Posts tagged with "Hip-Hop"

Betty (Get Money) cover art for Yung Gray via Republic Records Media for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Yung Gravy – Betty (Get Money)

Strutting back into the spotlight, multiplatinum hip-hop phenomenon Yung Gravy returns with a brand new single and video entitled “Betty (Get Money).” Listen to “Betty (Get Money)”HERE.
 
“Betty (Get Money)” pops off as a generation-bridging banger of the highest order produced by Dillon Francis, Dwilly, and Popnick. On the track, Gravy reignites the classic chorus of Rick Astley’s Never Gonna Give You Up” (and its iconic synths). In between, he ignites one clever and catchy bar after another until he turns up on the hook, “Never take a L no more, never take a damn thing slow, all I know is chase this dough and get money.”  Directed by Adriaan Kirchner,  the 80’s inspired music video finds Gravy surrounded by beautiful synchronized dancers in elaborate settings as he dons fresh white suiting, a fur coat, and hard bottom shoes.
 
About the single, he commented, “With every project I’ve done, I’ve always had a continuing narrative with MILF names. This is like the eighth name. ‘Betty’ is a dope one. It’s inspired by Betty White, RIP. I reserved the title for one of my favorite songs.”
 
It paves the way for much more music to come from Gravy very soon.
 
This year alone, Gravy has only accelerated his meteoric rise. He co-headlined a massive tour with Dillon Francis and unleashed the Cake & Cognac EP. Additionally, he played to packed arenas with the legendary Limp Bizkit. He has also churned out a series of RIAA certified platinum and gold bangers thus far. These include the platinum “Mr. Clean, platinum “1 Thot 2 Thot Red Thot Blue Thot, gold “oops!!!,” gold “Magic”  and gold “Whip A Tesla” with bbno$.
 
ABOUT YUNG GRAVY:

Only the best things get better with age—wine, whisky, cheddar, beef, 401ks, and the list goes on. Yung Gravy gets better with age too. For all of the swagger and style he exhibited upon his arrival, he somehow got even smoother since introducing himself back in 2016. The jewelry is more expensive, the outfits are more ostentatious, the hair is longer, and the flows are harder. Of course, the multiplatinum Minnesota-born MC is still the kind of guy you keep away from your mom (if you don’t want a new stepdad). 2018’s Snow Cougar EP blessed the world with the RIAA certified platinum singles “Mr. Clean” and “1 Thot 2 Thot Red Thot Blue Thot. His 2019 full-length debut, Sensational, yielded the gold-certified “Magic” and gold-certified “Whip A Tesla” with best friend and longtime cohort bbno$ (pronounced “baby no money”). Alongside bbno$, he dropped the Baby Gravy EP and its follow-up Baby Gravy 2 EP. Meanwhile, Gasanova put the pedal to the metal with gold-certified “oops!!!. He joined forces with Dillon Francis for the Cake & Cognac EP and a blockbuster co-headline tour. He’s the rare force of nature who can shut down arenas with Limp Bizkit or co-star in a music video with a cast member from Vanderpump Rules. Manifesting his dream collaboration, he wound up sharing the screen with Martha Stewart in a commercial for her frozen food line shown in theaters nationwide. After streams in the billions, packed venues, and “side missions” with Martha Stewart, he stirs up his tastiest sauce yet on more music to come in 2022.

Yung Gray artist image via Republic Records Media for use by 360 MAGAZINE
YVONTI artist photo via Johannes Timander (Flick Agency) for use by 360 MAGAZINE

YVONTI × MVRE

Electric Dance music phenomenon YVONTI has caught the attention of countless for their distinctive take on concealing their identity. Though mask mandates have slowly been lifted in the year 2022, YVONTI keeps themselves hidden by wearing a mask. That’s right; this artist’s true identity has been kept completely secret.

So, why exactly do they do it? Why did this choose this route for their career?

YVONTI decided to hide their identity to take a stand in opposition to societal norms, forcing audiences to throw away preconceptions revolving around race, gender and sexuality. In hopes to remind audiences that it doesn’t matter who you are or what you look like, the true matter at hands matters is the music that is being produced. An artist unlike any other that we’ve seen modernly, YVONTI continues to break boundaries.

Adding in the likes of Swedish Dance Pop Music producer/artist MVRE, we see the two powerhouses collaborate on YVONTI’s latest single “Looking For Me” with a fresh remixed track. The track is full of modern, reimagined pop and dance music influences, showcasing the duos true mutual power.

MVRE, too, stands up for what is truly important to him through his musical endeavors. As a member of the LGBTQ+ community, MVRE has continued to voice how he often grew up with no other artists inside of the Electric Dance music category that he truly connected with. Speaking on such important topics has cemented himself as an advocate within the musical realm.

The 360 team had the opportunity to chat with both YVONTI and MVRE about their artistic careers.

When speaking with YVONTI, we were able to learn more about their reasoning behind the choice to conceal their identity, their musical inspirations and so much more. Let’s dive in.

Q: When did you know that you wanted to pursue a career in music?

A: Music has been a key part of my life for as long as I can remember. In my teens I discovered Electronic Dance Music and fell in love. After that I started producing and realized I wanted to pursue a career in music.

Q: What artists do you look up to the most?

A: I feel quite connected to bands like The Beatles when it comes to my message but musically my inspiration comes from artists like Avicii, Swedish House Mafia, Marshmello, among others.

Q: Tell us a little more about your decision to mask your identity as an artist, and when did you make that artistic decision for your brand?

