Posts tagged with "COVID-19"

sara sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, business, tech, illustration

NAACP × STIMULUS PACKAGE

Derrick Johnson, president and CEO, made the following statement about Congressional passage of the $2 trillion stimulus package in response to the coronavirus. 

“This legislation is a critical step toward addressing the needs of the American people who are most at risk. After much negotiation, the final version resulted in an improved, if incomplete, response to the litany of harms caused by this crisis.  

But Congress has much more work to do. The NAACP will continue to advocate for a fair and equitable recovery plan for marginalized and under-resourced communities. In providing future relief, Congress must prioritize people first, not corporations.  

Impacted communities will undoubtedly need to receive repeat direct cash payments to help them weather this crisis. From workers who have lost their jobs to small businesses that will be forced to close to students drowning in student loan debt, we must ensure the safety of our communities and economy through cash injections and other forms of support, without stipulation, for those that are suffering. Additionally, our hospitals and health providers throughout this crisis need continued support to ensure all communities receive testing and treatment. We must expand paid family and medical leave for more workers. We must meet the food and nutrition needs of our most vulnerable families through this treacherous time.  

Above all, while this bill provides a downpayment to securing our democracy in this time of crisis, we recognize more robust action is required and quickly. The proposal allocates $400 million to protect elections when in reality states need $4 billion — ten times that amount — to ensure secure voting. We should not be forced to choose between our health and our vote. Congress must significantly increase funding to states so they may adopt a variety of measures to administer elections in a safe and accessible manner. Failing to protect our democracy is not an option in this critical election year. 

The NAACP urges Congress to begin work on another COVID-19 response package quickly. For the duration of this crisis, we will continue to fight for measures to protect the health, safety and well-being of underserved and overlooked communities.”

Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest nonpartisan civil rights organization. Its members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities. You can read more about the NAACP’s work and our five “Game Changer” issue areas here.

JESSIE J LIVE AT HOME

TUNE IN: JESSIE J LIVE AT HOME MARCH 27 AT 12P PT / 3P ET
WATCH HERE ON INSTAGRAM LIVE
#letsgetlivestayingside
 
SUPPORTING WHO & UNICEF
 
WHEN: MARCH 27TH (JESSIE J’S BIRTHDAY)
TIME: 12PM LOS ANGELES
3PM NEW YORK
7PM LONDON
3am – CHINA (March 28)
WHERE: INSTAGRAM @JESSIEJ – https://www.instagram.com/jessiej/
SUPPORTING:
WHO – https://www.facebook.com/donate/1564752357011737/10111653413088551/
UNICEF –  https://www.unicef.org.uk/donate/coronavirus/

Triller × Co-Trilla Festival

TRILLER PRESENTS “CO-TRILLA QUARANTINE SESSIONS” – A LARGE-SCALE DIGITAL MUSIC FESTIVAL WITH PERFORMANCES EXPECTED BY TOP INDUSTRY ARTISTS AND BANDS 

The Festival will Showcase New and Exclusive Music Performances Digitally Bringing Artists and Music Lovers Together to Raise Funds for Those in Need During the COVID-19 Pandemic 

With concert tours and major music festivals cancelled or postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Triller, the AI-powered music video “social streaming” platform, working in partnership with some of today’s most notable music artists and bands, today announced “Co-Trilla Quarantine Sessions,” a large-scale virtual music festival that will bring artists, bands and fans together in a new social sharing setting to enforce the need to flatten the curve, #stayhome, and still have the ability to help raise funds for those in need. The first “Co-Trilla Quarantine Sessions” will take place the weekend of April 10 through 12, 2020.

Inspired by the postponement of Coachella, the Triller “Co-Trilla Quarantine Sessions” are anticipated performances by many of today’s top artists and bands. The full lineup and timing is expected to be announced by the end of the month.  The performances will be broadcasting simultaneously on Triller and Triller’s YouTube channel.

“The Coronavirus has had a significant impact around the world, and we want to do our part to help those in need, while providing a safe environment for people to escape and enjoy some great entertainment,” said Mike Lu, CEO of Triller. “’The Co-Trilla Quarantine Sessions’ are our way of delivering premium entertainment, featuring some of today’s most notable artists, to everyone in the safety of their homes, while giving users an opportunity to help those in need.”

