredible — we were hooked from the very beginning, and so was everyone on our team.”

The three developed the project for more than a year-and-a-half before sharing it with Emmy®-winning
producers of HBO’s Room 104 and Amazon’s Transparent, Mark and Jay Duplass who are repped at
the same agency as Gaines. Within days, the Duplass brothers were in, and together, the team pitched
the four-part documentary series to HBO, who bought it within weeks. The Lady and The Dale is a
probing exploration of family and identity seen through the lens of a fearless and wily innovator, an
extraordinarily resilient woman, and a dedicated parent. The story is told using archival material with
photo collages and animation to illustrate Carmichael’s experiences.

“Animation was an important part of my early career, and I knew it could work here in a unique way,”
says Gaines, who started Cinemation Studios in 2010 as an animation and visual effects
house. “Documentaries often use re-enactments to help tell the story, but with The Lady and the Dale,
animation just made sense.”

HBO describes the series as a riveting, human portrait of an imperfect trailblazer, an industrious
businesswoman, and a beloved mother whose ambition and unwavering optimism ran headlong into
widespread transphobia and media bias. Ahead of her time, forced to operate in an unaccommodating world, Liz Carmichael stands as a heroic figure of resilience and as a symbol of untrammeled
enterprise and survival.

“As a filmmaker, I am always drawn to stories with compelling characters,” says Gaines. “There are
universal themes in The Lady and the Dale that people can relate to regardless of color, gender, and
socioeconomic status.”

Like Carmichael, Gaines is a firm believer in charting his own destiny. A native of Toledo, Ohio his
Hollywood journey began working for former Universal Studios President Kevin Misher, and later for
Producer Doug Wick at Sony. “Both Kevin and Doug taught me not to ‘play the market’ meaning don’t
try to copy what’s out there,” Gaines recalls. “They also said, don’t be so niche that your material will
go over people’s heads.” He also learned how to pick winners from British independent film producer
Cassian Elwes, a long-time friend, and frequent collaborator, but credits his parents, Jimmy and
Sharon Gaines, with teaching him about finance early.

“My parents taught me about money when I was just a kid, and I figured out very early in this business
that if you don’t control the money, you don’t control the narrative,” says Gaines. “People say never
use your own money. I have always said the opposite.”

While at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, Gaines began writing and producing
animation, then later producing live-action foreign films and U.S. remakes with STUDIOCANAL. Over
the course of his 15-year Hollywood career, Gaines has financed and produced over twelve
documentary and narrative feature films including Spike Lee’s Da Sweet Blood of Jesus, Ladder to
Damascus, Emmy-winner By the People: The Election of Barack Obama, Oscar-nominee Embrace
the Serpent, and SXSW winner Bill Nye: Science Guy on Netflix. Brazilian Western, The Immortal
Warrior, Bricks in Motion, and The Purple Onion were four films Gaines co-financed and produced
with first-time filmmakers in the director’s chair.

Gaines recently wrapped production on the reboot of Stephen King’s Children of the Corn, one of the
first films to shoot during the early months of the pandemic in 2020. In addition, Gaines is producing
Buzzed directed by Marc Forster, about famed astronaut Buzz Aldrin whose life took a turn for the
worse after landing on the moon, and Killing Gawker directed by Seth Gordon, a collaborator with
Gaines on Bill Nye: Science Guy, about the raucous trial of Hulk Hogan versus the defunct tabloid
news site Gawker.com. He re-teams with his Lady and the Dale partner Allen Bain and Blumhouse
TV on another upcoming documentary series Stateless, about a group of bitcoin anarchists who
attempt to build a society free of government rule in the Caribbean.

Gaines is also in the final stages of a project he financed, wrote, and directed – the highly anticipated
documentary feature film about legendary comedian and activist Dick Gregory. The journey has been
a special one for Gaines.

“I cold-called Mr. Gregory in 2015 and pitched the idea to start filming him. He was in,” says Gaines. “It
has been a six-year labor of love to bring the story of this extraordinary comedian, activist, cultural,
and entertainment icon to the screen, and I cannot wait for people to see it.”

Gaines says his time with Dick Gregory, who died in 2017, was a “period of enlightenment” for him
that redirected a path for his life and career in ways he could not have imagined.