A: I believe that many uprising issues in the world revolves around preconceptions about colour, sexuality, gender, etc. and I’ve seen it affect the music industry as well. I want people to judge me for my music not judge me for the way I look or the way I act. People are different and if there was more acceptance around the differences there would be fewer conflicts. Strong forces are clearly trying to polarize our society and have so far succeeded since friends/families now can become enemies solely based on different political views. Though I understand that emotions are powerful in questions like these, it shouldn’t ruin those important relationships. I want to be a force to counter the polarization that is connected to preconceptions by letting people judge my music not my person. My plan is to reveal my identity in the future to prove my point.

Q: What type of artist would you describe yourself as? What genres are your favorite to create for?

A: My roots come from the EDM genre but recently I’ve enjoyed producing more pop-like music as well as hiphop.

Q: What does music mean for YVONTI?

A: When I was young, music took me to another place where I could escape reality for a while. I believe that many people feel the same as me, an example is when we’re on a bus or plane and we plug in our headsets and listen to music to escape the less entertaining reality. It’s a way to ”capture the moment” even when the moment isn’t the most enjoyable one. In these situations (and everywhere else) you can choose music after your current mood in order to make yourself feel the way you want to feel. Music is powerful, it can help people in all kinds of situations and my goal is to play a part in my listeners life by creating music that connects them to their emotions.

Q: Will YVONTI’s identity ever be revealed?

A: As noted above I will reveal my identity in the future and if you pay attention you might notice when I start dropping clues on who I am.

Q: What’s next for YVONTI?

A: We’re soon revealing my next release which I am really excited about and more news will follow shortly after. Stay tuned!

360 then got to speak with MVRE about their early beginnings, what LGBTQ+ representation truly means to them and about diversification in the electronic music scene. Let’s take a look at what they had to say.

Q: What was it like growing up in a small town with a lack of diversity and inclusion?

A: I guess you never think of it much as a kid cause all you know is your hometown, but as I got older I slowly started to realize that I didn’t relate that much to the people around me and that there were a few too many that I didn’t share views or values with. Anything that stood out in any way wasn’t really received or accepted particularly well amongst (not all but) most people. I do love my hometown and growing up there, but as with all small towns, however charming, people have a tendency to become cut off and conservative in a way. It’s very sheltered if you don’t actively venture out to see and experience “the real world”.

Q: Did you admire/look up to any artists while growing up that have influenced your artistic career?

A: I think Blink 182 were my first idols going into my early teens and pop punk was the first genre that I really fell in love with. I think I picked up a lot of my way of playing guitar from pop punk, something that I’ve carried over into my EDM productions. I always try to incorporate at least some guitar! Justice was a huge inspiration for getting into electronic music and still holds a special place in my heart and I’ll never forget the first time I heard Swedish House Mafia or Skrillex. I think that speaks a lot for how varied my productions can be, I really take inspiration from most music I like in some way.

Q: When did you decide to pursue creating dance pop music? Did you grow up listening to the genre?

A: No, not really. Like I mentioned, I got into Pop Punk early and from that more Punk and Metal as I started to play in bands. It wasn’t until High School when I heard Justice and similar acts that I started to dabble in making electronic music, though I knew nothing about how to do it. At the end of High School I had gotten into more House music and Dubstep as well and I had my first few DJ-gigs at small clubs. I practiced my productions and my sound started to slowly move towards the Dance Pop-ish sound it has today and 10+ years later here I am, still learning haha! MVRE didn’t come around until around 2017, which was when I decided that I wanted to get more serious about my music.

Q: How important is it for the youth, specifically LGBTQ, to see themselves in the people that they look up to the most?

A: I think it’s very important! It’s about feeling validated, that you belong and knowing you can achieve your dreams, the way you want, just the way you are. Seeing someone “like you” that you look up to can mean a lot.

Q: Do you think that the electronic music scene is making steps towards diversification, or do you think that there’s a long way to go?

A: Yes I do, I think that it’s moving in the right direction. You see more female DJs and artist-producers now than 10 years ago, and more LGBTQ representation too. The mainstream EDM scene is still very “straight-male” dominated, but again, I think it’s moving in the right direction. The more diversity in any genre or field, the more vibrant and meaningful the experience can be for everyone and we all learn and grow from it.

Q: What does electronic music mean to you?

A: I think it’s such a wide and interesting span of sounds, emotions and expressions. You can go deep and vibey, dark and distorted, uplifting and melodic and everything in between. To me I think electronic music is both freedom and constraint at the same time. I can express myself really freely and genuinely, but I also want to make you move, to dance, and that keeps me grounded in a way.

Q: What can we expect from MVRE in the future?

A: A lot of new music, I’m really excited for the projects coming up! Also it would be really fun to get out and start playing shows again. Nothing is in the books yet but who knows what the future holds!

Lute's deluxe "Gold Mouf" album cover art via Umusic for use by 360 Magazine

Lute – Gold Mouf Deluxe

After crafting an entrancing debut, headlined by his gripping issues with anxiety and self-doubt, North Carolina MC Lute quenched fans’ thirst for more music with his deluxe release of Gold Mouf, including “Luther’s Freestyle,” “Run It Back,” and “Like Wine.” The latter receives the visual treatment from 12VY as GRAMMY-Award winner DJ Drama bolsters Lute’s lyrical exercise with his braggadocios adlibs. Standing in front of a fleet of cars, including a cherry red BMW, Lute’s confidence reigns supreme as he barks at his detractors with a series of jabs: “Shit, so fuck who ain’t believin’ me/ Can never say I’m wack, ’cause you rap niggas never seein’ me.” “Like Wine” comes on the heels of Lute’s recently released videos “Eye to Eye” and “Changes.” Check out Lute’s latest offering HERE

The GRAMMY-nominated rapper’s newest project is just one of many exciting developments in recent weeks. Lute performed at the long-awaited return of the annual Dreamville Festival last month, with his set praised in a shoutout from Complex. He also joined his labelmates for two cuts on the D-Day: A Gangsta Grillz Mixtape compilation, which debuted in the top 5 of Billboard’s Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums and Top Rap Albums charts. 

