Posts tagged with "generation z"

BARD COLLEGE illustrated by Rita Azar in 360 MAGAZINE.

BARD COLLEGE – VIRTUAL CEREMOMY

BARD COLLEGE HOLDS ONE HUNDRED SIXTIETH COMMENCEMENT, IN A VIRTUAL CEREMONY, ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2020

Musician David Byrne Delivered Commencement Address
 
Honorary Degrees Were Awarded to Byrne, Multimedia Artist Laurie Anderson, Physicist Steven Chu, Composer Gao Xiaosong, Curator Thelma Golden,  Brooklyn Public Library President Linda Johnson,  Educational Historian Ellen Condliffe Lagemann, and Biophysicist George Rose ’63.
 
Bard College held its one hundred sixtieth commencement on Saturday, August 22, 2020. In the virtual commencement ceremony streamed live from the Bard College campus, Bard President Leon Botstein conferred 437 undergraduate degrees, in absentia, on the Class of 2020 and 161 graduate degrees, including master of fine arts; doctor and master of philosophy and master of arts in decorative arts, design history, and material culture; master of science and master of arts in economic theory and policy; master of business administration in sustainability; master of arts in teaching; master of arts in curatorial studies; master of science in environmental policy and in climate science and policy; master of music in vocal arts and in conducting; master of music in curatorial, critical, and performance studies; and master of education in environmental education. The program, which took place at 2:30 p.m. in the commencement tent on the Seth Goldfine Memorial Rugby Field, included the presentation of honorary doctoral degrees.
 
Owing to the severity and longevity of the COVID-19 pandemic, the College held a modified commencement. The events and ceremonies were held in real time, but, consistent with public health policies and regulations, access to them was limited.
 
Text (unedited) of commencement address by musician David Byrne:
 
Thank you. Congratulations to the brass ensemble. It’s very difficult to play together when you’re distanced. I heard a story from a musician the other day. There was a socially distanced orchestra that was playing, and some of the musicians said, “You have to gesture bigger, we can’t see you.” So, the conductor had to make it bigger than before, so that everybody could see.
 
This is certainly my first time talking to a live audience … performing, alright, to a live audience in many, many months. It’s kind of strange. It’s kind of wonderful. It’s strange and wonderful to actually be gathered in a group of people this much. I’m encouraged by this institution. I was invited to come here. I have some familiarity with this place. I understand what Bard stands for.

I recently worked with a Bard alumnus named Alex Kalman ’06 on a book. I’ve written about the Bard Prison Initiative, which I think some of you will be familiar with. And, I’ve read some pieces that Mr. Botstein wrote about music.
 
This place is special. I’ve been here, visited here a few times over the years. I saw an exhibition at the gallery in 2008. The gallery had been turned into a re-creation of the artist Keith Edmier’s parents’ house, with all its extreme ’70s décor. It was like walking into a movie set. And, you know, as you walk into a movie set, you know that it’s all fake, but part of you is still seduced into feeling that you’re in that place. There’s this kind of wonderful tension in something like that where you know it’s fake, but you kind of feel like you’re in the place at the same time, between the real and the artificial. We are in a world that someone has made that is just like this world that this artist made of his parents’ house.
 
His world, like our world, is unreliable. It’s based on unreliable memory and imagination. We all do this. We make these artificial worlds. The difference is, we have to live in them. A world that’s made like this, it can be a seductive lie, or it can be a revealing truth. On a thing like this, a commencement, I imagine it’s common to ask oneself, “Well, what comes next for me? What comes next for me as I leave this place? Will I be a different person? Will I be a different person than I was a month ago?” Well, I think we’re all different than we were last week. Things are changing incredibly rapidly. And then you ask, “What person am I now, and how should I be as that person? What do I love? What does that entail? What, if any, are the … obligations? Obligations to myself? Obligations to a larger community? How does one reconcile oneself, between one’s personal rights, one’s personal desires, and those of the community and the collective? What have I learned here? Has the world changed? Has the world changed [laughing] since the spring? It probably has. Has it changed into something far different than the world that I knew? Is that a good thing? Is everything I learned here, at this institution, now meaningless?” I don’t think so.
 
