Posts tagged with "Disney"

filmfest illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 Magazine

Acting Success Through the Pandemic

Yuval David hasn’t let COVID-19 holt his career at all. The actor, producer and filmmaker, whose mission is to entertain, uplift and inspire has remained very busy and successful during the pandemic, and he wants to share his secrets for success with fellow actors.

Yuval currently has a number of projects in the works. He’s completed a highly anticipated documentary film, filmed and completed an episode of his award-winning man-on-the-street series, “One Actor Short,” and now he is virtually acting in a horror film. In addition, in his ‘free time’ he’s been the keynote speaker for very worthy advocacy causes supporting the LGBTQ and Jewish communities.

As an actor, Yuval has played major roles in studio and independent films, television, theatre, web, digital media, and voice overs. These include, “What Would You Do” (ABC), “Madam Secretary” (CBS), “The Michael J Fox Show” (NBC), “Beauty and the Beast” (Disney), in addition to productions with HBO, Comedy Central, DreamWorks, AFI, and theatres across the globe.

Even despite his personal COVID-19 illness last spring, Yuval continued to keep his career moving ahead by staying true to his creative process.

Here are Yuval’s tips for how to maintain success during the pandemic:

  1. Be tenacious. Don’t wait for your agents and managers to get work for you. While they are there to support your career with more work, you must be ambitious and seek opportunities for yourself every day.
  2. Respect, and be respected. Never let anyone disrespect you as an actor. The best directors, producers, and casting directors treat actors with respectfully. Don’t sacrifice your personal standards here, ever.
  3. Practice ‘identity politics’. You, as a person, are your own brand. Represent your identity authentically by creating and owning your own narrative and seeking out roles that complement who you are personally, as well as your acting skills. Pro Tip: Ask yourself questions such as “what triggers and activates you,” in order to develop your narrative.
  4. Take Yourself Seriously. Treat your creative career as a business and invest wisely along the way.
  5. Define your process. That is your brand at the end of the day.

Yuval’s exceptional work as a filmmaker has been screened at more than 60 film festivals and taken home nearly 50 awards from international film festivals, including The Big Apple Film Festival, New York International Film Festival, NewFilmmakers Film Festival, NYC Independent Film Festival, Hollywood Just4Shorts Film Festival, Top Shorts Film Festival, Vegas CineFest International Film Festival, IndieFest, Accolade Global, American Picture, Atlanta Film Festival, and Global Webisode Festival, just to name a few.

The New Blade

By: Catherine Martin

With the reboot of Marvel’s Blade expected to arrive to theaters in 2022, many fans of the original 1998 superhero movie speculate whether Wesley Snipes will reprise his role in the film. Snipes played the role of the eponymous half-vampire/half-human hybrid, Blade, who has the duties of a superhero and a vampire hunter. He played Blade throughout all three of the Blade franchise movies, yet, he is not expected to be cast in this iconic role again for the new reboot. Instead, Oscar-winning Mahershala Ali will be playing the role of this flawed hero. Keep in touch with what Ali is up to HERE.

Fans of the original Blade trilogy were uncertain about how to feel about the new casting, but Welsey Snipes has since told his fans to “chillaaxx.” Although he has told his fans to calm down, it has not stopped him from being adamant about how he is, and always will be, Blade. On January 7th he quote tweeted a message to him asking, “Wes, can you be Blade again?” and in response stated, “I AM BLADE…forever.” After spending so much time as Blade, there is no doubt that Wesley Snipes has a deep connection with this role and that it will always be a part of him.

The details of Blade are still being kept from the masses, and the only confirmed detail known, right now, is Ali’s attachment to the project. Back in 2019 Snipes made a comment about his opinion of Ali’s casting for the role of Blade:

“People are very, very sneaky. They try to make it about the actors,” Snipes told AP. “It’s not about me and him. I’m happy for him to be considered. I’m happy for them looking at him. Flattery… what do they say? Imitation is the best form of flattery. It’s something that he has acknowledged that he wanted to do and his family wanted him to do it, so I’m appreciative of him getting the love that I’ve created something that others want to carry on and make their own stamp on.”

Wesley Snipes response was not only calm and collected, but extremely supportive as well. More support can be noted in a more recent interview with Den of Geek (read more about it HERE), and we can see where the two stand in regards to each other and if they have kept in contact since the announcement of Ali’s new role as Blade. So, the suspicions people have about Snipes being upset with Ali can be erased once and for all.

“No, he hasn’t called me. We haven’t talked about characterizations or how he should play it or anything like that. I can’t imagine that call ever coming in. That would be really strange. But we did communicate about how much we appreciate each other’s work, and how I’m comfortable with saying, ‘Hey man, go rock it, baby. If you got it, do it.”

Though, Wesley Snipes will not be playing his iconic role as Blade, he will always carry the attachment and fond memories of his time with this character. In addition, his part has inspired many people, Mahershala Ali included (you can hear his thoughts on Wesley Snipes HERE), and will remain the marker and epitome of, Blade.

WESLEY SNIPES’ OTHER ENDEAVORS

There are many ways to keep up with the actor through his other endeavors. He recently played General Izzie in Coming 2 America, starring Eddie Murphy. The comedy/rom-com will be available to watch on Amazon Prime March 5, 2021. Watch the trailer HERE. Additionally, outside the realm of acting, Snipes has now coauthored a dark fantasy novel with Ray Norman, Talon of God. So, for all fans of Wesley Snipes, you can continue to keep up with the actor, film producer, martial artist and author through the multitude of content he continues to produce.

