Posts tagged with "social media"

October - Selena Gomez - ELLE Canada illustration by Anh Hoang use by 360 Magazine

October – Selena Gomez – ELLE Canada

KO MÉDIA REVEALS A FORWARD-LOOKING  SEPTEMBER ISSUE OF ELLE CANADA

KO Média is excited to unveil the October issue of ELLE Canada featuring Selena Gomez. The multi-hyphenate star opens up about her mental illness, shooting her new Hulu show with Steve Martin and releasing her first record in Spanish. “I focused so hard on making sure the language I was speaking — and the way I was speaking it — was authentic,” she says in the candid interview. “I wanted it to exude love. I wanted it to talk about pain but in a way that was confident. There is a song about girls saying goodbye to things that aren’t good for us.” One thing Gomez has said goodbye to is her access to Instagram. “I suffer from mental illness, and [social media] just wasn’t adding anything to my life,” she says, adding that once she gave it up, “I felt like I was suddenly able to be so present.”

Other stories of self-care and self-discovery in this issue include Canadian Grammy-winning artist Alessia Cara finding stability as her star continues to rise; Nesta Cooper on coming into her own opposite Jason Momoa in the second season of See; and Mohawk actor Devery Jacobs’ experience working on an Indigenous set and being an activist in her community. Rounding out the bunch is Jonathan Van Ness who, with six seasons of Queer Eye behind them, is now focused on feeding their own well-being, inside and out.

For readers who need some me time, we offer up Canada’s best spas to visit this fall, whether you want a full-body scrub en plein air in B.C. or a lakefront Nordic spa experience in Nova Scotia. Plus, the magazine looks at why dawn is the new time to get things done and how to properly care for sensitive or irritated skin (just in time for winter!).

In fashion, this edition is all about looking back — on the overt tackiness of the early-aughts (which is making a comeback for a surprising reason); the 40-year legacy of Max Mara’s 101801 coat; and the coming-together of two friends to design Markoo’s cool, effortless aesthetic.

And we get serious, diving into the history (and current reality) of medical misogyny, dissecting the downfall of the girl boss and what it says about women in power, and exploring the healing effect of restorative tattooing.

Ending on a lighter note, this issue has everything from forest-inspired fragrances and the next generation of Canadian winemakers to dinner party glow-ups and a mother-daughter road trip.

The October issue of ELLE Canada will hit stands and Apple News+ on October 20, 2021.

Farmers Protest illustration created by Rumnik Ghuman from 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

India’s Food Soldiers

By: Rumnik K Ghuman

Exactly a year ago, Narendra Modi’s government with little public or parliamentary debate, passed three farmer bills. According to them, these bills are a gift to the farmers, but in reality, the bills are a gift for the rich agribusinesses in India. The majority of the population in Punjab, Haryana, and Rajasthan are farmers, they make their entire income based on their produce. Some call the farmers ‘India’s Food Soldiers’ and many people have shown support to the farmers. 

The first bill that was released was The Farmers’ Produce Trade and Commerce(Promotion and Facilitation) Act. This act allows the farmers to produce and have free trade outside the physical premises of the specific markets under the APMC Act (Agricultural Produce Marketing Committee law). Under this act, the specific markets that the government has listed are agribusiness typhoons. These businesses are only going to set the price at a low rate so it’s cheaper for them. This act is in their favor because the farmers will not be able to go somewhere else to sell so they have to agree to the price the agribusiness sets. This puts the farmers in a low position to control their own products. 

The second bill that was passed was the Essential Commodities (Amendment) Act that made the decision to remove some items such as cereals and pulses from the list of essential commodities. This act was passed to attract foreign direct investment to the sector. This bill is limiting the number of items farmers can produce and sell. Certain states can only produce certain items based on the weather and the field the farmers have. This puts the farmers at a disadvantage when producing and won’t make as much money as they would normally. 

The third bill was regarding the Farmers (Empowerment and Protection) Agreement on Price Assurance and Farm Services Act. This bill states to have a nationwide price limitation on all produces. This act doesn’t give farmers any empowerment over their produces which is putting them at a disadvantage. Combining all of these acts together, puts all farmers at a disadvantage, to not have a free trade market for them, price points that are lower than normal, and limited items to sell. The agribusinesses have connections in the government which is why the agribusinesses have more control over the price and are the only buyers that the farmers can sell to. 

In August 2020, many farmers from the States of Punjab and Haryana gather to protest in the capital, Delhi. The farmers had seen that one bill was passed and they needed to stop for more to be released as in Haryana, these laws were issued as of August. September was when the government passed the Farmers Produce Trade and Commission Act, which put more fire into the farmers to get justice by removing these bills. Many farmers across the country were angry and had to show it somehow as the news was not covering the farmers’ protest in the capital because the news channels were owned by the agribusinesses or the government. So some farmers set their own fields on fire, marched to government offices, or protested at the capital. 

At first, the crowd of farmers was much smaller, so the government brushed it aside. It wasn’t until on November 23, 2020, when protesters march from around India toward Delhi. Once they reached the edge of the city on November 26, the protesters met a large group of police officers who used tear gas, water cannons, and physical force to keep them from entering the city. Over the entire year, over 1000 deaths have happened whether that be by the cold weather or by protestors hanging themselves. A majority of the population were elder men that have been farming for all of their life and don’t know another way to provide an income for their families. In Punjab, farmers have always had a hard time making an income as they don’t have much money to afford the necessities to run the field correctly. They take big loans to buy a tractor, but later can pay it off and then hang themselves. 

There have been big protests, but 360 Magazine feels the number of people from different religions, states, ages, and genders who came out to support the frontlines of the capital is unbelievable. The men were already fighting for their rights, but the women have been standing like hard rock with them. The women at the border are providing food and protesting as well. It’s amazing to see all come together to roll back new agricultural laws. Multiple women and kids have been injured during the violent behavior of the police but they still come back or stay to support. 

As many people from Punjab and Haryana reside in England, the United States, and Canada, the protestors sitting in the cold, were getting worldwide support. Even though these supporters are not in India to help physically, they showed their support by organizing protests in their cities, doing marches to bring more awareness, sharing on social media about what’s going on, and donating or sending money to their families back home to go provide food for the protestors as it was freezing at the start of the protest. Many other industry workers in India went on strike as well to show they are with the farmers. 