I’m very sorry for the world you inherit. We’ve left you a mess, the one that we made, the world that we made. But, there are reasons to be cheerful. The pandemic has pulled back the curtain, which has revealed both the worst and the best of what and who we are. Arundhati Roy, the writer, referred to this moment as a portal when we have unprecedented opportunity to change things, to cross into another world. In this moment, we have been both cursed and blessed. This is one of those moments that occur once in a while. Ideas that were taken as given, economic ideas, cultural ideas, etc., are being questioned, reconsidered. An era based on a set of biases and assumptions is ending. In a sense, we’re lucky. The portal that she mentions is opened and we have a chance to go through it.
 
I’m as a guilty as anyone else for waking up in the morning and feeling that nothing really changes very much. I have moments of despair and anger and frustration. No surprise. Martin Luther King Jr.’s quote, “The arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice,” some mornings that feels like an empty platitude when I look at the news that morning. It sometimes feels like, oh, you know, same as it ever was. But that’s not really true. The real constant is change. We often forget or overlook the momentous changes in our thinking that we now accept as obvious, inevitable. But, in truth, nothing was inevitable. The changes that have happened, that we live with now, for better or worse, they’re here because we made them so.
 
Okay, here’s a few of them: slavery is now universally considered unacceptable. Two thousand years ago, Aristotle thought slavery was natural and necessary, but even then his contemporaries argued that it was unacceptable. These changes don’t happen overnight. Okay, here’s another one: women should be allowed to vote. If I said to anyone now that if you heard someone else say, “No, women shouldn’t be allowed to vote,” you would think that was completely ridiculous. It happened in the United States, state by state, one hundred years ago. In Saudi Arabia it happened five years ago, but it happened. Education, primary and secondary education, I think everyone accepts that it should be free, it’s a right for everyone to have it. This was not always true. Children were considered cheap labor. Eventually, maybe higher education will be considered a right as well. Interracial marriage: I think we all accept this now. We all accept this. It seems like, what’s the big deal? The Supreme Court made a ruling legalizing interracial marriage in 1967—not that long ago. Alabama has some laws on the books that counteracted the Supreme Court ruling, and those were overturned 20 years ago. Okay, gay marriage, we all know that this is now law, this is now legal. When I was a young person, if someone had told me that this would be legal and generally accepted, I would have said, “You’re crazy, this should happen, but it’s going to take forever.” But, just five years ago, in 2015, it was recognized as legal in all 50 states.
 
I can go on—infrastructure, clean air, clean water, things that don’t exist for us entirely now, but we do think of them as our right, and these ideas that we consider as part of our lives and how it is to live and how it is to be, it didn’t always have to be that way. It wasn’t always that way. This is something new in the world, and the world has changes. These changes weren’t predictable, and they weren’t inevitable. I’m a little older than some of you, and I can say that some of these changes, they weren’t expected. They weren’t expected to happen as soon as they did, and when they did, then they seemed inevitable. People make these changes. Things that seemed impossible have happened, and they will continue to happen. Try and imagine what radical and momentous changes in our thinking might happen next, and they will! We can imagine what they might be.
 
Okay, make no mistake, things can go wrong, things can go the other way. This country was ever so closely inching towards democracy, but, as in many other countries around the world, there’s been some serious backsliding. There’s no guarantee that change will be good. That part is up to us. And, so I ask myself, “How did these changes happen? Where’s the levers? Where’s the buttons? What’s the process? What can we, as a lone individual or with a little group of people, what can we do to have an effect?” I supposed you might ask yourselves the same questions. “Does my line of work have any wider resonance?” Not that every line of work has to focus directly or solely on social justice. I believe that the meaning of what we do, in our work and our lives, is more subtle than that. I’ll use myself as an example, okay? Most of the time I’m a performer and a musician, and it seems to me that music and performance affects people’s view of the world, not directly, not by me writing a song about climate policy or housing inequities, although I might like to do that. Rather, it works in a less didactic and not kind of text-based ways. It’s kind of a language without words. Music creates community. When I was young, I heard music on a little radio that was about the size of a phone. And, I realized when I heard this music that there was a world out there that was very different and wider than the little suburban town that I lived in. You’ve heard people say things like, “That song saved my life” or “That DJ saved my life,” and these are kind of clichés, but there’s a truth to it. Music can have that kind of effect. It reveals a larger world, and it brings people together because they know that there are other people out there like them. For someone else, it might not be music that has this effect. It might be the visual arts, theater, cooking, dance. It might be ways of thinking in education, sustainability, even economics can touch people about a new idea and it changes their thinking.
 