KEEP UP WITH WESLEY SNIPES

Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

The Bell Twins illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 magazine

UNSTOPPABLE: THE BELL TWINS

By Emily Bunn

Forget The Suite Life’s Zach and Cody– Disney’s newest dynamic duo of twins, Isaac and Elijah Bell, have landed lead roles in Walt Disney Studio Picture’s up and coming release, “Safety.” (2020) The film will be released on the new Disney+ streaming platform, and was directed by Academy award-winning director and producer, Reggie Hudlin.

Their careers began as child models, but they dreamed of making it on the big screen. Inspired by their favorite actors and actresses, such as Denzel Washington, Robert de Niro, and Viola Davis, the brothers trained and studied acting at Mad Acting Studio with Max Decker. Decker has trained stars such as Brianna Hildebrand (Deadpool) and Amirah Johnson (Shameless), to name a few.

360 Magazine sat down with the starlets to talk teenagerdom in Hollywood, brotherly love, and Peter Pan. The transition from being a child actor to a Disney star is no small feat, but Elijah and Isaac possess a natural ability to entertain. Elijah and Isaac explain that they found their early career transition to be relatively easy, having been in front of the camera from such a young age. Far from being shy, the duo shines in the spotlight, especially when they’re together. Elijah and Isaac confidently explain, “you just have to look at the camera as your best friend and trust your own instincts.”

Luckily, Elijah and Isaac had the support of their family regarding their decision to begin acting. Hailing from Australia, the brothers had their eyes set on LA’s film industry, an ambitious undertaking. While no one else in their family is in the film industry, Elijah and Isaac both knew that acting was something they wanted to pursue. The twins continue explaining that in “Australia… acting is definitely not the biggest thing for most Aussies. But our mum and dad never doubted us during the decision to become actors once, which is nothing but a blessing having their full support.”

Elijah and Isaac were further supported by their acting coach Max Decker, at Los Angeles’ Mad Acting Studio. Speaking fondly of their coaching experience, the boys remark that working with Max is the best thing that they could have done for themselves as actors. Praising Decker’s impressive craft, Elijah and Isaac gratefully exclaimed, “He’s like master splinter from ‘Ninja Turtles’. He’s so invested in just the work aspect of acting, that nothing else matters but making sure his actors are sharp when it comes time to be on set. We couldn’t be more thankful for him, thank you Big Max.”

Being cast by Disney for their first roles as actors was a momentous milestone for Elijah and Isaac. The twins grew up watching Disney’s “Peter Pan,” so being cast to star in Walt Disney Studio’s “Safety” (2020) was “an absolute dream come true.” Before realizing their dreams of stardom on the big screen, the two brothers both had wanted to become D-1 athletes. Fortunately, “Safety” (2020) is a film revolving around football drama, so it was the perfect breakout role to combine the brother’s interests and talents. Living the life of a D-1 athlete in the film allowed for the brothers to vicariously live out their earlier dreams while simultaneously achieving their current aspirations. Another shared dream of the duo would be to work with Denzel Washington or Marlon Brando.

Looking towards the future, Elijah and Isaac’s ultimate goal is tell stories through their acting and connect with people along the way. In telling their own lives’ story, the brothers remarked that if they had to choose any actor to tell their own life story, it would be one another.

With mutual dreams of the big screen, all of the training that Elijah and Isaac have experienced has only brought them closer. Despite the pressures of the entertainment industry, their family dynamic has only become stronger and tighter knit. “We had to learn that having each other to support one another is the ultimate gift anyone could ask for. We continue to push each other to our fullest potential– yes, we can be hard on one another. but who wouldn’t want that? Someone to let you know when you are bullshitting, or when you are doing the right thing and being congratulated for the hard work being done. We are like Yin and Yang and unbreakable force.”

Carlo Alberto Orecchia photographs The Bell Twins for 360 MAGAZINE

Carlo Alberto Orecchia photographs The Bell Twins for 360 MAGAZINE

*Photos by Carlo Alberto Orecchia

Frank Pena for 360 Magazine

Jonte’ Moaning × Brian Thomas

360 Magazine had the opportunity to collaborate with Jonte’ Moaning and Brian Thomas for an editorial fashion shoot that encompasses the new age of fashion. The incredibly talented duo worked together to produce a photoshoot that displays high fashion and uniqueness. The creative director of the shoot was Franklin Peña and the production was done by Brian Rubiano

This shoot features two exquisite looks which Moaning carries off flawlessly. The chained shirt, paired with leather shorts and unique, gladiator boots creates a modern-day, stylish armor. The second look features a silver overcoat with red and black dripping detail falling from the jacket’s shoulders. When paired with this statement red and grey hat, the look comes together effortlessly. 

Jonte’ Moaning has been a pioneer for the entertainment industry worldwide. He has influenced major pop artists with his unique discography. His work can recently be seen in the Black is King film which was directed, written and executively produced by Beyoncé. Jonte’ has been of major importance for the LGTBQ+ community and has broken down barriers for men to explore their gender expression. 