Punjab is known for its music and their music really reaches a higher population. It was the only way to show to the world this is the reality of the protest which the news channels were not recording nor reporting to the world. So many Punjabi singers came together to make a ‘Kisaan Anthem’(Kisaan means farmers in Punjabi) that tells and shows every detail of the protest with live footage. Multiple Punjabi singers personally came and served the protestors, sat with the protesters, and tried their hardest to talk to official officers to get these laws rolled away. 

As we are speaking about the Farmers’ Protest, it is still going on and it’s been exactly a year since it started. The government has been pressured to speak about the bills in the parliament and hopefully will take the bills back. No Farmers No Food.

Q&A × Keenan Te

By: Heather

Keenan Te started posting singing videos on TikTok a year and a half ago and has amassed over 1.6million followers. 2021 has been a hectic year for Keenan, with his last song Dependent being released in April. Dependent currently has over 50 million plays across platforms and flew to number 1 on Indonesia’s Viral 50 Spotify chart, as well as the Top 5 of many other countries across Asia.

We had the pleasure of corresponding with Keenan to learn about his inspiration, who he looks up to, and so much more. Read on to find out his answers!

What first got you into music?

Music has always been a big part of my life ever since I was young. There are videos of me when I was 1 or 2 years old singing and putting on ‘concerts’ for my family hahah. My parents played a big part of the start of my music journey, my dad taught me how to play piano and my mum taught me how to play guitar! It’s always been something I’ve been surrounded by.

Who inspired you to make music?

My parents have always been super supportive of me which I’m really grateful for. I remember watching Australian Idol for the first time when I was 2 and thinking I would love to be on a stage like that or do something like that in future, so singing has always been something I’ve wanted to do.

How would you describe the music that you typically create?

The music I usually write are sad pop songs that are about real situations and feelings that I’ve gone through or experienced. I hate talking about my feelings and I’m really bad at it but for some reason putting them into a song comes naturally to me, so I love being able to do that.

What inspired you to write “Dependent”?

‘Dependent’ actually came to me in the middle of the night and it only took me around 20 minutes to finish writing! I had spent the day thinking about a past situation I had been through, where I couldn’t get over someone but also knew that they weren’t meant to be in my life anymore. I knew that the internal battle of wanting to move on but also not being able to was something that a lot of people would be able to relate to, so I sat down at the piano and kind of just sang whatever came to mind.

Can you tell us about the inspiration behind “I’m Done” and “Hello”?

I wrote ‘I’m Done’ right after I had an argument with someone, and it was just what I was feeling at the time. I wanted to write a song that people could vibe to but also scream their lungs out too right after a breakup or something like that.

I have a list of random lyric ideas in my phone, and there was one that said, ‘it’s the last time that I’ll say hello.’ I liked the idea of a breakup song about saying goodbye to someone being called ‘Hello’ hahah. I kinda built the song off that initial line.

How would you describe your experience on TikTok?

I love using TikTok and I am so grateful to have built a community on there! It actually started off as a joke, out of boredom one night right as the pandemic was beginning in 2020. I didn’t really understand how to use it at first but then just thought I’d upload a few singing videos, not expecting for anyone to see them. I remember waking up in the middle of that night because my phone was buzzing like crazy with notifications! I’ve been posting singing videos daily since that moment and it’s mind-blowing to me that over 1.6 million people follow me and want to hear me sing.  

What is your creative process like?

My creative process for writing songs always starts off at either the piano or guitar. I usually just sit and hit record on my phone, and then sing whatever melodies or lyrics that come to mind. It’s usually a whole lot of gibberish at the start but once I find a melody I like, I try to build off that and build the song around that. Sometimes it can take me as quickly as 15 minutes to finish writing a song, other times I let myself brainstorm over a few days. I

Who would you most like to collaborate with?

There are so many people I’d love to collaborate with. Definitely Olivia Rodrigo, I think we could write a cool duet together hahaha! I really like Clinton Kane’s songwriting as well, would be super cool to jump in the studio with him.

If you could open a show for any artist, who would it be?

Justin Bieber. I’ve watched a lot of clips of his tour performances and stuff, and it just looks like so much fun!!

What is one message you would give your fans?

If you have a dream or goals that you want to achieve, don’t be afraid to put in the hard work and take risks to reach it!

What is the most useless talent you have?

I can type really fast. I’ve been able to since I was like 9 hahah

What would you be doing right now if it wasn’t for your music career?

If it wasn’t for my music career, I would probably be doing something marketing or business-related. I had started my business degree before any of my TikTok or songs had begun to gain traction, so that would probably be the industry I would be in if it wasn’t for my music career.

Outside of TikTok, where have you performed?

I’ve done some local performances here in Melbourne and was featured on Australian TV a few times too. I actually appeared on The Voice Australia in 2019 as well but that feels like an entirely different world and person hahaha. I’ve grown a lot since then and am really happy with how things are going right now.

How do you think the internet has impacted your career? The music business in general?

The internet and social media helped my career so much! Social media has been the way that new people discover me and my music and has helped me connect with fans all over the world, which I love. The music business as a whole has also changed heaps too since the introduction of social media, Tik Tok especially. There are more opportunities for singers now to get their music out there without having to spend heaps of money on advertisements and stuff like that.

What is your favorite song to perform?

My favorite song right now to perform would be my recent song ‘Dependent’. There’s something that hits different when it comes to performing songs that I’ve written myself, compared to singing other people’s songs. But if I had to choose a song that isn’t mine, definitely ‘Jealous’ by Labrinth.

Which famous musicians do you admire?

I love how Justin Bieber and Shawn Mendes turned their social media following into a full-blown music career. There are a lot of artists that have done the same, and it’s something that I admire, as I can relate in some way, but am still working on.

What is the best advice you’ve been given?

The best advice that I’ve been given is that everything happens for a reason. I truly believe that both bad and good things help shape who you are as a person and can lead to better opportunities in the future.

If you could change anything about the industry, what would it be?

I love that the internet is creating so many opportunities for independent singers and musicians, but I would love it to be even more accessible somehow!

Would you agree that it is important to learn, study and understand old music and music history?

Definitely, old music trends and sounds reappear in today’s music so it’s important to have an understanding of what music was like in the past. I also just find it so interesting to see what the music industry was like before I was born and see the culture and also who were the biggest stars at the time!

