Posts tagged with "George Floyd"

Confront Art Launches SEEINJUSTICE Exhibition

Confront Art—which promotes diversity and education in the arts through collaboration between emerging artists and established organizations—is announcing today its inaugural exhibition SEEINJUSTICE, which will be on display for the public beginning October 1st through October 31st in Union Square. The SEEINJUSTICE series will feature three sculptures by Chris Carnabuci: “FLOYD”, “BREONNA”, and “JOHN LEWIS.”

Confront Art is working with the family of George Floyd and their charity “We Are Floyd”, the family of Breonna Taylor and John Lewis’ foundation for the SEEINJUSTICE series, aiming to raise awareness on racism and provide a safe place of healing and community through art.

The exhibition will take place in Union Square, selected for the location’s storied history as a gathering place within New York City for generations to express collective empowerment and to make their voices heard. As a venue that has historically protected the right to free speech and demonstration, Union Square NYC has long brought together people of all ages, races, nationalities, religions, and orientations in the name of community and discourse.

“We are inspired by the important work that Confront Art is doing to support the cause of “We are Floyd,” said Terrence Floyd, George Floyd’s brother. “We are looking forward to an extensive partnership with them as we bring art and creative resources to communities around the country.”  

“We founded Confront Art to create art that is inclusive, progressive, and sparks something deep within to discover one’s own creativity and causes,” said Lindsay Eshelman, Confront Art Co-founder.” Our mission is to foster art that is an immersive experience and allow our visual representations to push forward a movement of change and unity.”

“Confront Art’s mission is to inspire people to continue to create art during times of sadness and confusion and to share an awareness of empathy and hope for the future,” said, Andrew Cohen, Confront Art Co-founder.

“As a result of the death of George Floyd, there came a global awareness and understanding of the plague of injustice across the world,” said Chris Carnabuci, Artist of the SEEINJUSTICE series. “The exhibit represents this global understanding, and from understanding comes action and from action comes change.”

“We are honored to work alongside Confront Art in bringing Chris Carnabuci’s SEEINJUSTICE installation to Union Square,” said Jennifer Falk, Executive Director of Union Square Partnership. “As a long-standing venue for public demonstrations in pursuit of social change, we are proud of Union Square’s history as a space for New Yorkers and people from all over to congregate in the name of free speech, a legacy that we will always protect and uphold.”

“We are proud to display Confront Art’s inaugural exhibition through our Art in the Parks program,” said NYC Parks Acting Commissioner Margaret Nelson. “Chris Carnabuci’s statues of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and John Lewis highlight the need for social change and build upon Union Square’s long history as a democratic space where individuals gather to call for equality and justice.”

The final sculptures stand at 10-feet tall on top of a base inscribed with dedications from notable hip-hop artists, social figures, and family members. Each statue layers precision- cut wood to craft a detailed and realistic monument of each subject, based on 3-D models by Daniel and Rodman Edwards. 

The exhibition will be on display for one month and available for public view in Union Square in New York City. For more information on Confront Art, visit them here.

About Confront Art 

Confront Art was founded by Andrew Cohen and Lindsay Eshelman in 2020, with the mission to promote diversity and education in the arts by creating collaborative opportunities between emerging artists and established organizations. The collective aims to create productions that foster socially progressive art and merchandise. For more information on Confront Art, visit here.

About We Are Floyd 

WE ARE FLOYD is a 501C3 led by Terrence Floyd, George Floyd’s brother. We Are Floyd supports initiatives to help communities dealing with mental health issues, poverty, police brutality, and social injustice. In the name of George Floyd, We Are Floyd partners with existing community-centric organizations, bringing awareness to issues surrounding underserved communities, highlighting the lack of educational programs, and promoting change and progress. For more information on We Are Floyd, please visit them here.

Sculptor – Chris Carnabuci 

Chris Carnabuci is a New York based artist & sculptor. He has been creating work for commercial accounts and private collectors for the past two decades. In 2016, Carnabuci began incorporating his skill as a CAD designer to create stacked plate sculptures using a CNC Technique. The process slices a 3D model into a set number of layers, precisely cut and stacked to create an artistic rendition of the original model.

By far his most well-known work, “Mariposita” is a massive sculpture of a female figure emerging from a shell. Composed of over 2500 pieces of CNC cut wood, she stands at over 20FT tall. Created in 2019, Mariposita has exhibited at the Toronto Light Festival, and then again, she was commissioned to exhibit at Electric Daisy Carnival in Mexico City. Chris’ work and Mariposita have been featured in publications such as Forbes, Business Insider, Artsy and many others. 

About Union Square Partnership

 For over 45 years, Union Square Partnership has been working to ensure the best possible neighborhood for its residents, businesses, and visitors. As the leading advocate for the Union Square-14th Street community, we work to enhance the neighborhood’s quality-of-life by creating a cleaner, safer, and more enjoyable environment. With our vibrant community continuing to evolve and grow, the Union Square Partnership’s role is now more important than ever. We are dedicated to this neighborhood, and work 24/7 to make sure that Union Square remains a phenomenal place to live, work and visit.

#USQArt is an incredible opportunity to bring engaging artwork to one of NYC’s great public spaces. Exhibitions are presented by the Union Square Partnership with NYC Parks’ Art in the Parks program and NYC Department of Transportation’s Art Program in collaboration with selected galleries and artists.

About NYC Parks’ Art in the Parks Program 

For over 50 years, NYC Parks’ Art in the Parks program has brought contemporary public artworks to the city’s parks, making New York City one of the world’s largest open-air galleries. The agency has consistently fostered the creation and installation of temporary public art in parks throughout the five boroughs. Since 1967, NYC Parks has collaborated with arts organizations and artists to produce over 2,000 public artworks by 1,300 notable and emerging artists in over 200 parks. For more information about the program visit them here.

ANTHONY HAMILTON NEW ALBUM – LOVE IS THE NEW BLACK.

After teasing more music for the past year and building anticipation among fans worldwide, GRAMMY Award-winning, multiplatinum singer, songwriter, producer, and actor, Anthony Hamilton returns with his anxiously awaited tenth full-length and first album in five years, Love Is The New Black., on September, 24th 2021. Billboard made the exclusive announcement. It notably will be the flagship release under his own label My Music Box in partnership with BMG. Pre-order Love Is The New Black. – Here.

The 14-track R&B opus boasts a bevy of A-list friends and collaborators such as Academy Award winner Jennifer Hudson on the powerhouse “Superstar,” rap powerhouse Rick Ross on “Real Love,” and crunk king himself Lil’ Jon on “I’m Ready.” Other standouts include the smooth “White Hennessy” where his vocals simply intoxicate, the confessional “Mercy,” and one of the most emotionally charged tunes in his storied catalog, the George Floyd-inspired finale “Mama Don’t Cry.”

