Posts tagged with "Xbox"

Fortnite illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Fortnite Most Streamed Game on Twitch

Fortnite Most Streamed Game on Twitch for March 2021 – 7M Hours Streamed

According to data presented by Safe Betting Sites US, Fortnite was the most streamed game on Twitch for March 2021 – a total of 6.99 million hours streamed for the month.

Fortnite Leads Several of Twitch’s Key Metrics

Fortnite continues to dominate charts in 2021 and was the most streamed game on Twitch for the month of March. The popular online Battle Royale game logged a total of 6.99M hours streamed on the platform. The second most streamed game on Twitch was Call of Duty: Modern Warfare with a total of 5.03M hours streamed for the month of March.

Fortnite also led the charts in the number of streamers for the month of March 2021. A total of 669,749 streamers streamed Fortnite for the month. Minecraft had the second largest number of streamers with 468,017. Overall, the top 10 leading games in terms of the number of streamers for the month of March, were streamed by an estimated 3.2M streamers on Twitch.

The top 10 games on twitch with the most channels accounted for over 50K channels. Twitch had an almost 20% share of this total with 9,707 channels in March 2021. The second most was COD: Modern Warfare with just under 7K channels.

League of Legends had the largest recorded peak viewers on Twitch in March 2021 with 704,375 peak viewers. The second-largest belonged to Minecraft which recorded 663, 533 peak viewers in March 2021. Fortnite had the fifth largest peak viewers with 641, 227.

Rex Pascual, Esports Editor at Safe Betting Sites US commented: “Despite the rise of many other titles within the same game mode such as PUBG and Warzone, Fortnite continues to attract large audiences on video game streaming platforms. Fortnite’s status as the pioneer of the increasingly popular Battle Royale game mode gives it a loyal and avid fanbase that will keep it near the top of Twitch’s charts for years to come.”

You can read more about the story with more statistics and information here.

video game illustration by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 Magazine

GAME+ RAISES COMPETITIVE GAMING STAKES

Available on iOS and Google Play, Game+ provides a safe and secure marketplace for gamers to play for money 
Today, Game+, the app that enables skill-based head-to-head gaming competition for money, officially launched. Available now to download on iOS and Google Play, Game+ offers members a secure marketplace where they can create or accept gaming challenges for money and have their winnings automatically transferred to their account.

“Video games have always been a passion of mine, are surging in popularity, and are inextricably woven into the very fabric of our culture,” said Karim Sanford, Co-Founder and President of Game+. “We built Game+ to bring a secure, on-demand, competitive marketplace to the category that enables gamers to test each other’s skills for money while removing barriers to access any winnings.”

To use the Game+ platform, upon successful identification verification, gamers will create an account and receive a Game+ Discover® prepaid card that can be used everywhere Discover is accepted – at stores, online, or to get cash at ATMs nationwide.  Members who sign up can receive 5% cashback on purchases, subject to terms and conditions.

Once members’ accounts are set up, they will be able to use the app to send challenges to friends, choose from a library of over 50 games, select the gaming console or mobile device they want to compete on, and set the amount of money they want to put on the line for the game. The game is then played and the winner reports the results to the app, which automatically transfers funds to the winners’ account. Game+ members can participate in competitions across a variety of device formats including Xbox, PlayStation, Nintendo Switch, iPhone and Android.

In addition to facilitating competitive skill-based head-to-head challenges amongst friends, Game+ enables users to compete in challenges with the broader community for money. The platform currently supports dozens of popular games including FIFA, Madden, NBA 2K, Call of Duty, Fortnite, Halo, Tekken, Street Fighter, Super Smash Bros., and Rocket League. Members will be able to join hubs for their favorite games and create challenges. In the same way they’d challenge a friend, their game will then be shared with the community, providing industry defining, on-demand competition.

Game+ solves two of the thorniest problems in facilitating gaming for money. First, it provides a bank-level financial backend that enables payments to move quickly and safely to winners’ accounts, without excessive delays or hidden fees. And just as importantly, Game+ ensures fairness by vetting all users much as a bank would, and by creating a dispute resolution system in which judges review evidence from disputed matches to determine the winner. Game+ is a clean, trusted community where members’ funds are safe and their matches are fairly decided.

The Game+ app is certified compliant with the age verification and geolocation mandate under the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 (UIGEA). The certification was completed earlier this year by a leading independent lab – establishing a new standard for legitimacy and trust in the space.