Jonte’ is best known for taking part in curating the iconic “Sasha Fierce” persona of BeyoncéAlthough, he has also worked closely with a number of other notable artists such as Janet Jackson, Cassie, Tamar Braxton, Blackpink and many more.

Jonte’ released his first solo single, “Bitch You Betta” in 2008 and has continued to release music from there. The artist has stated that he was inspired to work on his solo career while he was working alongside performing artists and felt that he “could do it better.”

As a performer, Jonte’ is known for his androgynous look and trademark high heels which challenge classic gender norms. He has worked into the elite status and continues to produce music that embodies all he represents. His music, along with his style makes waves within the entertainment industry and this editorial shoot is no different. 

You can read more about Jonte’s successful career on his website, HelloJonte.com.

The photographer for the shoot, Brian Thomas, is an astound choreographer and photographer who is best known for working with legend Michael Jackson. Throughout his career, he has gained a great deal of experience and works closely with a variety of performing artists. Thomas also owns Spinkick Pictures in New York City, which produces extraordinary films. 

Thomas has had major success in the directing industry and some of his credits include “Amy’s Victory Dance,” an award-winning documentary as well as, “Follow, Lead, Love” and “P.S. Love Robby,” two documentaries currently in production. He also directed the short film, “Dark Matter” which features dancer Desmond Richardson

Thomas has also won the GLAM award for various music videos including “Higher Love,” which stares Carishma. He has also worked as the Associate Director for the Cirque du Soleil  Flash mob Time Square performance. 

As well as being an accredited director, Thomas has choreographed for many notable stars. He has worked with stars such as Michael Jackson, Mary J. Blige, Pink, Whitney Houston, Usher, Jason Durelo and Alicia Keys, all giant names within the music industry. He has also worked closely with stars like Destiny’s Child, Jamie Foxx, Mya, Brian McKnight, Deborah Cox, India Arie, Liza Minnelli, Gloria Gaynor and Marc Anthony to produce stellar choreography. 

Thomas has also choreographed for companies such as Sesame Street, The Electric Company, New York City Knicks Dancers, Brooklynettes, Optimum triple play, Are We There Yet, and numerous other TV and live stage events.

Thomas explained that his mission is to promote empathy through his work with Visual Art. He wants to further conversations about Equality, Representation, and Diversity which he certainly does with his films.   

Read more about Brian Thomas and his success on his website, http://brianthomasfilms.com/

The creative direction of the shoot was executed by Franklin Peña, a professional dancer and fashion model from New York City. He has always been heavily involved in the entertainment industry and in 2016 decided to make the move from the Bronx to Los Angeles. There, he appeared on E Network’s reality show, What Happens at The Abbey. This series takes a glance inside of The Abbey in West Hollywood, which is known as the “Best Gay Bar in the World.” The show follows the workers of the bar as they interact with celebrities and navigate love and drama. 

Pena was also tapped by 360 Magazine as a red carpet correspondent in 2017. He continues to grow his success working with a variety of other creatives in the industry. 

This shoot was produced by Brian Rubiano. As a first-generation immigrant from the Philippines, Brian Rubiano has gained success as an actor and producer. He also started “Humanize It,” his own Film Production and Brand Strategy consultation company. 

Rubiano has worked closely with Brian Thomas on many similar films for Spinkick Pictures. Rubiano worked as the Post-Production Producer for both the Award-Winning feature documentary “Amy’s Victory Dance” and the short film “Dark Matter,” both of which Thomas also worked on. 

Rubiano has a goal to use his platform, skills & knowledge in order to help artists and the creative community to expand their brand’s purpose. He aspires to be a vessel to the voiceless, marginalized & underrepresented by using film production as his medium.

You can keep up with Moaning, Thomas, Peña and Rubiano on their Instagrams. 

Model: Jonte’ Moaning 

Photographer: Brian Thomas 

Creative Direction: Franklin Peña

Producer: Brian Rubiano

Frank Pena for 360 Magazine

Frank Pena for 360 Magazine

Hunter Sansone Headshot by Leigh Keily

Q×A with Hunter Sansone

By Hannah DiPilato

360 Magazine has the opportunity to sit down with rising star, Hunter Sansone. Hunter is quickly making a name for himself in Hollywood with the characters he portrays on screen.

This winter, Hunter can be seen starring in Disney+’s highly anticipated sports film “Safety,” which was released to Disney+ on December 11. He also stars on CW’s hit series “Stargirl” as Cameron Mahkent also known as Icicle Jr. and is currently in the process of filming season two. We asked Sansone questions about his career, future and aspirations.

What has been your favorite role in your career so far?

Wow. That’s hard to say. Honestly, I don’t have a favorite. They have all been equally fulfilling. I learned different things from each project. I will say I am really into emotionally complex roles that involve a lot of raw emotional work.

What was your favorite part of working on the movie “Safety” for Disney+?

Being a part of an underdog sports film. I grew up watching these types of films, and they partially influenced my dream of becoming an actor one day. I played sports growing up, so to be able to utilize that childhood experience with my career was fun.

Do you have any exciting roles that are upcoming?

I am currently filming Stargirl Season 2, and that should be coming out sometime in 2021 on The CW. Few other things in the works that I can’t dive into at the moment.

I know you support the Stand Up for Pits Foundation, are there any other charities you would like to work with?