“I’ve been blessed with an incredible career, filled with wonderful mentors, awesome friends, and
supportive family,” says Gaines. “My mission now is to pay it forward and help other filmmakers
achieve their dreams while continuing to make meaningful and transformative art.”
Byline: Sherri McGee McCovey

The Lady and The Dale debuted with two back-to-back episodes on HBO on SUNDAY,
JANUARY 31 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, with new episodes on subsequent Sundays at 9 p.m. ET/PT. THE
LADY AND THE DALE is also available to stream on HBO Max.

ABOUT THE LADY AND THE DALE

A riveting, human portrait of an imperfect trans trailblazer, an industrious
businesswoman and a beloved mother whose ambition and unwavering optimism ran headlong into
widespread transphobia and media bias. Her life leaves a complicated legacy. Ahead of her time,
forced to operate in an unaccommodating world, Liz Carmichael stands as a heroic reminder of the
prejudices facing the trans community and as a symbol of untrammeled enterprise and survival.

ABOUT ANDRE GAINES

Andre Gaines is a Los Angeles-based producer, writer, director and the founder
of Cinemation Studios, a company that finances and produces content for the
motion picture and television industries. Over the course of his fifteen-year career,
Gaines has financed and produced more than twelve documentary and
narrative feature films.

Gaines started off 2021 as a producer alongside Mark and Jay Duplass of the HBO
four-part documentary series, The Lady and The Dale, the true story of Elizabeth
Carmichael, a transgender automotive entrepreneur who introduced a bold,
new three-wheel car in the 1970s. His other upcoming productions include: the
documentary series Stateless with Blumhouse TV; the remake of Stephen King’s
Children of the Corn; Buzzed starring Jeremy Renner and Keira Knightley; Killing
Gawker written by Charles Randolph and directed by Seth Gordon, and the
award-winning animated feature The Immortal Warrior starring Rodrigo Santoro.

Andre Gaines

Drive-In screening pop up article illustration by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 MAGAZINE

Drive-In at the Ebell of LA

Drive-In screening awards-eligible films across LA & launches this weekend @ Ebell of Los Angeles
 
Necessity drives awards-eligible filmmaker Phyllis Stuart to create the Your Consideration Drive-In Screening Series for the awards season.
 
With the 2021 awards season in full swing and theaters still shuttered, awards voters are left to judge competing films at home via an online link this season. It’s not ideal. So one awards-eligible filmmaker, Phyllis Stuart (Wild Daze) launched a series the Your Consideration Drive-In screening series to give voters a place to experience films the way their creators intended them to be seen on the big screen. Their Drive-In will follow all public health and safety requirements as mandated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health and the City of Los Angeles.
 
Awards voters are inundated with online voting links Stuart said, so motivated by The old proverb: Needs Must When The Devil Drives, aim to give my film a fighting chance to reach voters and offer other awards-eligible filmmakers a place to envelop audiences Conveniently located pop-up locations keep voters close to home while allowing them to watch films.
 
WHAT: Your Consideration Drive-in Screening Series for film awards voters
WHERE: VARIOUS / FIRST VENUE: THE EBELL OF LOS ANGELES: East Parking Lot @742 S. Lucerne Blvd. LA CA 90005
WHEN: Opening Night January 30th & 31st at 7 P.M.
HOW: Adhering to the 2021 awards outreach rules, all Your Consideration Drive-In Screening invitations will be emailed to awards voters from participating studios and campaign publicists, who will each host their own screenings
 
Like a traveling treasure hunt, the Your Consideration pop-up drive-in screening series allows Los Angeles film awards voter audiences the chance to travel short distances to see awards-eligible films on a big screen, from the safety of their own vehicles. Says its founder, Phyllis Stuart, always loved scavenger hunts as a kid, and since we must still socially distance this is a safe way to witness cinematic splendor together.
 
The first two nights of the series will take place at The Ebell of Los Angeles on January 30th and 31st with Stuart’s feature-length documentary Wild Daze. Thereafter, until April 2021 studio awards-eligible films will run at three Your Consideration Drive-In venues.
 