What’s next for you?

I have a few exciting projects in the works, and also a lot of songs coming out! My next single will be out next month so I’ve been working hard on that. I’ve been working really hard on these next few songs that are coming so I’m really keen for everyone to hear them.

Follow Keenan Te

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Photo Credit: Taine Noble

Image via 5WPR for 360 Magazine

Q×A – Co-Founders of Révolutionnaire

Justice Faith Betty, and Nia Faith Betty are co-founders of Révolutionnaire, a new social platform aimed at social awareness and activism. Originally a dance-oriented clothing brand started by sisters Justice and Nia, it has grown into a larger movement to empower the youth via a platform for education and conversation. We got to speak with the founders and one of their Action Leaders Naheim Banks below.

We were informed that you grew up with family members in the prison system which drove you towards a life dedicated to criminal justice reform. Can you talk more about how your activism and advocacy have expanded since you began this journey?

Naheim Banks: As you said, I have had family members involved in the system, and one of the things I realized while experiencing that was that our system is not a criminal justice system, but rather a criminal legal system because justice is what so many people don’t experience or get while going through our legal process. When I first began this journey on criminal legal reform, I started something in my school district called Teen Court, which is a youth diversionary program for minors that commit misdemeanors and other infractions. Part of what drew me to this work was because I could see myself in many of these kids, many of them in high school and middle school, who have parents working long hours, parents who are incarcerated and having to grow up way too fast. These kids happened to lose the moral luck lottery and have made mistakes, but that doesn’t mean we should let those mistakes define who they are for the rest of their lives. People are more than the worst thing they’ve ever done. I was encouraged to take my activism further when I saw voters reject Affirmative Action in my home state of California, reject cash bail, and reject a piece of legislation allowing for California to decertify police officers for misconduct despite being only one of four states to not have the authority to decertify law enforcement officers. Upon witnessing this, I decided to run to be an Assembly District Delegate to the California Democratic Party with the slate ‘Organizing for Progress’. Since being elected, I have made it a point to continue pushing the party to endorse legislation that supports Black lives and allows us to reimagine our criminal legal system. One of the ways I’m also doing that is by educating the public on legal reform through Révolutionnaire and our Action Guides and Petitions.

How has attending Howard University, an HBCU, impacted your views on activism and criminal justice reform?

Naheim: Attending Howard has really encouraged me to put myself out there and take risks. Before attending Howard, I always tried to fit into what Nikole Hannah-Jones calls, white spaces that are not made for people that look like me, and impact change within the confines of what is deemed ‘acceptable’. Not anymore. I no longer sugarcoat or tone down the issues that I am passionate about. Part of this huge passion that I have for criminal legal reform and my increased activism on the issue stems from the confidence Howard has instilled in me. Being a criminology major, I have had professors like Dr. Bahiyyah M. Muhammad that have so much passion for prison reform that their passion often rolls over onto you. At Howard, we have people that have non-profits like Just Us that mentors youth involved in the juvenile legal system; we have people that have started environmental justice organizations, gun reform organizations, and so many others that it inspires you to truly get out there in your community and make lasting change.

How did you find Révolutionnaire, and what drew you to become a part of the organization?

Naheim: I had followed Révolutionnaire since its original creation as a way to revolutionize dance apparel and empower all to celebrate the skin they’re in because I had never truly seen dance apparel that actually matched Black skin. I had been an outspoken advocate for criminal legal reform and when Nia Faith, one of the founders of the organization, reached out to me, I just couldn’t say no. Seeing the impact Nia and Justice already had on their homes, their schools, and their communities is what really inspired and drew me to become a part of the organization. I distinctly remember hearing Justice’s Valedictorian speech and one of the things she said that really fueled my love for Révolutionnaire, was that ‘Dreams Fuel Revolutions’. Everyone on this team has a dream for a better world and I just love having the opportunity to be a part of it.

What exactly are your responsibilities as an Action Leader with Révolutionnaire?

Naheim: As an Action Leader, I write about specific issues related to criminal legal reform such as the death penalty, three-strikes laws, and the War on Drugs. I give information to those that want to get more involved in legal reform initiatives and facilitate knowledge sharing and member engagement through writing petitions and 101 Action Guides on the issues that plague our society’s broken legal system.

Your website mentions that Révolutionnaire began with the idea to ‘revolutionize nude apparel’. Can you talk more about how this mission came about and what work has been done thus far?

Nia Faith Betty: I started Révolutionnaire as a dancewear line catering to dancers of color after growing up as a ballerina and never having access to apparel that matched my skin tone. I was tired of constantly feeling othered and dreamed of a more inclusive dance world. Today, the Révolutionnaire Shop has a collection of apparel and accessories for dancers, athletes, and everyone to celebrate the skin they’re in.

Justice Faith Betty: I was inspired by Nia’s journey and dream of revolutionizing the dance world and asked what it would look like if more young people with a dream of improving their communities had access to the network, tools, and information necessary to scale their impact across causes. And that question laid the foundation for Révolutionnaire – the social network for changemakers.

We’ve heard about the five key causes on which Révolutionnaire is centered. Can you tell us more about what work is being done by Révolutionnaire to specifically target these issues?

Nia: We’ve started off with five pillar causes (i.e., racial equity, environmentalism, criminal justice reform, housing + food security, gun reform) with more to come. Change starts with staying informed, so we’ve made information about each of these issues accessible to our audience by breaking down topics into 101 guides. Action items are embedded at the end of each 101 guide so members can move from learning about a problem in society to taking action – whether it’s through contacting their representative, signing a petition, finding volunteer opportunities, making a donation, or participating in another mode of engagement – all from within our platform. We also have action guides across our cause hubs for members to launch their own projects in their communities.

As Révolutionnaire continues to grow, it has been really exciting to see and hear about members getting their ideas off the ground and finding a network of supporters to ideate with.

Justice: We’re committed to making this work more sustainable through leveraging the power of technology to build community among like-minded young people. We recently launched group offerings and have spoken to so many youth-focused organizations who are excited to connect with other orgs doing fantastic work, feel a little less lonely on their respective journeys and scale their collective impact. As a further commitment to sustainability, we will be launching our Recharge library to offer our members content focused on mindfulness and self-care.

How can young people, like Naheim, get involved with Révolutionnaire?