During “Co-Trilla Quarantine Sessions”, viewers will be encouraged to use the Triller “donate” function to donate to a choice of charities supporting those suffering from lost wages and limited access to basic needs as a result of the COVID 19 pandemic.

As a fast-growing preferred platform for new releases and digital music challenges, Triller will leverage its deeply rooted music industry partners, connections and relationships to galvanize the music community during “Co-Trilla Quarantine Sessions.”

Triller’s music partners have included The Weeknd, Marshmello, Quavo, Lil Wayne, Snoop Dogg, Pitbull, Takeoff, MeekMill, and 21 Savage; mega music managers Gee Roberson (Co-CEO of The Blueprint Group), Moe Shalizi (Founder of The Shalizi Group), Amir “Cash” Esmailian and Tony W. Sal of XO, and Ash Pournouri (former manager for Avicii); and industry notables including Shawn Gee (President of Live Nation Urban), Anthony “Top Dawg” Tiffith (Chief Executive Officer of TDE), James Prince (Chief Executive Officer of Rap-a-Lot Records), and Troy Carter among others.

Eminem recently posted his Godzilla challenge on Triller generating tens of millions on-network views and hundreds of millions of off-network views. This challenge was covered by media ranging from national media including CNN, and local outlets around the world. The Weeknd recently posted his new single and music video to Triller receiving close to 80 million on-network views and 500 million off-network views.  Lil Yachty, Drake and Dababy recently released a Triller video along with their new single, generating 20 million on-network views and 60 million off-network views. Triller is also credited for helping Roddy Ricch reach #1 for 10 straight weeks.

About Triller
Triller is an AI-powered music video app that allows users to create professional-looking videos in a matter of seconds. Pick a song, select the portion of the song you want to use, snap a few takes and with the tap of a button you have a celebrity-quality music video starring you and your friends. Triller relies solely on organic growth and has more than 60 million downloads, with celebrities like Alicia Keys, Cardi B, Marshmello, Roddy Ricch and Eminem regularly using the app to create their own music videos. For more information, visit www.triller.co and follow @trillervids on Instagram.

COVID-19 POLICY ALLIANCE

To prevent hospitals from being overwhelmed, states should focus on preventing the spread of COVID-19 at high-risk sites, such as nursing homes, and in high-risk localities, the COVID-19 Policy Alliance—a group of experts brought together by two professors at the MIT Sloan School of Management—said in a presentation released today.

The Alliance also put online a set of data analytic tools to enable states to identify the highest risk facilities and localities—those with clusters of individuals over 65 or with relevant health issues. 

The Alliance analysis indicates that one of the factors possibly leading to the high fatality rate in Italy was that sick people from areas with concentrations of high-risk individuals overwhelmed hospitals, creating a domino effect that led to skyrocketing death rates. The Alliance has developed tools to identify institutions and counties in every state in the U.S. that have the same characteristics as the points in Italy that put its health care system into a tailspin.   

For example, the data tools not only show where nursing homes are and how many people reside in them, but show which nursing homes have had the most problems previously with infections. For counties, the tools show not only areas with high numbers of elderly, but also those with high numbers of individuals of all ages suffering from diabetes, obesity and other conditions that create COVID-19 risk.

A 15-minute webinar describing the Alliance’s tools and recommendations for U.S. federal, state and local policymakers is here. The webinar expands on a slide deck that lays out the analysis and guidance.

The COVID-19 Policy Alliance was launched on March 11 by Professors Simon Johnson, the Ronald A. Kurtz Professor of Entrepreneurship, and Retsef Levi, the J. Spencer Standish Professor of Operations Management. They pulled together a team of experts from across MIT and elsewhere to analyze the available data on the pandemic. The tools will be updated as more data and analysis are available.

Levi said, “We want to help states make data-based decisions that can save lives. Focusing on the sites and areas that are most likely to lead hospitals to crash is key.”

Johnson said, “Hospitals are a critical line of defense in the ongoing battle against COVID-19. We must focus now on preventing our world-renowned hospital systems from collapsing.”

About the MIT Sloan School of Management
The MIT Sloan School of Management is where smart, independent leaders come together to solve problems, create new organizations, and improve the world. Learn more at mitsloan.mit.edu.

