Posts tagged with "CEO"

Makeup Illustration for use by 360 Magazine

Art of Pure × Chicago

Art of Pure, a curator of clean beauty grounded in purity and sustainability, will open its first retail storefront this November. The new boutique, located at 958 W Armitage Ave. will offer a handpicked selection of local and internationally sourced skincare, makeup, haircare, modern wellness, personal care products, and eco-friendly home goods. Nurturing beauty, body, and wellness through truly natural, pure and potent products, Art of Pure ensures products are responsibly sourced, ethically produced, have a minimal environmental impact, and provide social good, while being free of any harmful ingredients. Art of Pure invites shoppers and the beauty community at large to access trusted and classic brands all while discovering unfamiliar gems.

“At Art of Pure, we are on a mission to prove that beauty can be synonymous with sustainability,” said Monika Joshi, founder and CEO of Art of Pure. “For years I have envisioned a store where green beauty lovers can shop without worrying about the ingredients, and I am thrilled to be able to share that vision with the community.”

Joshi, a former investment banker and mother, felt an urge to enter the beauty industry after spending countless hours researching skincare ingredients in an effort to understand her daughter’s eczema as well as her own issues with sensitive skin. Joshi became an expert in the field and decided to share her knowledge and product recommendations by launching the Art of Pure e-commerce store in 2017.

Art of Pure promises to bring safe, non-toxic, and entirely green solutions to customers through brands that seek to promote a health and wellness forward lifestyle. The new boutique will boast 1,000 square feet of space and serve as a physical extension of the online store, featuring products with high-performing, plant-based ingredients and actives. The store will carry all existing lines and categories along with new product lines including feminine wellness, environmentally friendly home goods, and gifts. As the focus is on sustainability, the store will include a soap and lotion refilling station. Customers will also be able to book a clean makeup application session with a professional makeup artist or a clean swap consultation. Additionally, Art of Pure will host wellness events, panels + discussions, and mini markets, all while helping foster community and dialogue. A mask bar will be offered at the store in the coming months as well.

Health and safety standards are uncompromising for Art of Pure. Ensuring transparency and thoughtful sourcing, Art of Pure tests every item, ingredient, and brand for performance and potency. Building on a foundation of growth and discovery, Art of Pure continues to learn and expand its knowledge base within the cosmetics industry, focused on continued research, thoughtful partnerships, and expanded knowledge.

For more information about the Art of Pure and its offerings, visit www.artofpure.com or follow along on Instagram and Facebook.

Melissa Snover via Caitlin Richards for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Melissa Snover

Everyone loves good vitamin gummies, but what if there was a way to customize them? That’s the idea behind Nourished, led by Melissa Snover, an entrepreneur and top UK female entrepreneur according to Business Leader. I had the opportunity to interview Snover about her career and Nourished. 

  1. How did you get into 3D modelling and nutrition? 

I founded my first company when I was 23 and have been developing innovative products to bring to the consumer market ever since. When running a gummy candy business called Goody Good Stuff, I became frustrated by the limitations of mainstream manufacturing and in 2015 started looking into 3D printing technology to create bespoke products on demand. This led me to launch Magic Candy Factory which 3D printed customized confectionery in retail outlets, amusement parks and private events – depending on the customer’s requirements. It was this technology that gave me the inspiration and foundation to create Nourished and personalize the way we take vitamins and make our nutrition regimes more enjoyable, convenient, and effective.

  1. What are the benefits of personalized gummies? 

Many of the vitamins made using traditional manufacturing methods can be largely ineffective by the time they reach the consumer. They often come from lengthy supply chains, are sat in a warehouse or on a store shelf for months and most importantly – are not produced with the individual’s needs in mind. At Nourished we combine 7 different superfoods, nutrients, and vitamins into one delicious and sugar free gummy, which are totally bespoke to the end user. We 3D print each stack on demand to ensure optimum efficacy and can change the customer’s customized blend each month as their goals and lifestyle also change.

  1. How did you develop the idea behind Nourished? 

I have been an avid consumer of supplements since my 20s and used to carry around with me a large transparent bag of various supplements and vitamins, and accidentally dropped it on the airport floor in security. Crawling round in my suit and heels picking them, I thought there must be a better way to do this and then I thought, well I have a 3D printing food business, maybe I can do it?

From there I sought to find a way to simplify the way we take vitamins and make the combinations 100% customized to the consumer.

  1. How did you feel about being included in Business Leader’s list of Top UK Female Entrepreneurs to Look Out for?

It was a huge honor to be recognized amongst such inspiring and impressive peers, and I am extremely grateful to Business Leader for celebrating female entrepreneurship. I am a passionate and proactive supporter of women in business, so this is very close to my heart, and I was delighted to involved.

  1. Why use the personalized packaging?

Personalization is at the heart of everything we do at Nourished, and we didn’t want to stop at our packaging! Each of our individual wrappers are printed with the name of the customer, as well as being 100% plastic free and home compostable in just 32 weeks!