The Game+ app is available to download on iOS or Google Play (standard data rates may apply). You must be 18 years of age or older to create an account on Game+. Game+ is not available in Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Louisiana, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Carolina, South Dakota, or Tennessee.

360 MAGAZINE illustration for online gaming by Symara Briel Wilson

Forgotten Vintage Gaming Consoles

The video game console scene these days is quite settled, boring even. Sony and Microsoft have a stranglehold on the market, with the PlayStation enjoying a healthy lead on the Xbox. And then you have Nintendo doing their own thing with the Switch on the handheld segment, despite the rise of mobile gaming. 

All this is a far cry from the early decades of video game consoles. Consoles had some crazy innovations in the 1970s, ‘80s, and ‘90s, as the designers were experimenting quite a lot. Naturally, the technology was also quite primitive in terms of computing power, graphics, and display, resulting in some extra weirdness. 

These are some of the vintage gaming consoles that never made it to the big leagues in the cut-throat video games market. Some were from small brands while others are from the big names we still see churning out consoles and games today.

Fairchild Channel F 

Despite being the first home console to use cartridges and a microprocessor, the Fairchild Channel F failed in the console market. Pitted against the legendary Atari 2600 (home of Pacman), the Channel F ended up decidedly second-best. 

Before the Fairchild, other consoles like the Magnavox Odyssey came with games built-in, which severely limited choice as well as graphics quality. The Channel F came with two built-in games and a library that eventually expanded to include over 26 games. 

The cartridges for these games were called “videocarts” and had games like Tic Tac Toe, Space War, Spitfire, and Shooting Gallery. Though it had a decent list of games, the Fairchild Console could not match Atari’s popular arcade games. 

And the controllers were also decidedly poor quality, breaking rather quickly. The F in Channel F stood for “Fun.” The fun stopped for Fairchild in 1983 as sales declined and they ended production after a six-year run that started in 1976. 

Radica Games Consoles

The modern handheld consoles like PSP, GameBoy, and Switch are designed to play many different games. But in the past, we had consoles that were basically one-trick ponies – they only came with one or a few handfuls of in-built titles. 

Radica Ltd is a name that many who were kids in the 1980s and 90s may not remember. Though not as famous as Sega or Nintendo, the US manufacturer was quite prolific in the handheld consoles market, mass-producing devices between 1983 and 2006. 

Though they became famous for consoles that carried titles from the biggest brands like Sega and Taito, Radica actually started in the gambling business. The company initially launched collectible game consoles for casinos. 

These had classic games like Blackjack 21, Poker, and Solitaire. Though thoroughly outdated by modern standards, the vintage feel of the games does make Radica consoles great from a nostalgic POV. Online variations have been designed to model modern blackjack tables as found in top land-based casinos.

Radica did not do anything innovative in the design department. Their consoles largely copied the design set by others. The company was eventually acquired and fully absorbed by toy giant Mattel in 2006. 

The Vectrex

We take screens for granted these days – be it on handheld consoles or mobile phones. But there was a time when consoles had to depend entirely on an outside video output source (and they still do for PS5 and Xbox Series X). 

The Vectrex was an idea that came far too soon – in an era when screens were still bulky, monochrome, and highly pixelated. Launched in the early ’80s, the Vectrex came bundled with its display, which was like a mini-TV. 

The display was black and white, with a series of plastic color overlays that you could place on the screen to make the objects look red, green, or blue. Though it had way better graphics than contemporary consoles, thanks to vector graphics instead of bitmaps (smooth lines), the console was ultimately a failure. 

For one, it was incredibly expensive. And the allure of not needing a TV for gaming was not huge in those days, especially as this was not a portable device. It was one of the major casualties in the great market crash of the video game industry in 1983.

Virtual Boy

Virtual Reality is a cutting edge technology that holds a lot of promise in gaming. Yet in 2021, it is still a niche in the video games landscape – a fast-growing one at that, but still in need of evolution. So you can imagine how primitive a VR-based console must have been way back in the 1990s. 

Launched by Nintendo in 1995, Virtual Boy was a good 20 years ahead of the technology. The 3D game system came with a cool VR headset and a connected controller, and games in full monochrome glory. 

Yes, Virtual Boy games had to be enjoyed in red, as the hardware was not capable of outputting in any other colors. It had a real “Terminator vision” vibe to it, which was probably intentional given how popular those movies were back then. 