I also think that one discipline needs to influence all the others. There needs to be a lot of curiosity about what’s going on in other disciplines, and one discipline can, in surprising ways, affect another one. When I heard the music of James brown, as a young man, I came to realize that here is music where no one part is more important than any other. The melody is not played by one instrument, but it emerges out of the interlocking parts played by all the instruments. The groove is not just played by the drums, but it comes into being as a result of what everyone is doing. I sensed that, unlike traditional Western music, Brown’s music is nonhierarchical. In his musical model, we’re given an audio metaphor. We hear, metaphorically, a model of social organization and cooperation that makes us feel joyous and transported. We’re not kind of intellectually going through all of this, but I feel that we sense it. Here I sense is a social and economic argument made with music, and the transcendent feeling it brings, when you hear and experience it, is more persuasive that language. Music proposes a world. Metaphorically, it gives evidence of that possibility. An economist hearing James Brown might possibly see the world the same way. Of course, my model for cross-disciplinary influences comes from music, but it can go the other way as well.
 
I’m going to mention the first abstract artist, Hilma af Klint, who was influenced by spiritualism that was prevalent over a hundred years ago, turn of the last century. It had been proposed that one of the reasons for the wide enthusiasm for this spiritualism was because of the scientific discoveries that were happening at that time. The science was showing that there were invisible forces in our world. Electromagnetism, radiation, radio waves, X-rays. The entire world, ourselves included, are affected by these invisible and pervasive forces. Science proposed this world, a world that hadn’t previously existed in our imagination, and this affected how these artists worked. They realized that what we with see with our eyes is only part of what is there, and artists like af Klint and others began to attempt the abstractions to represent this world, a world of energy that go through buildings and go through our bodies. So, with art and science, we conjure worlds, and, over time, we who conjure these worlds, we ourselves change, and then worlds that we conjure, those change as well.
 
A couple of years ago, after I finished a music tour that lasted almost a year, I decided to go to India. I wanted to catch a traditional music festival in Chennai. It was wonderful. I saw a kid, this young kid in a kind of Elvis outfit playing Carnatic music on a saxophone. I saw singers communicating with drummers with their hands. And, I also went to Kerala, which is another state in the south, and there’s a kind of performance there called Kudiyattam. It’s an ancient form of dance drama. It’s about a thousand years old. In this dance drama, the performer begins the performance by metaphorically dancing into existence and kind of proposing a world. This will be the world that the story will take place in, kind of like Star Wars or Game of Thrones. It’s complete, it has a cosmology, it has a history, every detail. In the dance drama, the world building is not made with sets and props and computers. It’s conjured in the audience’s imagination, via singing and dancing and gesture. Like the actors in this drama, we, in whichever field we endeavor, we also dance a new world into existence—not just in music or theater, every kind of work and activity we engage in proposes a world. In the end of the Kudiyattam performance, the actors dismantle the world that they have made. Likewise, we destroy an old world, a worn-out world, the one we ourselves and others before us have made, so that a new one can be imagined and brought into existence.
 
Thank you.
 
 

ABOUT THE COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER

 
David Byrne’s recent works include the Broadway debut of David Byrne’s American Utopia (2019); launch of Reasons to be Cheerful—an online magazine focused on solutions-oriented stories about problems being solved all over the world (2019); the solo album American Utopia (2018), which was nominated for Best Alternative Album at the 61st Grammy Awards; Joan of Arc: Into the Fire, a theatrical exploration of the historical heroine, which premiered at The Public Theater in New York (2017); The Institute Presents: NEUROSOCIETY, a series of interactive environments created in conjunction with PACE Arts + Technology that question human perception and bias (2016); Contemporary Color, an event inspired by the American folk tradition of color guard and performed at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center and Toronto’s Air Canada Centre (2015); Here Lies Love, a 22-song theatrical production about the life of Imelda Marcos, authored in collaboration with Fatboy Slim, which premiered at The Public Theater in New York City (2013), traveled to London’s National Theatre for a sold-out run (2014–15), and was remounted at Seattle Rep (2017); Love This Giant, a studio album and worldwide tour created with St. Vincent (2012); and How Music Works, a book about the history, experience, and social aspects of music (2012).
 