Justice: Whether you are someone who has wanted to make a difference, but perhaps doesn’t know where to start or have been doing this work for a long time, but are looking for a community and resources all in one place to take your impact to the next level – join Révolutionnaire. If, like Naheim, you are excited about contributing your voice on issues that matter to you and have ideas for how young people can take action, we welcome contributions from community members directly on Révolutionnaire through blog posts, lounge conversations, action item submissions and petitions!

Have you experienced any pushback as young women trying to influence such radical change? If so, how do you combat that?

Nia: There are oftentimes unspoken rules and gatekeeping measures that make getting involved in activism daunting and intimidating for young people. We have revolutionized and streamlined how people get involved in changemaking, service, and activism. With anything that is new or different, there are always situations where people don’t agree with it or don’t want to evolve the current ways of taking action to adapt to the changing times. At the end of the day, we always focus on the net good. If the end result is positive change and more young people getting involved with making the world a better place, then we are on the right path.

Make sure to follow Nia, Justice, Naheim, and Révolutionnaire for more!

illustration by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Digital Transformation | How has technology changed your business? 

The use of technology is providing businesses a myriad of opportunities to connect with customers, educate their client base, promote products and services, track trends using analytics, and extend visibility beyond traditional company websites. This is especially important given the increase in remote working environments as well as the increase in electronic shopping. Customers and clients are reaping the benefits of this digital world and these business leaders are sharing the unique ways technology has changed their businesses. 

1. Zero Carbon Footprint

Brittany Kaiser, Chair of the Board of Directors Gryphon Digital Mining

Technology has made our business possible. At Gryphon Digital Mining, we create the world’s largest fully integrated pure-play Bitcoin miner with zero carbon footprint. Bitcoin mining is the process of creating a new bitcoin by solving a computational puzzle.

Bitcoin mining is necessary to maintain the ledger of transactions upon which Bitcoin is based. We are grateful that technology offers a world of possibilities.

2. Customer Education and Connection

Micheal Fischer, Founder Elite HRT 

Our business has been able to connect physicians with patients much more effectively and easily with online access. On top of that, patient education has been much easier for our Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) treatment plans, in order to ensure patients of their informed decisions. It’s been great to connect people to get them started leading healthier and happier lives. 

3. Refreshing Remote Work Structure

Samantha Charleston, VP Human Resources Newell Brands

For the time being, Newell Brands is continuing our remote work structure for the majority of the office population. A benefit of the new situation is it has given employees an outlet to try new things, think differently, share ideas and find solutions.

4. Business through Webapps

Amber Theurer, Chief Marketing Officer ivee

The ability for us to generate business through a webapp has been very beneficial for us, since apps are usually very user-friendly and virtually everyone is on their phones often enough as it is. By just tapping a few buttons on your phone, we can have a Registered Nurse provide IV treatment and other health and wellness services to you at your home or work in as soon as an hour. Without our platform, the process of being able to set up these appointments, and the subsequent efficiencies gained would not be nearly as impactful.

5. Educate and Connect through Blog Posts

Brandon Monaghan, Co-Founder Miracle Brand

Providing customers with more information through our blog has been a game-changer. Through this online community of readers, we have been able to establish a personal connection with our customers and eventual customers. We feel educating people through the blog about our products and providing other helpful tips aids in new and recurring sales from previous customers. 

6. Analytics Platforms for a Better Customer Experience

Benjamin Smith, Founder Disco

Using the vast amount of information available through analytics platforms like Google Analytics or SEMrush is pivotal to understanding how customers are finding and interacting with a website. Tracking behavior, identifying trends and roadblocks, analyzing search terms, and so on can help guide how to go about optimizing for a better customer experience.

7. Remote Business Connection and Productivity  

Joe Parenteau, Co-founder  Fable Home

Fable Home has almost always been a remote working business, with the option to come into the office as needed. Technology has allowed us to smoothly and effectively transition all of our employees to remote roles with success. We are able to communicate with video chatting and quick emails or Slack messages. Technology allows us to constantly stay connected and boost productivity levels!

8. Promote with Social Media using Analytics

Annabel Love, Co-founder & COO Nori Press

Technology has changed the way we promoted our business and got in front of the right customers. With social media, we wanted to target people who were actually interested in using our product, rather than just hoping the advertisements would do their job. Using analytics, we are able to target people who are more likely to be interested and use more optimization to increase sales. 

9. Create an Office Atmosphere at Home with Video Communication

Brittney Dolin, CEO Pocketbook Agency

If it wasn’t for the quick and easy adaptation our company experienced with technology, we would be in a very different place right now. Technology contributed to basic day-to-day practices in addition to assisting us in the trend tracking process. We were able to implement video chatting and Slack communication to help employees create a resemblance of office atmosphere at home. As trends changed, so did our goals! 

10. Track Customer Goals to Meet Needs

Jeff Goodwin, Sr. Director of Performance Marketing and e-Commerce Orgain

Technology has allowed the nutrition industry to skyrocket, as more information becomes publicly available and the interest for higher nutrition increased tenfold in the past decade. We are also able to track more accurately how health and fitness can help people reach their goals, and being able to formulate our products around those needs has become a lot easier. 

11. Attract Prospects from Anywhere without Travel 

Chris Bedi, CIO ServiceNow

Employers will quickly realize that they can start hiring anywhere and attract a whole new set of prospects. And even though there’s a level of Zoom fatigue that’s setting in from nonstop video calls, the travel market is forever changed, he predicts. The concept of getting on a plane for six hours for a two-hour meeting and being jet lagged, people are going to go — why?

The pandemic has changed the way we live life and do business. As Elon Musk says, “Some people don’t like change, but you need to embrace change if the alternative is disaster.” Technology allows you to grow, expand, and elevate your business. With the number of opportunities to incorporate technology into your practice, how can your organization use technology to its advantage today?

12. Increase the Confidence of Customers through Education of Products

Aidan Cole, CEO TatBrow

We have been able to inform and empower the public by adding a “How to Use” section to our website. This gives potential customers confidence in using our product and has been enhanced with the use of video to show TatBrow demos without customers even leaving our site! This makes it convenient for customers to purchase immediately following their exploration of these resources. 