  1. How important are visuals when it comes to Nourished products?

Our Nourished stacks not only taste amazing, but they also look beautiful as the 7 layers of active ingredients each come in a different, vibrant color. Our mission at Nourished is to change the way people think about nutrition, and this means upgrading from popping pills and choking back on tablets each day. Our 3D printed vitamin gummies are the perfect visualization of what the future of nutrition can look like.

  1. Why should people choose Nourished?

At Nourished we believe that of all the things we personalize – our health should take priority. We use only the highest quality ingredients and pioneering manufacturing methods to ensure our customers receive truly bespoke nutrition, with the highest impact possible. All our ingredients are vegan, GMO free, sugar free and free from all major allergens and our packaging is 100% plastic free; meaning Nourished is as good for the Earth as it is for our customers!

  1. Do you have plans to release new products in the future?

We are constantly launching new active ingredients into our product range and optimizing our technology to ensure we stay at the forefront of personalized nutrition. We are also currently developing a personalized protein range and are planning on breaking into the pet market next year!

Ballerina by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Bombazo Caribbean Skirts Featured at New York Fashion Week

By: Javier Pedroza 

Milteri Tucker Concepción is a busy and multi-talented Afro Boricua who holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry and a master’s in Dance Education. She is an author, a mother and was casted in Lin Manuel Miranda’s In the Heights the movie. As we approach #NYFW2021, Milteri puts on another hat, as designer.

Milteri is the founder of BOMBAZO and the artistic director of Bombazo Dance Co. The Puerto Rican-Bronx based non-profit dance organization’s focus is to educate, advocate, preserve and perform Bomba Puertorriqueña. As an author, educator and master Bomba dancer, she lectures across the United States and the world. I sat with Milteri and we spoke about Bomba, fashion and Puerto Rico.

Milteri, tell our readers, who is Milteri Tucker Concepción? 

Well, I was born and raised in Puerto Rico and grew up with a passion for dance since I was 5 years old. I  recall dancing in “la Sala”(the living room) with three of the most influential women in my life: my grandmother, mother and aunt. As part of my upbringing I remember dancing, planting and assisting my elders in the kitchen. I also vividly recall shopping for fabrics with my aunt and watching my grandmother Abuela Teresa, warmly referred to as “Mama” sewing. My aunt “Titi” Maria Concepción was a designer who attended FIT and designed clothes for top actors in Puerto Rico. I was blessed to have been raised in a household full of  love, and love for my culture!

As a teenager, I studied dance in La Escuela de Bellas Artes in Ponce, PR. At 17, [I] moved to NYC to pursue careers in dance and science. In 2006, I graduated with a dual major of Dance and Biology with a minor in Chemistry from Hunter College. I currently hold a masters degree in Dance Education from NYU Steinhardt. Today I am a renowned Bomba master dancer, choreographer, scholar, dance educator and author. [I wrote] the first bilingual Bomba children’s book, titled “Bomba Puertorriqueña” and illustrated by Boricua artist, Mia Roman.

I’ve had the privilege to perform in multiple venues across NYC and the world – from the prestigious Lincoln Center, Madison Square Garden, City Center, Summerstage, Pregones Theater, BAAD, The Latin Billboards Awards, dancing for Don Omar with choreography by Maria Torres O’Connor, to amazing community centers.

I am a cultural warrior (guerrera cultural) who safeguards our traditions of Bomba Puertorriquenas, via [my] 501c3 non-profit dance organization: Bombazo Dance Co, Inc and international brand of Caribbean dance skirts: Bombazo Wear-Bomba & Caribbean Dance Skirts®. I was recently  featured in Lin Manuel Miranda’s movie, In The Heights, as the Bomba representation.

How was your experience filming ‘In the Heights’?

Being invited to dance Bomba for In the Heights was a surreal experience and a dream come true! It was an honor to represent our African heritage through our traditional dances. However, one of my favorite memories came after the movie premiered…. I had the opportunity to open the 2021 Virtual National Puerto Rican Day Parade in NYC, where Lin and I danced Bomba together.

What is the history of Bomba?

Bomba is Puerto Rico’s oldest musical genre, dating back to the 17th century and created by the African enslaved and free people of color from the Caribbean. This was one of the ways they communicated in our coastal sugarcane and coffee plantations.  It is a secular practice, where the community gathers to sing, dance and drum.

Why did you create Bombazo Dance Company?

I founded Bombazo Dance Company to show the world that Puerto Rico has rich African ancestry, and that our traditions are very much alive. As a Bomba dance company, we communicate through dance and drumming. [This is] reflected in our traditional folk art dancers. It is also important to create a safe space to fuse Bomba with other forms of dance – such as ballet, contemporary, social dances and dances of the African and Caribbean diaspora.

What inspired you to create Bombazo dance wear? 