In 2015, Byrne curated Southbank Centre’s annual Meltdown festival in London. A cofounder of the group Talking Heads (1976–88), he has released nine studio albums and worked on multiple other projects, including collaborations with Brian Eno, Twyla Tharp, Robert Wilson, and Jonathan Demme, among others. He also founded the highly respected record label Luaka Bop. Recognition of Byrne’s various works include Obie, Drama Desk, Lortel, and Evening Standard Awards for Here Lies Love; an Oscar, Grammy, and Golden Globe for the soundtrack to Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor; and induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with Talking Heads. Byrne has published and exhibited visual art since his college days, including photography, filmmaking, and writing. He lives in New York City.

Nicole Salazar illustrates new web-based application BLEWID for 360 MAGAZINE.

BLEWID

A NEW WAVE SPACE FOR EVERY RACE.

You either ‘blewid out the water’ or you didn’t.

COMING SOON…

A division of 360 MAGAZINE.

Bed Bath & Beyond has products, services, and solutions to help everyone get ready for on or off-campus living. As seen in 360 MAGAZINE.

Bed Bath & Beyond

By Armon Hayes

Post quarantine, many global citizens are adapting to the New World Order grand opening. College students, in particular, are navigating this semester, presenting new challenges, and subsequently shaping the future. COVID-19 has not only impacted economics across the board, but education as well.

Bed Bath & Beyond has products, services, and solutions to help everyone get ready for on or off-campus living. This is a crucial decision that many students will face, so it’s important that Bed Bath & Beyond makes college shopping easier and more convenient with great services and solutions. Bed Bath & Beyond is here to help with essentials, across the country students share faves and recommendations of what they couldn’t live without at school. Check out recommendations HERE.

No need to lug stuff from home to school. Students can pick out what they love online or at their local store and pick up at a store near campus to build a personalized workspace, whether students are home or away. From bedding to lighting, and décor, find everything needed to make a space cozy, functional, and authentically “you”! Utilize the Dorm & Apartment Checklists: A favorite resource among students and parents. These checklists have all they need for dorm or apartment life. Get it in-store or purchase online.

Whether it’s building a study-at-home setup or outfitting a new space, as of late, Bed Bath & Beyond outfitted live-work space for 360 Magazine. Gifting included Wamsutta collective comforter, designed with glamping in mind – a tent inspired bed set that’s beyond practical with deep cargo pockets, each at the head to store bedtime necessities. It is army green, which is the perfect neutral and ideal for anyone who enjoys snacks in bed. To complete the set, there are matching pillow shams with ringlet outline details. The awesome extras were two Dawson UGG pillows reminiscent of their iconic footwear and comfort.

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360 Magazine, Max Leone

Max Leone – Malleable

MAX LEONE PREMIERES NEW SINGLE & VIDEO “MALLEABLE”

21-YEAR-OLD SONGWRITER/PRODUCER’S DEBUT EP DUE OUT LATER THIS YEAR

“Burgeoning pop star”- Billboard

“Smooth vocals and sticky melodies”- Paper

“One of pop’s next young stars” – Pigeons and Planes 

Today, songwriter/producer/multi-instrumentalist Max Leone shares his new single “Malleable” and its accompanying video. Released via Darkroom Records, “Malleable” showcases the 21-year-old’s artist’s signature sound — an alt-leaning yet urban-inspired breed of lo-fi bedroom pop.

Listen to “Malleable” by Max Leone HERE.

Set against a backdrop of stark beats and moody guitar work, “Malleable” channels the pain and frustration of drifting apart from someone who once felt close. With his delicate balance of detailed storytelling and plainspoken confession, Leone reveals his gift for crafting unforgettable melodies and lyrics that cut right to the heart.

True to his DIY sensibilities, Leone created the video for “Malleable” along with his sister while the two were quarantined in their hometown of Portland, Oregon. As the camera follows Leone through lonely landscapes and empty streets, each shot perfectly intensifies the song’s bittersweet mood.

“Malleable” arrives as the follow-up to Leone’s recent single “The Beach,” an Alexander 23 produced track that earned acclaim from NME (who praised his “genuine raw talent”) and Ones to Watch (who noted that “we’re expecting Leone to hold a steady presence in pop’s next wave”). Earlier this year, Leone drew raves for “Cautious” — a February release that was quickly added to Triple J rotation and supported by BBC Radio 1, with Billboard hailing Leone as a “Gen Z bedroom pop star.”