Check out the full track listing below.

Hamilton literally poured blood, sweat, and tears into Love Is the New Black. After initially pursuing a more political-leaning direction, he shifted focus to speak to this hefty emotional need, while also covering the full spectrum of human emotions.

“Going through the Pandemic, we were faced with challenges, in general,” he states. “Then, we were attacked, slaughtered, and slain. In the beginning, the music was really for people who wanted to stand up in honor of Black Lives Matter. It was initially geared towards those souls, hearts, and the people we had lost. There were some really heavy and strong songs on there. As the world started to open, I wanted to lessen the heavy load and allow everyone to celebrate again. We still got a little bit of that, because it’s not going away, and we’ve gone through a lot. That side will be heard, but we’re taking from a bunch of experiences now, getting through it, and taking a turn. I feel like that’s what people need right now.”

He elaborates, “When creating this album, I wanted people to feel. I’m going into a new era and mindset expecting greatness, love, and peace. I wanted this album to feel like what was missing throughout the pandemic. This is the restoration. We’re making this thing called life, sexy, beautiful, and powerful again.”

His most recent single “You Made A Fool Of Me” has amassed more than one million streams to date. Rolling Stone called it a “pour-salt-in-the-wound ballad.” Soul Bounce called Hamilton “the modern king of churchy, soulful crooners,” and The House That Soul Built hailed the single as “crisp contemporary soul.” The Musical Hype wrote that Hamilton “can do no wrong,” adding that the track “is lushly produced, sounding idiomatic of both the neo-soul and adult contemporary vein of R&B.”

The accompanying video, directed by Terrence Crowley, premiered exclusively on BET Soul and brings back a familiar character with Charlene, reprising her role as the love interest.

It arrives on the heels of last year’s powerful and poignant “Mercy” [feat. Tamika D. Mallory], which Rated R&B praised as an “urgent soul track,” and his electrifying performance at the 2021 NBA All-Star Game.

Love Is The New Black. in 2021.

Track-listing:

  1. Love is the New Black.
  2. Threw It All Away
  3. Real Love feat. Rick Ross
  4. I’m Ready feat. Lil Jon
  5. White Hennessy
  6. Coming Home
  7. You Made a Fool of Me
  8. I Thought We Were in Love
  9. Superstar duet with Jennifer Hudson
  10. Pillows
  11. I’m Sorry
  12. Mercy
  13. Safe
  14. Mama Don’t Cry

KEEP UP WITH Anthony Hamilton!

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About Anthony Hamilton:

With over 50 million albums globally and proclaimed a “national treasure” by the Los Angeles Times, Anthony Hamilton’s voice will resonate louder than ever in 2021 with more music and performances on the horizon.

GRAMMY Award winning singer, songwriter, producer, and actor Anthony Hamilton has achieved global sales of over 50 million albums. The North Carolina Music Hall of Fame inductee notably performed for former President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle, cementing his place in the history books as the “narrator of love.” Introduced by way of the iconic 2003 smash “Charlene,” his raw, awe-inspiring performances garnered the attention of NPR where he starred in their Noteworthy documentary series. He made his film debut in the critically acclaimed American Gangster, and lent his vocals to the song “Freedom” from the Academy Award-nominated film Django Unchained. Hamilton now adds author and publisher to his list of accomplishments with the unveiling of his first self-published book, Cornbread, Fish ‘n Collard Greens, where he shares the inspiration for some of the iconic songs in his illustrious career and his love of southern food. Hamilton recently starred as Kyle Kirby in the feature film Carl Weber’s Influence, now streaming on BET+.

Cartooning While Black cartoon via Will Brierly for use by 360 Magazine

Cartooning While Black Gallery Exhibit

Black cartoonists from The New Yorker present their work at the Cartooning While Black Gallery Exhibit at ChaShaMa.

Chashama and Art To Ware present Cartooning While Black, a preview of the art from the upcoming One Idea Press title release, The Anti-Racism Activity Book. Art from the volume, written and illustrated by cartoonist and comedian Victor Varnado, will be shown alongside fellow black New Yorker cartoonists, Yasin OsmanAkeem S Roberts, and Jerald Lewis II. This exhibition is curated by Rebecca Mills.

LOCATION: ChaShaMa Gallery, 320 West 23rd Street, NY, NY

WHEN: Thursday, July 15, 2021, to Thursday, August 5th.

The Anti-Racism Activity Book is a social satire created in the style of a children’s puzzle and coloring book. The exhibit will feature crosswords, word finds, and other nostalgic activity book throwbacks, combined with original cartooning work from Varnado, all using humor to illustrate how dumb racism is.

“Traditionally, very few black cartoonists have appeared in the New Yorker, but recent efforts by the magazine and the cartoon editor Emma Allen have made an exhibit like this possible,” said Jason Chatfield, president of The National Cartoonists Society and New Yorker cartoonist.

“Yasin Osman, Akeem S Roberts, Jerald Lewis II, and Victor Varnado’s illustrative works shown together in the same exhibit will be the first time such a presentation has ever happened,” he added.

As a comedian, Victor Varnado has appeared on Late Night With Conan O’Brien and Jimmy Kimmel Live. His writing and cartooning work have been showcased in MAD magazineVICEMarvel Comics and Salon. Varnado was born legally blind and is albinistic. His New Yorker cartoon created in response to the national unrest following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police was one of the magazine’s most engaging pieces of content in 2020. Like Floyd, Victor also grew up in Minneapolis.

Photo via Lucas Jones of Polity Press for use by 360 Magazine

Q&A WITH AUTHOR DAVID THEO GOLDBERG

A pervasive sense has taken hold that any and all of us are under suspicion and surveillance, walking on a tightrope, a step away from erasure of rights or security. Nothing new for many long-targeted populations, it is now surfacing as a broad social sensibility, ramped up by environmental crisis and pandemic wreckage. We have come to live in proliferating dread, even of dread itself.

In this brilliant analysis of the nature, origins, and implications of this gnawing feeling, author David Theo Goldberg exposes tracking capitalism as the operating system at the root of dread. In contrast to surveillance, which requires labor-intensive analysis of people’s actions and communications, tracking strips back to the fundamental mapping of our movements, networks, and all traces of our digitally mediated lives. A simultaneous tearing of the social fabric – festering culture wars, the erosion of truth, even “civil war” itself – frays the seams of the sociality and solidarity needed to counter this transformation of people into harvestable, expendable data.

This searing commentary offers a critical apparatus for interrogating the politics of our time, arguing that we need not just a politics of refusal and resistance, but a creative politics to counter the social life of dread.

