Posts tagged with "social media"

Secret X-Men

Sunspot. Cannonball. Marrow. Boom-Boom. Tempo. Forge. Banshee. Strong Guy. Armor. Earlier this year, these X-Men characters were choices in the mega popular X-Men Vote! While they ultimately weren’t chosen as the final member of the Krakoan Age’s first team of X-Men, the vote took social media by storm with passionate fans campaigning fiercely for their favorites. And this February, fans can relive the excitement of this pivotal moment in X-Men history by seeing their chosen candidates in action in SECRET X-MEN #1! This special one-shot written by Excalibur and X of Swords scribe Tini Howard and drawn by Daredevil artist Francesco Mobili will bring all nine of these mutant heroes together for a secret mission to the stars!

When the Shi’ar Empire faces an unexpected threat, they must call upon the X-Men. Team co-captains Sunspot and Cannonball will lead Marrow, Tempo, Forge, Banshee, Strong Guy, Armor, and Boom-Boom on a dangerous mission to save a figure of paramount importance—the daughter of Professor X and empress of the Shi’ar: Xandra!

“We had to do it, yeah? And I jumped at the chance to tell the story while I had the time,” Howard said. “Cannonball was my vote, and Strong Guy? Tempo? Boom-Boom? This is the perfect team for an intergalactic X-Men mission. I hope they didn’t forget anything important!”

See the team assemble on Leinil Francis Yu’s cover below and be there when SECRET X-MEN #1 hits stands on February 9!

Green Car by Mina Tocalini

Lamborghini Adopts what3words

Lamborghini, the leading global brand of luxury sports cars, has revealed today it will become the first auto manufacturer to integrate what3words, fully enabled by Alexa. With voice set to be the way we communicate with cars, this partnership signals  a disruptive move to combine the best user experience with the slickest and most innovative technology. 

what3words location technology is changing the way we approach addressing. It has divided the globe into 57 trillion 10ft squares and given each one a unique combination of 3 words: a what3words address. For example, drivers can enter ///usual.trying.highs to navigate to the exact 3 meter square that offers the best view of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. The system will also work entirely offline. 

Traditional addresses can be difficult to enter into navigation systems, especially by voice, and are often inaccurate or confusing. Many address searches typically drop pins in the centre of buildings and street names are often duplicated. For example, there are 367 Park Streets in California and 521 George Streets in Australia. Of course, many parts of the word are not addressed at all. 

what3words eliminates these issues. Every what3words address is unique, minimising errors and getting drivers exactly where they want to go–whether that’s a new trendy pop-up bar, or a friend’s apartment’s parking lot. With market-leading voice accuracy, what3words addresses can be entered either by text or voice just like street addresses or points of interest.

The Lamborghini Huracán is all about performance, control, and innovation. The cars are equipped with the latest technology for great performance, and navigation is no exception. Lamborghini is the first automotive brand to incorporate Amazon Alexa’s Complete Control, and the integration with what3words allows users to navigate to a precise 3 meter square with a simple voice command. 

Luca Giardino, Head of Connectivity at Lamborghini adds, ‘The future of mobility demands the most advanced technology, and that is why Lamborghini announced the roll-out of what3words. Our drivers can experience the most seamless way to navigate by voice.’

Chris Sheldrick, CEO and Co-founder of what3words adds, “Traditional addresses aren’t suitable for voice input, and a lot of the time, the best spots don’t have an address at all. Together, what3words and Alexa offer the perfect solution for navigation, and with that a top of the range experience. Lamborghini drivers can now explore off the beaten track, or find a VIP entrance to an exclusive venue with just 3 words.

About what3words

What3words is the simplest way to talk about location. The system covers the entire world, never needs updating, and works offline. A what3words address is a human-friendly way to share very precise locations with other people, or to input them into platforms and machines such as ride-hailing apps or e-commerce checkouts. It is optimized for voice input and contains built-in error prevention to immediately identify and correct input mistakes.

The free what3words app, available for iOS and Android, and the online map enable people to find, share and navigate to what3words addresses in over 50 languages to date. Millions of what3words addresses are in use around the world, with thousands of businesses using them to save money, be more efficient and provide a better customer experience. what3words is integrated into apps, platforms and websites, with just a few lines of code. Products are available for free or for a nominal fee for qualifying NGOs. Its partners include Mercedes-Benz, Triumph Motorcycles, Premier Inn, the AA and many emergency services across the world.

what3words has a team of over 100 people, across offices in the UK, USA, Germany and Ulaanbaatar Mongolia. The company has raised over £100 million in capital from investors such as Intel, Aramex, Deutsche Bahn, Subaru and the Sony Investment Fund.