Rice University on COVID-19

Rice U. experts available to discuss COVID-19’s wide-ranging impact

As the COVID-19 pandemic grows and impacts the lives of people across the globe, Rice University experts are available to discuss various topics related to the disease.

Joyce Beebefellow in public finance at Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy, can discuss paid leave programs.

“COVID-19 highlights the importance of paid (sick) leave programs to workers,” she said. “The issue is not whether we should have a paid leave program; it is how to design a program that provides nationwide coverage to all American workers instead of waiting until the next pandemic.”

Robert Bruce, dean of Rice’s Glasscock School of Continuing Studies, is an expert in online and distance learning, community education and engagement and innovative models for personal and professional development programs.

“The field of continuing and professional studies is uniquely positioned to help the public during a crisis that requires social distancing,” he said. “Our core mission is to empower people to continue to learn and advance, regardless of location or age or learning style.”

Utpal Dholakia, a professor of marketing at Rice’s Jones Graduate School of Business, is available to discuss consumer behavior and panic-buying during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Everyone is panic-buying, not just all over the country, but basically all over the world,” Dholakia said. “That makes the sense of urgency even more. Are all these suppliers going to be able to keep up with the demand?”

John Diamond, the Edward A. and Hermena Hancock Kelly Fellow in Tax Policy at the Baker Institute and an adjunct assistant professor in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss the economic impact on Houston and Texas, particularly unemployment.

Elaine Howard Ecklund, the Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Social Sciences, professor in sociology and director of Rice’s Religion and Public Life Program, studies the intersection of science and religion. She can discuss how these two entities can work together to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and recently authored an editorial about this topic for Time magazine. It is available online HERE.

Christopher Fagundes, an associate professor in the department of psychological sciences, is available to discuss the link between mental and immune health.

“In my field, we have conducted a lot of work to look at what predicts who gets colds and different forms of respiratory illnesses, and who is more susceptible to getting sick,” Fagundes said. “We’ve found that stressloneliness and lack of sleep are three factors that can seriously compromise aspects of the immune system that make people more susceptible to viruses if exposed. Also, stress, loneliness and disrupted sleep promote other aspects of the immune system responsible for the production of proinflammatory cytokines to overrespond. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine production can generate sustained upper respiratory infection symptoms.”

And while this research has centered on different cold and upper respiratory viruses, he said “there is no doubt” that these effects would be the same for COVID-19.

Mark Finley is a fellow in energy and global oil at the Baker Institute.

“The U.S. and global oil market is simultaneously grappling with the biggest decline in demand ever seen (due to COVID-19) and a price war between two of the world’s largest producers, Russia and Saudi Arabia,” he said.

Bill Fulton, director of Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, an urban planner, an expert on local government and the former mayor of Ventura, California, can speak to both the short-term and long-term changes in city life and the way government works.

What will the effect be on transportation and transit? Retail and office space? Will people walk and bike more? How will they interact in public spaces in the future? How will government function and hold public meetings during the crisis, and will this fundamentally alter the way government interacts with the public in the long run? How will local governments deal with the inevitable revenue loss — and, in the long run, with the fact that they will probably have less sales tax?

Vivian Ho, the James A. Baker III Institute Chair in Health Economics, director for the Center of Health and Biosciences at the Baker Institute and a professor of economics, can discuss insurance coverage as families experience lost income and jobs during the crisis.

“Policymakers should temporarily expand subsidies for middle class workers who buy insurance through the Affordable Care Act marketplace,” Ho said. “Families experiencing lost income due to the pandemic shouldn’t have to worry about losing access to health care in the midst of a pandemic.”

“Hospitals in states that did not expand Medicaid coverage to able-bodied adults under the Affordable Care Act are bearing tougher financial burdens, which may damage their ability to respond to the current health crisis,” she said.

Mark Jones, a professor of political science and fellow at the Baker Institute, is available to discuss how the spread of COVID-19 is impacting elections, including runoffs in Texas.

“COVID-19 has already resulted in the postponement of local elections originally scheduled for May 2, with the elections now to be held in November with current officeholders’ tenure extended until their successors are confirmed in November,” Jones said. “It is increasingly likely that COVID-19 will affect the Democratic and Republican primary runoff elections scheduled for May 26, with a growing possibility that the elections will be conducted entirely via mail ballots or at the minimum will involve the adoption of no-excuse absentee voting whereby any Texan, not just those 65 or older, hospitalized or out of the county, will be able to obtain an absentee ballot and vote by mail.