At the same time I started Bombazo Dance Company, I was teaching Bomba classes to the community and needed skirts. Believe it or not, it was hard to find a seamstress who could make Caribbean skirts or a location to purchase them. I wanted to create skirts that fit all Caribbean dance styles, because I am that dancer. And voilà – Bombazo Wear Bomba Caribbean Skirts was born! My mother, Dr. Margarita Concepción, and I are the CEOs and we sew the [skirts] too. Our skirts are handmade, custom[ized] and tailored to each client. A part of the funds go to aid families affected by the earthquakes in Southern Puerto Rico.

How does it feel to be invited to NYFW 2021 / Harlem Fashion Week?

It is an honor to have been invited to showcase for a second time in HFM! The organizers are truly showcasing diversity within their shows and providing  opportunities for designers of color to present their designs to the world. It’s important to me – as a woman of color, a Latina and AfroBoricua – [that] they understand my vision of dance as fashion. And my skirts have fashion written all over them!

Tell us about your upcoming collection “Resistencia y Libertá!” (Resistance and Freedom)

I am the creator of the Puerto Rican Bomba Flag Skirt®. A flag; its colors, represents a collective orgullo – pride for its people. Our flag was conceived and designed here in NYC. It was prohibited to fly The Puerto Rican flag in both Puerto Rico and New York at one time. Its pride is back after Hurricane Maria, [now] you see our colors in every town’s building and rinconcito (corner) in both Puerto Rico and the diaspora! Therefore, my new collection for 2021 is titled: “Resistencia y Libertá!” Where each skirt in the collection represents a social cause affecting Puerto Rico – such as the cultural resistencia by the people, No al Feminicidio, Boricua hasta en la Luna, Afroboricuaness, LGBTQ+ representation and support in the Bomba Community, ect. It is important to note that this is a brand and line designed and sewn by a Bomba dancer, a person from the community. These are skirts [are designed] with a mission. Part of the funds go to help families affected by the earthquakes in the South of Puerto Rico and organizations/community ensembles continuing the labor of safeguarding Bomba traditions in the island.

Any advice for the youth who want to connect and immerse themselves with their African roots and Culture?

Learn about all parts of you! That makes you unique and special. Speak to your elders: abuelas, abuelos, tias, tios and elders from your community. They have a lot of wisdom and years of experience you can learn from. Always connect to your culture, to your African roots! There is an African proverb I love : “Sankofa– in order to move forward you must know your past!” Know who you are, where you come from, so that you can pass the knowledge to your next generation! Ubuntu! (an African Proverb [that] means “I am because we ALL are!”)

For more information and to view images, please visit HERE.

Interview with Ooshma Garg

Meal delivery services have gained a lot of popularity over the recent years and there are now many different services to choose. I was able to sit down with Oosma Garg, founder of one of these delivery services: Gobble.

Given all of the meal delivery services on the market today, what do you think makes yours stand out?

Unlike other meal kit services, Gobble’s meals only take 15 minutes to prepare. Gobble’s army of sous chefs do the prep work; like simmering sauces, marinating meats, and chopping vegetables, so that members can prepare a gourmet meal at home easily and quickly. We prep complex ingredients for 18 unique dishes every week, which gives members variety and new flavors with every meal. 

With freshly prepped meal kit ingredients, Gobble simplifies the process of eating healthy, nutritious, and flavorful food, ensuring that members don’t sacrifice time for taste or vice versa. Convenience is at the core of every Gobble product and experience — The company even launched a text concierge service so that members can chat with a “sous chef” and get real-time, educated answers at any time, especially during their cooking experience.

What inspired you to create the 15 minute meal idea?

I have always been a tinkerer and grew up curious, constantly experimenting. Women have been wondering ‘what’s for dinner’ since the beginning of time. Other companies in this industry approached this question through diets or teaching women to cook. Gobble was encouraged to solve the real problem at hand and fit into the fabric of everyone’s daily life. Gobble’s already prepped and prepared meal kits do the invisible work of solving this timeless mealtime question, in just 15 minutes. Gobble’s 15 minutes philosophy was inspired by the importance of quality time with loved ones, and when dinner isn’t stressful or time consuming, this is made possible. 

Are there meal options to fit certain diets?

Yes there are. Gobble’s Lean and Clean meal options feature lean proteins, healthy fats, and are under 600 calories per serving. This meal plan also includes the same flexibility that Gobble’s other plans do, as members can easily add breakfast and lunch options, or skip deliveries with ease. 

Additionally, Gobble is a great option for picky eaters, as customers can choose their own proteins, grains, and quantities. And, Gobble gives the user full ingredient control. Gobble does most of the prep, but it leaves the final amounts of sauces and most other ingredients going into your dish up to you (unlike oven-ready, or fully prepped/cooked kits).

Tell us about Gobble’s ingredients.