Big Boss Vette – Eater

BIG BOSS VETTE TURNS EVERYONE INTO AN “EATER” IN NEW MUSIC VIDEO

Today, St. Louis rapper and singer Big Boss Vette drops the music video for her vivacious rising single “Eater” via Republic Records.
Watch “Eater” HERE.
Listen to “Eater”—HERE.
Directed by Fonzy, the clip opens on a truly high-stakes situation. Newscasters swarm a university, and a S.W.A.T. team readies to enter because Big Boss Vette has taken over! Inside, she manages to turn everyone into an “Eater” with her bewitching bars, unapologetic lyrics, and over-the-top charisma. It’s furiously paced, hilarious, and completely befitting of this blunt banger. You need to see it to believe it.
She unleashed “Eater” a few weeks back, and it garnered looks from Consequence of Sound4 Sho Magazine, and more.
On the track, a hyped-up New Orleans bounce-inspired beat rages underneath her confident and charismatic delivery. She rips through one raunchy, raw, and raucous NSFW bar after another without apology. She previewed the track with snippets on social media, generating tens of thousands of listens and inciting anticipation for its arrival.
No stranger to making bangers, Vette put numbers on the boards with independent tracks such as “Bad Bitch,” “Outside,” “No Fakin,” “Make Em Mad,” and more. This year, she caught the attention of Republic Records and signed to the label.
Now, she’s got even more heat on deck. You’ve been warned. There’s a new boss in town.

Millennials × Spirits Making a Difference In The World

It is no secret that millennials are making changes in the world around us every day. From social justice, equality, politics, climate change, and social media, the world is changing every day because of them.

Millennials outnumber Gen X and will soon outnumber Baby Boomers among voters. Not only have they revolutionized the economy, but they have also shifted today’s culture in many ways. For example, millennials are well-known for how much they use social media. The millennial generation uses social media as a voice to reach hundreds, or even thousands, of people worldwide. Because of how they use social media, they are forever changing human interaction.

Millennials are making significant changes every day, and one of those changes is in alcohol trends.

In the last few years, millennials have become more focused on the quality of alcohol and the variety of flavors the alcohol industry offers. The demand for beer has decreased within the last decade while wine, whisky, vodka, and other spirits have grown.

Millennials have become more conscious of the quality and ingredients in alcohol than their Baby Boomer and Gen X counterparts. Nowadays, millennials are looking for value and health benefits in exchange for their money and are looking more at hand-crafted and artisanal alcohol products.

Many vodka brands are borrowing tactics from gin because of these changes. They are moving to a much lighter serve and lower-alcohol offerings to appeal to the millennial generation. Many of these brands are becoming “healthy” alcohols by removing sugars and adding botanical flavors.

Glasgow Distillery Company‘s co‐founder Mike Hayward says, “The success of gin has opened up the consumer’s thirst for new and interesting products that have botanicals and natural flavor at the core. We see this as a great opportunity to attract consumers to the vodka category by creating a range of products that meet the desire for interesting and innovative spirits presented in a new and exciting way.”

One vodka brand is taking a few ideas from the millennial generation and using their social responsibility to donate to groups trying to change the world while making a “smooth, crisp, and warming sipper.”

Organika Vodka, founded in 2016 in Russia, focuses on the ideals of sustainability in all forms. From locally sourcing renewable resources in the Lake Baikal region to working side-by-side by the indigenous people and developing a biodegradable spirits bottle, this company is striving toward showing just how much of a difference a company can make toward sustainability and ecological consciousness. By creating a more ecologically conscious alcohol, Organika is changing the industry for the better.

There are three varieties of Organika Vodka: Organika, Organika Life, and Organika White Truffle. While each kind is made with highly oxygenated water from Lake Baikal and 100% grain BIO spirit, they each have one ingredient that differentiates them.

Organika is made with Siberian Larch Extract, which can be found in different parts of the world, while the most valuable species is found in Siberia. It is said that Siberian Larch is known for strengthening blood vessels, which makes it a natural aphrodisiac.

A well-known tonic called sagan-daila is used to create Organika Life. Sagan-daila means “life-giving” and is said to stimulate the brain, kidneys, and heart activity. It is also said to relieve fatigue and hangovers.