David Theo Goldberg is Director of the University of California Humanities Research Institute.

Interview by: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

To begin, when did you realize that you first wanted to be a writer?

Quite young. I liked to write as a teenager, fifteen or sixteen, won a prize at high school for English writing. Looking back, I was not nearly as compelling as I fantasized. In training to be an academic I started attending closely to my technical writing. While at graduate school in New York I was involved in making independent films and music videos. I co-wrote the outline and voice-over text for an experimental film on apartheid South Africa which I also co-directed. The film won some international film festival awards. My early published academic writing was dense. I worked hard at getting myself to be clearer, cleaner, more concise. Like all art, writing requires endless attention to its detail, rhythm, flow.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I have a couple. I lap swim quite seriously early every morning. When I am struggling with an idea, or even to articulate a sentence, the quiet solitude of pulling through water on one’s own unbothered by anything around often leads one, or even a whole sentence or two. The challenge, of course, is to recall accurately   enough what I thought so great to be able to write it down at swim’s end. Until injuries caught up with me a few years ago I surfed extensively, and for many decades. I would travel to some surf spots further afield as much to be able, between surfs, to write uninterrupted by day-work at home as to enjoy the great surf and culture at hand.

When I have things pouring out of me and I am writing fast I tend to plug into fast jazz. The likes of the great Cuban jazz pianist Gonzalo Rubalcaba or Japanese pianist Hiromi. Or the big band Snarky Puppy, with Hammond organist Cory Henry, who are fun. Writing has rhythms and I hope some of the music has rubbed off in my writing. There are times, nevertheless, when I like to write in silence, completely alone with my own thoughts.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

It depends on the book: I usually read extensively regarding the subject matter until I feel saturated and an argument thread for the book is mostly in place. Jacques Derrida, the great French philosopher, was once asked by the documentary filmmaker, Amy Ziering, if he had read all the books in his enormous personal library. “I have read only four,” Derrida responded. He then added, the crease of a smile at the corners of his mouth, “But I have read them very well.” The challenge is to read whatever one is engaging to find insights and ideas with which one can think.

I also find it thought-provoking to observe cultural, technological, political and economic trends and changes at work around us. My writing itself is as much an unfolding of the argument line, often enough surprising me in the writing, through where the writing takes me.

Edward Said, the great intellectual of the late twentieth century, wrote a book, Beginnings, which is about how challenging it can be to open a book, to write the first sentences. But also how to end, to bring it to a close in ways that will linger with the reader. Whether creative or analytic writing, not that it is always easy to distinguish the two. Said’s book has stuck with me through much of my writing career.

How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

Ten sole or co-authored monographs; another ten edited or co-edited books. Naming a favorite, especially publicly, is like saying who among your children are your best ones. Tough to do. There are two books that stick out because they have both expressed key developments in my thinking and have been impactful in scholarly debates around these questions.

The first is The Racial State (2002), about how the modern state since the 17th century was founded on racial structures, structuring into its very formation the elevation of Europeans/those of European descent at the expense of all others. Obviously these structures transformed over time, and from one place to another,  but the driving principle has largely remained in place. The key argument is that modern states become modern by taking on the technologies of race as structuring mechanisms.

The second is The Threat of Race: Reflections on Racial Neoliberalism (2009). This book traces the ways the neoliberalizing of polities globally—the financialization of everything; the divorcing of contemporary social, economic, and political conditions from the historical forces that produced them; the complete personalizing of responsibility for one’s standing and experience in society, no matter the social structures and challenges one has faced–has sought to empty the concept of racism and its affiliated racial conceptions of any critical charge or meaning.  The conservative attacks we are currently witnessing on critical race theory have their foundations in this neoliberalizing turn starting in the 1980s. Conservatives of this stripe find discussions, analysis, and engagement of racial issues threatening precisely because they challenge their view of the world.

What inspired you to write Dread: Facing Futureless Futures?

In 2016 family, friends, and colleagues were waking up each day with a sense of anxiety, some calling it a sense of doom. The rise in authoritarianism here in the U.S. but also across a widening range of societies was in part fueling this sense. I was feeling it too. I started by trying to put my finger on what this feeling was, what it amounted to, to name it. “Dread” was the concept I came up with to best express this sense. When I mentioned it aloud, others would exclaim, “That’s it!” What followed was the urge to write a book exploring the underlying conditions prompting this generalized sense, and the implications.

What is the significance of the title?

Dread is a socially produced pervasive anxiety the basic cause(s) of which it is difficult fully to identify. Like Kierkegaard in the 19th century, I contrast dread with fear. Fear is a feeling the object of which one can usually identify, name concretely. The object of dread is a feeling of anxiety and unsettlement the sources of which I cannot concretely or precisely articulate.

“Facing Futureless Futures,” the subtitle, speaks to the ways in which we have created or collectively allowed to be created social conditions that threaten our very wellbeing, if not existence. That some are talking about “the sixth extinction” exactly expresses this heightening anxiety about the survival not just of lifestyle but of life, of the world that supports life itself.

Can you tell us about the book?

I wanted to account for the conditions prompting this pervasive sense of dread, of uncontainable anxiety. The authoritarianisms that seemed to be taking hold, the unhinged statements and expressions struck me as symptomatic of something deeper, structurally more pervasive and difficult to address. So I was concerned to string together an analysis of those conditions, to offer a language of analysis for what is happening to us, what we are doing to ourselves and over which we think we have little if any control.

These include the pervasive emergence of algorithmic culture, the ways algorithms are structured increasingly into and order our everyday activities, the overwhelmingly instrumentalist mode of thinking it insists upon, often in increasingly intrusive ways (the “internet of everything”). This pervades not just how we order consumer goods, how we invest, how we learn at school and college but how we run our homes and businesses, increasingly how cars drive, how and with whom we interact, how we relate to each other, indeed, the quickening pace of worker and work function replacement by robots. Everything we do when electronically connected is now being tracked—where we go, who we interact with, what we consume, how we vote, our medical conditions, our work habits, everything! And that in turn becomes the basis for shaping and reshaping our desires but also the (narrowing of) possibilities presented to each of us.

Increasingly, chips are being inserted into human beings, for a variety of purposes, from medical reasons to consumption accessibility (we are in the early process of being turned into walking credit cards), to tracking productivity, and government control. The digital is transforming the very nature of the human into the techno-human.

The anxiety all this is producing, consciously or not, includes the sense of lost privacy and transparency, depersonalized desire, and undermined self-control. This is readily exacerbated by events and even structures over which we take ourselves to have little or any control, like the pandemic and the impacts of climate change, the conditions for the production of both of which have been dramatically over-politicized. And all of this has laced through it structurally produced differentiations of class, race, and gender, further intensifying the concerns. The outcome of all of this, I suggest, is the ramping up of “civil war,” less conventionally understood than as more or less violent contestations over how we should all be living in the world.