Director of Special Events, Anessa Birkemeier believes supporting the documentary work of a female filmmaker like “Wild Daze” director Phyllis Stuart aligns with the mission at The Ebell of Los Angeles: To participate in and encourage the educational, cultural, and social growth of the diverse LA community. The venue parking lot with 150 spaces at 742 S. Lucerne Blvd., sits directly across from the clubhouse, where the Your Consideration Drive-In will launch. Ms. Birkemeier added, “The Ebell of Los Angeles is excited to host a drive-in experience that connects our community and supports the film industry.”
 
ABOUT YOUR CONSIDERATION DRIVE-IN SCREENING SERIES
Featuring a 40-foot inflatable screen with a 30,000 lumen Barco projector and FM transmitted audio, the pop-up drive-in accommodates 75 to 150 vehicles for evening film screenings beginning January 30th through April 2021. The series offers film awards, voters, the opportunity to watch awards-eligible films on the big screen in a charming Los Angeles cinematic environment. For more venue details visit HERE and to book a screening visit HERE.
 
ABOUT THE EBELL OF LOS ANGELES
The Ebell of Los Angeles is home to the Wilshire Ebell Women’s Club, an active club that began in 1894. In 1927 the women built their historic landmark in the mid-Wilshire area of Los Angeles. The 75,000 square foot property includes a tri-level clubhouse and the 1,238-seat Wilshire Ebell Theatre that has hosted top artists including Cher and Stevie Wonder and lectures by world leaders like Dr. Jill Biden. Judy Garland was discovered on the Broadway-style stage while performing as Baby Frances Gumm. Revenue from the Theatre, private events, film and TV&  productions fund the operations so that the Ebell women can continue their social and philanthropic work in the community. The Ebell will serve as one of three venues for the Your Consideration Drive-In screening series.
 
ABOUT WILD DAZE THE MOVIE
Under the banner of Light Productions (The Women’s Image Awards, 50 Years of Funny Females), filmmaker Phyllis Stuart forges an awards-eligible documentary Wild Daze, a project six years in the making, fueled by a fierce desire to save African wildlife, while protecting the women, children and forest peoples whose fates are tied up with the survival of the continent’s most iconic and majestic animals. Visit www.wilddazethemovie.com and follow developments on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Trailer HERE.
The Bell Twins illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 magazine

UNSTOPPABLE: THE BELL TWINS

By Emily Bunn

Forget The Suite Life’s Zach and Cody– Disney’s newest dynamic duo of twins, Isaac and Elijah Bell, have landed lead roles in Walt Disney Studio Picture’s up and coming release, “Safety.” (2020) The film will be released on the new Disney+ streaming platform, and was directed by Academy award-winning director and producer, Reggie Hudlin.

Their careers began as child models, but they dreamed of making it on the big screen. Inspired by their favorite actors and actresses, such as Denzel Washington, Robert de Niro, and Viola Davis, the brothers trained and studied acting at Mad Acting Studio with Max Decker. Decker has trained stars such as Brianna Hildebrand (Deadpool) and Amirah Johnson (Shameless), to name a few.

360 Magazine sat down with the starlets to talk teenagerdom in Hollywood, brotherly love, and Peter Pan. The transition from being a child actor to a Disney star is no small feat, but Elijah and Isaac possess a natural ability to entertain. Elijah and Isaac explain that they found their early career transition to be relatively easy, having been in front of the camera from such a young age. Far from being shy, the duo shines in the spotlight, especially when they’re together. Elijah and Isaac confidently explain, “you just have to look at the camera as your best friend and trust your own instincts.”

Luckily, Elijah and Isaac had the support of their family regarding their decision to begin acting. Hailing from Australia, the brothers had their eyes set on LA’s film industry, an ambitious undertaking. While no one else in their family is in the film industry, Elijah and Isaac both knew that acting was something they wanted to pursue. The twins continue explaining that in “Australia… acting is definitely not the biggest thing for most Aussies. But our mum and dad never doubted us during the decision to become actors once, which is nothing but a blessing having their full support.”