Organika White Truffle is made with not only sagan-daila but also the white truffle mushroom, which is said to rejuvenate the body and “positively influences the men’s power.”

Not only does this company focus on being sustainable and ecologically conscious, but they are also focused on the preservation of rare animals like the Amur Tiger, the Far Eastern leopard, the snow leopard, and the polar bear.

The majority of their charitable donations are given to the World Wildlife Fund who actively sought out the brand for a partnership after being “so moved” by Organika’s efforts in rare animal preservation. Even during the height of COVID-19, Organika continued to support its partners.

If there is one thing millennials also care about significantly, it is most definitely animals. Suppose millennials cannot get behind a sustainable and ecologically conscious vodka brand that is making significant changes in wildlife. In that case, I am not sure what they would get behind. Not only does Organika use organic ingredients and locally source them, but they are also donating toward saving animals all around the world. I would say that is a win-win on both accounts.

With millennials caring more about what is in their drinks than the experience of drinking them, it is no surprise that vodka companies are making changes in their production.

In an interview with Forbes, Jonathan Hemi, the managing partner of Crystal Head Vodka, said, “Clean, additive-free, high-quality liquid is where we see opportunities as well in different expressions through different types of grains.” In other words, clean and sustainable alcohol is creating more opportunities for vodka brands like Organika to make significant changes in the alcohol industry.

Organika has recently signed contracts with the Miami Dolphins and the Breakthru Beverage Group in Florida, expanding their reach into the United States from Russia and Germany.

The contract with the Miami Dolphins sees Organika at the Hard Rock Stadium from the 2021 season to the 2023 season. Fans of the Dolphins will be able to experience Organika vodka and Organika Life. They are also planning on using aluminum cups instead of traditional plastic for their drinks in the stadium.

The partnership with Breakthru Beverage opens new sales and distribution opportunities in Florida for Organika Vodka in the ultra-premium vodka category while also distributing the brand into 14 different states and Canada.

Sustainability and change are essential for both millennials and Organika Vodka to thrive. Not only can millennials help Organika change the world for wildlife, but Organika can also produce clean and eco-conscious alcohol for millennials. Both of these groups are working to change the world differently, but imagine what they could do working together. With the social-media-hungry millennials, there is no telling just how much Organika can achieve with its mission of preserving wildlife.

Covid created by Allison Christensen from 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Tik Tok × Covid-19

With 732 million users worldwide, TikTok, a trending video-sharing platform, is one of today’s most popular social media networks. During the lockdown, the app’s short and amusing videos drew a lot of attention, but it was not long before cybercriminals took advantage of TikTok’s fame for their own gain.

According to the data presented by the Atlas VPN team, TikTok was the most impersonated app in Covid-19 related to Android app scams in the first half of 2021. There were a total of 88 TikTok copy-cat apps detected spreading FakeApp malware.

Malicious applications impersonating organizations that give out free laptops to students were also highly prevalent. There were 37 bogus Android laptop registration applications detected in H1 2021.

The third spot on the list is occupied by apps impersonating vaccine registration channels. Overall, 14 such malicious applications were found in the first half of this year. 360 Magazine is surprised to see this research about Tik Tok, which is widely used internationally.

Fake apps often imitate the login pages of the official apps to harvest users’ credentials and other personal data. They are typically distributed through third-party app stores, but on occasion, fake apps make it to the official Google Play store as well.

Ruth Cizynski, the cybersecurity researcher and writer at Atlas VPN, gives advice on how to recognize fake applications: “What makes fake apps so dangerous is that they are typically designed to look exactly like an official app, making them hard to spot. The best defense consumers have against falling prey to fake app downloads is knowing what to look out for. Reading the apps reviews, taking some time to research the developers, and reading the permissions agreement are just some of the things consumers should do before proceeding with an app.”

Apart from fake apps, cybercriminals have launched multiple other cyberattacks leveraging the global pandemic, including phishing campaigns, malicious URLs, as well as malware. While cyberattacks were widespread across the world, some countries suffered more than others. In total, 35.9% of such threats affected the United States in the first half of 2021. Other highly affected countries include Germany (18.9%), Colombia (10.5%), Italy (3%), and Spain (2.5%).