13. Stay on Top of Trends to Increase E-Commerce

Chris Vaughn, Co-founder Saucey

Before the pandemic e-commerce sales were already on the rise. When the pandemic hit and everyone was forced to purchase their essentials through the internet, naturally sales sky-rocketed. The convenience of purchasing products and services shifted from real-time purchases (in-stores) to finding the best product or service (researching and analyzing online), so our technologies also made that shift. We were able to stay on top of trends by effectively tracking them! Quickly, consumers began developing e-commerce habits that significantly helped these businesses track their sales and network. 

14. Promote through Social Media and Web Platforms

Ben Teicher, President/CEO Healthy Directions

Being able to promote our podcasts from our website and on our YouTube channel has been really helpful for our business. Without these digital forms of media, we probably wouldn’t be able to communicate our expertise with the public to the same degree, nor would we be able to allow our prospects and customers to get to know our brand as well. 

15. SEO Marketing

Danielle Callabrese, COO De La Calle

An important component of technology is the work put into search engine optimization. Consumer behaviors have unmistakably changed. They are no longer casually shopping around in stores. Trends have indicated that consumers are researching products they are interested in purchasing before making the trip to their preferred retailer (whether that be in person or online). SEO marketing has been around for some time, but it wasn’t until the global pandemic that we saw this side of marketing truly take off.

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

TikTok’s Explosive Growth

TikTok is world’s most popular mobile video app with 660 million downloads in 2020

Despite facing competition and privacy concerns, TikTok’s 2020 growth appears to have solidified. It has now emerged as the most popular mobile video platform for the last year.

Data acquired by Finbold indicates that TikTok was the most popular mobile video app in 2020 globally, with 660.12 million downloads. Singapore’s Likee trails TikTok, accounting for 270.3 million downloads, while SnackVideo ranks third with 233.57 million downloads.

Despite strong brand support and longevity, YouTube ranks fourth with 222.7 million downloads, while TikTok Lite ranks fifth with 141.89 million downloads.

Other mobile video apps with significant downloads include Moj (93.87 million downloads), Zili (84.11 million downloads), MX TakaTak (81.7 million downloads), Josh (78.13 million downloads), and Uvideo (74.95 million downloads).

Pandemic impacts TikTok’s growth 

TikTok’s growth was accelerated early last year and the report highlights some of the driving factors. According to the research report:

“The app experienced rapid growth in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, especially with the emerging lockdowns. During the lockdown, many people had to stay at home with apps like TikTok keeping people engaged leading to a snowballing effect.”

The app’s growth has also emerged from factors like the ability to offer users an alternative way of sharing content online by creating short videos with music, filters, and other captivating features.

TikTok’s growth has come amid increased challenges ranging from privacy concerns in the United States that saw the app almost get banned. Notably, the app was banned in India, losing a key market.

Furthermore, the app is still facing competition from established platforms like Facebook and Instagram.

Read the full story with statistics here

Art by Heather Skovlund of 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

360 READS

“Jaguar Century: 100 Years of Automotive Excellence” by Giles Chapman

“Jaguar Century” is a lavishly illustrated large-format retrospective examining 100 years of Jaguar, one of the most acclaimed marques in automotive history. Established in 1922 by William Lyons and William Walmsley, the Swallow Sidecar Company transformed into one of the auto industry’s most revered car brands, synonymous with performance and luxury. “Jaguar Century” chronicles this company and its remarkable vehicles, from the 1935 Jaguar SS sporting saloon to today’s F-Type sports cars, F-PACE SUV, and X-Type sedans—filled with images, history, and in-depth analyses of the incredible cars Jaguar has created year after year.

Automotive historian Giles Chapman showcases how company visionaries developed the brand in the trying economic times leading up to World War II before resetting Jaguar during England’s bleak postwar years. “Jaguar Century” will make a great addition to any holiday gift list, just in time for the marque’s 100 anniversary next year.

Publishing September 28, 2021 by Motorbooks ∙ Hardcover, 224 pages ∙ $75.00 US, $99.00 CAN ISBN: 9780760368664

Jaguar Century: 100 Years of Automotive Excellence by Giles Chapman ∙ Publishing September 28, 2021 ∙ Motorbooks via Steve Roth at The Quarto Group for use by 360 Magazine

“DAMANHUR Social Alchemy, Magical Temples and the Superindividual” by Jeff Merrifield

What is Damanhur? It is an alternative way of life. A societal model for the betterment of humanity, an experiment in human consciousness. A collective of people devoted to the sustainability of communal living; an ecovillage and spiritual community based in Northern Italy. Founded by Falco Tarassaco in the mid-70s, Damanhur has grown from humble beginnings to become a prime mover in spiritual-artistic standing and research and the ecological protection of the planet.

In Jeff Merrifield’s book, he writes with reverence about this community that has fascinated him for over two decades. His book is an introduction to the intricacies, philosophies and structures of the seemingly closed-off Damanhur, the guide to the lessons of this community.

DAMANHUR Social Alchemy, Magical Temples and the Superindividual by JEFF MERRIFIELD (10th August; Watkins/Penguin Random House; £18.99/$29.95; 9781786783707

Jeff Merrifield's book, Damanhur (10th August; Watkins/Penguin Random House; £18.99/$29.95; 9781786783707) via Isabelle Panay at Watkins Media Limited for use by 360 Magazine

 “Move Like Water × Be Fluid” by Vaughn Lowery

Move Like Water × Be Fluid” is a stunning memoir documenting the author’s journey from a childhood in the Detroit’s subsidized, section 8 housing to a successful career in fashion and media. The arc of this remarkable passage twists and turns in surprising ways, ensuring readers will believe in the concept that this life truly is what you make it. The text will debut as an exclusive multi-volume installation within 360 MAGAZINE and marks the inception of the brand’s foray into publishing.

This provocative coming-of-age story explores the power of branding strategy, a technique the writer developed at an early age and carried with him throughout his lifetime. Lowery, from the time he was a young child, is able to comprehend that one’s innate, individual self is their greatest commodity in life. Through the highs and lows that inform his experience, he stays true to that ideal. Lowery puts forward a raw and compelling narrative of a child, and later a man, who repeatedly picks himself up, reimagines his life, and finds innovative ways to move forward. 

Move Like Water x Be Fluid is available in PDF format on Blurb.

Move Like Water x Be Fluid is available in hard copy format at AmazonBarnes & NobleGoogle Books and Target.