Rebecca Corry and the Stand Up For Pits foundation are incredible. They have done so much with ending discrimination towards pit bull type dogs. I have also recently partnered up with Stray Rescue of St. Louis. Their main focus being rescuing abandoned, abused, and neglected animals off the streets. Both incredible organizations that I plan to have my voice attached to for many years to come.

Since you grew up in Missouri, how did you get involved in acting? Did you have other future plans?

My mom has been a professional singer and vocal coach my whole life. She was my influence that led me down this path. She used to say to me that she thought I would be a good actor, but I didn’t think much of it for a few years. One day, I found myself curious and went to an acting class with her and I was hooked.

What is your favorite scene from “Safety” that you think viewers should be on the lookout for?

A combination of a few different scenes where Ray and I are sneaking Fay around the dorms. Definitely had some good laughs with those.

Do you have an idol you respect in Hollywood? What about them inspires you?

I’ve always respected Leonardo DiCaprio and how he attacks a role. He always gives 150%. He commits physically, mentally, and emotionally to every role. I try to approach every single one of my roles with that same tenacity and work ethic.

Tell us more about your character Daniel Morelli in the new movie.

Daniel is Ray’s roommate, teammate and best friend. He is the first person that Ray confides in about his situation with his little brother. You will see Daniel showing up for Ray in more ways than one throughout the film. He is all about family. Also, Daniel is an Italian kid from Long Island with a thick accent. I’m Italian myself so that was fun to be able to honor my Italian heritage on screen.

Tell us about the filming for Season 2 of Stargirl, can you give our readers an inside scoop?

We are working away on Season 2 as we speak. Having a blast while doing it. I can’t give you much, but what I can say is if you loved Season 1, you will definitely not want to miss Season 2. It should be coming out sometime in 2021 on The CW.

Where do you see your career going in the future, are there any goals you have for movies or TV?

I have big goals. I dream big. I recommend that to anyone with a dream. Don’t commit 50%. Set the biggest dreams for yourself as possible and go after them with every fiber in you. I think I’m going to keep them to myself for now and we can regroup down the road once a few of them have been accomplished.

Salem Ilese – Marry Christmas

Today, singer/songwriter Salem Ilese releases her festive song “Marry Christmas” just in time for the holidays. Out now via 10K Projects/Homemade Projects, “Marry Christmas” has all the trappings to become a Christmas pop hit with its cheery melody, bright horns, and driving beat. The new single follows up the breakout success of her August 2020 hit, “Mad At Disney” and her November 2020 single “Coke & Mentos.” Gaining significant momentum on TikTok, “Mad At Disney” has sparked the creation of over 3.1M videos and has been streamed 116M+ streams on Spotify and was featured on Spotify’s Today’s Top Hits playlist for over 15 weeks. Another undeniable pop hit, Zane Lowe debuted “Coke & Mentos” on his Apple Music 1 show on November 22. Last week, Salem joined Charli D’Amelio and her family for their own “Coke & Mentos” experiment. Stream “Marry Christmas” and watch Salem’s YouTube video with the D’Amelio’s below.

LISTEN TO “MARRY CHRISTMAS” HERE

WATCH “COKE & MENTOS WITH THE D’AMELIOS” HERE

21-year-old pop artist Salem Ilese has been preparing for this moment her entire life. Born and raised in Mill Valley, CA, right outside San Francisco, the singer/songwriter has been “making music for longer than [she] can remember.” With an innate drive for songwriting, her parents quickly put their precocious daughter into music lessons and introduced her to their favorites, namely, David Bowie and The Beatles. “My Dad likes to consider himself an ‘expert music listener,’” she says, “and even though they aren’t musicians, they made sure I knew the greats. Listening to a lot of Bowie had a huge influence on me because I love pop music, but my taste always veers a little bit left of center.”

Salem attributes her music career to legendary writer Bonnie Hayes, her first songwriting teacher. Credited for creating hit songs for Cher, Bonnie Riatt, David Crosby, Bette Midler and more, Bonnie Hayes immediately saw then-12-year-old Salem’s gift for storytelling; “she took me under her wing. I probably wouldn’t be here without her.”

Hayes eventually moved to Boston to head Berklee College of Music’s songwriting department and shortly thereafter Salem also relocated across the country to enroll in her department. After a couple years of intense learning, Salem made the decision to move back to the West Coast, this time settling down in Los Angeles.

“My biggest fear when dropping out of Berklee was that I wouldn’t be busy enough in LA. I’m the type of person who thrives off of a packed schedule,” she reflects, so the young musician dedicated herself to a strict regimen of songwriting sessions every single day, including weekends, for six months straight in order to make the most out of her move. “Sometimes I’d even do doubles,” she said, “I also did some live shows at night here and there.”

Soon, Salem’s dedicated lifestyle attracted interest from big-name publishing companies, hoping to work with her as a writer. Per the advice of her manager, she held out for something greater – “I started seeing my own music pick up soon after, with a few placements on Spotify playlists New Music Friday and Fresh Finds.” The growing buzz landed Salem in a label bidding war, and she eventually found herself landing with 10K Projects/Homemade Projects in August 2020.

Now, Salem is at work on her first full length project and continues to do writing sessions over Zoom which she admits has been “a little weird.” But the cheerful 21-year-old reassures that she’s still living her dream and would “never have considered any other career for myself, except maybe to be an astronaut when I was three,” she laughs. “I take care of my lizard, and I make music all the time. Things are good.”