Did you learn anything while writing the book?

One cannot address a dominant set of social concerns without first understanding it. The given is not indelibly cemented into place. What looks like natural conditions is often, at the very least, socially arranged. That means what we have made with debilitating effect we can unmake.

Above all, this invites a relational mode of analysis. It involves seeing—in the sense of looking at the world—in its deeply relational constitution. What we do in one place both affects and is affected by what others are doing elsewhere. Like the weather, environmental impacts and pandemics know no national boundaries or borders. Tracking is at once individually isolating and, less visibly, deeply relational. Racial ideas circulate globally, even if taken up and expressed differently in one place from another, just as racisms in one place are shored up and sustained by racisms elsewhere. For example, critical race theory was originally formulated and fashioned in American law schools but both its application and of late its facile condemnation have been taken up as far afield as Britain, France, and Australia.

And second, I found myself reaching a more hopeful conclusion, if not ending. I suggest that those societies that have taken seriously infrastructures of care for members of the society at large are far better able to address collective challenges such as pandemics and the impacts of climate change, or indeed racisms, at least in principle. Societies that fared better in quickly addressing the pandemic and saving their populations from rampant infection and death have been those that have invested more readily and enduringly in social infrastructures of care.

What is the purpose of the book?

To elaborate an analysis and vocabulary for understanding the debilitating social and ecological conditions we have created and face, and how we might address the challenges in creatively relational ways.

What are you wanting your readers to take away from the material?

Three insights: that we have created a world that in all it gives us is undermining the very conditions of possibility for sustaining those affordances; that the technological apparatuses so completely transforming our worlds and who we are in them,    especially tracking technologies, enable possibilities not previously available. But at the very same time they have proved debilitating, socially, ecologically, and increasingly politically; that a completely self-regarding disposition to the world, individually and nationally, is in stark contrast with one that recognizes our deeply relational condition socio-ecologically; the deeply relational ways in which socio-ecological worlds are constituted become key to addressing the challenges we are facing interactively.

What were the key challenges you faced when writing this book?

The conditions unfolding across the world were transforming remarkably quickly. The pandemic took hold in the middle of writing the book, shutting down much of what we had taken for granted. It revealed deep socio-economic  disparities, racially indexed, exacerbating the impacts.  These were further ramified by the George Floyd murder, among others, and the protests that followed. While I was already lacing racial analysis into the analytic contours of the book, the series of police killings and protests as well as the attacks on Asians, especially women, needed to be referenced. Nor could one write a book about dread without addressing the pandemic. So I added a chapter devoted to Covid and its social impacts and implications pretty much in situ.

What was the highlight of writing this book?

Being in sustained conversation with close intellectual friends and colleagues about the range of conditions I address in the book. This was especially productive and meaningful given our extended collective remoteness as a pandemic consequence. But also, because I was thinking and writing in the midst of an unfolding of the very conditions which I was addressing.

Is there anything that you would like to add for the readers?

The world we have inherited and from which we make ourselves today has furnished us with extraordinary possibility. But in being less mindful of the cumulative impacts of the many generations of this making we have just begun to understand that our world also is in advanced process of radically undermining the conditions making its enduring sustainability possible. The book is about our present circumstances with a view to understanding some of what it will take to have futures to which to look forward. I very much hope it is read in this spirit.

Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Heather

Heather Reibsamen is an illustrator, graphic designer, and writer, who has published work within 360 Magazine and issuu. Specializing in new media, Heather’s innovation and passion are a force to be reckoned with.

Currently working at 360 Magazine, Heather’s talents have blossomed in unbelievable ways.  Heather has created an abundance of illustrations ranging from celebrities such as Britney Spears and Doja Cat to heart-wrenching moments such as George Floyd and mass shootings. Heather’s most recent work details the shocking testimony from Britney Spears about the inhumane activities within her conservatorship. In addition, she has written articles on various topics and has interviewed rapper/actor celebrity Page Kennedy and artist David Irvine from The Gnarled Branch.

Heather has also worked with the migration of the 360 Magazine website to a new hosting service and continues to work on building the 360 Magazine eCommerce platform that features styles from the creative director of Ace of Haze Style of Ace (AOHSOA), Armon Hayes. She also assists with copyediting articles and the recent book “Move Like Water × Be Fluid” written by Vaughn Lowery, web design, and client communication.

Heather completed her associate degree in graphic design through Independence University and will complete her bachelor’s degree through Southern New Hamphire University. She is a proactive member of the AIGA IU Student Group as well as the Director of Communications. Heather works alongside fellow officers to bring digital content to the students as well as helping to create the e-zine “Creative Layers”. Heather is also a member of the Alpha Beta Kappa National Honor Society. She has also made charitable design contributions to Dola Dolls to Love through Dementia and Love’s Law.

Heather looks forward to her blossoming career and is excited to see where the path leads her. Follow her on LinkedIn and Instagram. View her portfolio on Behance.

Image via Transmedia Group for 360 Magazine

Maryam Henein – Q×A

Here at 360 Magazine, we were lucky enough to be able to speak with acclaimed journalist and activist Maryam Henein. We got to speak with her about her controversial and brave ongoing investigations as well as her work with her company HoneyColony. Read the entire conversation below.

So, you have a reputation as the most censored woman, even more censored than Laura Loomer, what aspects of your investigations and reports do you think have led to this?

I started feeling the wrath of technofascism, which is a term that I’ve popularized, as early as 2017, and in this case, it was in regard to selling CBD before mostly being on the front lines. Now today, everyone and their mother sells CBD, but back then it was novel. I started feeling censored for sharing information on the health benefits of CBD. Initially, we got shut down several times by different merchant processors, including PayPal, Stripe, and QuickBooks. My first ban was PayPal back in 2018. Then as I started doing investigations into the politics of CBD, I experienced even more censorship. I was a victim of Google’s ‘Medic Update’ and my website, HoneyColony was buried. Then I started doing research into Google and I was already covering vaccine safety, which is not a topic that the mainstream embraces. I discovered that Google is basically a drug company. And I went and reached out to Google whistleblower Zach Vorhies when I came upon his disclosure. As a result of Google’s algorithmic changes, we lost 67% of our traffic on HoneyColony. I was getting 500,000 unique visitors a month on our magazine and that all went to hell. And then slowly, as I started covering the Coronavirus, given that medical freedom and health are my beats, I got censored even more for peddling supposed “medical misinformation” because YouTube takes its directives from the World Health Organization, a.k.a “China.” I started covering politics and today I’m shadow banned on Twitter. I’m on my second strike on my second YouTube channel and banned from PayPal, Kiva, and GoFundMe. Square booted me the day of the “Deadly Insurrection.” I was a part of their CBD beta program and had signed an NDA, and for absolutely no reason, we lost our account. We went four months without being able to generate money. I soon learned that Dorsey owned Square up until a few months ago. So, I have been digitally assassinated, or they’ve tried to digitally assassinate my voice and my work. Back in 2017, I was telling people, Roseanne Barr today, you tomorrow. Well, here we are.