Signed copies of Vaughn’s memoir,  Move Like Water × Be Fluid, are available in our shop.

Move Like Water x Be Fluid cover image via Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

“Bodega Cat” by Louie Chin

Already a recipient of starred reviews from Publisher’s Weekly and Kirkus Reviews, Louie Chin’s “Bodega Cat” has been selected by the Junior Library Guild as a Spring 2020 Gold Standard in the City Elementary category. Referred to as “the subscription box for the modern librarian,” the Junior Library Guild plays a pivotal role in stocking library inventories nationwide with the highest caliber of books for children. Of the thousands of applicants, only 3% receive this annual distinction and over 95% of JLG Gold Standard books go on to win other book awards. Congratulations to Louie Chin, and to editor Jordan Nielsen!

Born and raised in New York, Louie Chin is an illustrator who creates commercial and editorial content. He has always been an animal-lover, and there is one family pet in particular from which he drew inspiration for “Bodega Cat”: a spirited and feisty orange tabby cat named Simba. His favorite bodega order is coffee and an egg and sausage sandwich on a toasted roll. “Bodega Cat” is the first book that he both wrote and illustrated. He currently resides in Brooklyn, New York.

Animals & Cats / City & Town Life / People & Places, Hispanic & Latino Hardcover, 10.5 x 10.5 Inches, 32 Pages
ISBN: 978-1-57687-932-0, $17.99 US/$23.99 CAN

"Bodega Cat" by Louie Chin (ISBN: 978-1-57687-932-0, $17.99 US/$23.99 CAN)via POW! Kids Books for use by 360 Magazine

The Fragile Skin of the World” by Jean-Luc Nancy

The world is everything that passes between us – ourselves and everything that happens to us, everything that becomes of our contacts, our gazes, our movements; and through referrals from skin to skin, from the fleeting to the immemorial, you reach without even knowing it the entire actuality of the world: the act of its existence. This act is made up of works and disasters, splendors, horrors, and catastrophes. As long as it is ours, it is the act of an infinite emergence that is all the sense there is: a sense that incessantly goes from skin to skin and is itself never enveloped by anything.

The texts in this volume are all oriented by the concern for what is currently happening to us – we, late humanoids – when we arrive at an extremity of our history, whether this extremity should turn out to be a stage, a rupture, or quite simply a last breath.

Jean-Luc Nancy is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Université Marc Bloch in Strasbourg and teaches Political Philosophy and Media Aesthetics at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee. “The Fragile Skin of the World” will be published in November 2021.

The Fragile Skin of the World, by Jean-Luc Nancy via Lucas Jones at Polity Press for use by 360 Magazine

“Passion for Practice with Musings From Music Masters” by Becky Chaffee

Becky’s new book for anyone playing an instrument, Passion For Practice With Musings From Music Masters, is an imaginative visual presentation expressing music practice concepts. Whether you take private lessons or you learned an instrument in grade school and need to take some lessons to get started again, this book will encourage you. The better you are, the more fun you’ll have. Regular practicing can be rough, but Ms. Chaffee’s book helps you to practice smarter, making it more of a fun challenge than rote practice.

Both an art book and a practice reference book, Passion For Practice With Musings From Music Masters contains personal practicing stories and suggestions from musicians around the world, including famous musicians, Grammy award-winning musicians, and principals of sections in major orchestras on all instruments. You might also enjoy her first book, Have Fun With Your Music to inspire young musicians to make practicing their own. Buy this book to inspire music practice or as a gift for a music teacher’s studio.

Becky Chaffee grew up in a musical household and raised two musical children. She has degrees in civil engineering from UC Berkeley and Cornell University. She enjoys playing flute for her music club. Through her music gifts company, Becky raises funds for music education and has distributed $1,000s to youth. Much of the artwork in her books is presented on note cards, prints and Tee shirts that sell in music stores and symphony gift shops such as the Brevard Music Center, Nashville and San Francisco Symphony Gift Shops, SW Strings, and so on.

becky chaffee book cover for use by 360 magazine
illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

DABABY, HOMOPHOBIA × CANCEL CULTURE

By: Andrew Shibuya

No one thought that the return to normalcy – or at least the path towards it – would be without hurdles. Indeed, the past six months have proven similarly difficult to the previous twelve, and the coming few seem to promise no respite. And so, in the now past and brief interlude in mask mandates and lockdowns in the United States, surely one would think that crowded events such as music festivals would be about celebrating reunion and unity.

Unfortunately, with the precedent of a certain performer at Rolling Loud, it is clear that unity was not the first thing on everyone’s mind. No one has made this more clear than rapper DaBaby. During his performance at the festival, the rapper is reported to have said several homophobic comments including, “If you didn’t show up today with HIV, AIDS, or any of them deadly sexually transmitted diseases that’ll make you die in two to three weeks, then put your cellphone lighter up,” as well as the peculiar, “Fellas, if you ain’t sucking d**k in the parking lot, put your cellphone lighter up.”

Of course, the Internet had something to say, and the deserved virtual tirade against DaBaby began. Twitter users in particular took up arms against DaBaby’s comments, lambasting the rapper for what they deemed to be some mixture of idiocy and ignorance.

And while fools’ remarks should hardly be considered worth coverage alone, the following onslaught and festivals’ responses are worth discussing. In the past week, numerous notable festivals have pulled DaBaby from their lineups, including Lollapalooza, New York’s Governors Ball, and Day N Vegas. The festivals all shared similar messages to their social media channels regarding the change, citing the need for and value of inclusion and diversity. The former’s message read: “Lollapalooza was founded on diversity, inclusivity, respect. And love. With that in mind, DaBaby will no longer be performing at Grant Park tonight.” Read our coverage of Lollapalooza and its implications with COVID HERE.

These festival changes seemed to have induced an apology from DaBaby, who, at first, was reluctant to apologize or recognize any wrongdoing. In response to the first wave of criticism, the rapper responded on his Instagram Story, stating, “What I do at a live show is for the audience at the live show. It’ll never translate correctly to somebody looking at a little five, six-second clip from their goddamn crib on their phone. Because, regardless of what y’all motherfuckers are talking about and how the internet twisted up my motherfucking words, me and all my fans at the show, the gay ones and the straight ones, we turned the fuck up.”