With Gold Mouf Chronicles, Lute gets vulnerable about his battle with anxiety, and the toll it had on his family.  He also shares his bout with open-heart surgery that left his future up to fate. While the procedure was successful, Lute’s experiences have a lasting mental and physical impact. But rather than succumb to his fears, Lute valiantly wears his vulnerabilities on his sleeves, advancing his skills as an MC and deepening his connection with his fans

SK8 press photo via Jimmy Fontaine for use by 360 Magazine

SK8 – Taylor Gang

Omaha, Nebraska-born, LA-based artist SK8 has risen to acclaim with an insatiable desire for his craft. Beginning music in his early teens, the now 27-year-old recording artist has opened for the likes of Lil Wayne, Rae Sremmurd while also working with Wiz Khalifa.

SK8’s devotion to his music has been evident through the course of his career, earning him widespread success – which he doesn’t plan on ceasing anytime soon. 360 Magazine’s Vaughn Lowery had the opportunity to speak with SK8 regarding his rise to critical notoriety, where his creativity stems from and his star-studded new album Last Day on Earth.

Listen to SK8 on 360 MAG PODCAST HERE.

To truly understand the talent that is SK8, it’s important to appreciate his start in the music game. Nathan Maloley, also known as SK8, has had a passion for music his entire life. He began making his own music and downloading his tracks onto CD’s when he was in his early teen years.  

Even taking choir for a few years in school, SK8 remembers his early beginnings writing music. While growing up, he found “that [music] was almost my escape. I would always go home […] and look up YouTube beats and [begin] writing.”

Back in 2013 and 2014, artists were constantly being found online via social media. SK8 recalls searching for new artists to listen to, “I really wanted to find a new artist, like, who was the up-and-coming artist?” Little did he know, his time was swiftly coming.

Stuck in the middle between a potential basketball or music career, SK8 juggled his two loves throughout high school leading into college. The Omaha community knew about his dreams to become a rapper, and this led to further connections with the people around him.

SK8 attended Hastings College in Nebraska, a performing arts school which allowed him to also play basketball. During his freshman year, artists would frequently come perform at the school, which led to SK8’s early performance gigs. SK8 would open for the artists coming to the school, gaining him even more recognition within the music industry.

His freshman year, SK8, too, decided that he was going to go after his dream of chasing a professional music career, dropping out of college, and giving up basketball. Moving back home with his mother, SK8 dove into music, which took off quickly after.

His debut break into the scene came from his collaboration with Jack and Jack, popular Viners back in the mid 2010’s. The Viners went to SK8’s high school and decided to link up and work on music together. They came together to create “Like That,” a track that ended up going certified gold independently.

This collaboration ultimately kicked off his career, and SK8 joined Jack and Jack on their tour. Taking full advantage of his time on the road, SK8 made it his mission to connect with a new fanbase. “I was the guy that was opening up, like, yo ‘Imma get as many fans as I can.’” He remembers bonding with fans after the shows, gaining more of a following on social media after the tour closed.

Joining Jack and Jack on their tour opened even more opportunities than SK8 could have ever foreseen. Through the widescale exposure that he gained on tour, this allowed SK8 to connect and open for popular rap artists Rae Sremmurd and Lil Wayne.

Well on his way with a whole new set of fans, SK8 embarked on his first solo tour in 2016 celebrating his Skaterade project. The tour was a great time for SK8 to travel and meet his fanbase. He recollects the thrill, stating, “It was a really, really cool tour to see where my fans were at, and just [to] independently be on the road, it was a really good time.”

Soon after the tour wrapped up, SK8 began contemplating what his next steps were going to be. After accomplishing so much in the early stages of his career, what would come next? He had a longstanding dream of opening his own label, to which he began to pursue while connecting industry professional James McMillan.

McMillan and SK8 joined forces to start the imprint known as Alignment Records. The two began pitching their record label and found partnership with Atlanta Records swiftly after opening up Alignment.

Continuing further with the process, SK8 questioned who would help oversee the project, “Sh**, I got the label, but who’s gonna manage this sh**?”

And then, it seemingly all fell into place.

Having met Wiz Khalifa in Los Angeles a few times prior, SK8 recalled one late night in the studio where the two artists began their first collaboration track together. At 4 AM, Wiz happened to be at the same studio as SK8, where SK8 showed Wiz some of his new tracks. The pair started going back and forth in the studio, knocking out a hook and verse, completing their first joint track.

After this night, they kept in touch via Wiz’s manager Will Dzomback. Dzomback was very interested in SK8, inviting him to sign with Taylor Gang Management. Platforming SK8’s talents to a whole new level, this collaboration set his career to new altitudes.

Previously more immersed in the rap/hip-hop genre, SK8 showcases a newfound rock/pop punk era on his new album Last Day on Earth. He accredits his longstanding love for rock music back to his adolescence.

My dad listened to Bob Marley, that was his favorite artist, […] I grew up listening to Red Hot Chili Peppers, and also my hip hop inspirations too, I’ve always listened to a bunch of sh** like Nirvana and Kurt Cobain.”

The start of SK8’s transition to the rock/pop punk sound arrived after working with Machine Gun Kelly’s drummer, Rook, in the studio. Rook and SK8 met in LA a few years back and have stayed friends for quite some time.

Bouncing off of each other in the studio, they began recreating and mixing old rock classics. Popular tracks from artists like SK8’s beloved Red Hot Chili Peppers and Nirvana became completely transformed; SK8 had found his new sound.

“[Rook] started just playing some live instruments, […] he started playing some sh**, I think it was the ‘Pages melody, and that was kinda the first song that we were like ‘this is gonna be tight,’” said SK8. “I listen to a lot of old school stuff, […] I wanted to just strip the music, and not just go on beats. We really took the time, went in there with guitar riffs.”