CONNECT WITH SALEM ILESE

INSTAGRAM / TIKTOK / TWITTER / FACEBOOK

Graffiti and art article illustrated by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 magazine

The Most Scandalous Cases of Plagiarism in Art

By Judy Nelson

Art is generally connected to creativity and original work. The ability to design something that has not been seen before is the driving force behind most artistic minds. Unfortunately, some people choose to take advantage of the creativity of others rather than come up with their own content. 

To make matters worse, these people also fail to give credit where it’s due, instead trying to pass these reproductions off as their own. Plagiarism has become a growing problem in the pop art world, with many emerging artists having their work stolen by others looking to make a quick buck. Some of the more scandalous incidents that have happened in this genre include:

Andy Warhol vs. Patricia Caulfield 

Andy Warhol is considered one of the founding fathers of pop art culture. His works offered new forms of expression that connected art with the advertisement industry and celebrity culture. Because of his prominent position in the industry, the discovery of his plagiarism came as a shock to the world. 

In 1964, the artist released a new series known as “Flowers,” which took the industry by storm. The work consisted of a beautiful floral design printed on various silkscreens. It was soon discovered, however, that instead of creating an original portrait of flowers, 

Warhol had used a photograph by artist Patricia Caulfield –which had been published in a 1964 issue of Modern Photography. This shortcut led to Warhol’s first lawsuit, as Patricia lodged an official complaint in 1966. Any such situation leads to disgrace and as a student, you are also recommended professional plagiarism checker for students in the UK. It ensures 100% unique work and this instills confidence in you that you are writing plagiarism-free and then submit the academic work.

Zara vs. Tuesday Bassen 

In 2016, Zara, a prominent fast-fashion retail brand from Spain, clashed with Los Angeles based independent artist Tuesday Bassen. The dispute arose because of the global brand’s use of the illustrator’s pin designs without her consent. 

The designs had been added to a new line of Zara’s products, with Bassen only finding out when her fans contacted her after noticing the similarities. Zara showed no remorse for their actions, refusing to acknowledge any wrongdoing. 

The retail brand even pointed out that complaints related to the similarities in design were insignificant compared to the overall traffic that the company attracted. This callous response caused uproar within the artistic community. It also highlighted the struggles endured by independent brands and artists in the industry when going up against big corporations. 

Lili Chin vs. Kohl

In 2016, Lili Chin, another independent artist from Los Angeles, filed a complaint against mega retail store Kohl for the use of her work without permission. The lawsuits consisted of copyright infringement and unfair competition charges. 

Lili demanded damages that could have reached up to $1 million. The complaint was based on the retailer marketing her drawings of “Boogie the Boston terrier” on socks and t-shirts sold in their stores. The drawings were based on a 2011 poster designed by the illustrator, showing the dog in various poses. 

Lili Chin pointed out that she sold similar merchandise with the same designs on them. She also mentioned that part of her proceeds went to dog rescue organizations, with Kohl’s actions reducing the amount of charity she was able to give to this worthy cause. In the end, the two parties settled out of court. 

Modern Dog vs. Disney/Target  

Another dog-based design was at the forefront of artwork plagiarism in 2013, when Modern Dog sued commercial giants Disney and Target over the use of an image that had featured in one of their books. Unauthorized copies of the picture had been printed on t-shirts and sold by the two major corporations. 

The companies’ online plagiarism checker was found at fault when they tried to argue that the illustrations involved fell under a technical rather than creative category. The image in question was a collection of sketches of different small dog faces. 

In the summary hearing, the court ruled in favor of the complainant and awarded Modern Dog with broad copyright protection for all 26 drawings. 

Forever 21 vs. Valfré 

Ilse Valfré is the third Los Angeles-based artist to suffer plagiarism at the hands of a major corporation. In 2016, the Mexican-born designer created a cartoon-based design of a rainbow featuring pastel colors and white puffy clouds. Less than a year later, fashion giant Forever 21 released a similar design. 

Both emblems featured matching colors and were branded on the back of iPhone cases. Further investigations by the complainant found that Rue 21, another major retail corporation, had also plagiarized three other designs from Valfré – in the production of their stereo earbuds. 

Conclusion

These examples of plagiarism highlight the need for strict regulation policies when it comes to the protection of copyrighted work. Independent artists deserve recognition for their productions, and, unfortunately, some major companies would rather try and plagiarize these designs than pay the artists for their work. Luckily, the growing influence of social media has made it harder for companies to get away with this act. 

Author Bio:

Judy Nelson works for an NGO based in East Africa, where it runs programs to spread awareness about education for all. She is their lead content writer and editor and also works part-time as a thesis and dissertation writer for an online academic writing service. In her free time, she plays with her pets, drives to the countryside and learns caricature drawing. 

Streaming, tv, film, Nielsen story illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

STREAMING PLATFORMS LEADING THE WAY 

IN ON-SCREEN DIVERSE REPRESENTATION

Diversity at all-time high due to growing television landscape but notable disparities persist

The explosion of new television platforms across broadcast, streaming and cable has led to an increase in on-screen representation of diverse identity groups, according to Nielsen’s latest Diverse Intelligence Series report: Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV. 