This was just the first response of many, with each becoming increasingly apologetic as more of his shows were cancelled. The most recent of his apologies, which many on Twitter have dubbed “DaApology,” reads: “I want to apologize to the LGBTQ+ community for the hurtful and triggering comments I made. Again, I apologize for my misinformed comments about HIV/AIDS and I knew education on this is important.” And while some fans online deemed his response to be acceptable, many did not see it as adequate.

Celebrities similarly took to Twitter and other social media platforms to offer their two cents on the situation. Many decried DaBaby’s words, such as his recent collaborator Dua Lipa, who claims to be incredibly taken aback by this side of DaBaby. Other big names in the music industry such as singer-songwriter Elton John and pop legend Madonna have similarly criticized the ignorance and inaccuracy of DaBaby’s comments on HIV and AIDS. Most recently, Miley Cyrus has shared on social media that she has reached out to DaBaby to “learn from each other” in the wake of this incident.

And still, some rappers and other industry names have come to DaBaby’s defense. Some, like rapper NLE Choppa, insist that this is just a slight hiccup in DaBaby’s career, with NLE Choppa recently tweeting, “Dababy Gone Come Out Bigger Than Ever While Y’all Tryna Down Play The Man.” Rapper T.I. similarly called for more equality and fair treatment for DaBaby, seeming to suggest the praise Lil Nas X has recently received. In an Instagram comment, T.I. wrote, “If Lil Nas X can kick his s**t in peace… so should DaBaby.”

DaBaby’s comments come after a recent onslaught of homophobic vitriol directed toward Nas X this past summer. Following the release of the rapper’s successful singles “MONTERO (Call Me By Your Name)” and “Industry Baby” and brazen accompanying videos, many – both fans and other rappers – took to Twitter. And while many people did support Nas X as T.I. seems to allude to, the openly gay rapper received far from unanimous praise.

In addition to spurring an inundation of homophobic sentiment online from quotidian users, Nas X proved to be similarly divisive amongst other rappers in the hip hop industry. While some voiced their support and praised the rapper’s bravery and bold works, some were similarly quick to voice their disproval. Many condemned the rapper for what seemed to them to be brazen lewdness, though many Twitter users thinly veiled homophobia.

The discourse over “cancelling” is rather interesting in light of so much present discussion over the actual existence of cancel culture and its implications. Especially in the music industry, where the effects of “cancelling” someone seem to be diminished – Chris Brown still plays on the radio, Dr. Luke still produces number-one hits, and most recently “cancelled” country singer Morgan Wallen has seen his popularity grow tremendously despite this year’s earlier controversy. This is in contrast with the film industry, where, although far from free from offenders, certain players have been blackballed far more effectively and efficiently.

Surely, all those people could be an argument against the existence of cancel culture. The consequences to their actions seem to have faded as quickly as people’s memories of their wrongdoings. And so, as to the question of whether or not DaBaby has been “cancelled” is unclear. The action against him – at least at the level of cancelling his headlining performances and shows – has so far managed to induce at least a single apology from the rapper. And while what lies in store for DaBaby remains unclear, one certainty remains – the Internet has at least some power to affect change in the real world.

Headphones illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

JENA ROSE LIFESIZE CHESS MUSIC VIDEO – CHECKMATE

Cuban-American gen-Z artist Jena Rose hit a 5-week streak on MTV’s Friday Livestream with Kevan Kenney, joining a-list artists including Harry Styles and Zayn in the fan-voted Top 10 rankings. The larger-than-life music video, “Checkmate”, released via Gem Street Music and Sweety High, was inspired by “The Queen’s Gambit” and her lifelong fascination with chess. The pop track visually follows Jena as she takes the power back in a toxic relationship. Watch here.

Since releasing “Checkmate” in June, Rose has experienced tremendous momentum across social media and DSPs. By the numbers, “Checkmate” has generated 4.65M total views and streams, 450K monthly Spotify listeners and 70K new TikTok followers. Additionally, the “Checkmate” sound has been used in 8.3K videos.

The single kicks off an exciting new chapter for Jena Rose and prepares listeners for her forthcoming debut EP Baby, Maybe. The project is slated for release later this year and will feature collaborations with all-star co-writers/producers including Nick Furlong and John Feldmann (Blink 182, Panic! At The Disco).

Christened a “tour de force” by American Songwriter, Jena has toured with Aly & AJ, Echosmith and Why Don’t We, attended NYFW (dressed in Alice+Olivia, Anna Sui, Tom Ford, etc), and worked on brand partnerships with Tommy Hillfiger, FabFitFun and MAC.

About Jena Rose

Growing up with a father who immigrated from Cuba and a mom raised in Chicago, Jena was inspired by a wide array of musical influences from a very young age. Displaying a precocious talent early on, she started playing her own songs on tour with AJR, Echosmith and Why Don’t We when she was only 17-years-old. Trained as a multi-instrumentalist, singer and dancer, with over 1M social followers and 10M likes, she is an artist to watch in 2021. Gearing up for a slate of releases, fashion week, and her debut EP, Rose will be back on tour just as soon as the world allows.

About Gem Street Music

Gem Street Music, based in LA and Nashville, was created as a solution to a new music market that requires artists to drive continual growth across their digital platforms. Their core business, spanning from A&R and content production to growth and distribution, delivers the cultural scale essential to building real fan bases and driving positive ROI. Owning one of the largest Gen Z platforms and growth networks in the U.S. (Sweety High and Social Impact), they leverage their diverse audiences and employ innovative, collateralized strategies for both established stars and promising newcomers.

Nechelle Vanias Headshot 2021 via Jonathan Stinson at freedomunitedsocial for use by 360 Magazine

Nechelle Vanias Six Degrees of Influence Q×A

Nechelle Vanias is Chief Strategic Officer of the full-service digital marketing and talent agency, Six Degrees of Influence (SDI). Spearheading the agency, Nechelle looks to elevate professionally managed content. Through SDI’s three curated influencer content houses – The Vault, La Casita, and Twin Flames – the agency looks to offer a unique opportunity to both brands and content creators. 360 Magazine spoke with Nechelle about SDI’s approach to creating viral content, brand campaigns, Gen Z/Millennial trends, and more.

What void do the The Vault, La Casita, and Twin Flames houses fill in the professionally managed content collaboration house industry? 