Tracks like “Girl Next Door” came out of this genre blend experimental phase that SK8 boarded on. “It was really cool bringing Wiz into that feel, too,” he says about combining hip-hop with rock influences, “I’ll have my whole album finished, and you know, I’ll have verses open just in case, […] he came to me and was like ‘Nah, that one right there, ‘Girl next door.’”

The addition of live instrumental pieces took the album to whole heights. SK8 accredits this while speaking about the vision for Last Day on Earth, stating, “The motivation really was like, yo, I wanna create something that’s authentic to me but still I wanted to, like, have live elements, […] I didn’t want to just rap and do melodies over just beats. I wanted to create something that had all live elements.”

In the works since the start of the pandemic, Last Day on Earth has been a long time coming. Taking over two years to perfectly craft and complete the body of work allowed SK8 to fully enjoy the experience of making the project.

“I really enjoyed making this project,” he begins, “I had a really, really good team around me that helped me bring this album to them, so I have to give props to them, for real.”

Considering what’s next for SK8, the sky seems to be the limit. At the forefront of his priorities is to stay consistent and continue pushing out new music that he believes in.

The two-year hiatus between his previous drops allowed SK8 to have “a good period of time to actually really find the sound that I wanted to find, and now that I found it, I’m really dialing in.” He remarks, “I wanted to tap into the real me, I didn’t want to tell a story that wasn’t me, I didn’t want to do nothing that wasn’t me.”

For those with aspirations of starting a career in music, SK8 has some great advice. “It may sound cliché, but never give up. If it’s something that you really, really enjoy and really love doing, just don’t give up, there’s been a lot of ups, there’s been a lot of downs […] don’t give up, your time is gonna come, you’re gonna get your break.

“You don’t have to be mainstream, you don’t gotta to be the biggest artist in the world, you can still make music and make money at the same time. That’s what I, like, wake up and am always grateful and blessed to wake up and do music, that’s what I love.”

Article by: McKinley Franklin x Vaughn Lowery

SK8 press photo via Jimmy Fontaine for use by 360 Magazine
SK8 press photo via Jimmy Fontaine for use by 360 Magazine
Photo Credit: Jimmy Fontaine
Lil Nas X illustration by Kaelen Felix for use by 360 magazine

The Grammy Awards

Sunday, April 3, the 64th Grammy Awards were held at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. Trevor Noah hosted the esteemed award show where looks were turned on the red carpet, performances were given and winners were crowned.

A good number of awards were bestowed before the telecast commenced, including The Best Rap Album award won by Tyler, the Creator’s Call Me If You Get Lost. The Grammy’s have had a longstanding history of opposition with hip-hop dating all the way back to 1989. A pattern of not broadcasting or platforming hip-hop has grown to be infamous with the Grammy’s, hinting as to why many artists in the genre were not in attendance and have even boycotted the show.

Of the most captivating performances of the night included Olivia Rodrigo, who walked away with a stunning three Grammy Awards by the end of the night. She took to the stage while performing her breakout 2021 hit, ‘Drivers License,’ which ultimately won the Grammy for Best Pop Solo Performance.

Other noteworthy acts included Billie Eilish’s rendition of her hit ‘Happier Than Ever,’ and Lil Nas X joined by Jack Harlow to perform fan favorite ‘Industry Baby.’

Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy sent in a pre-taped message to the Vegas showing in which he spoke on the significance of music and support for Ukraine right now. While words were spoken, John Legend took to the stage to perform “Free,” with Ukrainian artists Siuzanna Iglidan, Mika Newton and Lyuba Yakimchuck.

Zelenskyy began his speech, stating, “The war doesn’t let us choose who survives and who stays in eternal silence, […] Our musicians wear body armor instead of tuxedos. They sing to the wounded in hospitals. Even to those who can’t hear them. But the music will break through anyway.

“We defend our freedom. To live. To love. To sound. On our land, we are fighting Russia which brings horrible silence with its bombs. Fill the silence with your music. Fill it today. Tell our story. Tell the truth about the war on your social networks and TV. But not silence.”

One of the most touching moments of the night came from Jazmine Sullivan‘s superb acceptance speech as her album was named the R&B Album Grammy winner.

Sullivan spoke to the inspiration of the piece, and how the album embodied a voice for Black women, while stating, “I wrote this project to deal with my own shame and unforgiveness around decisions I made in my 20s that weren’t favorable. But what it ended up being was a safe space for Black women to tell their stories, for us to learn from each other, laugh with each other, and not be exploited at the same time. That’s what I’m most grateful for. Shoutout to all Black women who are just living their lives and being beautiful.”

We also saw Doja Cat and SZA receive their first wins for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance for their collaboration on “Kiss Me More.” Their acceptance speech rung more lighthearted, with both artists cracking jokes about Doja rushing to the bathroom prior to the announcement. SZA teased, “Bro, you went to the bathroom for five minutes. Are you serious?” to which Doja replied, “I have never taken such a fast piss in my whole life.”

The pair continued to thank express their gratefulness to each other and those around them, to which Doja showed emotional rawness while raving, “I like to downplay shit, but this? It’s a big deal. Thank you, everybody.

See the full list of 2022 Grammy Award winners.