Art by Heather Skovlund of 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Moving – The Atlantic

In this first volume of Remember the Internet, a series that tells a complete history of the Internet, one book at a time, journalist Ana Valens introduces us to the erotic gifs, hashtag fetish fan art, and sex worker resource blogs that combined to transform Tumblr into the vanguard of a user-generated sexual revolution. As she tells the story of her own online sexual and political awakening, Valens investigates how Tumblr’s technical architecture made it a convenient laboratory for social justice and sexual freedom, one that would ultimately clash with the government’s crackdown on sexuality online. 2021.

In the second Volume, Not just anyone can join the most elite Tori Amos tape trading webring of 1998. In a world before “search” and “social media,” teenage Megan Milks has what it takes, negotiating two-to-one trades of rare concert audio with some of the most intense “ears with feet” in the Toriverse, using their living room computer to navigate fandom friendships haunted with nascent queer meaning. In this new volume of Remember the Internet, Milks leads us through a world of bootleg concert recording on DATs and USEnet meetups, a world still inventing the rules for being with one another online: bring references, bring blanks.

Available September 21, 2021

In the third volume, Google Glass was supposed to replace phones and PCs, becoming the peripheral that turned the internet itself into a bodily function, making the instant overlay of real-time information into a new organic language. Where did everything go wrong? Was it the unchecked hubris of Big Tech, which had become addicted to solving problems that didn’t exist using grandiose solutions with prohibitive price tags? Was it a tone deaf marketing campaign that failed to take into account the secret loathing of Silicon Valley’s haughty elites? Or was it simply too early, a product before its time like the Palm Pilot or disco? Journalist Quinn Myers gets the inventors, users, developers, detractors, lovers, haters, models, and members all on the record in this slim new entry in the Remember the Internet series. NOT AVAILABLE FOR GOOGLE GLASS.

Available November 16, 2021

In the fourth volume, On Myspace, Noor al-Sibai is a scene queen: artfully curated and presented to rise to the top of the top 8. Off of it, she’s a teenager: dealing with trauma both personal and political, bad relationships, and understanding the ways in which the new world of social media is changing her relationship to each of these. In this new installment of Remember the Internet, Noor al-Sibai tells the story of growing up on Myspace as part of the first generation to come of age online.

Available Spring 2022

October - Selena Gomez - ELLE Canada illustration by Anh Hoang use by 360 Magazine

October – Selena Gomez – ELLE Canada

KO MÉDIA REVEALS A FORWARD-LOOKING  SEPTEMBER ISSUE OF ELLE CANADA

KO Média is excited to unveil the October issue of ELLE Canada featuring Selena Gomez. The multi-hyphenate star opens up about her mental illness, shooting her new Hulu show with Steve Martin and releasing her first record in Spanish. “I focused so hard on making sure the language I was speaking — and the way I was speaking it — was authentic,” she says in the candid interview. “I wanted it to exude love. I wanted it to talk about pain but in a way that was confident. There is a song about girls saying goodbye to things that aren’t good for us.” One thing Gomez has said goodbye to is her access to Instagram. “I suffer from mental illness, and [social media] just wasn’t adding anything to my life,” she says, adding that once she gave it up, “I felt like I was suddenly able to be so present.”

Other stories of self-care and self-discovery in this issue include Canadian Grammy-winning artist Alessia Cara finding stability as her star continues to rise; Nesta Cooper on coming into her own opposite Jason Momoa in the second season of See; and Mohawk actor Devery Jacobs’ experience working on an Indigenous set and being an activist in her community. Rounding out the bunch is Jonathan Van Ness who, with six seasons of Queer Eye behind them, is now focused on feeding their own well-being, inside and out.

For readers who need some me time, we offer up Canada’s best spas to visit this fall, whether you want a full-body scrub en plein air in B.C. or a lakefront Nordic spa experience in Nova Scotia. Plus, the magazine looks at why dawn is the new time to get things done and how to properly care for sensitive or irritated skin (just in time for winter!).

In fashion, this edition is all about looking back — on the overt tackiness of the early-aughts (which is making a comeback for a surprising reason); the 40-year legacy of Max Mara’s 101801 coat; and the coming-together of two friends to design Markoo’s cool, effortless aesthetic.

And we get serious, diving into the history (and current reality) of medical misogyny, dissecting the downfall of the girl boss and what it says about women in power, and exploring the healing effect of restorative tattooing.

Ending on a lighter note, this issue has everything from forest-inspired fragrances and the next generation of Canadian winemakers to dinner party glow-ups and a mother-daughter road trip.

The October issue of ELLE Canada will hit stands and Apple News+ on October 20, 2021.