Six Degrees of Influence (SDI) sought to create long lasting brands when developing The Vault, La Casita, and Twin Flames, not just an influencer hang out or Airbnb. SDI likens this approach some of the popular TV shows, like Love Island and Big Brother, where the audience falls in love with the show platform and may have their favorite contestants each season, but still come back to engage with the next season. In fact, SDI runs each of their content houses like a TV show production set replete with the same operations, including call sheets and writers’ room. This ensures a predictable, consistent and timely amount of content is produced for both the house social media channels and brand partners.

Six Degrees of Influence (SDI) uses a multi-channel content approach. What different channels do you use to promote content?

SDI employs social and live channels to promote the house’s content.  This includes live streaming fan events and on-site brand activations at the houses. The content houses’ reach is amplified beyond the house channels by hosting daily collaboration days with their influencer and Young Hollywood friends. [These collaborations] then create exposure for the guests’ audiences as well.

Is there a specific media channel that SDI influencers are currently focusing on the most? 

SDI knows that content creators can still earn more money that is relative to their follower count and engagement on Instagram and YouTube, than on TikTok. This is because Instagram and YouTube are established platforms from which brands have been able to experience quantitative conversion results over long periods of time.  Brands are still figuring out how to best use TikTok, thus while their marketing spends are increasing for TikTok. [However,] you can still earn more on the other platforms with less followers.  We have a creator with six five thousand followers on Instagram and earns $1,500 on average for one Instagram post, whereas her following of three hundred and fifty thousand followers on TikTok earns her $750 on average. Now, add in the fact that SDI has never seen followers move to other platforms in the way TikTokers are able to move their followers. Therefore, TikTok is still a large focus as it serves as an advertising tool to drive the growth of Instagram and YouTube. For these reasons, SDI focuses on Instagram and YouTube growth for the housemates, but certainly keeps TikTok front of mind.

What benefits does living in a content house offer influencers, as opposed to more traditional housing arrangements?

Collaboration amongst all creative types is a tried-and-true method of growing and being inspired.  Living in a content house offers influencers a tribe to go to for content ideas, support and camaraderie.  When run by SDI, that [support] comes with mental health check ins and encouragement. [Encouragement] is very necessary for influencers who are under an immense amount of pressure to maintain their brand. SDI also provides insight on platform growth, relationships with the platforms for exclusive campaign, and event opportunities, and secures brand deals for the housemates. Overall, in SDI’s houses housemates receive the support, resources and tools to grow their social platforms, increase their revenue potential and get a “masters” in the business of content creators.

Is there a formula/process that SDI follows when attempting to create viral content? 

In order to achieve viral content you have to put out A LOT of content. It is foremost a numbers game – the more content you deploy the more you increase your chances of going viral. The second most important process of creating viral content is to study data, so that you are putting out a lot of purposeful content with the intent to speak to a generation. Have your content resonate with [viewers] and have them respond with affirmation through their views, likes, shares and comments. SDI is a very data driven agency, so we are looking at what the data is telling us, what the comments of the fans telling us, what is trending in pop culture, what do we hear the talent talking most about, what is getting the views.  Once SDI has the “what”, we start looking at the “why” so that we can determine how to leverage the data to create viral content.

SDI creates custom designed campaigns for individual brands. How does SDI go about customizing these campaigns for each brand? 

We curate campaigns for brands that align with their overall marketing goals and what we know will be embraced by the creators. We speak the brands language, but live in the creator’s world, so we know how to create a win-win collaboration. We also leverage the unique setting of a content house in our campaigns.  Most specifically, the ability to do on-site branded activations and signage at the houses themselves.  For example, if it is a beverage brand, we might recommend a branded glass front refrigerator by the pool. If it is a clothing brand, we might recommend a branded master closet with signage that is full of the brand’s clothing. If it were a cereal brand, we might recommend a cereal bar in the kitchen.  All of these concepts would include intentional branded content created by the housemates, but also a more subliminal exposure in the background of content. [This subliminal exposure] has proven to be successful in traditional product placement [methods] used in TV and film. The possibilities are endless, and we look to get as creative as we can. [SDI] pushes the envelope [with] of out of the box ideas that deliver conversations and increase brand awareness.   

Who are some of the most popular content creators that SDI represents?

SDI works with many creators, and the most popular doesn’t always mean the most follower count.

Rave Vanias with 350k is a brand favorite, doing campaigns for brands such as Cinnamon Toast Crunch, HP and Fenty Skin. She also pulls thousands of views when she goes live on her social channels. Her confident personality and accessibility make her a favorite all around.

Alessya Farrugia has strong numbers on all channels (2M on TikTok, 391k on Instagram, 176k on YouTube) and is another talent. [Alessya is also] a brand favorite for campaign activations on TikTok, Instagram and YouTube.  She also is one of the few creators that appear on the gossip sites for her great looks, and not for drama.

Joshua Suarez, with almost 13 million followers on TikTok, is one of our largest creators. [He has] has great chemistry with his girlfriend, Star Abelar, who herself has almost 10 million followers on TikTok.

So many influencers audition to join content houses. What qualities does SDI specifically look for when finding influencers to represent your full-service digital marketing and talent agency? 

SDI is looking for creators that have a great work ethic and want to be great. If someone is doing this as a hobby, they are not a fit for the agency. SDI is looking to go on a journey with talent that are looking to take their careers to the next level, reach their full potential, and aren’t afraid to do the work that is needed to be great!  SDI doesn’t just sign talent with large followings, because we know that doesn’t necessarily translate into big money or meaningful careers. SDI is looking for creators that are coachable and passionate about their art because those are the ones that have the greatest potential impact on the industry!

SDI mentioned that their demographic mainly caters to Gen Z and Millennial fans. Which Gen Z/Millennial trends are SDI influencers currently creating content about? 

The Gen Z and Millennial generations are very confident in their self-expression, and SDI looks to amplify those voices. Relationships and connections are a main theme in the content we create – whether that be romantic, casual, family or friendly interactions. These generations are more connected [to each other than ever before] in history, thanks to technology and social media. So, [these elements] play a large part in their lives and create a universal theme with which they can relate and engage.  

Is SDI looking to create any more content houses in the future? 

SDI does indeed have two more houses in development for 2021, with plans for international expansion in 2022. SDI wants to create an international network of content houses that can incubate future leaders and give brands a platform to weave into the fabric of their customers’ lives.