Among the 300 most-viewed programs in 2019, 92% had some level of diversity in the cast (i.e. women, people of color or LGBTQ+). Whites, African Americans and LGBTQ+ had the largest overall share of screen while Women, Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans were underrepresented relative to their population estimates. The report uncovers notable differences in identity group representation across different platforms; with streaming over-indexing on representation for certain identity groups versus traditional broadcast and cable.

In this report, Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV, Nielsen reports on scripted, reality, variety and news programming on key metrics: 

  • Share of Screen (SOS): composition of the top 10 recurring cast members in a program
  • Inclusion Opportunity Index (IOI): compares the SOS of an identity group (e.g. women) to their representation in population estimates
  • Inclusion Audience Index (IAI): compares the SOS of an identity group to their representation in a program’s audience.

The report is powered by Gracenote Inclusion Analytics, a new solution delivering cutting-edge metrics created from Gracenote content metadata and Nielsen audience measurement data, providing the industry with consistent and reliable measurement of granular viewing. The report also leverages Gracenote Video Descriptors, metadata relating to story, mood, character, theme and scenario in each program. 

Key insights from the report include:

Overall, representation of diverse identity groups in on-screen programming is low across all media platforms. Streaming fares better for inclusion followed by broadcast and cable. Viewing audiences are increasingly seeking content that tells their stories. As a result, people are migrating to platforms that have broad and more diverse content offerings. 

  • Representation by platform (Broadcast, Cable, Streaming): Nearly one-third of the content on cable doesn’t have parity representation of Indigenous, People of Color (Black, Native American, Asian & Pacific islander, Hispanic/Latinx, Middle eastern/ North African, Multiracial), Women or LGBTQ talent. 
  • Subscription video on demand (SVOD) programming represents several identity groups e.g. Blacks, Hispanic and Asians well, helping us understand, in part, why more diverse audiences are subscribing to streaming services than the general population.
  • Representation of identity groups by genre (e.g. comedy, drama, news): 
    • While women are not well represented in any single genre, the highest representation for women is in science fiction, drama, comedy and horror. 
    • Women have the lowest representation in news. 
    • People of color representation is at parity in music and drama, followed by science fiction and action and adventure.  
    • People of color have least relative representation in news. 
    • News does prominently feature LGBTQ talent on-screen. 
    • Reality and horror programming also prominently feature LGBTQ talent. 

All audiences, regardless of how they identify, like to see diversity in the content they view on TV. Programs that represent multiple identity groups evenly yield higher overall audience ratings for all viewers when compared to shows that have a significant over or under representation of any one identity group.  

Quality of representation matters too. The themes and narratives depicted on-screen can contribute to identity formation and social perceptions. As the industry seeks to improve diversity on-screen, content creators and publishers should consider the context in which women, people of color, and LGBTQ+ talent are presented. Equally important is investing in marketing those diverse programs so that they are watched.

  • Women insights
    • Comprise 52% of the U.S. population; show up on screen only 38% of the time
    • Women 50+ years old 
      • 60% less likely to see themselves in programming than in the general population, and 2x the representation of men 50+
      • Women 50+ comprise 20% of the population and 20% of all TV viewers, but have a SOS of less than 8%
      • Men 50+ years old are 17% of the total population and have SOS of 14%
  • LGBTQ+ insights
    • 1 out of 4 top performing programs across cable, broadcast and streaming have relative representation of LGBTQ+ cast members 
    • Total SOS for LGBTQ was 7%. LGBTQ people are 4.5% of the population so across all platforms we see fair representation
    • The highest level of representation is on SVOD (8% SOS), followed by cable (7%) then broadcast (5%). 

Aligning representative casting and content themes is an area of opportunity. In the programming where identity groups see themselves represented at parity, these are the themes that are most present: 

  • Latinas: dysfunction, emotional, suspenseful, melodramatic, police stations
  • Black women: emotional, personal relationships, sons, investigation, rivalry
  • Black men: investigation, thrilling, streets, pursuit, teamwork, discovery
  • East Asians: challenge, courage and bravery, justice, sons, discovery
  • South/Southeast Asian males: thrilling, awakening, offices, courtrooms
  • White women: friendship, family, love, husbands, daughters

Nielsen’s findings aim to show media owners the degree to which their programming is inclusive, coupled with the diversity of the audience they draw. Additionally, brands and agencies will now be able to measure their advertising investment and alignment to inclusive content. The identity groups measured included: Female, Male & Expansive Gender Identities, Black/African American, Hispanic, Asian & Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern/North African, Multiracial, White, Native American/Native Alaskan, and Sexual Orientation. The data, which was both intersectional and granular, enables Nielsen to look at specific identity subsegments like Afro-Latino or Southeast Asian. 

“At Nielsen, we believe that the audience is everything and that inclusion is a prerequisite of a healthy media ecosystem, ensuring all communities and individuals are heard and seen,” stated Tina Wilson, Nielsen EVP, Media Analytics and Marketing Outcomes. “The call for inclusive programming that breaks traditional stereotypes and gives a voice to underrepresented groups has never been louder.”

“This work underscores the essential importance of on-screen representation in an increasingly diverse audience landscape,” said Sandra Sims-Williams, Nielsen SVP, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. “Not only is the business case for inclusion made but it also provides practical recommendations on how media companies can address inclusion gaps. This is a must-read for any media professional who wants to be part of the change that today’s television viewers demand.”