The hardware was quite bulky, with the headset being quite cumbersome. And it was also quite notorious for causing headaches and eye strain to users. The one major game available on the Virtual Boy was Mario’s Tennis. 

Though the stereoscopic 3D was quite impressive for its time, the console was widely panned by critics and users. It was a commercial failure as well, due to insane pricing. Nintendo did try to make it more appealing by dropping the prices but to no avail. The Virtual Boy sank without a trace. 

Asian-American LGBTQ+ Actor Slays Stereotypes in Monsters of Man

Mark Toia’s Monster’s of Man has been crushing the online streaming service game, sitting on AppleTV’s Top Movies, Top Rentals, Highlights, and currently ranking in the top 200 movies on IMDb having just debuted on December 8th, 2020.

Hawaiian/Korean-American actor Conrad K. Pratt from Kāne’ohe, Hawai’i (Hawai’i Five-O, The Wolverine, GLEE, The Real O’Neals) was approached by production initially to play Bao, one of the medical students the film centers around. After learning that he had an extensive background in dance, motion capture and stunts, Toia quickly offered him the roles of the four killer robots as well. Pratt’s physicality was highlighted several times throughout the film, mostly in his cat and mouse chase through the Cambodian jungle and several of the robot-on-robot fight sequences.

“My dance and theatre background really helped me in creating these characters. I was incredibly honored that Mark has trusted me with the movements of our antagonists, as any sort of robot movement can go cheesy unbelievably quick. Working on Monsters of Man, we actually shot in the Cambodian jungle so I was lucky to have the surroundings right there for me. On a normal Mo-Cap shoot, you’re on a blue screen stage and it’s up to you to create that masterpiece around you. A project like Avatar would be such a wild experience and challenge, one that I would love to take on one day.”

The stigma surrounding masculinity in both the Asian-American and LGBTQ+ communities seem to not deter Pratt from forging on in his career. Given that he’s competing in Caucasian and heterosexually dominant avenues of Hollywood, it actually seems to be doing the exact opposite.

“I think the words ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ are so unbelievably dated. Who gives a flying ‘you know what.’ It’s an opinion, there’s no right answer. I do, however, believe that both the BIPOC and LGBTQ+ communities are being better represented and more visible across the entertainment spectrum. To represent both of my communities on a project of this scale was an absolute privilege and I look forward to crushing these ‘masculine/feminine’ stereotypes by just being unapologetically me.”

Monsters of Man is now available world-wide on Apple TV, Amazon Prime, Vimeo On Demand, YouTube, Google Play, and XBOX with more streaming services being added in the future.

Has eSports Become a Part of Pop Culture?

A couple of decades ago, when video games burst into the mainstream audience for good, everyone could have guessed that gaming would soon become an important part of the entertainment industry. But what no one could have predicted is just how popular it would become not to play video games yourself, but to watch other people play. So popular in fact, that competitive video gaming, i.e. eSports, has slowly but steadily grown to become an important part of pop culture. But how and why did eSports gain so much momentum?

eSports expand their reach into the mainstream audience

When the first organized competitive gaming tournaments emerged where professional players vie for a prize, analysts very aptly dubbed the new practice “eSports”. And research reported by the Influencer Marketing Hub reveals that this new industry has quickly expanded its appeal and gained unprecedented growth. In 2017, eSports reached an audience of 335 million viewers, which climbed to 380 million in 2018. It is now estimated that until 2021 that number will reach roughly 557 million, exhibiting an annual growth rate of 14%. Out of those, 250 million will be regular viewers but another 307 million will be casual spectators. This means that casual viewers will constitute the majority of the eSports audience.

Furthermore, according to the same source, even people who do not watch eSports have still heard of them. In 2015, an impressive 800,000 people were aware of the industry. But a year later, over a billion people have reportedly heard of eSports – a jaw-dropping growth. In 2019 alone, eSports awareness was estimated to have reached 1.57 billion people around the world. The combination of these two facts, i.e. the number of casual viewers and the tremendous growth in awareness, lead us to the conclusion that eSports has now become an important part of pop culture.