The topics of your stories have a wide range of backgrounds, from police brutality to animal extinction. It is obvious these issues are near to your heart. What inspires you to move on to a new and wildly different topic or area?

Just to set the record straight. I’m not really looking at police brutality, per se, that’s a subtopic of this multilayered psycho that I call George Floyd. Sometimes I cover stories by accident. I caught a lie by CNN or a kind of lie rather than by the mainstream media and I was driven to learn the truth. I am driven to show people how the mainstream media lies and deceives and doesn’t give a shit about details or accuracy. As far as the bees, they flew into my life and kind of stuck. Pun intended. Bees are wonderful teachers, they feed us, and they are working for the greater good. So, I am not sure what triggers my interest other than injustice, or something that I see will impact people on a global scale and it’s very hard to decipher fact from fiction. So, one has to be discerning and there’s a lot of corruption out there from actual journalists that are supposed to share the news with you. So, I’m an eclectic person, a lot of interests, I’m an intellectual. And I’ve also really dedicated many years of my life to empowering people to be their own best health advocate, having suffered from a chronic illness. Consider that today more and more information regarding health and wellness is buried.

Your film, Vanishing of the Bees was a massive success, what inspired you to convert your journalism into film? 

At that point, I was already working on independent projects of many kinds as a researcher and a producer, I wanted to make my own project and I decided. George Langworthy and I decided to collaborate and then the bees flew into our lives, and I had just recovered from a near-death experience where I was given a second chance and I wanted to cover something that is pertaining to all of us because we all eat, and we all take bees for granted. I wanted to give back and be in service to make the most out of my life.

Your current cases and investigation on the George Floyd case, what inspired you to research and investigate on your own?

As I mentioned earlier that kind of accidentally fell into the story when Zach Vorhies, the Google whistleblower, asked me about a year ago in Costa Rica, while we were under lockdown to recreate the George Floyd kneeling on his neck. So, he asked me to put my knee on his neck. And I asked, who’s George Floyd?  I don’t think anyone’s going to ever ask that question again and I interviewed the medical examiner’s office because I said, if you really want to look at how he died, let’s look at the death certificate autopsy report. I was told that it would take weeks and weeks, and I found another local publication that had said the same thing. Then, the next thing I saw was CNN had put out this preliminary report. So, they were trying to sow discord in the narrative. Soon, we had this tale of two autopsies that emerged and with Benjamin Crump and Michael Baden on the scene, which raised some suspicions that I was collecting. I just didn’t tap out of the story, and I was covering it. The different hearings and such and keeping a close eye. Then I decided, well, I’m probably suited to write the most comprehensive book out there because I’ve looked under lots of rocks, and I’m very detail oriented. So, I will have a lot of very interesting factual tidbits to offer people to show what really happened, and not what the mainstream wanted you to see, and what the corrupt government officials wanted you to see by sitting on the camera, body worn camera for four months.

What do you think is the biggest misconception about the George Floyd case? And what is the source of that misinformation?

The sources, definitely the mainstream media and the government officials behind the narrative and their objectives, whether it’s to defund the police, to destabilize America, to give the illusion that there’s systemic racism across the country. So, the biggest misconception, which is not really a misconception, because Keith Ellison, after all of this, went on 60 minutes and stated that this had nothing to do with race. This case has nothing to do with race. And that’s how it was painted. And while it could have characteristics of police brutality, it had nothing to do with race. And then you have the Attorney General. He also puts this emphasis on the many talking points that I discovered or that are obvious, but he believes in what you see with your eyes. Well, that’s a crock of shit, hello, movie magic, hello, eyes can deceive you. So many things are happening behind the surface. And that’s part used to trick human beings and to have them make decisions based on a lack of proper information and emotion. If you don’t have all the information your perception is skewed and you’re not able to make a proper conclusion or decision. So just really like many multi layered SOPs are just great examples of the lies, whether you want to call it the deep state or the mainstream media, which is the deep state bitch. They work hand in hand to deceive the people.

We know you got to speak with medical examiners to the 911 transcriptsand other information concerning the police department’s handling of the case, what were you able to find? And what was the most shocking piece of evidence you can speak on?

Well, I’m still gathering, still conducting investigations. So right now, I’ve uncovered a cover up. I’m not quite sure what the cover entails if it entails an informant. Clearly, someone I’m trying to speak to is gatekeeping the story and I’ve found some lies. I’ve done 911 calls. Well, there’s three, one from the store and two of the bystanders to the bystanders. Those were released and featured in the trial, but the main call has not been released. And in Minnesota, there’s a statute that only the caller can release the call. So, what is the prosecution asked for those bystanders to release the call, not the call from cut foods. I know who made the call. I know who identified the people in the store. And I’ll leave it at that for now. I have also obtained the death certificate. Just basically showing that George Floyd died of a heart attack while being restrained not because of being restrained. That one word has a big impact and can be debated emotionally and viciously. Probably I’d like to just pose well would have George Floyd died if he had not gathered lots of drugs. In that position now, Derek apparently had his knee on the neck of a team for 17 minutes and not much smaller child person survived. George Floyd was at least six foot four, 230 pounds. It took for three people to restrain him. So, would he have died? Without the drugs? Would he have died without the knee on the neck? Maybe not. So that was interesting to see what the death certificate is. I’m, I’m still trying to obtain some other records. I’ve just obtained the actual archival exhibits pretrial exhibits, so it’s much clearer and I’m putting together a short documentary. 

What significance did the George Ford case have on you personally and your brand HoneyColony?

It has no impact on my brand HoneyColony. As far as on me it’s been very revealing to see how information in this day and age is scrubbed by the Ministry of Truth and if you’re not there, covering it, and paying attention to the details, you will probably be a victim of what I call narrative supremacy, and you’ll probably be bamboozled. I’ve seen people who are well versed in this case, repeat a slight of numbers. For instance, George Floyd was arrested for aggravated robbery. The tale says the woman was pregnant, but the actual court document that I’ve read does not saying anywhere that she was pregnant. So, I don’t know where that piece of the puzzle or sorry that that detail started. But you have to be very, very detail oriented and specific. So, it’s, it’s taught me more than more than ever reminded me how the media lies, and how you have to be paying attention and really look at details because they should matter.