For more details and insights, download Being Seen On Screen: Diverse Representation & Inclusion on TV. Please visit nielsen.com/inclusionanalytics to learn more. Join the discussion on Facebook (Nielsen Community) and follow us on Twitter (@NielsenKnows).

ABOUT NIELSEN 

Nielsen Holdings plc (NYSE: NLSN) is a global measurement and data analytics company that provides the most complete and trusted view available of consumers and markets worldwide. Our approach marries proprietary Nielsen data with other data sources to help clients around the world understand what’s happening now, what’s happening next, and how to best act on this knowledge. For more than 90 years Nielsen has provided data and analytics based on scientific rigor and innovation, continually developing new ways to answer the most important questions facing the media, advertising, retail and fast-moving consumer goods industries. An S&P 500 company, Nielsen has operations in over 100 countries, covering more than 90% of the world’s population. For more information, visit www.nielsen.com.

The “Magic” of the Disney College Program 

By Hannah DiPilato

“The Magic Kingdom is now open!” a loud voice blares over the intercom at the entrance of the most famous park at Disney World. Hoards of people rush towards the small gates to journey into the land of magic. Upon entering, the magic hits like a wall with Mickey Mouse balloons and a Main Street lined with buildings that look like they were pulled from a storybook. This all leads up to the glistening masterpiece that is Cinderella’s castle. 

But how magical is this experience when you have to do it daily as a burnt-out college student working to make ends meet? For thousands of college students, this is their daily life, but the magic gets dull with each screaming child and cranky parent they encounter. Does the magic truly vanish while working for the Disney College Program, or is all the hassle worth the enchantment that encompasses Disney? 

What it Takes to Work for the Mouse

Although it may seem like no one would be begging to work in a theme park, the Disney College Program gets thousands of applicants every year and only ends up accepting less than 20% of those students. The Disney College Program offers programs at both Walt Disney World in Florida and Disneyland Resort in California. There are five basic qualifications students must meet before they should begin to apply.

According to the Disney Program website, students that hope to apply to the program must be “enrolled and taking classes at an accredited program or institution” at the time they hope to apply. Students must have already completed at least one semester of classes or have graduated within 12 months. The program is specifically designed for undergraduate students, but graduate students are able to apply. Some individual universities have special requirements for students to meet such as a specific GPA, so students should meet with an advisor at their school before applying. 

The program also requires all applicants to be at least 18 years old by the time the program starts as well as possess an unrestricted work authorization. Finally, students that have done the program before must wait at least four months from their departure date to return to the program again. 

However, the program requirements go deeper than this. Since the program is so competitive applicants need to do their best to stand out. The first step of the application process is a general questionnaire that’s similar to many basic job applications. After passing this step, applicants move on to a more in-depth web interview. Finally, a phone interview makes the final decision if someone is selected for the program. 

The Captivating Cast Member Positions

There’s a variety of positions available for students that register for the program. The jobs range from working in the parks to working in the hotels and are assigned by random or based on applicants’ prior experience. These positions are no walk through wonderland, they’re full-time positions and students need to be available to work days, nights, weekends and holidays. The wage depends on the position, but most of the employees only make around $9 an hour or a similar amount close to minimum wage. The paychecks certainly aren’t fit for royalty. 

One past cast member who was a part of the Disney college program, Rebecca Condon, worked Merchandise at the Emporium on Main Street in the Magic Kingdom. This retail experience allowed her to become a manager at Lilly Pulitzer at the young age of 22. Northeastern alumni, Kayla DiPilato also participated in the program as a seater at Be Our Guest, a themed restaurant in the Magic Kingdom. She believes she received this position because of her prior experience as a hostess at Top of the Hub in Boston. 

As both of these jobs seem to capture the whimsical essence of Disney, many positions in the program are not as sought over. Some roles such as custodial or food prep, are minimum wage jobs that can be found at most basic establishments all around the country. However, what would be a part-time job in a fast-food restaurant or a business turns into hours on hours in an amusement park to make ends meet. Depending on which job an applicant is selected for could determine whether they love or hate the program. Although, one person’s job nightmare could be a dream come true for somebody else. 

Not a Castle Nor a Carriage 

The housing and transportation for the program has not received stellar reviews from past cast members. Members of the Disney College Program are housed in apartments and rent is taken weekly from their paychecks. Rent can cost anywhere from $114 to $205 a week depending on what housing a person is placed in. Many times cast members have to share a room as well as sharing the apartment with a few other workers. The rules of housing are apparently incredibly strict, with restrictions against alcohol as well as overnight guests of the opposite gender. 

“My least favorite part of the job was the apartments they housed us in,” said Rebecca Condon. “My apartment was the oldest Disney property and had tons of issues. My toilet overflowed 7 times during the program because of bad pipes in the wall to the point where it flooded our whole apartment with about 2 inches of water.” The rent might be cheap, but in the end you get what you pay for. 

If students were unable to bring their own car, they had to rely on the transportation provided by Disney. The college program in Orlando provides a shuttle service to help transport cast members, but the Anaheim program only provides cast members with a free city bus pass. Although the shuttle sounds like a convenient option, it was much less practical than having a car on the property. 