All of Gobble’s ingredients and production are fresh, as if it was cooked in small batches at home, and the production is devoid of shelf stabilizing compounds or preservatives. This makes the supply chain evermore difficult as the company cannot store these complex and custom prepped ingredients from one week to the next. 

Tell us about being a female founder in this meal kit delivery space.

Being one of the only female founders in this space, I was inspired to solve a fundamental aspect of society, mealtimes. I saw my mom working 12+ hours a day while balancing her professional role alongside her role as a mom, that there was a void of solutions that allowed working women to provide for their families without sacrificing time or nutrition. Gobble is designed to solve a real problem and fit into the fabric of everyone’s daily life. I’m proud to be a female founder in this space, and am excited to continue to bring even more solutions to the table. (Literally.) 

How did the pandemic affect Gobble?

Gobble has seen a 200% increase in basket size of non-dinner menu items, as people are home all day and demand increased deliveries for all mealtimes. Throughout this pandemic, many Americans found themselves facing COVID Burnout, which led them turning to other meal solutions. During Fall 2020, Gobble ran a survey to better understand how COVID was affecting its members. 78.5% of respondents reported that the pandemic affected how they shop for and prepare food with 48% of people sharing that they order groceries solely online. We offer members the ability to transform one’s kitchen into a new country and transport one’s tastebuds through unique flavors and ingredients by implementing adventure into everyday life at home.

Rodney Ramlochan image via Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

Rodney

Rodney Ramlochan is an executive, entrepreneur, and global business generator who has dedicated his career to empowering others, identifying strategic relationships, and building world-class organizations. Driven by his passion for technology, fashion, lifestyle, and culture, he serves as 360 Magazine’s global business manager. Rodney builds market position for 360 by locating, developing, defining, and closing business relationships with leading brands.

Alongside his role at 360 Magazine, Rodney serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Dev-Byrne & Company, a national technology expense management firm serving premier clients ranging from global not-for-profits to Fortune 500 firms. He is a highly accomplished leader known for laser-like vision in formulating and executing cutting-edge strategies to achieve business goals.

Over the years, Rodney has held multiple roles within the business sector over the past two decades. As Vice-President and co-founder of an award-winning telecom auditing firm, he garnered an elite list of clients, taking the startup from obscurity to highly profitable in under three years. At Verizon, he oversaw large business units responsible for service delivery for enterprise clients.

Rodney completed both undergraduate and graduate degrees, with honors at New York University. He is a published contributing author who has written papers on service delivery and Total Quality Management. In addition, he has served on the Alumni Board Committee of New York University and the chairman of the board for St. Frances Cabrini Academy in Brooklyn, NY.

Joel Peterson photo via Deseret News for use by 360 Magazine

Joel Peterson x My Road to Cancellation

Joel Peterson, Stanford Professor and former JetBlue Chairman, writes about his experience navigating the minefield of woke hostility in his piece My Road to Cancellation:

“Wokeism,” America’s new civil religion, draws on elements of neo-Marxism, critical race theory, social justice and identity politics. Its adherents believe it will lead to a more just society. Its detractors, on the other hand, believe its “cancel culture” will push civil society to the brink. And, for the “woke,” either will do.

The roots of my own unlikely cancelation go as far back as 1987, when Jesse Jackson marched Stanford students up Palm Drive to a rhythmic chant of “Hey, hey, ho, ho! Western Civ has got to go!” The next year, I joined the advisory council of its Graduate School of Business where I was soon invited to fill a one-year faculty vacancy. To everyone’s surprise (including my own), I returned every fall for the next three decades to teach four courses to a generation of exceptional MBA candidates.

Then, last year, before a student-politician boldly posted that “White people need to be eradicated,” I was summoned to respond to an equally disturbing complaint over having “triggered” woke students. Because I didn’t think I’d done anything worthy of the summons and because I had received the distinguished teaching award from students, a “Silver Apple Award” from alumni and been appointed to a faculty chair, I wasn’t worried. Alas, I’d misjudged my peril.

Years after Jackson’s campaign to eliminate Stanford’s requirement to study Western civilization, an Iowa-born, New York Times reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, developed what she titled “The 1619 Project.” In it, she presented America as founded on slavery and stained by perpetual bigotry.

With boosts from the Pulitzer Foundation and from George Floyd’s tragic death, her social justice message struck a nerve. However, when a number of historians debunked the pseudo-history, Hannah-Jones repositioned her essay as “a work of journalism that explicitly seeks to challenge the national narrative.” She followed up with a New York Times Magazine article headlined “What is Owed” making a case for reparations, consistent with her 1995 letter to the editor in Notre Dame’s “The Observer,” in which she likened Christopher Columbus to Hitler.

With police departments defunded, monuments vandalized and cities torched, Dr. Seuss was soon condemned as racist, Mr. Potato Head scheduled for gender reassignment, and free speech restricted by social media oligarchs. So, it wasn’t a surprise to see social justice warriors on the previously welcoming Graduate School of Business campus.