What did you learn about George Floyd’s life that you think more people should know about?

Well, George Floyd isn’t innocent and that doesn’t justify his death. But George Floyd was a career criminal, he spent the last 20 years of his life in and out of jail, and he was, according to some, bad news. He has appeared in at least one porno; he’s pretended to be a part of the water department and dressed in costume to help carry out this robbery. And so, we know that he can kind of act, play act and take on different personas if need be. So, let’s just keep that in the back of our minds. I do believe he was not an evil, or rather, you know, I think Lester, his friend, was a much bigger stand back. So, he certainly apparently was meant to change America, as one person stated. I don’t know what that means, but he was not supposed to die, and he was supposed to change. So do what you will with those phrases right now. 

What was the most difficult part in gaining sources and information about George Floyd’s life and death?

Well, it’s still currently difficult. I’m still under undertaking an investigation. And the hardest thing is people who can talk on behalf of Derek Chauvin. Nobody wants to say anything because they might wake up with a pig’s head on their doorstep. I’m not able to find any family members, very weird. So that’s been a challenge, contacting people from the force. I mean, I haven’t started trying to reach people on George Floyd’s side. I can tell you, for instance, I didn’t have any luck getting the initial second autopsy, independent from Michael Baden and Alicia Wilson. So where is that actual report? Was it just a verbal press release? He’s just the Hollywood medical examiner? Why wasn’t his autopsy even used in the trial of Derek Chauvin? Okay, sorry, I’ll just add that a lot of information has disappeared. I’ve been able to catch some of it because I was doing it in real time and when this first happened, but now it’s not like who owned that SUV Mercedes Benz. It’s not George. And you can’t find who the owner is. Although I do have a name. But yeah, so basically just information scrubbed, addresses. Very interesting that George lives in Texas at 3333. There’s a lot of three threes in this story. And six sixes.

Where can we learn more about you and your findings about the George Floyd case?

You can find me on my telegram channel at Truth Lives Here. Lady be on gab. And that book will be coming out next year. So, you can also contact me at Maryam@honeycolony.com 

Maryam Henein is an investigative journalist and functional medicine consultant. As founder and editor-in-chief of HoneyColony, an online magazine for health and wellness, she shares her wisdom with thousands of followers. She is also the director of the award-winning documentary film Vanishing of the Bees, narrated by Elliot Page. For more information, visit her website.  

HoneyColony is dedicated to cross-pollinating with companies who uphold high-quality standards that value planet, humanity, honesty, and fair-trade practices. HoneyColony is committed to unite the growing number of people adopting healthy lifestyles and seeking to cut through the hype and claims about natural products and remedies.  For more information, visit HoneyColony.

Music Notes by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

OMB Bloodbath – Don’t Do It

OMB Bloodbath released the music video for her new single: “Don’t Do It.” They not only honor the rapper’s home but they provide a glance into Bloodbath’s life with loved ones who keep her grounded. Directed by Jon Primo and Edgar Esteves, Bloodbath enjoys some fashionable moments while rightfully parading her Blackness as she cruises through the streets of Houston. These moments also come with a sombering sentiment. Bloodbath’s late mentor George Floyd is honored throughout the visuals as she performs with glee in front of his iconic mural. While bittersweet, Bloodbath has previously shared her inspiring friendship with Floyd in an editorial for Billboard. “He had a good aura about him. You look at a dude that big and think he has to be some type of extra-hard gangsta, but he was the exact opposite,” she said at the time of his death. “That’s why you hear a lot of people call him the gentle giant. He had a heart of gold.”

About OMB Bloodbath

Representing Houston’s historic Third Ward, OMB Bloodbath is in a class of her own. While 2020 was a wild ride for everyone, it was OMB Bloodbath’s pivotal year. Her hustle paid off, when Blood secured a deal with 10:22 PM and Love Renaissance (LVRN), in partnership with Interscope Records.  The release of “Dropout” with fellow Houston star Maxo Kream fanned the flames for what was to come. The song cracked 750K organic views in no time on YouTube and is currently inching towards a million. Also, Bloodbath’s “For Me” became a TikTok favorite. The Chase B and Ken The Man assisted single is also enjoying a ride to the 2 million mark on YouTube, making it her biggest record to date. “My whole hood is rooting for me, my city’s rooting for me. I’m just taking in every moment of it, working hard, and keeping it going,” she explains.

Joel Peterson photo via Deseret News for use by 360 Magazine

Joel Peterson x My Road to Cancellation

Joel Peterson, Stanford Professor and former JetBlue Chairman, writes about his experience navigating the minefield of woke hostility in his piece My Road to Cancellation:

“Wokeism,” America’s new civil religion, draws on elements of neo-Marxism, critical race theory, social justice and identity politics. Its adherents believe it will lead to a more just society. Its detractors, on the other hand, believe its “cancel culture” will push civil society to the brink. And, for the “woke,” either will do.

The roots of my own unlikely cancelation go as far back as 1987, when Jesse Jackson marched Stanford students up Palm Drive to a rhythmic chant of “Hey, hey, ho, ho! Western Civ has got to go!” The next year, I joined the advisory council of its Graduate School of Business where I was soon invited to fill a one-year faculty vacancy. To everyone’s surprise (including my own), I returned every fall for the next three decades to teach four courses to a generation of exceptional MBA candidates.

Then, last year, before a student-politician boldly posted that “White people need to be eradicated,” I was summoned to respond to an equally disturbing complaint over having “triggered” woke students. Because I didn’t think I’d done anything worthy of the summons and because I had received the distinguished teaching award from students, a “Silver Apple Award” from alumni and been appointed to a faculty chair, I wasn’t worried. Alas, I’d misjudged my peril.

Years after Jackson’s campaign to eliminate Stanford’s requirement to study Western civilization, an Iowa-born, New York Times reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, developed what she titled “The 1619 Project.” In it, she presented America as founded on slavery and stained by perpetual bigotry.

With boosts from the Pulitzer Foundation and from George Floyd’s tragic death, her social justice message struck a nerve. However, when a number of historians debunked the pseudo-history, Hannah-Jones repositioned her essay as “a work of journalism that explicitly seeks to challenge the national narrative.” She followed up with a New York Times Magazine article headlined “What is Owed” making a case for reparations, consistent with her 1995 letter to the editor in Notre Dame’s “The Observer,” in which she likened Christopher Columbus to Hitler.

With police departments defunded, monuments vandalized and cities torched, Dr. Seuss was soon condemned as racist, Mr. Potato Head scheduled for gender reassignment, and free speech restricted by social media oligarchs. So, it wasn’t a surprise to see social justice warriors on the previously welcoming Graduate School of Business campus.