“The emergency adoption of no-excuse absentee voting would change the composition of the May primary runoff electorate by expanding turnout among many voters who otherwise would have been unlikely to participate, as well as increase pressure on the Texas Legislature to reform the state’s electoral legislation to allow for no-excuse absentee voting when it reconvenes in January of 2021 for the next regular session.”

Danielle King, an assistant professor of psychological sciences and principal investigator of Rice’s WorKing Resilience Lab, is an expert on the topic of resilience to adversity. Her research focuses on understanding the role individuals, groups and organizations play in fostering adaptive sustainability following adversity. She can discuss how individuals can remain resilient and motivated in difficult circumstances.

“Though we are still in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic, we can begin to enact adaptive practices that foster resilience such as remaining flexible to changing circumstances, practicing acceptance of the present realities, seeking social support in creative ways while practicing social distancing, and finding and engaging with experiences and thoughts that elicit positive emotions during trying times,” King said.

Tom Kolditz, founding director of Rice’s Doerr Institute for New Leaders, is a social psychologist and former brigadier general who has done extensive research on how best to lead people under perceived serious threat. His work is widely taught at military service and police academies globally, and he did extensive work with the banking industry during the 2008 financial crisis. His expertise is in articulating what people need from leaders in volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous times and what leaders must do to gain and maintain people’s trust. His book, “In Extremis Leadership: Leading As If Your Life Depended On It,” teaches people to lead in crisis, when people are anxious or afraid.

“Leadership when people are under threat hinges far less on managerial principles, and far more on trust,” Kolditz said. “Whether in a company or their own family, people who lead in the same way now as they did two months ago will experience a significant decline in their influence.”

Jim Krane, the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow for Energy Studies at the Baker Institute, is an expert on energy geopolitics and Middle East economies and societies. He can comment on the effect on OPEC and its production decisions, relations between Russia and Saudi Arabia, and how low oil prices will affect policy inside producer countries.

Ken Medlock, the James A. Baker III and Susan G. Baker Fellow in Energy and Resource Economics at the Baker Institute, senior director of institute’s Center for Energy Studies and an adjunct professor and lecturer in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss COVID-19’s impact on oil prices and the oil industry.

Kirsten Ostherr, the Gladys Louise Fox Professor of English and director of Rice’s Medical Futures Lab, can discuss the representation of outbreaks, contagion and disease in public discourse and the media. She is also an expert on digital health privacy. She is the founding director of the Medical Humanities program at Rice, and her first book, “Cinematic Prophylaxis: Globalization and Contagion in the Discourse of World Health,” is one of several titles made available for open-access download through June 1 by its publisher, Duke University Press.

Peter Rodriguez, dean of the Jones Graduate School of Business and a professor of strategic management, can discuss the economic impact of COVID-19 in Houston, the state of Texas and around the world.

Eduardo Salas, professor and chair of the Department of Psychological Sciences, is available to discuss collaboration, teamwork, team training and team dynamics as it relates to COVID-19.

“We often hear that ‘we are in this together’ and, indeed, we are,” Salas said. “Effective collaboration and teamwork can save lives. And there is a science of teamwork that can provide guidance on how to manage and promote effective collaboration.”

Kyle Shelton, deputy director of the Kinder Institute, can discuss how the economic impact of COVID-19 closures and job losses can amplify housing issues, and why governments at every level are opting for actions such as halting evictions and foreclosures and removing late fees. He can also speak to some of the challenges confronted by public transportation, why active transportation like biking and walking are so important now, and how long-term investments in these systems make cities and regions more adaptive and resilient.

Bob Stein, the Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and a fellow in urban politics at the Baker Institute, is an expert in emergency preparedness, especially related to hurricanes and flooding. He can also discuss why and when people comply with government directives regarding how to prepare for and respond to natural disasters, and the political consequences of natural disasters.

“Since God is not on the ballot, who do voters hold accountable before and in the aftermath of natural disasters?” he said.