How eSports became a part of pop culture

But if you want even more proof, just take a closer look at eSports betting. That’s right: betting sites now consider eSports as a sub-category of the traditional realm of sports betting, and punters can place wagers on the biggest eSports tournament just like they would on the NBA finals or the Super Bowl. It is no surprise, when you consider the hype surrounding the biggest eSports competitions. In 2019, the League of Legends World Championship gathered an audience of almost 4 million viewers, and the Fortnite World Cup Finals amassed an impressive 2.3 million. Speaking of Fortnite, it is perhaps the game that best encapsulates how video gaming and eSports are now part of pop culture in their own right.

Who could forget the iconic and hilarious scene in Avengers: Endgame that saw Thor compete against “Noobmaster69” on Fortnite? Just like people are still not over the live concert series that now takes place within the Fortnite game. Travis Scott was the first to take the leap of faith and performed virtually to raving reviews. Now, the digital concerts continue, with J Balvin reportedly set to headline the Fortnite Halloween Concert series, in a perfect blend of these divergent strands of pop culture that has had audiences going wild. Much like the music industry, other sectors have realized the potential of eSports and gaming that allows them to reach to a wider audience and are jumping at the chance. For example, Oakley has already announced that they would launch a new type of lenses specifically designed for gaming.

If we want to understand better how eSports have so quickly become a part of pop culture, we also need to look at the channels that enabled them to connect with their audience. Millennials are now in their 20s and 30s, and they have grown up in an increasingly digital world. Watching their favorite gamers play live on Twitch or YouTube, and interacting with them on chat or social media was an organic way for them to connect. Steven Spielberg’s recent blockbuster Ready Player One took the concept one step further. In a dystopian future, taking place in a VR gaming tournament has become the one shot its protagonist has at fixing everything wrong with the world – competitive gaming has somehow turned into something more real than real life itself.

For the young adults that are right now the driving force behind market trends, and are shaping pop culture, eSports are an integral part of life and culture.

Nintendo Switch: Top-Selling Game Console of 2020

As one of the most popular consoles globally, Nintendo Switch witnessed a surge in the number of new players since its release in 2017. With millions of people spending more time playing video games during the coronavirus lockdown, 2020 brought an influx of new Nintendo fans. 

According to data presented by SafeBettingSites.com, Nintendo Switch is the top-selling gaming console in 2020, with 15.6 million units sold as of September, 65% more than PlayStation 4 and Xbox combined.

Nintendo Switch Sales Grows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox Consoles Drop

One of the key reasons for the Switch’s success is the popularity of Nintendo’s first-party titles. Blockbuster series like Mario, The Legend of Zelda, and Pokémon are exclusive to Nintendo, meaning that fans can only play them on Nintendo consoles. These Nintendo exclusive games dominate the list of top-selling Switch titles worldwide, with Mario Kart 8 Deluxe being the most popular game.

Statista and VGChartz data revealed that PlayStation 4 represents the second most popular gaming console this year, with 7.22 million units sold as of September. Xbox One ranked third, with 2.17 million units sold in the nine months of 2020. During the same period, gamers bought 330,000 Nintendo 3DS consoles. 

The annual sales of Nintendo Switch consoles have been increasing continuously in the last three years, while PlayStation 4 and Xbox are being affected by a downsizing trend. 

A year after its launch in March 2017, the Nintendo Switch hit 15.5 million units sold worldwide. The growing popularity of Nintendo’s gaming console continued in 2019, with the lifetime sales reaching 49.8 million units in December, a 55% jump from the year before. Nintendo sold nearly 4 million Switch consoles in the first quarter of 2020, with its lifetime sales growing to 53.7 million. However, between March and August, another 9.6 million units were sold, with the cumulative sales surging to 63.4 million units.

In 2017, Sony sold almost 20 million Playstation 4 consoles all around the world. By the end of 2019, annual sales dropped to 14.2 million, a 30% plunge in two years. Statistics indicate that the sales of the third most popular gaming console, Xbox One, fell by 35% in this period, decreasing from 7.6 million units in 2017 to 4.9 million last year. 

Playstation 4 Leads in Lifetime Unit Sales

Although Nintendo Switch is ranked as the world’s most popular gaming console, Playstation 4 still dominates in terms of lifetime unit sales. 

In the first three years after its launch in 2013, Sony sold 35.9 million PlayStation 4 units. Between January 2016 and December 2017, the lifetime unites sales surged by 105% to 73.6 million. Since then, another 40 million units were sold worldwide, with the cumulative sales of Sony’s PlayStation 4 gaming console rising to almost 113 million, as of August. Xbox One hit 48.2 million units in lifetime sales as of August, a 22% increase in two years. 