Content of character vs. color of skin

In a class I teach, students objected when guest CEOs claimed to have been “color blind.” When I volunteered that I, too, had resisted hiring based on skin color, gender or quotas, and had relied, instead, on character, competence and commitment, some students were offended. To understand why those “triggered” would object to standards of character and competence being added to the emergent holy grail of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), I turned to one of my own daughters.

Sensing my bafflement at the outrage, she immediately wrote back:

“I have known you my entire life, and I know by your words and deeds that you value all people of all races, ethnicities, and genders. I know you are constantly impressed and inspired by immigrants and their amazing stories of courage and perseverance. I’m proud of the work you’ve done. If this younger, ‘triggered’ generation pushes out of their lives all who seek to improve their understanding, teach them, and open their minds to broader ways of thinking, it will be to their detriment.”

I’d taught my kids – and, until now, my students — that talent, character, and competence are evenly distributed across every demographic. In response to my determination to be on the lookout for leaders without regard to identity, an offended gender-studies major wrote that she’d not known “whether to scream or throw up.” After all, it had been nearly 60 years since Martin Luther King had dreamt of the day when the content of one’s character mattered more than the color of one’s skin. But, by the time that day happily arrived, “wokeism” had hijacked his dream, re-elevating skin color over character.

As demands for skin-color diversity were broadened to include gender and sexual orientation, a student notified me that I’d called on more men than women in two (of four) classes. Knowing that I was no respecter of persons — whether by gender, race, sexual orientation, or anything else — I moved ahead with the course, suddenly aware that my interactions with students were being catalogued by identity.

Soon, a Black Lives Matter advocate asked, of all things, whether I would stand for the American flag. To provide context for my decision, I shared a story. As a toddler, I’d seen my mother take a call from the Department of Defense announcing that her fighter-pilot brother had been killed. Honoring her grief, I’d chosen to stand for the flag under which my only uncle had offered the ultimate sacrifice. The student’s response was presented as an irrefutable argument; my choice was “racist.”

Furthermore, in this woke new world, my professional experience was no longer relevant because of the race and gender I’d been assigned at birth. Despite having created tens of thousands of jobs, promoted women and minorities, and coached scores of entrepreneurs, I was deemed an “oppressor” in the catechism of “wokeism.” Furthermore, the penance for being raised in a “systemically racist” society — founded on millennia of Greek, Roman and Judeo-Christian antecedents, no less — was submission, and, if resisted, cancelation.

The reason behind such tyranny came into focus for me when Condolezza Rice, former secretary of state and current director of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, told me she’d shared with her students that the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (9/11’s architect) had felt like “having Erwin Rommel under lock and key.” The blank looks on the faces of her very bright students revealed that they had never heard of WWII’s famous Desert Fox.

Until then, I’d traced the enmity to activists like Jackson and Hannah-Jones. Now, I could see that it also stemmed from students having swapped an education for indoctrination. Those enlisted as social justice warriors had avoided the lessons of history, missed out on refining skills that might have allowed them to judge assertions, and denied themselves the insights required to make wise trade-offs.

Because such uninformed activism brought with it a minefield of woke hostility, I kept to myself any reservations I harbored about critical race theory, gender fluidity, and climate alarm. And, when Stanford’s math department proposed achieving “racial equity” by eliminating AP math (as racist, no less), I also kept quiet. Instead, I hoped my hardscrabble climb to CEO might inspire those who saw themselves as victims of inequity. Ironically, those who strained to label my uphill journey a product of “white supremacy” were often the very beneficiaries of woke preferences.

Oppressor-victim

To understand this recipe for canceling predecessor generations, I spoke next with Stanford military historian Victor Davis Hanson. Because Hanson had written the following, I wanted his help in gracefully handling the oppressor-victim theme:

“We should not… allow a current affluent, leisure, and pampered generation to hijack the past, and damn it to perdition. (They have) not earned the right to… cancel… those of the past who won Gettysburg, or built the Hoover Dam, or produced a Liberty ship every week.”

While Stanford had long nurtured a remarkably diverse and admirably inclusive community, it nonetheless rejected Hanson’s counsel in favor of a now fashionable “institutional racism.”

When Graduate School of Business faculty were further instructed to avoid “racist and xenophobic rhetoric and actions against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community,” I found myself wondering if the addendum were a virtue-signaling accusation, or if it were based on something I’d simply never encountered in all my years at Stanford. And, when the facts behind subsequent murders (of a Capitol police officer and 10 Colorado shoppers) contradicted de rigueur narratives, I wondered if the time had come to move beyond racial memes.

Apparently not. With free markets also labeled “racist,” those of us with responsibilities outside the ivory tower began to feel our “diversity of optic” (based on long experience) had been dismissed in favor of a “diversity of identity” (rooted in ideology). So, while I care deeply about Stanford University, and like and admire its president, provost, and business school dean, I was beginning to feel isolated.