Laurence Stuart, an adjunct professor in management at Rice Business, can discuss unemployment in Texas, how people qualify for it and what that means for employers and employees.

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,962 undergraduates and 3,027 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 4 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance.

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GameTruck Virtual Gaming Parties

Video Game Party Company Goes Virtual Helping Mom and Dad Save Birthday Parties

Arizona based, GameTruck, is adding Virtual Gaming Parties as part of their suite of video game party experiences guiding mom and dad to provide a virtual party experience.

GameTruck, the industry leader in mobile video game parties, is proud to announce a new offering to its video game party options: Virtual Gaming Parties.

Over the past 15 years, GameTruck, who invented the mobile video game party, has entertained and connected more than ten million children and their families across the country. Due to the extraordinary circumstances the world is facing, GameTruck is constantly looking for ways to get people connected. As a way to support communities, GameTruck officially launched Virtual Gaming Parties to provide entertainment and relief during this difficult time.

Virtual gaming parties offer customers a way to play and experience the joy of a video game party while practicing social distancing. A virtual gaming party will let up to 24 players connect with each other remotely through voice and text chat to communicate and join each other in the online games they share.

The goal of virtual gaming parties is to create a product that allows people to connect virtually while in-person parties are impossible. Moreover, GameTruck will insert the best parts of their in-person gaming parties and to create a virtual offering that is safe, easy, and tons of fun.

Here is how a virtual gaming party works:

GameTruck creates a private virtual party space for customers to join together, remotely.

Customers will play from their homes, and join the fun, remotely.

The GameCoach connects everyone, helps share friend codes, presents special challenges, and monitors the fun.

Customers will provide their own gaming equipment and games.

GameTruck will manage the setup, gameplay and will moderate the entire event.

“At its core, GameTruck is a human connection company. In-person social interaction has been the heart of our business. The current public health crisis gives us an opportunity to reimagine how to entertain communities without physically being together. We are excited to launch our Virtual Gaming Parties,” Founder Scott Novis said.

GameTruck virtual gaming parties are a turn-key solution to connecting people through video games. Scott Novis, GameTruck Founder, believes this offering could be a game-changer in the video game entertainment and esports market.

“With so many people staying home from school and work, our team came together and came up with a solution to connect people,” Novis said. “I am very proud to stand behind our virtual gaming party experience, and I believe we can continue our mission: to connect people through gaming.”

Virtual gaming parties will be available across the United States starting Monday, March 23, 2020. For more information, please visit: www.gametruckparty.com

About GameTruck™ and Global Youth Enterprises, LLC

Global Youth Enterprises, LLC is a human connection company that creates transformational video game experiences through excellence in entertainment, sports and learning. The company operates GameTruck™, and Gameplex™, franchises across the U.S. to deliver high-quality entertainment for private parties and corporate events. In addition, Bravous® Esports, serves the competitive and recreational Esports players of all ages. For more information, please visit www.globalyouthenterprises.com.

James blake, 360 MAGAZINE

JAMES BLAKE – LIVE STREAM

TUNE IN TO JAMES BLAKE’S LIVE STREAM PERFORMANCE TODAY

TUNE IN HERE.

Making the most of self-quarantine, British singer-songwriter James Blake will be performing on Instagram Live today, March 23rd at 3pm EST, 7pm GMT. Tune in HERE.
 

sara sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, business, tech, illustration

SCLC FIGHTS FOR POOR

With all Americans bearing the brunt of the Coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis, Dr. Charles Steele, Jr., president and CEO of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), today called on President Donald Trump and the U.S. Congress to make sure all Americans benefit from the nearly $1 trillion that will be spent to restore the health of citizens and the economy.
 
“I want to weigh in on behalf of regular people,” said Dr. Steele, who currently heads the civil rights organization co-founded and first led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “We have seen this socialist bailout of corporate America before. As the Trump Administration and Congress prepare to help some corporations, hand out new contracts and create new jobs to address this pandemic, we must ensure that billions ends up in the hands of the people who have been historically left behind. Poor people, black and brown people, must be recipients of these gifts of generosity that normally go to corporations.”
 
President Trump has said efforts are underway to financially assist corporations that have been hit hard by Convid-19, including the travel and cargo industries. He has announced plans to assist small businesses, but there are no specifics how those disbursements will be handled, and he has announced plans to give all families at least $2,400 to help them through the crisis.
 