Leone is now at work on his debut EP, due out later this year. With its themes of self-doubt, nostalgia, and the tension between keeping up appearances and striving to build real-life connections, the EP tells the story of navigating a new city alone while chasing a potentially far-fetched dream.

About Max Leone:

Born and raised in Portland, Max Leone took up guitar at the age of seven, then later began experimenting with violin, drums, and piano. He soon started composing his own material and playing in jazz bands, in addition to teaching himself music production and posting his remixes to SoundCloud. Although his tremendous passion for music eventually led him to attend the prestigious Berklee College of Music as a guitar principal, Leone left the school after one year and relocated to Los Angeles to pursue music full-time. Soon after signing with Darkroom Records, he made his label debut with “First Grade” — a January 2020 release that quickly garnered acclaim from outlets like Hillydilly.

For more information on Max Leone, visit:

Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Photo Credit: Clyde Munroe

360 Magazine, Ahmaud Arbery, Politics

So You Want a Career in Journalism?

Journalism is an exciting, fast-paced, and interesting career where no two days are the same. Journalists can work for newspapers, TV stations, websites, magazines and radio stations. Most of the time, the best way to get into a career as a journalist is to earn a relevant degree, although you might be able to get into the field through an apprenticeship. If you’ve decided that a career in journalism is a good fit for you, here’s the experience and qualifications you’ll need to beat the competition. 

Qualifications:

There are two common routes into journalism, which include earning an undergraduate journalism degree, or taking an undergraduate degree in a different subject, followed by a master’s degree in journalism. You can search journalism courses at University Compare; a website where you can look at all the different degree options available, where to study them, and the differences between them. When you choose where to do your degree from this list, make sure that you opt for a course that is NCTJ (National Council for the Training of Journalists) accredited if you want to eventually work for a news organisation based in the UK. You can also choose a degree with an area of specialisation, such as newspaper journalism, multimedia journalism, or broadcast journalism. 

Blogging:

While studying for your degree in journalism, using your spare time to start a blog can be a great way to get relevant experience in your career and make valuable connections that will help you when looking for work in the future. A strong blog and a large Twitter following will help you get noticed by potential employers who are looking for new hires that have a solid understanding of online journalism. And, many postgraduate degree courses will expect applicants to have blogging experience and an active Twitter account with a large following, so this will be extremely helpful if you want to go on to get a master’s in journalism in the future. 

Choosing the Right University:

Most universities in the UK will offer a course in journalism, but not all of them are created equal. Along with making sure that you are only applying to NCTJ accredited courses, you might want to consider other accreditations, such as the BJTC (Broadcast Journalism Training Council) if you are considering a career in radio journalism. You should also look at the facilities, reputation, teaching staff, course content, and where journalism graduates from a particular university go on to study further or work. Bear in mind that journalism graduates who have a wide range of skills tend to have more options in the job market, so it’s worth considering a course that teaches extra skills such as data journalism, financial reporting, or video production. 

Getting Work Experience:

While there will be plenty of opportunities for you to get valuable work experience as you study, the experience that matters the most is that you get after graduating. Typically, your first job will be working as a junior reporter, covering any stories that are allocated to you. Generally, these jobs are long-term contracts rather than short-term, which is great if you’re looking for a position with plenty of security, which isn’t always the case when working in the media. However, starting salaries are low, so you might want to consider freelancing for more than one news organisation, something that will become more accessible to you as you build up your experience and contacts. 

Working as a journalist is a very exciting career choice. Finding the right university and course to study, however, is just the beginning; start focusing on building your network and experience as early as possible. 

NICKELODEON × TIME

Nickelodeon, TIME and TIME for Kids today announced that submissions have opened for the first-ever Kid of the Year honor, a multiplatform initiative recognizing extraordinary young leaders who are making a positive impact in their communities.  Now through Aug. 1, parents, teachers, friends and more, can nominate a kid (aged 8-16) who is doing incredible and inspiring things to make the world a better place.  Five honorees will be featured in a TV special—hosted by Trevor Noah (The Daily Show with Trevor Noah) and simulcast on Nick and the CBS Television Network in December–with one kid ultimately being recognized as TIME Kid of the Year and featured on a cover of TIME with a companion story in TIME For Kids.
 
