Posts tagged with "Mass Shootings"

Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Heather

Heather Reibsamen is an illustrator, graphic designer, and writer, who has published work within 360 Magazine and issuu. Specializing in new media, Heather’s innovation and passion are a force to be reckoned with.

Currently working at 360 Magazine, Heather’s talents have blossomed in unbelievable ways.  Heather has created an abundance of illustrations ranging from celebrities such as Britney Spears and Doja Cat to heart-wrenching moments such as George Floyd and mass shootings. Heather’s most recent work details the shocking testimony from Britney Spears about the inhumane activities within her conservatorship. In addition, she has written articles on various topics and has interviewed rapper/actor celebrity Page Kennedy and artist David Irvine from The Gnarled Branch.

Heather has also worked with the migration of the 360 Magazine website to a new hosting service and continues to work on building the 360 Magazine eCommerce platform that features styles from the creative director of Ace of Haze Style of Ace (AOHSOA), Armon Hayes. She also assists with copyediting articles and the recent book “Move Like Water × Be Fluid” written by Vaughn Lowery, web design, and client communication.

Heather completed her associate degree in graphic design through Independence University and will complete her bachelor’s degree through Southern New Hamphire University. She is a proactive member of the AIGA IU Student Group as well as the Director of Communications. Heather works alongside fellow officers to bring digital content to the students as well as helping to create the e-zine “Creative Layers”. Heather is also a member of the Alpha Beta Kappa National Honor Society. She has also made charitable design contributions to Dola Dolls to Love through Dementia and Love’s Law.

Heather looks forward to her blossoming career and is excited to see where the path leads her. Follow her on LinkedIn and Instagram. View her portfolio on Behance.

illustration by Maria Soloman for use by 360 magazine

Over 150 people shot, more than 400 shootings over the weekend

By: Kai Yeo

In June, the total reported number of shootings were at 272. According to data compiled by the Gun Violence Archive (GVA), at least 150 people were killed by gun violence in more than 400 reported shootings across the country as major cities nationwide confront a surge in gun violence during the Fourth of July weekend. The 72-hour data chart includes shooting accidents and gun violence victims and has constantly been updating.

New Yorkers saw 21 shootings that injured 26 people between Friday and Sunday, according to the New York Police Department, is a decrease from the same period last year when 30 people were shot in 25 shootings. On July 4, NYC experienced 12 shooting incidents that involved 13 victims, an increase from last year when there were eight shootings and eight victims.

Gun violence incidents in New York have spiked almost 40% over the same period in 2020, with 767 shootings and 885 victims.

In Chicago, 92 people were shot over the holiday weekend, 16 of whom died. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, the 76 wounded include six children and teenagers, and two Chicago police officers who were dispersing a crown on the city’s West Side.

The homicide rate in Chicago this year is 2% lower than the same period in 2020, but the number of victims is still 14% higher.

Mass Shootings

GVA defines a mass shooting “based only on the numeric value of four or more shot or killed, not including the shooter.”

Eight people were injured in a shooting near a car wash in Fort Worth, Texas, early Sunday morning after a group of men got into an argument. Fort Worth Police released a statement on Twitter than an officer heard gunfire around 1:30am and found eight people with gunshot wounds upon arrival at the scene.

A KTLA report shows that two men were killed and seven people were injured in a neighborhood late Sunday night in North Las Vegas. Police say that victims were chased through Venice neighborhood before deadly car-to-car shooting.

In Norfolk, Virginia, four children were shot on Friday afternoon – a 6-year-old girl, a 14-year-old boy, a 16-year-old girl, and 16-year-old boy – the 6-year-old girl was reported to have life-threatening injuries; however, she is now considered to be in stable condition. Detectives have charged a 15-year-old boy with the following: malicious wounding, attempted malicious wounding, shooting into an occupied building, possession of a firearm by a juvenile, and two counts of use of a firearm.

In suburban Atlanta, police responded to a report on Saturday and found golf professional Gene Siller shot near the green of the 10th hole of the Pinetree Country Club in Kennesaw. This was also where he worked as the golf pro, according to the Cobb County police. Siller was found unresponsive with an “apparent gunshot wound to the head” and pronounced dead at the scene, along with two other gunshot victims on the course.