Content of character vs. color of skin

In a class I teach, students objected when guest CEOs claimed to have been “color blind.” When I volunteered that I, too, had resisted hiring based on skin color, gender or quotas, and had relied, instead, on character, competence and commitment, some students were offended. To understand why those “triggered” would object to standards of character and competence being added to the emergent holy grail of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), I turned to one of my own daughters.

Sensing my bafflement at the outrage, she immediately wrote back:

“I have known you my entire life, and I know by your words and deeds that you value all people of all races, ethnicities, and genders. I know you are constantly impressed and inspired by immigrants and their amazing stories of courage and perseverance. I’m proud of the work you’ve done. If this younger, ‘triggered’ generation pushes out of their lives all who seek to improve their understanding, teach them, and open their minds to broader ways of thinking, it will be to their detriment.”

I’d taught my kids – and, until now, my students — that talent, character, and competence are evenly distributed across every demographic. In response to my determination to be on the lookout for leaders without regard to identity, an offended gender-studies major wrote that she’d not known “whether to scream or throw up.” After all, it had been nearly 60 years since Martin Luther King had dreamt of the day when the content of one’s character mattered more than the color of one’s skin. But, by the time that day happily arrived, “wokeism” had hijacked his dream, re-elevating skin color over character.

As demands for skin-color diversity were broadened to include gender and sexual orientation, a student notified me that I’d called on more men than women in two (of four) classes. Knowing that I was no respecter of persons — whether by gender, race, sexual orientation, or anything else — I moved ahead with the course, suddenly aware that my interactions with students were being catalogued by identity.

Soon, a Black Lives Matter advocate asked, of all things, whether I would stand for the American flag. To provide context for my decision, I shared a story. As a toddler, I’d seen my mother take a call from the Department of Defense announcing that her fighter-pilot brother had been killed. Honoring her grief, I’d chosen to stand for the flag under which my only uncle had offered the ultimate sacrifice. The student’s response was presented as an irrefutable argument; my choice was “racist.”

Furthermore, in this woke new world, my professional experience was no longer relevant because of the race and gender I’d been assigned at birth. Despite having created tens of thousands of jobs, promoted women and minorities, and coached scores of entrepreneurs, I was deemed an “oppressor” in the catechism of “wokeism.” Furthermore, the penance for being raised in a “systemically racist” society — founded on millennia of Greek, Roman and Judeo-Christian antecedents, no less — was submission, and, if resisted, cancelation.

The reason behind such tyranny came into focus for me when Condolezza Rice, former secretary of state and current director of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, told me she’d shared with her students that the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (9/11’s architect) had felt like “having Erwin Rommel under lock and key.” The blank looks on the faces of her very bright students revealed that they had never heard of WWII’s famous Desert Fox.

Until then, I’d traced the enmity to activists like Jackson and Hannah-Jones. Now, I could see that it also stemmed from students having swapped an education for indoctrination. Those enlisted as social justice warriors had avoided the lessons of history, missed out on refining skills that might have allowed them to judge assertions, and denied themselves the insights required to make wise trade-offs.

Because such uninformed activism brought with it a minefield of woke hostility, I kept to myself any reservations I harbored about critical race theory, gender fluidity, and climate alarm. And, when Stanford’s math department proposed achieving “racial equity” by eliminating AP math (as racist, no less), I also kept quiet. Instead, I hoped my hardscrabble climb to CEO might inspire those who saw themselves as victims of inequity. Ironically, those who strained to label my uphill journey a product of “white supremacy” were often the very beneficiaries of woke preferences.

Oppressor-victim

To understand this recipe for canceling predecessor generations, I spoke next with Stanford military historian Victor Davis Hanson. Because Hanson had written the following, I wanted his help in gracefully handling the oppressor-victim theme:

“We should not… allow a current affluent, leisure, and pampered generation to hijack the past, and damn it to perdition. (They have) not earned the right to… cancel… those of the past who won Gettysburg, or built the Hoover Dam, or produced a Liberty ship every week.”

While Stanford had long nurtured a remarkably diverse and admirably inclusive community, it nonetheless rejected Hanson’s counsel in favor of a now fashionable “institutional racism.”

When Graduate School of Business faculty were further instructed to avoid “racist and xenophobic rhetoric and actions against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community,” I found myself wondering if the addendum were a virtue-signaling accusation, or if it were based on something I’d simply never encountered in all my years at Stanford. And, when the facts behind subsequent murders (of a Capitol police officer and 10 Colorado shoppers) contradicted de rigueur narratives, I wondered if the time had come to move beyond racial memes.

Apparently not. With free markets also labeled “racist,” those of us with responsibilities outside the ivory tower began to feel our “diversity of optic” (based on long experience) had been dismissed in favor of a “diversity of identity” (rooted in ideology). So, while I care deeply about Stanford University, and like and admire its president, provost, and business school dean, I was beginning to feel isolated.

Their deference to selective diversity led me to reflect upon a meeting I’d conducted in Berlin as chairman of JetBlue Airways. After the meeting, I’d taken a stroll down Unter den Linden to the Bebelplatz, 500 yards to the east of Berlin’s famous Brandenburg Gate. It was at that plaza, on May 10, 1933, that newly empowered Nazi officials had orchestrated the burning of “objectionable” books. Later dubbed “The Night of Shame,” the conflagration eventually contributed to Germany’s liberal democracy turning a blind eye to Kristallnacht, the Holocaust and an appalling rationale for war.

While loath to compare such a long-ago shame with how I was currently feeling in Palo Alto, of all places, I remembered being impressed that, in Berlin, the survivors of that era’s cancelation had later inserted “stumbling stones” between pavers to ensure that all who followed neither forget, nor repeat, that calamity.

As I traversed the once-riven capital city, the ground-level reminders had provoked in me a surge of optimism. Surely, the world would avoid the sort of conflict for which my own father had gone to war. Surely, everyone realized by now that banning books, restricting free speech and stoking fear would lead to tragedy. And, just as surely, America would eventually reject totalitarianism, even in its “wokest” form.

Yet, here I was, only three years later, 6,000 miles to the west of Berlin, sensing I was perilously connected to a prior generation’s intolerance. Adding to my anxiety was a discovery that my grandchildren’s generation were being scheduled to view an honorable heritage through a lens cleverly manufactured to provoke shame.

Forced to consider moving to a less hostile teaching environment, I heard from former students. One female “of color” offered that, of all her professors, I’d been the most supportive of women and minorities. Another confirmed that the majority of his classmates felt silenced by the threats of a racist label. One student even scolded me for having allowed “the slings and arrows” of the woke to achieve their hoped-for effect.