Elijah and Isaac were further supported by their acting coach Max Decker, at Los Angeles’ Mad Acting Studio. Speaking fondly of their coaching experience, the boys remark that working with Max is the best thing that they could have done for themselves as actors. Praising Decker’s impressive craft, Elijah and Isaac gratefully exclaimed, “He’s like master splinter from ‘Ninja Turtles’. He’s so invested in just the work aspect of acting, that nothing else matters but making sure his actors are sharp when it comes time to be on set. We couldn’t be more thankful for him, thank you Big Max.”

Being cast by Disney for their first roles as actors was a momentous milestone for Elijah and Isaac. The twins grew up watching Disney’s “Peter Pan,” so being cast to star in Walt Disney Studio’s “Safety” (2020) was “an absolute dream come true.” Before realizing their dreams of stardom on the big screen, the two brothers both had wanted to become D-1 athletes. Fortunately, “Safety” (2020) is a film revolving around football drama, so it was the perfect breakout role to combine the brother’s interests and talents. Living the life of a D-1 athlete in the film allowed for the brothers to vicariously live out their earlier dreams while simultaneously achieving their current aspirations. Another shared dream of the duo would be to work with Denzel Washington or Marlon Brando.

Looking towards the future, Elijah and Isaac’s ultimate goal is tell stories through their acting and connect with people along the way. In telling their own lives’ story, the brothers remarked that if they had to choose any actor to tell their own life story, it would be one another.

With mutual dreams of the big screen, all of the training that Elijah and Isaac have experienced has only brought them closer. Despite the pressures of the entertainment industry, their family dynamic has only become stronger and tighter knit. “We had to learn that having each other to support one another is the ultimate gift anyone could ask for. We continue to push each other to our fullest potential– yes, we can be hard on one another. but who wouldn’t want that? Someone to let you know when you are bullshitting, or when you are doing the right thing and being congratulated for the hard work being done. We are like Yin and Yang and unbreakable force.”

Carlo Alberto Orecchia photographs The Bell Twins for 360 MAGAZINE

Carlo Alberto Orecchia photographs The Bell Twins for 360 MAGAZINE

*Photos by Carlo Alberto Orecchia

Asian-American LGBTQ+ Actor Slays Stereotypes in Monsters of Man

Mark Toia’s Monster’s of Man has been crushing the online streaming service game, sitting on AppleTV’s Top Movies, Top Rentals, Highlights, and currently ranking in the top 200 movies on IMDb having just debuted on December 8th, 2020.

Hawaiian/Korean-American actor Conrad K. Pratt from Kāne’ohe, Hawai’i (Hawai’i Five-O, The Wolverine, GLEE, The Real O’Neals) was approached by production initially to play Bao, one of the medical students the film centers around. After learning that he had an extensive background in dance, motion capture and stunts, Toia quickly offered him the roles of the four killer robots as well. Pratt’s physicality was highlighted several times throughout the film, mostly in his cat and mouse chase through the Cambodian jungle and several of the robot-on-robot fight sequences.

“My dance and theatre background really helped me in creating these characters. I was incredibly honored that Mark has trusted me with the movements of our antagonists, as any sort of robot movement can go cheesy unbelievably quick. Working on Monsters of Man, we actually shot in the Cambodian jungle so I was lucky to have the surroundings right there for me. On a normal Mo-Cap shoot, you’re on a blue screen stage and it’s up to you to create that masterpiece around you. A project like Avatar would be such a wild experience and challenge, one that I would love to take on one day.”

The stigma surrounding masculinity in both the Asian-American and LGBTQ+ communities seem to not deter Pratt from forging on in his career. Given that he’s competing in Caucasian and heterosexually dominant avenues of Hollywood, it actually seems to be doing the exact opposite.

“I think the words ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ are so unbelievably dated. Who gives a flying ‘you know what.’ It’s an opinion, there’s no right answer. I do, however, believe that both the BIPOC and LGBTQ+ communities are being better represented and more visible across the entertainment spectrum. To represent both of my communities on a project of this scale was an absolute privilege and I look forward to crushing these ‘masculine/feminine’ stereotypes by just being unapologetically me.”

Monsters of Man is now available world-wide on Apple TV, Amazon Prime, Vimeo On Demand, YouTube, Google Play, and XBOX with more streaming services being added in the future.