Record of the Year

“Leave the Door Open,” Silk Sonic

Album of the Year

“We Are,” Jon Batiste

Song of the Year

“Leave the Door Open,” Brandon Anderson, Christopher Brody Brown, Dernst Emile II and Bruno Mars, songwriters (Silk Sonic)

Best New Artist

Olivia Rodrigo

Best Pop Solo Performance

“Drivers License,” Olivia Rodrigo

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance

“Kiss Me More,” Doja Cat featuring SZA

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

“Love for Sale,” Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga

Best Pop Vocal Album

“Sour,” Olivia Rodrigo

Best Dance/Electronic Recording

“Alive,” Rüfüs Du Sol

Best Dance/Electronic Music Album

“Subconsciously,” Black Coffee

Best Alternative Music Album

“Daddy’s Home,” St. Vincent

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album

“Tree Falls,” Taylor Eigsti

Best Rock Performance

“Making a Fire,” Foo Fighters

Best Metal Performance

“The Alien,” Dream Theater

Best Rock Song

“Waiting on a War,” Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins, Rami Jaffee, Nate Mendel, Chris Shiflett and Pat Smear, songwriters (Foo Fighters)

Best Rock Album

“Medicine at Midnight,” Foo Fighters

Best R&B Performance

“Leave the Door Open,” Silk Sonic

“Pick Up Your Feelings,” Jazmine Sullivan

Best Traditional R&B Performance

“Fight for You,” H.E.R.

Best R&B Song

“Leave the Door Open,” Brandon Anderson, Christopher Brody Brown, Dernst Emile II and Bruno Mars, songwriters (Silk Sonic)

Best Progressive R&B Album

“Table for Two,” Lucky Daye

Best Rock Album

“Medicine at Midnight,” Foo Fighters

Best R&B Performance

“Leave the Door Open,” Silk Sonic

“Pick Up Your Feelings,” Jazmine Sullivan

Best Traditional R&B Performance

“Fight for You,” H.E.R.

Best R&B Song

“Leave the Door Open,” Brandon Anderson, Christopher Brody Brown, Dernst Emile II and Bruno Mars, songwriters (Silk Sonic)

Best Progressive R&B Album

“Table for Two,” Lucky Daye

Best Country Duo/Group Performance

“Younger Me,” Brothers Osborne

Best Country Song

“Cold,” Dave Cobb, J.T. Cure, Derek Mixon and Chris Stapleton, songwriters (Chris Stapleton)

Best Country Album

“Starting Over,” Chris Stapleton

Best New Age Album

“Divine Tides,” Stewart Copeland and Ricky Kej

Best Improvised Jazz Solo

“Humpty Dumpty (Set 2),” Chick Corea, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album

“Songwrights Apothecary Lab,” Esperanza Spalding

Best Jazz Instrumental Album

“Skyline,” Ron Carter, Jack DeJohnette and Gonzalo Rubalcaba

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album

“For Jimmy, Wes and Oliver,” Christian McBride Big Band

Best Latin Jazz Album

“Mirror Mirror,” Eliane Elias With Chick Corea and Chucho Valdés

Best Gospel Performance/Song

“Never Lost,” CeCe Winans

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song

“Believe for It,” CeCe Winans; Dwan Hill, Kyle Lee, CeCe Winans and Mitch Wong, songwriters

Best Gospel Album

“Believe for It,” CeCe Winans

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

“Old Church Basement,” Elevation Worship and Maverick City Music

Best Roots Gospel Album

“My Savior,” Carrie Underwood

Best Latin Pop Album

“Mendó,” Alex Cuba

Best Música Urbana Album

“El Último Tour Del Mundo,” Bad Bunny

Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album

“Origen,” Juanes

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)

“A Mis 80’s,” Vicente Fernández

Best Tropical Latin Album

“Salswing!,” Rubén Blades y Roberto Delgado & Orquesta

Best American Roots Performance

“Cry,” Jon Batiste

Best American Roots Song

“Cry,” Jon Batiste and Steve McEwan, songwriters (Jon Batiste)

Best Americana Album

“Native Sons,” Los Lobos

Best Bluegrass Album

“My Bluegrass Heart,” Béla Fleck

Best Traditional Blues Album

“I Be Trying,” Cedric Burnside

Best Contemporary Blues Album

“662,” Christone “Kingfish” Ingram

Best Folk Album

“They’re Calling Me Home,” Rhiannon Giddens with Francesco Turrisi

Best Regional Roots Music Album

“Kau Ka Pe’a,” Kalani Pe’a

Best Reggae Album

“Beauty in the Silence,” Soja

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical

“Love for Sale,” Dae Bennett, Josh Coleman and Billy Cumella, engineers; Greg Calbi and Steve Fallone, mastering engineers (Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga)

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical

Jack Antonoff

Best Remixed Recording

“Passenger” (Mike Shinoda Remix); Mike Shinoda, remixer (Deftones); track from: “White Pony” (20th Anniversary Deluxe Edition)

Best Global Music Performance

“Mohabbat,” Arooj Aftab

Best Global Music Album

“Mother Nature,” Angelique Kidjo

Best Children’s Music Album

“A Colorful World,” Falu

Best Spoken Word Album

“Carry On: Reflections for a New Generation From John Lewis,” Don Cheadle

Best Comedy Album

“Sincerely Louis C.K.,” Louis C.K.

Best Musical Theater Album

“The Unofficial Bridgerton Musical,” Emily Bear, producer; Abigail Barlow and Emily Bear, composers/lyricists (Barlow & Bear)

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media

“The United States vs. Billie Holiday,” Andra Day

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media

“The Queen’s Gambit,” Carlos Rafael Rivera, composer

“Soul,” Jon Batiste, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, composers

Best Song Written For Visual Media

“All Eyes On Me [From Inside],” Bo Burnham, songwriter (Bo Burnham)

Best Immersive Audio Album

“Alicia,” George Massenburg and Eric Schilling, immersive mix engineers; Michael Romanowski, immersive mastering engineer; Ann Mincieli, immersive producer (Alicia Keys)

Best Immersive Audio Album (for 63rd Grammy Awards)

“Soundtrack of the American Soldier,” Leslie Ann Jones, immersive mix engineer; Michael Romanowski, immersive mastering engineer; Dan Merceruio, immersive producer (Jim R. Keene and the United States Army Field Band)