“It is unbelievable how they are able to transport thousands of us,” expressed Condon. “Although, with that being said, it was really hard because I would have to leave two hours before my shift to make sure I got there in time and I often wasn’t home until two to three hours after my shift.” After an incredibly long day of working in a busy park, a two-hour commute is much longer than anyone would want to endure. 

The unreliable shuttle was one reason DiPilato decided to drive her car all the way from Massachusetts to use during her time in the program. “I knew how disastrous it would be to take the shuttle for commuting,” she said. “I also wanted to have the freedom to explore Orlando.”

Experience the Magic but Fight the Villains 

Disney has its perks as well as its downsides just as any normal day job does. DiPilato said her favorite part of the job was making magic for guests, especially for kids that were part of the Make A Wish program. However, she also recalled that families would often get hot and tired after a long day in the park and take out their frustrations on her.  

There were also a lot of strict rules such as never being allowed to point with one finger, never calling guests “people” instead of guests, not being able to have piercings besides one on your earlobes and not being able to wear too much makeup. 

“Once I got yelled at because a child threw his shoe into our moat. How was that my fault?” recalled DiPilato. “Although, I did get to meet Josh Gad in promotion of the Beauty and The Beast live-action movie that was set to come out at the time, so that was a super cool experience.”

Condon recalled one occurrence where the cast members got to experience an exclusive party for the cast members. “Disney opened up one of their water parks for cast members after hours,” she recalled. “They hired a DJ and catered with some of the best Disney Treats, especially the Mickey Bars!”

Every day working at Disney for the Disney College Program is a unique experience. DiPilato mentioned that guests would often sprinkle ashes of relatives within the rides and cast members would have to clean them up. “Yeah, that happened a lot, mostly in the Haunted Mansion,” she said nonchalantly. She also touched on the fact that kids would often get separated from their families, throw up randomly and scream… a lot. “Giving kids a magical experience is amazing, but it comes with so many more problems than would come with working strictly with adults,” she said. 

Is the Work Worth the Pixie Dust?

It takes a special and dedicated person to participate in the Disney College Program. Days are full of long hours of work and lots of cranky families. However, the perks and experience a cast member receives from the job will last a lifetime. 

“I absolutely loved the program and feel like I grew so much from it,” concluded Condon. “The skills I learned from working for this Fortune 500 company is something I carry around with me every day.” 

If you could walk through the streets of Magic Kingdom daily without it ever getting old, or eat a Mickey Ice Cream bar every day without ever getting sick of them, you could have what it takes to become a cast member. To many, it is the job of a lifetime to be able to play an important role in millions of children’s most magical memories and the free park entry doesn’t hurt either. 

If you can get over the job’s flaws, you could have Mickey Mouse as your coworker. And hey, don’t all jobs have their downsides? 

Bella Thorne Illustration By Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Bella Thorne – Girl

By Hannah DiPilato
Last week, Girl starring Bella Thorne was released to select theaters and VOD platforms. The psycho-thriller movie has gained mixed reviews so far with a 4.8 out of 10 on IMDb and a 63% on Rotten Tomatoes.
The film was directed and written by Chad Faust and stars Faust along with Thorne and Mickey Rourke. Thorne stars the main character known as Girl, who returns to her hometown for the first time since she was kicked out of her house by her father at age six. She comes ready with a plan to get revenge on her abusive father. Upon arrival, she discovers that someone has reached him first and finds him dead.
Determined to find out what happened to her father and fueled by rage, Girl ignores the advice of her mother to get out of the small town and makes it her responsibility to find out who was responsible for the murder of her dad. Armed with her father’s old hatchet throughout the movie, Girl sets out for revenge and answers and it seems nothing will stop her from getting them.
She comes in contact with a lot of interesting characters along her journey through the small, rural town. She meets a friendly bartender, played by Glen Gould, a kind prostitute, played by Lanette Ware and Faust’s character, a mysterious charmer. Rourke plays the local sheriff, who seems suspicious from the start.
As the story progresses, we learn the sheriff and the charmer are working together to find a large sum of money that Girl’s father supposedly hid. With the suspension that Girl now possess the money, it’s clear why she becomes the target. The storyline goes into a whirlwind of family secrets and drama that Girl discovers throughout her investigative journey. The movie plays on themes of poverty, abuse and trauma.
The movie is reminiscent of the 2005 film House of Wax and also has similarities to the Texas Chainsaw Massacre horror series. Thorne does an impeccable job portraying the character of Girl and used a realistic southern accent to add to Girl’s persona. Thorne isn’t one to shy away from big roles and Girl is the actress’s fourth appearance in a feature film for 2020.
The film is available on Apple TV, YouTube, Google Play and Amazon Prime Video for $6.99. The thriller is an hour and thirty-two minutes of plot twists that will keep you on the edge of your seat the entire time.
Thorne is continuously making a name for herself in Hollywood. Her first Hollywood appearances took place on ABC’s Dirty Sexy Money and NBC’s My Own Worst Enemy. She then took on a lead role in 2010 as Cece in the Disney Channel show Shake It Up. Thorne is continuing her career and has been featured in many new TV shows and movies after her success as Cece. In 2018 she starred alongside Patrick Schwarzenegger in Midnight Sun, a moving teen romance movie. She has also taken on roles in The Babysitter, Blended and The Duff.