Their deference to selective diversity led me to reflect upon a meeting I’d conducted in Berlin as chairman of JetBlue Airways. After the meeting, I’d taken a stroll down Unter den Linden to the Bebelplatz, 500 yards to the east of Berlin’s famous Brandenburg Gate. It was at that plaza, on May 10, 1933, that newly empowered Nazi officials had orchestrated the burning of “objectionable” books. Later dubbed “The Night of Shame,” the conflagration eventually contributed to Germany’s liberal democracy turning a blind eye to Kristallnacht, the Holocaust and an appalling rationale for war.

While loath to compare such a long-ago shame with how I was currently feeling in Palo Alto, of all places, I remembered being impressed that, in Berlin, the survivors of that era’s cancelation had later inserted “stumbling stones” between pavers to ensure that all who followed neither forget, nor repeat, that calamity.

As I traversed the once-riven capital city, the ground-level reminders had provoked in me a surge of optimism. Surely, the world would avoid the sort of conflict for which my own father had gone to war. Surely, everyone realized by now that banning books, restricting free speech and stoking fear would lead to tragedy. And, just as surely, America would eventually reject totalitarianism, even in its “wokest” form.

Yet, here I was, only three years later, 6,000 miles to the west of Berlin, sensing I was perilously connected to a prior generation’s intolerance. Adding to my anxiety was a discovery that my grandchildren’s generation were being scheduled to view an honorable heritage through a lens cleverly manufactured to provoke shame.

Forced to consider moving to a less hostile teaching environment, I heard from former students. One female “of color” offered that, of all her professors, I’d been the most supportive of women and minorities. Another confirmed that the majority of his classmates felt silenced by the threats of a racist label. One student even scolded me for having allowed “the slings and arrows” of the woke to achieve their hoped-for effect.

I smiled wanly to see that Prince Hamlet had somehow survived Jesse Jackson. I, on the other hand, had failed utterly to anticipate the distorting polemics of identity politics. The script advanced during America’s annus horribilis had pitted race against race, gender against gender, and generation against generation, all risking a degradation of spirit worse than any virus.

As a former CEO, it seemed to me that the narrative had gone well beyond gaining political or market advantage. It had even exceeded antifa’s hope for French-Revolution-style anarchy. In fact, by 2021, it looked like a bold attempt at a hostile takeover of mankind’s best hope for peace and prosperity.

This conclusion led me to contrast two Americans best known for their connections to societal breakdown — a mid-19th-century Abraham Lincoln and a mid-20th-century Saul Alinsky. I selected Lincoln because he’d guided America through a civil war, and Alinsky because his dream had been to provoke civil unrest by inciting those he called the “have-nots” against those whom he called the “haves.”

President Lincoln’s observation of America’s vulnerability mirrored community organizer Alinsky’s precondition for a successful revolution. Thus, the warning attributed to Lincoln that “America will never be destroyed from the outside; if we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves” was the basis for the race and class warfare Alinsky welcomed by rewriting history, inciting envy and “canceling” a large portion of the population.

Whereas Martin Luther King had called upon our “better angels” to subordinate our differences to shared values and, thus, to overcome what Condi Rice called our nation’s “birth defect,” Alinsky chose to repudiate King’s redemptive dream. If he could get people to ignore e pluribus unum (America’s motto since 1782), he might be able to overcome the spirit under which the nation had thrived.

By 2020, the pandemic had offered activists a unique opportunity to cleave the nation along identity and tribal lines, skirting the 238-year-old aspiration that had been Alinsky’s steepest obstacle. Using a fear of cancellation to silence half the population, SJWs dismissed the steady social progress that was the trademark of the world’s most successful multicultural society. Instead of celebrating the progress flowing from our commonalities, they fomented division by pointing to historical injustices.

Between a pandemic, racial tensions and the absence of a Lincolnesque figure to bind up our wounds and bring us together, America was, indeed, vulnerable. As its citizens awakened to the soft tyranny promoted during the pandemic, many felt betrayed by institutions they’d once admired and leaders they’d once trusted. And, for my part, I discovered that the experience I’d had with cancellation in the academy was being repeated all across the nation.

While I may well survive, America will not survive the rewriting of its history, the violation of its Constitution and the abandonment of the freedoms it has promised to citizens of all political persuasions, ethnicities, genders and orientations. No matter our differences, unless we preserve free speech, secure our Constitution and re-enthrone individual responsibility over victimhood, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men will be unable to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.

And Alinsky’s vision will have canceled Lincoln’s.

Joel Peterson Bio

Joel Peterson is the Robert L. Joss Professor of Management at Stanford University, the former managing partner of the Trammell Crow Company, the former chairman of the board of Overseers of the Hoover Institution, the former chairman of JetBlue Airways and the founder and chairman of Peterson Partners, a sponsor for a quarter century of more than a dozen funds covering private equity, venture and real estate investments in hundreds of companies and real estate projects across the nation and throughout the world.