One juvenile dead and eleven others were injured in a shooting at a block party in Toledo, Ohio on Sunday night. According to Police Chief George Kral, more than 80 rounds were fired from multiple guns. Two victims, a 51-year-old and a 19-year-old, are in critical condition, Kral said, and the other nine people wounded are in stable condition, their ages ranging from an 11-year-old to three 19-year-olds.

Cincinnati police said two males (16 and 19) were killed and three others were injured at a holiday celebration at a park late Sunday night. The two were “engaged in a verbal altercation that resulted in them exchanging gunfire” and the other victims were caught in the crossfire. Two girls (16 and 17) and a 15-year-old boy were wounded in the shooting. According to Cincinnati police Chief Eliot Isaac, the 17-year-old girl is in critical condition while the other two victims suffered gunshot wounds that were not life-threatening.

Dallas police responded to two separate shootings on July 4. A 61-year-old man was killed in the first incident after being shot “multiple times in the street during a disturbance” and died at a local hospital. The second incident involved five men who were shot, and three of the victims were pronounced dead after being transported to a nearby hospital.

End Gun Violence illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Boulder Shooter Kills Ten People

Colorado Supermarket Mass Shooting:

Gunman kills 10, including police officer

The series of mass shootings have continued within the United States, this time in Boulder Colorado at 3600 Table Mesa Drive. A gunman killed 10 people at a King Soopers supermarket on Monday afternoon. One of the victims included police officer Eric Talley who was first on the scene. Officer Talley was first to respond to report of gunfire at the grocery store. The workers and shoppers that survived were able to flee the scene and others were able to take shelter within the store – enduring the horrific violence that echoed throughout the store.

The shooting started shortly after 2:30 p.m. in the parking lot of King Soopers. Videographer Dean Schiller provided a livestream video showing what appears to be victims and an employee saying the shooter was inside of the store. Two roommates commented that “he just came in and started shooting” without saying a word. They went on to note that the gunman “let off a couple of shots, then was silent, and then he let off a couple more – He wasn’t spraying.”.

Survivor Ryan Borowski commented to CNN’s Don Lemon that he was still processing what happened. Borowski had just gone to buy some ice cream at the grocery store. He had changed his mind at the last minute and went down a different aisle. Borowski then heard the first gunshots, which he then started running to the back of the store. Borowski and several others rushed out of the store through the back, telling employees “Gun, gun, gun. Run, run, run.” Borowski went on to comment “I don’t remember anybody screaming. It was just go, go, go, get out of here… I knew I had to move.”.

Steven McHugh commented that his son-in-law and his two granddaughters were in the store as their dad got the vaccination for Covid-19. McHugh was told that his family watched people get shot and managed to run to a staff area to hide in a coat closet until police were able to intervene.

The 21-year-old suspect, Ahmad Al Issa, was taken into custody and treated for injuries, however, there are not many answers as to why the violent crime was carried out. Issa is facing 10 counts of first-degree murder and will be taken to Boulder County Jail. Officials say it will take days to investigate the crime scene thoroughly and notify families of the loss of their loved ones. Local, state, and federal agencies responded to the scene to aid in the investigation.

Officer Eric Talley had been with the department since 2010 and was very passionate about his job according to Officer Mark Bliley, head of the Boulder Police Department’s union. Bliley continued to say that Talley had a unique ability to connect with people; that he was a highly respected, well-loved person and officer – a solid person that everyone loved.

Kelli McGannon, King Soopers spokeswoman, said the company is working with investigators and will be deferring to law enforcement on all inquiries about the shooting. “Our hearts are broken over this senseless act of violence,” she said.

Former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords commented “It’s beyond time for our leaders to take action” on gun control. Giffords is a gun control advocate and mass shooting survivor. She went on to comment that “This is not normal, and it doesn’t have to be this way. This is an especially personal tragedy for me. I survived a shooting at a grocery store, in a tragedy that devastated my beloved community of Tucson. It’s been 10 years, and countless American communities have had to face something similar. Today it’s a tragedy in Boulder, Colorado. This past weekend it was a house party in Philadelphia. And last week it was an armed attack on Asian American women in the Atlanta area.”