“When it comes to bearing the weight, it is not fair that the corporations get the support when the rest of us starve,” Dr. Steele said.  “We saw our government bail out the banks during the housing collapse. We also bailed out the auto industry and Wall Street. Those industries recovered, but we didn’t. Most black and brown people lost their homes. We lost our wealth. Nearly 75 percent of poor people are living from check to check. Many of us have no health insurance. We can’t afford to take a day off work.”
 
Dr. Steele said the SCLC, which has focused on the plight of the poor and the voiceless since the days of Dr. King, has received calls for individuals and groups who are concerned about how individuals with no jobs and insurance will fair during this pandemic and recover after the crisis is over. 
 
“They are asking, ‘Where are our leaders,’” Dr. Steele said. “They are not seeing them standing up to make sure the real money will flow down to the people most impacted. That is why the SCLC is taking a stand. We must fight to make sure our government does not repeat what has happened in the past. We need more than $1,200 to catch up in America. We will not be left behind this time.”

ABOUT THE SCLC:

Established in 1957, the SCLC, whose first president was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is a now an international organization made up of chapters and affiliates with programs that affect the lives of all Americans: north, south, east, and west. Its sphere of influence and interests has become international in scope because the human rights movement transcends national boundaries. For additional information about the SCLC, visit www.nationalsclc.org.

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Lotus Chefs × COVID-19 Care

NEWS AND SUPPORT FROM LOTUS CHEFS AND RESTAURANTS

Andrew Wong and Kimberly Hernandez boxing up at home meals for elderly, vulnerable and in need hospitality workers in the community. 

In these difficult times, our clients are working tirelessly to offer educational and practical initiatives, but also to bring some excitement to many who are struggling with the boredom and loneliness of isolation. At Lotus, we cannot express enough our pride in representing them and we believe they can help make this whole process a little easier. We will continue to support our restaurants and chefs and the industry through this time of adversity.

Andrew Wong, London

Michelin starred chef Andrew Wong is working to create at-home meals for elderly and vulnerable members of the local community with the help of his protégé Kimberly Hernandez, Head Chef at Kym’s. Using restaurant quality produce, meals will be packaged and hand delivered free of charge, ready to be heated up at home. The boxes will be left on the doorstep of those who are self isolating to minimise human contact for those who are at high risk. For the time being the initiative is being organised through his local parish church – St Peters in Eaton Square. Andrew will continue to work tirelessly to find opportunities to keep his staff busy and motivated whilst also giving back as much as he can to his surrounding community in SW1.

Brace, Copenhagen

The team at Brace have just launched an incredible take-away option at their Copenhagen restaurant with a huge selection of dishes that can be collected, heated and finished at home. The new take-away menu very much carries the soul of Brace and utilises all local, organic and wild produce with sustainability and seasonality at its core. Dishes can be ordered every day of the week, for both lunch and dinner online at www.restaurantbrace.dk.

WAGYUMAFIA, Japan & Hong Kong 

Kobe beef specialists Wagyumafia have started their first-ever premium meat home delivery service. Supporting his farmers is Wagyumafia founder Hisato Hamada’s top priority, saying ’As we promised them, despite the current crazy crazy situation, we will never stop, but keep thinking and be more creative than yesterday.’ For people living in Japan please message @wagyumafia_butcher and in Hong Kong message @wagyumafiahk for details on how to order.

Aqua Crua, Barbarano Vicentino (VI)

In the initial weeks of the COVID 19 contagion, before the total lockdown of the country, Giuliano Baldessari from 1* Michelin Aqua Crua in Vicenza was the first chef in the country to offer his guests a “Comfort the Souls” – a bespoke 4 course menu for €30 that could be collected from the restaurant and enjoyed at home. Aqua Crua has since closed and will reopen in April. Baldessari has joined many Italian chefs in the initiative #iocucinoacasa (I cook at home) by Gambero Rosso, by showing a short and easy recipe for home cooking: watch here. He is going live daily on instagram at 3:30pm GMT with recipes and cooking techniques.