Best Engineered Album, Classical

“Chanticleer Sings Christmas,” Leslie Ann Jones, engineer (Chanticleer)

Producer of the Year, Classical

Judith Sherman

Best Orchestral Performance

“Price: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 3,” Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor (Philadelphia Orchestra)

Best Opera Recording

“Glass: Akhnaten,” Karen Kamensek, conductor; J’Nai Bridges, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Zachary James and Dísella Lárusdóttir; David Frost, producer (The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; The Metropolitan Opera Chorus)

Best Choral Performance

“Mahler: Symphony No. 8, ‘Symphony of a Thousand,’” Gustavo Dudamel, conductor; Grant Gershon, Robert Istad, Fernando Malvar-Ruiz and Luke McEndarfer, chorus masters (Leah Crocetto, Mihoko Fujimura, Ryan McKinny, Erin Morley, Tamara Mumford, Simon O’Neill, Morris Robinson and Tamara Wilson; Los Angeles Philharmonic; Los Angeles Children’s Chorus, Los Angeles Master Chorale, National Children’s Chorus and Pacific Chorale)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance

“Beethoven: Cello Sonatas – Hope Amid Tears,” Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax

Best Classical Instrumental Solo

“Alone Together,” Jennifer Koh

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album

“Mythologies,” Sangeeta Kaur and Hila Plitmann (Virginie D’Avezac De Castera, Lili Haydn, Wouter Kellerman, Nadeem Majdalany, Eru Matsumoto and Emilio D. Miler)

Best Classical Compendium

“Women Warriors – The Voices of Change,” Amy Andersson, conductor; Amy Andersson, Mark Mattson and Lolita Ritmanis, producers.

Best Contemporary Classical Composition

“Shaw: Narrow Sea,” Caroline Shaw, composer (Dawn Upshaw, Gilbert Kalish and Sō Percussion)

Best Instrumental Composition

“Eberhard,” Lyle Mays, composer (Lyle Mays)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella

“Meta Knight’s Revenge (From ‘Kirby Superstar’),” Charlie Rosen and Jake Silverman, arrangers (The 8-Bit Big Band featuring Button Masher)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals

“To The Edge Of Longing (Edit Version),” Vince Mendoza, Arranger (Vince Mendoza, Czech National Symphony Orchestra and Julia Bullock)

Best Recording Package

“Pakelang,” Li Jheng Han and Yu, Wei, Art Directors (2nd Generation Falangao Singing Group and the Chairman Crossover Big Band)

Best Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package

“All Things Must Pass: 50th Anniversary Edition,” Darren Evans, Dhani Harrison and Olivia Harrison, art directors (George Harrison)

Best Album Notes

“The Complete Louis Armstrong Columbia and RCA Victor Studio Sessions 1946-1966,” Ricky Riccardi, album notes writer (Louis Armstrong)

Best Historical Album

“Joni Mitchell Archives, Vol. 1: The Early Years (1963-1967),” Patrick Milligan and Joni Mitchell, compilation producers; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer (Joni Mitchell)

Best Music Video

“Freedom,” (Jon Batiste); Alan Ferguson, video director; Alex P. Willson, video producer.

Best Music Film

“Summer of Soul,” (Various Artists); Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, video director; David Dinerstein, Robert Fyvolent and Joseph Patel, video producers.


Coi Leray Releases ‘Anxiety’ Music Video

Following the dramatic release of Coi Leray’s new smash hit ‘Anxiety,’ today she releases an accompanying music video for the single! Watch the music video for ‘Anxiety’ HERE and stream the single HERE.

Throughout the cinematic masterpiece, Coi seemingly is followed around by a demonic figure, symbolizing her deep anxieties. The visual experience is able to depict the emotions that she speaks on throughout her lyrics. Coi sings, “I still got anxiety, that’s why I keep it on me, sometimes I feel I can’t trust no one around me, there’s another side of me, but I don’t even show it.”

UPROXX raved on the new smash single, stating, “The track is a bright record that takes a step into the pop lane as Coi speaks about the nature of anxiety and how it affects from day-to-day. Billboard even named the song amongst their 10 Cool New Pop Songs to Get You Through The Week, asserting, “Leray opens up about her struggles with stress and depression, pivoting from a hummable refrain to unshrinking bars about her personal ordeals.”

YouTube even deemed Coi as their most recent Artist on the Rise, along with the likes of Rod Wave, Jack Harlow and 24kGoldn. Catch a look at YouTube’s official statement HERE.

Coi has made her mark in the music industry, with her viral it TWINNEM  accumulating a mass viewing of over 16 billion views, with 50 million global streams and 6+ million video creations. She made her first late-night television on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon this past year, and has been nominated for a vast array of awards, including Favorite Female Hip-Hop Artist at the 2021 American Music Awards and Best Female Hip-Hop Artist and Best New Artist at the 2021 BET Awards.

This year, Coi has received nominations for the 2022 XXL Awards as Female Rapper of the Year and Best New Artist of the Year as well as the 2022 iHeartRadio Music Awards, including the categories of Best New Hip-Hop Artist of the Year and TikTok Bop of the Year. She joins the coveted list of performers performing at this years Rolling Loud Portugal and the Governor’s Ball.

"Hello" cover art via Noelle Accardi for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Tay Money × Saucy Santana – Hello

Dallas-based rapper Tay Money joins forces with fellow rap star Saucy Santana on new record “Hello.” Esteemed for her catchy flows and edgy beats, Tay Money mixes her country flare with Saucy Santana’s impeccable vibes on this new hit. Paired with the drop of an official music video, the comic book style intro goes dark fast as the two “smash the gas on his wallet, turn him to a crash dummy.”

Stream “Hello” by Tay Money HERE, and watch the official music video HERE.