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MediaCo’s New Chief Executive Officer

MediaCo Holding Inc. (NASDAQ: MDIA), owner of HOT 97, WBLS, and Fairway Outdoor, announced today that Rahsan-Rahsan Lindsay has been named Chief Executive Officer, effective July 1, 2021. Mr. Lindsay most recently served as Executive Vice President, Urban One. He brings over twenty years of successful leadership experience across media, television, and advertising to MediaCo.& As CEO, Lindsay will be responsible for setting MediaCo’s overall strategic vision and expanding its radio and outdoor divisions with an emphasis on transforming the digital business.

“Rahsan-Rahsan is a talented and dedicated leader with the right strategic vision, relentless drive, and passion for media required to lead the MediaCo team at this critical time. He forged his career at the intersection of technology and media, and his vast experience and keen perspective will be invaluable in taking the company into the future,” said MediaCo Board Director Laura Lee.

Lindsay has spent the past nine years at Urban One, Inc., where he oversaw advertising sales, integrated marketing, and sales operations for TV One and sister network CLEO TV, which he helped launch in 2019. In 2020, he took over the role as head of iOne Digital ad sales and One Solution, Urban One’s cross-platform marketing group, as well as One X Studios, the branded content production arm of Urban One. Prior to joining TV One in 2011, Lindsay spent nearly eight years in Ad Sales for Viacom Media Networks, focused on new business development for MTV, Comedy Central, Spike, CMT, and TV Land. He also served as VP of Ad Sales for MTV2, mtvU, and Palladia.

Passionate about serving the community and grooming the next generation of leaders, in his spare time Lindsay serves as the co-chair of the Board of Directors for The Brotherhood/Sister Sol, a Harlem-based nonprofit organization.

“The opportunity to work with iconic brands like HOT 97 and WBLS is just too good to pass up,” said Lindsay. “I see a number of potential ways to further cultivate both brands, build on their well-established legacies, and drive new revenue streams. I’m also energized by the opportunity to leverage the Fairway footprint in a way that helps fulfill the MediaCo mission to connect with broader audiences.”

MediaCo’s newly formed senior management team is poised to drive future success, comprised of capable leaders who bring a collaborative spirit and a necessary focus on future strategy. As part of MediaCo’s strategic realignment, Bradford Tobin was also recently named President and Chief Operating Officer.

“Brad is a seasoned and trusted leader who consistently delivers results. He is uniquely qualified to drive strategic prioritization and accountability within MediaCo, with a laser focus on operational excellence,” said Soo Kim, MediaCo’s lead investor.

Prior to joining MediaCo in August 2020, Tobin served as General Counsel/Chief Compliance Officer for Standard Diversified Inc., and General Counsel/SVP for RadioShack, where he established a proven track record for building and managing high-growth sales organizations. In his current role, Tobin leads business operations for MediaCo, including rapidly scaling digital capabilities and aligning the organization’s innovation engine.

“I’m proud to be a part of MediaCo’s executive team and thrilled to help lead the company into its next phase of innovation as we focus on building a 360 media experience for consumers,” said Tobin.

Ovulation illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Fertility Technology

The future of home-diagnostic tests

By Aayush Rai, CEO, Inito

During the pandemic, many of us worry about our own health and of our families. And recently, a conversation with a close friend turned to this topic. She has Hypothyroidism and needs to be on lifelong medication to manage the condition.

While managing this ailment in regular times wouldn’t be an issue, doctor visits and trips to the hospital for regular check-ups have either been put on hold or become dangerous and stressful during the pandemic. That led her to use an online service to get her thyroid medication delivered home. The convenience of an online consultation with a doctor and medicine delivery to her doorstep was great; she still had to go to the lab to get a blood test.

Clinicians and patients alike do not want to spend time traveling to labs and incur the expense, pain, and delays associated with traditional testing. And now, there is no need in many cases since there are alternatives such as home blood pressure monitoring, urine pregnancy, ovulation test kits, glucose monitoring, and more. In fact, advances in technology have even made it possible to conceive at home, in the privacy of your own space, without the need to visit a doctor’s office. This is wonderful news for women who are struggling with infertility problems, since home insemination is a cost-effective solution that can be done completely on your own.

Besides being cost-effective, quick, and confidential, home use tests can help:

  • Detect health conditions even before symptoms arise so that you can get early treatment and lower your chance of developing later complications such as cholesterol, hepatitis, and other STI testing. Home EKG tests can pick up atrial fibrillation long before symptoms arise. 
  • Detect specific conditions when there are no symptoms or signs to take immediate action, such as pregnancy testing so that you avoid alcohol intake and start prenatal vitamins.
  • Monitor conditions to allow frequent changes in treatment, such as to monitor blood sugar levels in diabetes and making insulin adjustments or adjusting blood pressure medications in the case of hypertension.

