Posts tagged with "web design"

Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Heather

Heather Reibsamen is an illustrator, graphic designer, and writer, who has published work within 360 Magazine and issuu. Specializing in new media, Heather’s innovation and passion are a force to be reckoned with.

Currently working at 360 Magazine, Heather’s talents have blossomed in unbelievable ways.  Heather has created an abundance of illustrations ranging from celebrities such as Britney Spears and Doja Cat to heart-wrenching moments such as George Floyd and mass shootings. Heather’s most recent work details the shocking testimony from Britney Spears about the inhumane activities within her conservatorship. In addition, she has written articles on various topics and has interviewed rapper/actor celebrity Page Kennedy and artist David Irvine from The Gnarled Branch.

Heather has also worked with the migration of the 360 Magazine website to a new hosting service and continues to work on building the 360 Magazine eCommerce platform that features styles from the creative director of Ace of Haze Style of Ace (AOHSOA), Armon Hayes. She also assists with copyediting articles and the recent book “Move Like Water × Be Fluid” written by Vaughn Lowery, web design, and client communication.

Heather completed her associate degree in graphic design through Independence University and will complete her bachelor’s degree through Southern New Hamphire University. She is a proactive member of the AIGA IU Student Group as well as the Director of Communications. Heather works alongside fellow officers to bring digital content to the students as well as helping to create the e-zine “Creative Layers”. Heather is also a member of the Alpha Beta Kappa National Honor Society. She has also made charitable design contributions to Dola Dolls to Love through Dementia and Love’s Law.

Heather looks forward to her blossoming career and is excited to see where the path leads her. Follow her on LinkedIn and Instagram. View her portfolio on Behance.

Marta Klopf photo from Grace Topalian for use by 360 Magazine

Digital Artist/Designer Marta Klopf QXA

By: Ally Brewster

Marta Klopf is graphic designer that works in web and brand design. When talking about her artwork Klopf says, “My projects focus on clear communication while highlighting the values, thoughts and stories behind a brand and translating conceptual ideas into cohesive visual worlds.” Originally from Italy, Klopf graduated from Minneapolis College of Art & Design and soon moved to New York City, quickly falling in love with the city and finding inspiration in it. She loves being able to help with change through her art and design. Klopf looks forward to getting back to creating art for local community focused organizations in the future. We had the opportunity to ask Marta Klopf about her artistic journey and what’s next for the artist: 

How did you get into graphic design? Was graphic design always the direction you wanted to go?

I wasn’t one of those people who know as children what they are going to be when they grow up: for a long time I didn’t see a path that seemed right for me. I was always interested in a lot of things, and always wanted to follow new ideas and start new projects. What I did know was that I was interested in art, and that I was passionate about communicating. So I discovered design, which is at its very core visual communication. I moved to Minneapolis to pursue my BFA in graphic design and have worked in the field since. And I think it worked out, because design gives you the opportunity to be interested in a lot of things, to approach different projects with different ideas and interests.

Do you have a preference for working digitally or physically? Why?

I love working digitally: I feel like the digital world is where a lot of people today go to find information, learn things, discover brands, buy things, make connections, and therefore it is a dynamic place that is always evolving, which makes it exciting to be a part of it. I also think digital projects challenge you in a different way, because they need to make an impact while also remaining flexible and adaptable.

You stated: “New York is vibrant and makes you feel alive. You always feel like you are part of something big. It always pushes you creatively because there is always something new to inspire you.” What initially drew you to work in New York? Do you have a favorite thing in New York you always go back to for inspiration if you ever feel burnt out?

I think that, at first, what drew me to New York was the sheer quantity of creatives and creative endeavors, which gives you the opportunity to really find a path that works for you and matches your interests. But I didn’t expect to really fall for the city as much or as quickly as I did: I met a lot of inspiring designers and creatives who were pursuing their passions in so many different ways. I think the people are what always inspires me: it may be a bit cliché, but the energy that comes from surrounding yourself with other creative people can be very energizing. I also love to take long walks: you always end up somewhere new, and getting out of your usual environment and what is comfortable usually helps.

You’re a freelance graphic designer “with experience in web and brand design.” What is your favorite aspect of being a freelance artist? The most difficult?

I work for an agency and also do freelance projects, so I get the best and worst of both. I love the freedom of freelance work. You are in charge of what projects you take on, and the directness of working directly with the person who will use your work makes it empowering. The most difficult part would be that you are alone: you have to be the one who does all the organizing, the designing, the coordinating, the email writing, the zoom calls. Which I like, but can be quite a lot.

How do you begin your process of starting a new project with a brand?

The first thing I do is learn as much as I can about the project, first to determine whether it’s something I am able to take on, and then to find out what makes the project special. I would then typically meet with the client, talk about big picture things (their ideas and needs, their philosophy, and so on) as well as practical things (timeline, other people involved in the project, etc). Depending on the project I would then come up with a few ideas and see whether they will work and are well received. From there, it becomes a matter of getting more and more detailed and continuing to incorporate feedback from the client until the final product is ready.

Of the projects you’ve worked on, which is your favorite? What about it makes it so memorable/special for you? 

I recently finished a website called letstech.at. It is geared towards kids 10-18 in age and is meant to be a science/engineering portal for them: get them interested in more scientific or technical subjects, present ideas through videos and blog articles, as well as show role models (especially female ones) who work in the field and be a place where they can find information about careers in engineering. I loved working on it both because it was a design challenge (trying to speak to a relatively broad age range), and because it truly is a great resource for kids: it feels great to be part of something that empowers them through learning and through highlighting female role models.