Hello” debuts following Tay’s own viral sensation “The Assignment,” which is just another track that has gained Tay critical acclaim. Released in September, the track had fans talking about it on TikTok two months prior to its release. The sound itself has now surpassed #2 on Instagram reels this week and #3 on TikTok US, averaging to 20K TikTok creative videos each day and a little bit under 800K to present day.

About Tay Money

A validated freshman in the game, Tay Money has amassed a supportive fanbase and millions of streams swiftly. Her country twang paired with her unique and creative melodious styling sets her apart from other rappers in the industry. Her breakout hit of “Trapper’s Delight” drafted immediate success, generating over 1.1 million views for the official music video in 2018.

Continuing her trendy streak, Tay released both “Bussin” (11 million YouTube views), “Bussin 2.0” with Saweetie (7 million YouTube views) and “Brat” featuring Mulatto, two tracks that are showcased on her latest EP Blockedt. Tay continues to be endorsed day in, and day out, as FLAUNT named her “one of the biggest women rappers in Texas.” Tay continues to prep and get ready amidst the release of her upcoming EP.

"Anxiety" Coi Leray song cover via Republic Records Media for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Coi Leray – Anxiety

The forthcoming rapstress herself Coi Leray debuted her most recent single Anxiety, where she talks about the worries that she faces each and every day.

The song tackles Coi’s trust issues and journey that she endured to get where she is modern day. Stream Anxiety HERE.

The chorus rings, “Sometimes I feel like, can’t trust no one around me, there’s another side of me but I don’t even show it, ’cause I got way too many people eating off me, been through depression and I learned my lessons, so I count my blessings and run it up.”

Coi’s debut album Trendsetter is right around the corner, and here’s why you’ll want to tune in when it releases…

Coi’s viral hit TWINNEM has accumulated a mass viewing of over 16 billion views, with 50 million global streams and 6+ million video creations. She made her first late-night television on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon this past year, and has been nominated for a vast array of awards, including Favorite Female Hip-Hop Artist at the 2021 American Music Awards and Best Female Hip-Hop Artist and Best New Artist at the 2021 BET Awards.

This year, Coi has received nominations for the 2022 XXL Awards as Female Rapper of the Year and Best New Artist of the Year as well as the 2022 iHeartRadio Music Awards, including the categories of Best New Hip-Hop Artist of the Year and TikTok Bop of the Year. She joins the coveted list of performers performing at this years Rolling Loud Portugal and the Governor’s Ball.

Coi Leray photo via Brian Ziff for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Maria Becerra inside 360 Magazine.

SPOTLIGHT ON MARÍA BECERRA

María Becerra is a tour de force. The Argentinian songstress, known as “la nena de Argentina” released her second EP in 2021, embracing and experimenting with hip-hop, reggaeton, trap, R&B, salsa, and more to craft her new sound. Described as a “leading voice in Argentina’s urban pop movement,” Becerra is a star on the rise. As the first Latin artist signed to indie American record label 300 Entertainment and with a Latin Grammy Award for Best New Artist pending, it is clear despite her successes already, she is only just beginning. She sat down to answer a few questions for 360 Magazine including how she got her start in music, the story behind her nickname, her influences, and what to expect from her in 2022.

How would you describe your style of music?

I believe I have a very melodic and versatile musical style. In the studio, we always try to ensure that each song has a varied melodic line, with different degrees of nuances. Above all, we aspire to make a melody that sounds familiar and enjoyable to the public. I have experimented with several genres and in all of them, I was able to find how to make my own style fit within them. I hear they call me ‘the Queen of Weeping,” which makes me laugh. I have many songs that are for dogging and dancing, and others that are a bit sadder.

How did you first become interested in creating music?

From a very young age, art was important to me; I learned how to sing, act and dance as a child. In my home, we listened to a lot of music. For a while, I did covers of famous songs as I learned. I think I was absorbing different music and styles to the point where I felt the need to start expressing myself with my own works. Despite this desire, I was not 100% confident in my abilities yet and had many insecurities. I was afraid of how the public would receive my music and doubted if this was my true path. Luckily, things turned out in a positive way. Today, I have no doubts that yes, I was born to create music and it brings me a lot of joy.

Which songs are you most proud of?

Mm, they are all special to me and fill me with pride. It is difficult for me to pick just one. If I had to choose one, my first instinct is to say Ademas De Mi or Mi Debilidad, that song is very significant to me as an artist. I cried a lot while making it and recording the video.

You were a Youtuber before becoming a singer. How was the experience of transitioning from an influencer to an artist?

YouTube was a beautiful experience, and I am grateful that the opportunity was a positive one. The change in my life was progressive over time. Being on YouTube allowed me the chance for people to get to know me, while I gained confidence and worked on my own fears as a public person. Obviously, my life and my career are now on another path but having the experience of being a YouTuber served as the foundation for everything that has gone on to happen in my life.

What is your favorite fan moment?

My favorite moments are when my fans tell me everything in my music speaks to them. It’s amazing how something I pour so much love into in the studio can reach so many people and positively influence their lives. In live concerts, we would raise up different fans to speak with them, and at one performance a girl told us that with my song ‘Tell Me How I Do,’ she declared her love to her girlfriend. I found it beautiful. Those moments fill me with incredible happiness.

Maria Becerra by Christian Garfa 2

How does it feel to have reached this level of popularity so young?

It still doesn’t feel real. It is incredible to me, but I just try and take things one day at a time. I try to appreciate the small things and remain the humble girl I’ve always been because that’s still who I am. I surround myself a lot with my friends, my family, and my pets who are my rocks – they remind me of where I come from and who I am.

Why do you refer to yourself as the Girl from Argentina?