The Kid of the Year TV special will also feature stars from entertainment, sports and pop culture surprising the honorees, as well as musical performances.  Each of the finalists will receive funds to further their respective causes and have the opportunity to serve as a Kid Reporter for TIME for Kids with exclusive access to a Nickelodeon event.  For official submission rules and additional information about the initiative, visit KidoftheYear2020.com.  
 
Said Noah, “In the unprecedented times that we are living in today, it has been inspiring to see humanity come together to help one another, and I’ve been especially drawn to the stories of kids using their creativity to bring resources to their communities.  After all, the person who’s going to bring us a better tomorrow is a kid who’s out there doing it today!”
 
Nickelodeon’s Kid of the Year TV special is a co-production of TIME Studios, Day Zero Productions, Mainstay Entertainment and Nickelodeon. Executive Producers include Andrea Delbanco (TIME for Kids), Ian Orefice and Mike Beck (TIME Studios), Trevor Noah and Haroon Saleem (Day Zero Productions), Norm Aladjem, Derek Van Pelt and Sanaz Yamin (Mainstay Entertainment) and Rob Bagshaw, Paul J. Medford and Stacey Carr (Nickelodeon). Production of Nickelodeon’s Kid of the Year is overseen by Rob Bagshaw, Executive Vice President, Unscripted Content.
 
About TIME

TIME is a global media brand that reaches a combined audience of more than 90 million around the world, including over 40 million digital visitors each month and 44 million social followers. A trusted destination for reporting and insight, TIME’s mission is to tell the stories that matter most, to lead conversations that change the world and to deepen understanding of the ideas and events that define our time. With unparalleled access to the world’s most influential people, the immeasurable trust of consumers globally, an unrivaled power to convene, TIME is one of the world’s most recognizable media brands with renowned franchises that include the TIME 100 Most Influential People, Person of the Year, Firsts, Best Inventions, World’s Greatest Places and premium events including the TIME 100 Summit and Gala, TIME 100 Health Summit, TIME 100 Next and more. 
 
About TIME For Kids

Since 1995, TIME for Kids has delivered current events from TIME news bureaus around the world to millions of students in elementary and middle school classrooms across the U.S. Each week, TIME for Kids presents news in a format that teaches young readers to become critical thinkers and informed citizens. As an educational publication, the mission of TIME for Kids is to help teachers engage students with the world around them and inspire kids to join the conversation about current events. 

About Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon, now in its 41st year, is the number-one entertainment brand for kids. It has built a diverse, global business by putting kids first in everything it does. The brand includes television programming and production in the United States and around the world, plus consumer products, digital, location based experiences, publishing and feature films.

360 Magazine, Bronx, Columbia Records, culture, generation z, millennials, r&b, Rileyy Lanez, soul music, teenager, urban

Rileyy Lanez- Beautiful Mistakes

R&B songstress Rileyy Lanez has released her debut EP Beautiful Mistakes via Columbia Records. The 5-track project includes previously released songs, “Foul Play” and “I’m Leaving”, as well as “Left 4 Me” which was released alongside a stunning visual. Listen to Beautiful Mistakes here and watch the video for “Left 4 Me” here.

In speaking about the EP, Rileyy says “I’ve seen so many people around me get their heart broken into pieces. Seeing this and knowing there are thousands of people going through the same shit made me want to write and create something beautiful that expresses these feelings.”

Born and raised in the Bronx, 19-year-old Rileyy Lanez pulls no punches with her heart-on-her sleeve R&B music. In May of 2019, she released her original song “I’m Leaving,” which has over 16M streams and 7.7M+ video views. Rileyy is also featured on Lil Tjay’s album track “Post To Be,” and she launched her vlog series “LANEZ LIFE” – watch the first episode HERE.

Beautiful Mistakes serves as a foreward for what’s to come from one of R&Bs most promising voices and rising stars.