Farmers Protest illustration created by Rumnik Ghuman from 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

India’s Food Soldiers

By: Rumnik K Ghuman

Exactly a year ago, Narendra Modi’s government with little public or parliamentary debate, passed three farmer bills. According to them, these bills are a gift to the farmers, but in reality, the bills are a gift for the rich agribusinesses in India. The majority of the population in Punjab, Haryana, and Rajasthan are farmers, they make their entire income based on their produce. Some call the farmers ‘India’s Food Soldiers’ and many people have shown support to the farmers. 

The first bill that was released was The Farmers’ Produce Trade and Commerce(Promotion and Facilitation) Act. This act allows the farmers to produce and have free trade outside the physical premises of the specific markets under the APMC Act (Agricultural Produce Marketing Committee law). Under this act, the specific markets that the government has listed are agribusiness typhoons. These businesses are only going to set the price at a low rate so it’s cheaper for them. This act is in their favor because the farmers will not be able to go somewhere else to sell so they have to agree to the price the agribusiness sets. This puts the farmers in a low position to control their own products. 

The second bill that was passed was the Essential Commodities (Amendment) Act that made the decision to remove some items such as cereals and pulses from the list of essential commodities. This act was passed to attract foreign direct investment to the sector. This bill is limiting the number of items farmers can produce and sell. Certain states can only produce certain items based on the weather and the field the farmers have. This puts the farmers at a disadvantage when producing and won’t make as much money as they would normally. 

The third bill was regarding the Farmers (Empowerment and Protection) Agreement on Price Assurance and Farm Services Act. This bill states to have a nationwide price limitation on all produces. This act doesn’t give farmers any empowerment over their produces which is putting them at a disadvantage. Combining all of these acts together, puts all farmers at a disadvantage, to not have a free trade market for them, price points that are lower than normal, and limited items to sell. The agribusinesses have connections in the government which is why the agribusinesses have more control over the price and are the only buyers that the farmers can sell to. 

In August 2020, many farmers from the States of Punjab and Haryana gather to protest in the capital, Delhi. The farmers had seen that one bill was passed and they needed to stop for more to be released as in Haryana, these laws were issued as of August. September was when the government passed the Farmers Produce Trade and Commission Act, which put more fire into the farmers to get justice by removing these bills. Many farmers across the country were angry and had to show it somehow as the news was not covering the farmers’ protest in the capital because the news channels were owned by the agribusinesses or the government. So some farmers set their own fields on fire, marched to government offices, or protested at the capital. 

At first, the crowd of farmers was much smaller, so the government brushed it aside. It wasn’t until on November 23, 2020, when protesters march from around India toward Delhi. Once they reached the edge of the city on November 26, the protesters met a large group of police officers who used tear gas, water cannons, and physical force to keep them from entering the city. Over the entire year, over 1000 deaths have happened whether that be by the cold weather or by protestors hanging themselves. A majority of the population were elder men that have been farming for all of their life and don’t know another way to provide an income for their families. In Punjab, farmers have always had a hard time making an income as they don’t have much money to afford the necessities to run the field correctly. They take big loans to buy a tractor, but later can pay it off and then hang themselves. 

There have been big protests, but 360 Magazine feels the number of people from different religions, states, ages, and genders who came out to support the frontlines of the capital is unbelievable. The men were already fighting for their rights, but the women have been standing like hard rock with them. The women at the border are providing food and protesting as well. It’s amazing to see all come together to roll back new agricultural laws. Multiple women and kids have been injured during the violent behavior of the police but they still come back or stay to support. 

As many people from Punjab and Haryana reside in England, the United States, and Canada, the protestors sitting in the cold, were getting worldwide support. Even though these supporters are not in India to help physically, they showed their support by organizing protests in their cities, doing marches to bring more awareness, sharing on social media about what’s going on, and donating or sending money to their families back home to go provide food for the protestors as it was freezing at the start of the protest. Many other industry workers in India went on strike as well to show they are with the farmers. 

Punjab is known for its music and their music really reaches a higher population. It was the only way to show to the world this is the reality of the protest which the news channels were not recording nor reporting to the world. So many Punjabi singers came together to make a ‘Kisaan Anthem’(Kisaan means farmers in Punjabi) that tells and shows every detail of the protest with live footage. Multiple Punjabi singers personally came and served the protestors, sat with the protesters, and tried their hardest to talk to official officers to get these laws rolled away. 