As someone who loves being able to help change the world through your artwork, which causes are you passionate about that you would want to design for in the future?

I try not to set limits on what want to do, but generally I feel strongly about projects that are of value to people: in the case of the project above, kids who want to learn, but also, for example, design for community based organizations who help women, minorities, or in any way empower people by offering them resources that may be otherwise difficult to access. As another example, I also was part of a mentoring program, where professional designers helped create logos for groups of high schoolers who wanted to pitch ideas to help their community to investors. I love being able to use my skills that way: making an impact through design.

With your artwork, what direction do you feel like you want to go in next? Is there any new pattern, style, process, person, media, etc, that you feel has grabbed your attention and inspired your work? Is there anything you’ve done in the past you want to continue with? 

I feel that style changes constantly, and the more we focus on style the less longevity a project has. What matters to me the most are good ideas, and I think the time of the pandemic (having to stay home and mostly focus on work) really reinforced the idea of wanting to make work that has an impact. I always look at the work of Partner & Partners (where I used to work) and Hyperakt in New York as inspiration for beautiful work that is backed by great ideas and also makes an impact on the communities and the world we live in.

Marta Klopf is currently accepting freelance projects here.

Marta Klopf design for LetsTech from Grace Topalian for use by 360 Magazine

Marta Klopf design for LetsTech

Art by Mina Tocalini of 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

PornHub Announces ‘Remastured’ Archive Collection

Pornhub Announces Remastured, An Initiative That Restores Century-Old Erotic Films to Titillating Technicolor with Modern AI Technology, The adult entertainment platform used machine learning and over 100,000 adult videos and images from its library to educate the AI in the subtleties in colorizing vintage porn for the modern age

Pornhub, the premier online destination for adult entertainment, today announced the launch of Remastured, an innovative project that employs the latest AI (artificial intelligence) technology to restore some of the oldest – and steamiest – erotic films ever produced. The company used machine learning and over 100,000 adult videos and images from its library to colorize vintage porn for today’s modern audience. Viewers are transported back in time to experience 20th century-old erotic films featuring voluptuous Victorians and silent seductors in titillating technicolor with The Remastured Film Library.    

Since the moment someone figured out how to record moving images, people have been making adult movies, said Pornhub. We thought it was important to not only preserve but modernize these films, and we are very excited to include this selection of artfully restored vintage material to our library, allowing users to indulge in old school erotica from a bygone era.

View the SFW Remastured campaign video here.

It is common practice in film to colorize and restore even the most antique footage. However, the algorithms generally available are lacking since standard deep-learning models are trained with millions of SFW images, not nude or even pornographic ones.

By introducing the AI to Pornhub’s massive content library, it learned a naughty new trick; how to detect the subtle shades of penises, nipples, and turn-of-the-century bush. Transforming these centennial masterpieces into modern content resulting in The Remastered Film Library; A collection of 20 visually stunning scenes ranging from the 1890’s to the 1940’s, featuring the work of film pioneers like Thomas Edison and George Méliès and elaborate plots of the modern porn aficionado’s favorite categories:  co-eds, masseurs, orgies, threesomes, foursomes, spankings, cosplay, strap-ons, and more. The variety is impressive, but it’s the kinky content that will keep you coming back for more.

The process – which utilized several AI algorithms with limited human intervention – included:

  • Preparation of images: noise reduction, sharpening and contrasting
  • Colorizing using deep learning
  • Boosting to 60 frames per second (fps)
  • Rescaling to crisp 4K resolution
  • Digital remastering: cleaning artifacts, stabilization, and flickering reduction
  • Remastering audio or adding a new audio track

To develop the machine-learning algorithm, we paired black and white images, along with the colorized version. Through testing, the AI was able to generalize its comparative findings and colorize images provided previously to colorizing images it had never seen.

Pornhub’s Remastured campaign is a collaborative initiative with creative agency Officer & Gentleman and creative studio Espada Santacruz.

Pornhub has a history of supporting the preservation of early erotic films. The company previously partnered with the Museum of Sex in New York City in 2019 to present STAG: The Illicit Origins of Pornographic Film. Exclusively curated by the Museum of Sex, the interactive exhibition featured films demonstrating the major aesthetic and thematic trends that shaped the early history of illicit film. Later that year, Pornhub partnered with Maccarone fine art gallery in Los Angeles to present The Pleasure Principle, a multi-disciplinary and pan-generational all female art show where artists were invited to share work depicting their respective interpretations of pleasure. The show included work from Marilyn Minter, Louise Bourgeois, Tracey Emin and more. Most recently, Pornhub hosted the online premier of SHAKEDOWN, the critically-acclaimed documentary art film centered around the Black lesbian stripper scene in early Los Angeles by filmmaker and vanguard artist Leilah Weinraub. The digital event included a viewing of  the documentary and a series of Q&A live chats with Weinraub to simulate the experience of watching the film together. 

About Pornhub

Founded in 2007, Pornhub is the leading free, ad-supported adult video streaming website, offering viewers the opportunity to upload and share their own videos. With over 3 million videos and over 130 million visitors a day, Pornhub truly is the best adult site in the world. Pornhub has built the largest dedicated membership base in the adult community, averaging over 76 million monthly active members, offering viewers a fun and sophisticated social experience directly insite, complete with messaging, photos, achievement badges, and much more.