While home-use tests are a necessity during the pandemic, the change in user behavior will be permanent. In older days, couples trying to conceive could only track when they are fertile at home using Ovulation Tests. Ovulation tests can be done at home, measuring the presence of L.H., which shows up in the urine after ovulation occurs. Modern ovulation tests like Inito have advanced such testing by measuring the actual value of three essential fertility hormones, two of which predict, in advance, the time of ovulation and one that confirms that it did actually occur.

The user can simply send the chart of their hormones to the doctor rather than going through the anxiety and stress of lab tests. Once users and doctors experience the ease of use of these, they will not want to back to traditional methods.

People want to live healthy lives autonomously without excessive medical intervention. Even after the pandemic, consumers will continue to adopt home diagnostics.  As technology sufficiently matures, every house will have a single connected device capable of conducting these tests – becoming as much a part of the household as a thermometer is today. This is especially critical in the U.S., given the high incidence of chronic diseases.

About 45% of the U.S. population – close to 133 million Americans have at least one chronic disease.  The total costs for direct treatment for chronic conditions totalled $1.1 trillion —equivalent to nearly six percent of the U.S. GDP. Diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and osteoarthritis are the most expensive conditions in direct healthcare costs.

For people with diabetes, the HbA1c test (also known as the hemoglobin A1c or glycated hemoglobin test) is an essential indicator of their average glucose levels. It indicates how well their disease is controlled and must be taken every three months. Not testing regularly can lead to the condition spiralling out of control, risking life, and increased costs of care. Many other conditions, like Hypothyroidism, require constant monitoring and lifelong medication.

The ability to conduct home testing dovetails perfectly with online consultation and medicine delivery. With modern connected devices, patients can directly share test reports with their doctors, consult with them online, have their prescriptions renewed, and await the arrival of medicines at their doorstep. A complete ecosystem.

Managing conditions at home will gradually become a norm, as we build out this complete ecosystem. By taking travel and waiting times out and delivering care faster, home diagnostics can save us millions of years, spent in the pursuit of our health at an equivalent or even lower cost.

Inito is the world’s first home device that tests for fertility hormones on a single device connected to a smartphone. This groundbreaking device is the only ovulation test to perform lab-grade fertility diagnostic tests at home. 

Geneva Supply illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Geneva Supply Increases Minimum Wage

Geneva Supply Increases Minimum Wage to $15 for Hourly Employees

Co-Founders Jeff Peterson and Mark Becker lead efforts to boost worker wages in Wisconsin, South Carolina, and Arizona and offer new day-of-hire benefits.

Geneva Supply Co-Founders Jeff Peterson and Mark Becker, along with the company’s human resource team, Mariann Hunter and Emma Hobday, have announced a pay adjustment and wage increase to $15.00 per hour for all full-time hourly employees. The increase became effective on April 5, 2021. 

  • In addition, employees are now eligible for medical, dental, and vision benefits on the day of hire. 
  • Workers also can choose to be vested in the company retirement plan as soon as they have started their employment with Geneva Supply. 

The moves have impacted workers operating from five U.S. cities across three states, including employees at Geneva Supply’s corporate headquarters in Delavan (Wisconsin) and business locations in Wilmot (Wisconsin), Menomonee Falls (Wisconsin), Charleston (South Carolina), and Phoenix (Arizona).

“This has been an ongoing matter of great importance to us, and the employee feedback and support for these positive changes continues to enliven us,” said Jeff Peterson, CEO of Geneva Supply. “As we move ahead, we will keep focused on our workers and acknowledge the significance of what this increase means to each of them – their families – and the communities they live in.”

Wisconsin and South Carolina’s minimum wage is currently set at $7.25, the same level as the federal minimum wage. Arizona’s state minimum wage rate bumped to $12.15 per hour in early 2021. Although this is a considerable recalculation for Geneva Supply, it is one which Jeff and Mark feel is essential when offering competitive wages to current workers and for attracting potential employees. 

“As Geneva Supply continues to grow, we have made it a priority to invest in our people. Adjusting our full-time minimum wage to $15.00 per hour contributes to the people-first momentum our incredibly hard-working employees support each day. This adjustment is necessary, and we have no doubt it will open more doors for our workers and company in the future,” said Mark Becker, COO of Geneva Supply.

Part of Jeff and Mark’s mission has always included focusing on company culture and employee retention. By raising the minimum wage for all full-time hourly employees, the Small Business Administration award-winning entrepreneurs and leadership team are confident Geneva Supply is taking another step in the right direction.

“Raising our wages is also a smart business move. We know that paying people fairly leads to greater employee retention, which reduces the cost of hiring and training new people to replace employees who leave,” said Mariann Hunter, Human Resource Manager of Geneva Supply. “More important though, we value the people that choose to work here and hope that by increasing the hourly wage, they see and feel that.”

For more information, visit Geneva Supply or for available career opportunities, head to Geneva Supply Careers.