As we are speaking about the Farmers’ Protest, it is still going on and it’s been exactly a year since it started. The government has been pressured to speak about the bills in the parliament and hopefully will take the bills back. No Farmers No Food.

Q&A × Keenan Te

By: Heather

Keenan Te started posting singing videos on TikTok a year and a half ago and has amassed over 1.6million followers. 2021 has been a hectic year for Keenan, with his last song Dependent being released in April. Dependent currently has over 50 million plays across platforms and flew to number 1 on Indonesia’s Viral 50 Spotify chart, as well as the Top 5 of many other countries across Asia.

We had the pleasure of corresponding with Keenan to learn about his inspiration, who he looks up to, and so much more. Read on to find out his answers!

What first got you into music?

Music has always been a big part of my life ever since I was young. There are videos of me when I was 1 or 2 years old singing and putting on ‘concerts’ for my family hahah. My parents played a big part of the start of my music journey, my dad taught me how to play piano and my mum taught me how to play guitar! It’s always been something I’ve been surrounded by.

Who inspired you to make music?

My parents have always been super supportive of me which I’m really grateful for. I remember watching Australian Idol for the first time when I was 2 and thinking I would love to be on a stage like that or do something like that in future, so singing has always been something I’ve wanted to do.

How would you describe the music that you typically create?

The music I usually write are sad pop songs that are about real situations and feelings that I’ve gone through or experienced. I hate talking about my feelings and I’m really bad at it but for some reason putting them into a song comes naturally to me, so I love being able to do that.

What inspired you to write “Dependent”?

‘Dependent’ actually came to me in the middle of the night and it only took me around 20 minutes to finish writing! I had spent the day thinking about a past situation I had been through, where I couldn’t get over someone but also knew that they weren’t meant to be in my life anymore. I knew that the internal battle of wanting to move on but also not being able to was something that a lot of people would be able to relate to, so I sat down at the piano and kind of just sang whatever came to mind.

Can you tell us about the inspiration behind “I’m Done” and “Hello”?

I wrote ‘I’m Done’ right after I had an argument with someone, and it was just what I was feeling at the time. I wanted to write a song that people could vibe to but also scream their lungs out too right after a breakup or something like that.

I have a list of random lyric ideas in my phone, and there was one that said, ‘it’s the last time that I’ll say hello.’ I liked the idea of a breakup song about saying goodbye to someone being called ‘Hello’ hahah. I kinda built the song off that initial line.

How would you describe your experience on TikTok?

I love using TikTok and I am so grateful to have built a community on there! It actually started off as a joke, out of boredom one night right as the pandemic was beginning in 2020. I didn’t really understand how to use it at first but then just thought I’d upload a few singing videos, not expecting for anyone to see them. I remember waking up in the middle of that night because my phone was buzzing like crazy with notifications! I’ve been posting singing videos daily since that moment and it’s mind-blowing to me that over 1.6 million people follow me and want to hear me sing.  

What is your creative process like?

My creative process for writing songs always starts off at either the piano or guitar. I usually just sit and hit record on my phone, and then sing whatever melodies or lyrics that come to mind. It’s usually a whole lot of gibberish at the start but once I find a melody I like, I try to build off that and build the song around that. Sometimes it can take me as quickly as 15 minutes to finish writing a song, other times I let myself brainstorm over a few days. I

Who would you most like to collaborate with?

There are so many people I’d love to collaborate with. Definitely Olivia Rodrigo, I think we could write a cool duet together hahaha! I really like Clinton Kane’s songwriting as well, would be super cool to jump in the studio with him.

If you could open a show for any artist, who would it be?

Justin Bieber. I’ve watched a lot of clips of his tour performances and stuff, and it just looks like so much fun!!

What is one message you would give your fans?

If you have a dream or goals that you want to achieve, don’t be afraid to put in the hard work and take risks to reach it!

What is the most useless talent you have?

I can type really fast. I’ve been able to since I was like 9 hahah

What would you be doing right now if it wasn’t for your music career?

If it wasn’t for my music career, I would probably be doing something marketing or business-related. I had started my business degree before any of my TikTok or songs had begun to gain traction, so that would probably be the industry I would be in if it wasn’t for my music career.

Outside of TikTok, where have you performed?

I’ve done some local performances here in Melbourne and was featured on Australian TV a few times too. I actually appeared on The Voice Australia in 2019 as well but that feels like an entirely different world and person hahaha. I’ve grown a lot since then and am really happy with how things are going right now.