The supermarket shooting occurred just seven days after the violent mass shooting in Atlanta where eight innocent people, including six Asian women, were killed when a gunman terrorized three spas. On March 17, five people were gunned down in a drive-by shooting while preparing a vigil in Stockton, California. Just a day later, four victims were shot in Gresham, Oregon. In Houston, five people were shot within a club during a disturbance on March 20. In Philadelphia, five people were injured and one murdered during a shooting at a party on the same day.

The Colorado Healing Fund is collecting donations for victims of the Boulder shooting. The Colorado Healing Fund is a non-profit organization created to support victims of mass tragedies.

Victims of the King Sooper’s Mass Shooting:

  • Denny Strong, 20 years old
  • Neven Stoanisic, 23 years old
  • Rikki Olds, 25 years old
  • Tralona Bartkowiak, 49 years old
  • Suzanne Fountain, 59 years old
  • Teri Leiker, 51 years old
  • Officer Eric Talley, 51 years old
  • Kevin Mahoney, 61 years old
  • Lynn Murray, 62 years old
  • Jody Waters, 65 years old

Majority of Adults Stressed by Mass Shootings

ONE-THIRD OF U.S. ADULTS SAY FEAR OF MASS SHOOTINGS PREVENTS THEM FROM GOING TO CERTAIN PLACES OR EVENTS

Hispanic adults more than twice as likely as white non-Hispanics to say they experience mass shooting-related stress often or constantly

A large majority of adults in the United States are stressed by mass shootings, and a third of U.S. adults say that fear of mass shootings stops them from going to certain places and events, according to a new survey on stress and mass shootings by the American Psychological Association. “It’s clear that mass shootings are taking a toll on our mental health, and we should be particularly concerned that they are affecting the way many of us are living our daily lives,” said Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, APA’s chief executive officer. “The more these events happen in places where people can see themselves frequenting, the greater the mental health impact will be. We don’t have to experience these events directly for them to affect us. Simply hearing about them can have an emotional impact, and this can have negative repercussions for our mental and physical health.”

To better understand the impact of mass shootings on stress and health in the aftermath of the recent tragic El Paso and Dayton shootings, APA commissioned the nationally representative survey. It was conducted online by The Harris Poll between Aug. 8 and 12 among 2,017 adults ages 18 and older who reside in the U.S. The survey found that more than three-quarters of adults (79%) in the U.S. say they experience stress as a result of the possibility of a mass shooting. Additionally, many adults report that they are changing their behavior due to fear of mass shootings. Nearly one in three adults (32%) feel they cannot go anywhere without worrying about being a victim of a mass shooting, while just about the same number (33%) say fear prevents them from going to certain places or events. Nearly one-quarter (24%) of adults report changing how they live their lives because of fear of a mass shooting.

When asked which places they are stressed about the possibility of a mass shooting occurring, adults most commonly say a public event (53%), mall (50%), school or university (42%) or movie theater (38%), with only one in five (21%) saying they never experience stress as a result of the possibility of a mass shooting. “Mass shootings are a public health issue, and we need to take a comprehensive public health approach to understand and devise lasting policy solutions,” Evans said. “It is important that people and policymakers realize that this is not an insurmountable issue; it is something we have the power to change.”

Hispanic adults (32%) are more likely than white non-Hispanic adults (15%) to say they experience stress often or constantly related to the possibility of a mass shooting. Hispanic adults and African American adults also are more likely than white non-Hispanic adults to say they do not know how to cope with the stress they feel as a result of mass shootings (44% of Hispanic adults and 43% of African American adults vs. 30% of white adults). Black adults are more likely to feel that they or someone they know will be a victim of a mass shooting (60% compared with 41% of white adults and 50% of Hispanic adults). Women report feeling stressed more often than men about the possibility of a shooting (85% vs. 71%), and parents of children under the age of 18 are nearly twice as likely as those without children under 18 to say they experience stress often or constantly because of the possibility of a mass shooting (28% vs.16%). Further, 62% of parents say they “live in fear that their children will be victims of a mass shooting”.