In general, it is known that many of the best discoveries occur accidentally, and this was no exception. When we recorded Animal with Cazzu, in the song’s lyrics I sing “Las Nenas de Argentina,” as if referring to the two of us. Apparently, when people listened, they heard “La nena de Argentina” and everyone loved that I referred to myself that way. From there, I started to use it as my brand, and I feel it gives me a special power for communicating to the world my music and I are made and from Argentina.

Who are your influences?

Wow, so many artists! I especially love and admire Ariana Grande, Beyoncé, and Rihanna. They are very important role models to me. I watch their shows and videos a lot.

How did it feel to join a label as prestigious as 300 Entertainment?

I am honored and very happy to work with them. They have always been supportive, even affectionate, towards me. Unfortunately, their office is in Los Angeles, so we don’t have the opportunity to see each other that often, but when we do it’s always a special moment. I know the whole team at 300 takes care of me and wants the best for me, so I respect them and thank them very much.

Your most recent EP blended many different genres. Which genres would you like to experiment with in the future?

I like Bachata, and I think more songs like this are coming from me. Yet as I said before, I don’t want to pigeonhole myself. I love to experiment with different genres and different sounds, and that is what is important to me as I create music today. So, in 2022 you and all my fans can be surprised with what I come out with next.

What can we expect to see from you in the future?

I feel like 2022 is going to be a great year. My team and I are working hard to make it so. I’m locked in the studio, and many of the songs we are currently working on are tremendous. I am already anxious for people to listen to them. This year, a new album is coming, as well as trips and several shows in Argentina and Europe. We hope to reach many places and have everyone dance and sing to my music.

Maria Becerra inside 360 Magazine 3

Photos: Christian Garfa

Steve Aoki × End of the World

Steve Aoki

2x-Grammy-nominated artist Steve Aoki and Multi-Platinum Tokyo-based group End of the World released the brand new self-titled End of the World today Beautifully synchronizing the individual styles of both artists, the single sees End of the World lead singer Fukase’s whispery falsetto smoothly glide over Aoki’s signature electronic groove. The track pulses with positive energy from start to finish, leading with a universal message about tapping into the present. Listen here.

The End of the World’s origin story began with Aoki as a fan of the band, who are known for performing in Japan to stadium-sized audiences upwards of 140K fans. Sooner than later, Aoki reached out, and End of the World was excited to join forces. This intense exchange of energy and emotion between Aoki and Fukase inspired them to hit the studio to work on an original collaboration, which would ultimately become End of the World. During the process, the two finally met this summer in July, when Fukase appeared on stage at one of Aoki’s Las Vegas performances. The song’s refrain “Don’t tell me it’s the end of the world tonight” suggests a longing for the night to keep going and to feel hopeful again, energized by the return to live music and their shared experience being back on stage.

Aoki, who was recently announced as an Asian Hall of Fame inductee for the class of 2021, says of the project, “I’ve been a big fan of End of the World’s music for a while now, so when the opportunity came up to work with them, I was honored. It’s always fun for me to collaborate with Japanese artists given my heritage, and to bring that to the rest of the world. The song we made is special not only in its lyrical content, but in its uplifting melody, and I am so excited for it to be out for everyone to dance and sing along to.

End of the World’s Fukase adds, “As our first ever self-titled work, this song brings me back to the time in my life when I had lost everything that it literally felt like it was the end of the world. Thats how the band’s name came about, to remind all of us that it is never too late to start anything, even from the very end. Lyric-wise, this song sounds a lot like a normal love song, but I also feel like every word is meant for my old self in the past.”

About Steve Aoki

Steve Aoki, the two-time Grammy-nominated producer/DJ is one of today’s most successful American cross-genre artists, collectively counting 2.8 billion music streams on Spotify. As the founder of the trendsetting record label, events/lifestyle company, and apparel line Dim Mak Records, which he founded in 1996, Aoki has helped launch the careers of global acts like The Chainsmokers, Bloc Party, The Bloody Beetroots, The Gossip, and The Kills, among many others. Dim Mak today counts more than 1,000 official releases from the biggest acts and most buzzing newcomers across EDM, indie rock, hip-hop and beyond over its two-decades-plus discography. As a solo artist, Aoki boasts a lauded discography that includes: Wonderland (2012), his debut solo album, which garnered him his first-ever Grammy nomination for Best Dance/Electronica Album; hip-hop centric Kolony (2017), and the Neon Future series, which includes Neon Future I (2014, certified gold by the RIAA), Neon Future II (2015), Neon Future III (2018) and the recently released Neon Future IV (April 2020); which has rocketed in streaming to date and received praise from singles such as Maldad; ft. Maluma and Let It Be Me, ft. Backstreet Boys. Recognized by Forbes as one of the top 5 world’s highest paid DJ’s and the world’s hardest working DJ, Aoki is “one of the most in-demand entertainers in the world” (Billboard), counting more than 250 tour dates per year. In 2012, Aoki founded The Aoki Foundation, which primarily supports organizations in the brain science and research areas with a specific focus on regenerative medicine and brain preservation, more information HERE. Most recently, Steve Aoki released his critically acclaimed memoir entitled, “Blue: The Color of Noise” published by St. Martin’s Press.

About End of the World

Since their debut in Japan, End of the World composed of 4 childhood friends Fukase, Nakajin, Saori and D.J. Love have swept the Japanese music scene as Sekai No Owari quickly gained momentum, touring sold-out arenas and stadiums all over Asia. In keeping with the ambition and desire to share music with a global audience, End of the World is completely reinvented as the band’s new moniker to take an innovative approach with their music. Their single Lost featuring Clean Bandit was play-listed on BBC Radio2 gaining 30M+ streams worldwide. After many years of making, End of the World released a debut album Chameleon reflecting the journey as End of the Word.

Steve Aoki Wikipedia HERE

360 Magazine Golden Cat Issue HERE.