How do you think the internet has impacted your career? The music business in general?

The internet and social media helped my career so much! Social media has been the way that new people discover me and my music and has helped me connect with fans all over the world, which I love. The music business as a whole has also changed heaps too since the introduction of social media, Tik Tok especially. There are more opportunities for singers now to get their music out there without having to spend heaps of money on advertisements and stuff like that.

What is your favorite song to perform?

My favorite song right now to perform would be my recent song ‘Dependent’. There’s something that hits different when it comes to performing songs that I’ve written myself, compared to singing other people’s songs. But if I had to choose a song that isn’t mine, definitely ‘Jealous’ by Labrinth.

Which famous musicians do you admire?

I love how Justin Bieber and Shawn Mendes turned their social media following into a full-blown music career. There are a lot of artists that have done the same, and it’s something that I admire, as I can relate in some way, but am still working on.

What is the best advice you’ve been given?

The best advice that I’ve been given is that everything happens for a reason. I truly believe that both bad and good things help shape who you are as a person and can lead to better opportunities in the future.

If you could change anything about the industry, what would it be?

I love that the internet is creating so many opportunities for independent singers and musicians, but I would love it to be even more accessible somehow!

Would you agree that it is important to learn, study and understand old music and music history?

Definitely, old music trends and sounds reappear in today’s music so it’s important to have an understanding of what music was like in the past. I also just find it so interesting to see what the music industry was like before I was born and see the culture and also who were the biggest stars at the time!

What’s next for you?

I have a few exciting projects in the works, and also a lot of songs coming out! My next single will be out next month so I’ve been working hard on that. I’ve been working really hard on these next few songs that are coming so I’m really keen for everyone to hear them.

Follow Keenan Te

TikTok

Instagram

YouTube

Spotify

Photo Credit: Taine Noble

Image via 5WPR for 360 Magazine

Q×A – Co-Founders of Révolutionnaire

Justice Faith Betty, and Nia Faith Betty are co-founders of Révolutionnaire, a new social platform aimed at social awareness and activism. Originally a dance-oriented clothing brand started by sisters Justice and Nia, it has grown into a larger movement to empower the youth via a platform for education and conversation. We got to speak with the founders and one of their Action Leaders Naheim Banks below.

We were informed that you grew up with family members in the prison system which drove you towards a life dedicated to criminal justice reform. Can you talk more about how your activism and advocacy have expanded since you began this journey?

Naheim Banks: As you said, I have had family members involved in the system, and one of the things I realized while experiencing that was that our system is not a criminal justice system, but rather a criminal legal system because justice is what so many people don’t experience or get while going through our legal process. When I first began this journey on criminal legal reform, I started something in my school district called Teen Court, which is a youth diversionary program for minors that commit misdemeanors and other infractions. Part of what drew me to this work was because I could see myself in many of these kids, many of them in high school and middle school, who have parents working long hours, parents who are incarcerated and having to grow up way too fast. These kids happened to lose the moral luck lottery and have made mistakes, but that doesn’t mean we should let those mistakes define who they are for the rest of their lives. People are more than the worst thing they’ve ever done. I was encouraged to take my activism further when I saw voters reject Affirmative Action in my home state of California, reject cash bail, and reject a piece of legislation allowing for California to decertify police officers for misconduct despite being only one of four states to not have the authority to decertify law enforcement officers. Upon witnessing this, I decided to run to be an Assembly District Delegate to the California Democratic Party with the slate ‘Organizing for Progress’. Since being elected, I have made it a point to continue pushing the party to endorse legislation that supports Black lives and allows us to reimagine our criminal legal system. One of the ways I’m also doing that is by educating the public on legal reform through Révolutionnaire and our Action Guides and Petitions.

How has attending Howard University, an HBCU, impacted your views on activism and criminal justice reform?

Naheim: Attending Howard has really encouraged me to put myself out there and take risks. Before attending Howard, I always tried to fit into what Nikole Hannah-Jones calls, white spaces that are not made for people that look like me, and impact change within the confines of what is deemed ‘acceptable’. Not anymore. I no longer sugarcoat or tone down the issues that I am passionate about. Part of this huge passion that I have for criminal legal reform and my increased activism on the issue stems from the confidence Howard has instilled in me. Being a criminology major, I have had professors like Dr. Bahiyyah M. Muhammad that have so much passion for prison reform that their passion often rolls over onto you. At Howard, we have people that have non-profits like Just Us that mentors youth involved in the juvenile legal system; we have people that have started environmental justice organizations, gun reform organizations, and so many others that it inspires you to truly get out there in your community and make lasting change.