360 Magazine, Calgary, Canada, Celebrity, cowboy, emerging artist, entertainment, generation z, hip hop, music, newcomer, recording artist, singer, songwriter, stampede, turbo

TURBO – HEART STOP

A truly original and fearless artist, Calgary-bred, singer, songwriter and producer Turbo, combines the gritty authenticity of outlaw country with hard-hitting hip-hop inspired beats and rhymes. On “Heart Stop”, his debut single for 10K Projects/ Homemade Projects/ Internet Money Records, out today, the musical maverick shows the sheer force of his emotionally raw lyrics, along with his razor-sharp instinct for crafting unforgettable hooks. “Heart Stop” reveals Turbo speaking his unapologetic truth about living fast with no regrets, set to a backdrop of gorgeous acoustic-guitar work supplied by labelmate Alec Wigdahl.

“Everybody wants to party with a rockstar but they got no idea what it’s like to be a rockstar,” said Turbo. “I’m the real fucking deal, outdoing everyone including myself. Hate me or love me, it’s easy makin’ that Heart Stop.”

Born Nicholas LaMonaca, Turbo grew up on country thanks mainly to his father (a famed guitarist in the international bluegrass scene), but felt drawn toward rap music and obscure electronic genres like hardstyle, the fusion of techno and hardcore. At the age of 12 he started making his own music, a move heavily inspired by Avicii’s progressive-house classic “LE7ELS.” “Once I heard that song I couldn’t get enough of it,” Turbo recalls. “I was so obsessed, I ended up downloading FL Studio to try to recreate the melody on my own.” Although he instantly discovered a natural talent for production, Turbo put music aside for several years, until he graduated high school. “On my 18th birthday I bought a laptop, keyboard, and set of speakers, and figured I’d have rappers come in and do their thing,” he says. “But after a while I just started winging it, making beats and rapping over them myself.”

As he pushed deeper into his artistry, Turbo began mining inspiration from left-of-center country singers like Colter Wall, a Canadian musician he stumbled across while stocking the shelves at his full-time liquor-store job. “Colter Wall has one of the raspiest, rawest, rudest voices I’d ever heard in my life, and it just completely took me over,” he notes. From there, Turbo tapped into his own country roots and created a full-length project titled Sixth Gear, a 2019 release featuring his breakthrough single “Light Speed.” Soon after YouTube curator Astari shared the song’s video on his channel, “Light Speed” caught the attention of 10K, quickly paving the way for Turbo’s signing to the label, along with Homemade Projects and Internet Money Records.

LISTEN TO “HEART STOP

360 Magazine, Ben Shenassafar, Bobby Kim, culture, fashion, generation z, Germany, gym shoes, Herzogenaurach, lifestyle, millennials, music, outerwear, Puma, shoes, sneakerhead, sneakers, Sneakertopia, streetwear, style, The Hundreds, unisex, urban

PUMA X THE HUNDREDS

Sports company PUMA has joined with community-powered streetwear brand The Hundreds to debut a new line of footwear, apparel and accessories. Inspired by the transformation of streetwear over the last three decades, ‘The ‘90s Cliques’ collection features bold graphic-driven pieces with heavy color blocking. Garments can be broken down into four key styles: preppy, jock, party crew and 20/20.

The PUMA x The Hundreds Windbreaker rocks a plaid print that would look at home at any ‘90s concert, with a half-zip neckline and welt pockets. For a more contemporary look, try the camo PUMA x The Hundreds Reflective Windbreaker paired with PUMA x The Hundreds Reflective Shorts. Each clique is also present in the collection through an extensive range of unique tees, hoodies, shorts and tracksuits.

The 20/20 crew is represented by the RS-Pure x THE HUNDREDS shoe, which merges past and present sneaker trends with a monochromatic black camo print and a suede Formstrip. The new line also incorporates PUMA classics like the Palace Guard, Performer Mid, Clyde and Leadcat, with a look tailored to reflect each clique.

Highlights from the accessories collection include the PUMA x The Hundreds Bucket Hat and PUMA x The Hundreds Cap with a flat brim, as well as two takes on the classic streetwear backpack.

California-based The Hundreds was founded in LA in 2003 by Bobby Kim and Ben Shenassafar. It is a classic streetwear brand and a media platform dedicated to global street culture. Their guiding focus, people over product, is also the main force behind the PUMA x The Hundreds collaboration. By exploring the progression of ‘90s street style over time, designers got a chance to create products for the consumer of today as well as tomorrow.

The  PUMA X The Hundreds collection ranges from $35 – $140 and will be available April 30, 2020, on thehundreds.com and May 7, 2020, on PUMA.com and select retailers.