Roblox Mobile Player Spending Surge

Roblox Mobile Player Spending Hit $102.9 Million in May, a 175% Jump in a Year

As one of the most popular mobile games worldwide, Roblox has witnessed a surge in revenue amid the COVID-19 lockdowns. According to data gathered by SafeBettingSites.com, Roblox Mobile player spending hit $102.9 million in May, a 175% jump compared to the same month in 2019.

Over $1.5 bn in Lifetime Revenue

In May 2019, Roblox Mobile players worldwide spent $37.5 million on the game, revealed Statista and SensorTower data. In the next three months, this figure rose to $50.9 million. Thanks to in-app purchases and microtransactions, the app generated $79.3 million profit in December 2019, the highest value in the second half of the year.

However, with millions of Roblox fans spending more time indoors and online amid coronavirus lockdown, the famous kid-friendly creation hit a new record in 2020. Statistics show that in January, Roblox Mobile player spending amounted to $65.2 million. After a slight drop to $54.6 million in February, this figure jumped to $68.9 million in March.

The increasing trend continued in the next two months, with Roblox players spending nearly $103 million in May, a 55% increase since the beginning of the year. The Sensor Tower data also revealed the mobile version of the popular game hit over $1.5 bn in lifetime revenue.

The United States Leads in Roblox Player Spending

Statistics show that in June, Roblox mobile was the second top-grossing iPhone app worldwide, with $26.15 million in revenue. The kid-friendly creation platform also ranked as the sixth most popular Android game last month, with $28.28 million profit in Google Play Store. Statista data also revealed that Roblox was the most popular app among iPad users, who spent $30.34 million on the game last month.

Analyzed by geography, the United States represents the leading country with more than $1bn in lifetime player spending in May. Statistics show that Roblox Mobile was the top-grossing App Store app in the United States last month, with $21.9 million profit generated from iPhone users.

Android users spent $16.69 million on the popular game in June, ranking it as the third top-grossing Google Play Store app in the United States.

Read the full story HERE.

DaBaby, Xbox, Big Brothers Big Sisters, LA, 360 MAGAZINE

DABABY × XBOX

DaBaby “sleighs” as DaSanta with a big surprise this holiday season by giving Xbox consoles to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Los Angeles – just one of many exciting collabs to come between DaBaby and Xbox.
 

Watch HERE.

Kaepernick Madden Lyrics

By Reid Urban

While Colin Kaepernick made news on Thursday when he was featured in a Nike commercial on Sunday Night Football, he also made news in the video game industry.

Back in early August, EA Sports had edited out a lyric that featured Kaepernick’s name on the Madden 19 soundtrack. It led to outrage and condemnation towards EA Sports. Eventually, they put his name back into the lyrics.

Here is what the lyrics said, courtesy of Big Sean, “feed me to the wolves now I lead the pack and s—, you boys all cap, I’m more Colin Kaepernick.” Where that name was supposed to be said, it was edited out as if it were a profanity.

EA Sports came out with a statement that it was “an unfortunate mistake,” by taking Kaepernick’s name out of the song “Big Bank” by YG on that soundtrack.

This isn’t EA Sports’s first debacle featuring his name. The Madden 18 soundtrack had a song by Mike WiLL Made-It which featured his name, but was removed as well.

Both YG and Big Sean, whose song had Kaepernick’s name in the Madden 18 soundtrack, took to Twitter to express their displeasure with removing his name.

EA Sports also said about the name, “Members of the team misunderstood the fact that while we don’t have the rights to include Colin Kaepernick in the game, this doesn’t affect the soundtrack.”

NIGHTMARCHERS

Nightmarchers – Alpha Preview Invitation

Wyrmbyte Studios invites you to join us in paradise! Well, sort of… Nightmarchers will be hosting interviews and previews in the coming days. We’d love to get you into an early build of the game, connect you to Wyrmbyte for a tour, and see what you think of our Hawaiian epic.

Nightmarchers is an open world RPG shooter which crosses the glory of Hawaiian mysticism with the post-apocalypse of destruction. In this Moana meets Mad Max RPG you will explore the island paradise to rid the land of deadly raiders and unlock the secrets of the gods. Using weapons and abilities to build your character, play through the story and explore our vast world. Resources, weapons, and choices make Nightmarchers exciting for players who want action mixed with an in-depth storyline.

Take a look at what the game has to offer below:

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kceKBnbTEJA