TURK Fatih Tutak, Istanbul

Istanbul’s critically acclaimed TURK Fatih Tutak has closed its doors until further notice, however, stay tuned for home-style recipes and tutorials on chef Fatih Tutak’s Instagram. His video tutorials will showcase Turkish dishes with soul that will be easy to produce, nourishing and inventive.

Marsan and Joia, Paris

Hélène Darroze has closed the doors of her Parisian restaurants; Marsan and Joia until further notice. The 2* Michelin chef and her teams are respecting French isolation instructions, and plan to come back stronger when they reopen their doors. For updates please follow @helenedarroze,  @marsanparhelenedarroze,  and @joiaparhelenedarroze.

Hélène Darroze at The Connaught, London

Hélène’s two Michelin star restaurant at The Connaught has restricted it’s opening hours, and will now close on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.  It remains open Wednesday to Saturday, and the team looks forward to welcoming guests, with restricted reservations, spacing between tables and increased hygiene practices. For news please follow @helenedarrozeattheconnaught.

Ikoyi, London

Jeremy Chan and Iré Hassan-Okdukale have taken the sad decision to temporarily close Ikoyi in St James’s Market. They will continue to support the entire Ikoyi team, and once things have settled, start cooking again.  For updates please follow @jeremychanikoyi and @ikoyi_london.

Mirazur, Menton

Mirazur has temporarily closed in Menton, on the Cote D’Azur. Mauro, Julia and the whole Mirazur family look forward to welcoming guests again soon.  For news and recipe inspiration please follow @maurocolagreco and @restaurantmirazur.

Il Pagliaccio, Rome

Anthony Genovese and the team of 2* Michelin Il Pagliaccio in Rome have also joined the movement started in Italy earlier this month for a stronger and safer future, by closing the restaurant until the 4th April.

Lux Lucis, Forte dei Marmi

Lux Lucis in the Hotel Principe Forte dei Marmi in Tuscany, home to the Michelin starred cuisine of Valentino Cassanelli, has postponed its seasonal reopening from March until May this year.

Duomo & I Banchi, Ragusa 

A ‘see you soon’ has been sent from Sicily from Ciccio Sultano, as he closes I Banchi and 2*Michelin Duomo in Ragusa until the 6th April. Sultano, though, has joined many Italian chefs in the initiative #iocucinoacasa (I cook at home) by Gambero Rosso, by showing a short and easy recipe for home cooking: watch here.

Farzi Cafe, London
Modern Indian Restaurant Farzi Cafe have closed their doors until further notice, but look forward to receiving guests as soon as they can. For updates please follow @farzilondon.

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COVID-19 × Technological Change

COVID-19 Pandemic Will Force Companies Around the World to Radically Rethink How They Operate and Embrace Technological Investment

ABI Research Analysts share their thoughts on the likely short-and long-term impacts the global pandemic will have on technology and end markets

The Coronovirus outbreak and the worldwide reaction to the pandemic will force companies to radically rethink how they operate and embrace technological investment, states global tech market advisory firm, ABI Research.

In its new white paper, Taking Stock of COVID-19: The Short- and Long-Term Ramifications on Technology and End Markets, ABI Research Analysts look at the current and future ramifications of COVID-19 across technologies and verticals. Analysts also offer recommendations to weather the storm and strategies to help companies rebound and prosper after the pandemic has slowed.

“To effect change, there must be a stimulation of a magnitude that means companies cannot do anything but make bold decisions to survive. COVID-19 is that magnitude,” explains Stuart Carlaw, Chief Research Officer at ABI Research.

Bold decisions and technological investments could lead to outcomes such as:

-A more concerted and widespread move to lights-out manufacturing
-Increased usage of autonomous materials handling and goods vehicles
-A more integrated, diverse, and coordinated supply chain
-Investment in smart cities to support community resilience
-A move to virtual workspaces and practices…
…And so much more

“Before we feel this potential long-term impact, there will be some serious short-term implications. Contractions in consumer spending, disruptions to supply chains, and reduced availability of components will create a rough sea for all boats,” Carlaw says. “In the short-term, there will be a retrenchment in outlooks a reduced investment in modernization, as survival instincts trump the drive to prosperity.”

For a clearer picture of the short- and long-term global impacts of COVID-19, download the whitepaper Taking Stock of COVID-19: The Short- and Long-Term Ramifications on Technology and End Markets.

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