How did you find Révolutionnaire, and what drew you to become a part of the organization?

Naheim: I had followed Révolutionnaire since its original creation as a way to revolutionize dance apparel and empower all to celebrate the skin they’re in because I had never truly seen dance apparel that actually matched Black skin. I had been an outspoken advocate for criminal legal reform and when Nia Faith, one of the founders of the organization, reached out to me, I just couldn’t say no. Seeing the impact Nia and Justice already had on their homes, their schools, and their communities is what really inspired and drew me to become a part of the organization. I distinctly remember hearing Justice’s Valedictorian speech and one of the things she said that really fueled my love for Révolutionnaire, was that ‘Dreams Fuel Revolutions’. Everyone on this team has a dream for a better world and I just love having the opportunity to be a part of it.

What exactly are your responsibilities as an Action Leader with Révolutionnaire?

Naheim: As an Action Leader, I write about specific issues related to criminal legal reform such as the death penalty, three-strikes laws, and the War on Drugs. I give information to those that want to get more involved in legal reform initiatives and facilitate knowledge sharing and member engagement through writing petitions and 101 Action Guides on the issues that plague our society’s broken legal system.

Your website mentions that Révolutionnaire began with the idea to ‘revolutionize nude apparel’. Can you talk more about how this mission came about and what work has been done thus far?

Nia Faith Betty: I started Révolutionnaire as a dancewear line catering to dancers of color after growing up as a ballerina and never having access to apparel that matched my skin tone. I was tired of constantly feeling othered and dreamed of a more inclusive dance world. Today, the Révolutionnaire Shop has a collection of apparel and accessories for dancers, athletes, and everyone to celebrate the skin they’re in.

Justice Faith Betty: I was inspired by Nia’s journey and dream of revolutionizing the dance world and asked what it would look like if more young people with a dream of improving their communities had access to the network, tools, and information necessary to scale their impact across causes. And that question laid the foundation for Révolutionnaire – the social network for changemakers.

We’ve heard about the five key causes on which Révolutionnaire is centered. Can you tell us more about what work is being done by Révolutionnaire to specifically target these issues?

Nia: We’ve started off with five pillar causes (i.e., racial equity, environmentalism, criminal justice reform, housing + food security, gun reform) with more to come. Change starts with staying informed, so we’ve made information about each of these issues accessible to our audience by breaking down topics into 101 guides. Action items are embedded at the end of each 101 guide so members can move from learning about a problem in society to taking action – whether it’s through contacting their representative, signing a petition, finding volunteer opportunities, making a donation, or participating in another mode of engagement – all from within our platform. We also have action guides across our cause hubs for members to launch their own projects in their communities.

As Révolutionnaire continues to grow, it has been really exciting to see and hear about members getting their ideas off the ground and finding a network of supporters to ideate with.

Justice: We’re committed to making this work more sustainable through leveraging the power of technology to build community among like-minded young people. We recently launched group offerings and have spoken to so many youth-focused organizations who are excited to connect with other orgs doing fantastic work, feel a little less lonely on their respective journeys and scale their collective impact. As a further commitment to sustainability, we will be launching our Recharge library to offer our members content focused on mindfulness and self-care.

How can young people, like Naheim, get involved with Révolutionnaire?

Justice: Whether you are someone who has wanted to make a difference, but perhaps doesn’t know where to start or have been doing this work for a long time, but are looking for a community and resources all in one place to take your impact to the next level – join Révolutionnaire. If, like Naheim, you are excited about contributing your voice on issues that matter to you and have ideas for how young people can take action, we welcome contributions from community members directly on Révolutionnaire through blog posts, lounge conversations, action item submissions and petitions!

Have you experienced any pushback as young women trying to influence such radical change? If so, how do you combat that?

Nia: There are oftentimes unspoken rules and gatekeeping measures that make getting involved in activism daunting and intimidating for young people. We have revolutionized and streamlined how people get involved in changemaking, service, and activism. With anything that is new or different, there are always situations where people don’t agree with it or don’t want to evolve the current ways of taking action to adapt to the changing times. At the end of the day, we always focus on the net good. If the end result is positive change and more young people getting involved with making the world a better place, then we are on the right path.

Make sure to follow Nia, Justice, Naheim, and Révolutionnaire for more!