I smiled wanly to see that Prince Hamlet had somehow survived Jesse Jackson. I, on the other hand, had failed utterly to anticipate the distorting polemics of identity politics. The script advanced during America’s annus horribilis had pitted race against race, gender against gender, and generation against generation, all risking a degradation of spirit worse than any virus.

As a former CEO, it seemed to me that the narrative had gone well beyond gaining political or market advantage. It had even exceeded antifa’s hope for French-Revolution-style anarchy. In fact, by 2021, it looked like a bold attempt at a hostile takeover of mankind’s best hope for peace and prosperity.

This conclusion led me to contrast two Americans best known for their connections to societal breakdown — a mid-19th-century Abraham Lincoln and a mid-20th-century Saul Alinsky. I selected Lincoln because he’d guided America through a civil war, and Alinsky because his dream had been to provoke civil unrest by inciting those he called the “have-nots” against those whom he called the “haves.”

President Lincoln’s observation of America’s vulnerability mirrored community organizer Alinsky’s precondition for a successful revolution. Thus, the warning attributed to Lincoln that “America will never be destroyed from the outside; if we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves” was the basis for the race and class warfare Alinsky welcomed by rewriting history, inciting envy and “canceling” a large portion of the population.

Whereas Martin Luther King had called upon our “better angels” to subordinate our differences to shared values and, thus, to overcome what Condi Rice called our nation’s “birth defect,” Alinsky chose to repudiate King’s redemptive dream. If he could get people to ignore e pluribus unum (America’s motto since 1782), he might be able to overcome the spirit under which the nation had thrived.

By 2020, the pandemic had offered activists a unique opportunity to cleave the nation along identity and tribal lines, skirting the 238-year-old aspiration that had been Alinsky’s steepest obstacle. Using a fear of cancellation to silence half the population, SJWs dismissed the steady social progress that was the trademark of the world’s most successful multicultural society. Instead of celebrating the progress flowing from our commonalities, they fomented division by pointing to historical injustices.

Between a pandemic, racial tensions and the absence of a Lincolnesque figure to bind up our wounds and bring us together, America was, indeed, vulnerable. As its citizens awakened to the soft tyranny promoted during the pandemic, many felt betrayed by institutions they’d once admired and leaders they’d once trusted. And, for my part, I discovered that the experience I’d had with cancellation in the academy was being repeated all across the nation.

While I may well survive, America will not survive the rewriting of its history, the violation of its Constitution and the abandonment of the freedoms it has promised to citizens of all political persuasions, ethnicities, genders and orientations. No matter our differences, unless we preserve free speech, secure our Constitution and re-enthrone individual responsibility over victimhood, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men will be unable to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.

And Alinsky’s vision will have canceled Lincoln’s.

Joel Peterson Bio

Joel Peterson is the Robert L. Joss Professor of Management at Stanford University, the former managing partner of the Trammell Crow Company, the former chairman of the board of Overseers of the Hoover Institution, the former chairman of JetBlue Airways and the founder and chairman of Peterson Partners, a sponsor for a quarter century of more than a dozen funds covering private equity, venture and real estate investments in hundreds of companies and real estate projects across the nation and throughout the world.

Emanuel Image provided by Nikki Crystal and Capitol Records for use by 360 MAGAZINE.

Emanuel × ALT THERAPY

One of the most anticipated debut R&B albums of the past year, Emanuel’s full-length project ALT THERAPY has been unveiled to the world today via Motown Records & Universal Music Canada. 

Before the world experienced moments of great upheaval and change this past year, an unknown new artist in Canada, a son of Ethiopian immigrants, had unknowingly written music that was prophetic to the times. His debut single, the emotionally stirring “Need You”, was released as the global pandemic struck, resonating with people around the world who were forced into isolation. Months later, when the brutal killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Trayvon Martin sparked a worldwide reckoning of systemic racism and racial inequality, Emanuel offered “Black Woman” to the world – his moving ode of reconciliation that honors the majesty of Black women. Last month, as vaccines were distributed and possibility began to take the shape of reality, Emanuel shared his prayer for the future with the release of “Worldwide”. Now, during the week of Juneteenth and one year after the release of his debut EP Session 1: Disillusion, Emanuel celebrates freedom, growth and love with ALT THERAPY, his full-length contribution to the “renaissance of beautiful black art in the world.”

ALT THERAPY is a journey. A narrative of discovering a deep self-awareness and celebrating personal growth, Emanuel’s debut album is the testament of a young man in the process of becoming a great man. 

“This album represents a spiritual self-discovery for me,” says Emanuel. “It’s about the nuances of the human experience. I hope ALT THERAPY inspires others to gain understanding about themselves and the world, and that it’s attached to beautiful memories in their lives the way certain music is attached my mine. That would be an honour.”

 

A collection of 12 songs, ALT THERAPY is home to Emanuel’s two EPs released in 2020, Session 1: Disillusion (nominated for the 2021 Traditional R&B/Soul Recording of the Year JUNO Award) and Session 2: Transformation, as well as six additional songs: the manifestation mantra “Worldwide”, the revelation of new love on “Pillows”, the emotional plea of “I Need a Doctor”, the inner reckoning on “Detention”, the discovery of authentic love on “I Been”, and the rare male R&B duet on “Hindsight” featuring fellow Toronto R&B artist Dylan Sinclair. See the full tracklist below.

Also released today is the visually striking official video for “Worldwide”, a song born out of Emanuel’s deep yearning to take his music, its message and energy, to people around the world while experiencing and absorbing the wisdom of many cultures. Directed by Kit Weyman and Executively Produced by Director X, the video is a visual depiction of Emanuel’s “Worldwide”manifestation mantra.

Emanuel’s talent is indisputable. Discovered by Canadian hip-hop icon Kardinal Offishall, launched by global superstar Idris Elba, signed by legendary R&B record label Motown Records, honored with a JUNO Award nomination for his debut EP, and championed by fans, critics and industry partners alike, Emanuel is one of the most destined new voices in R&B.

LISTEN TO ALT THERAPY HERE

WATCH THE “WORLDWIDE” VIDEO HERE

Brooklyn Art Studio illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Blank Slate Exhibition

Blank Slate’s Inaugural Summer Exhibition Series

Location and Timing

The Series will run from June 10 through July 18, 2021. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday from 6pm – 10pm and Saturday – Sunday from 1pm – 10pm. Artists will be present during the opening reception of each exhibition. Blank Slate is located at 283 47th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11220.

How to Attend

Please contact Jennifer Spencer to make an appointment. To secure tickets, visit Blank Slate Exhibitions.

SCHEDULE

MASKS by Spencer Flores and Maxwell Sykes

June 10 – June 18

MASKS examines the shared experiences and the psychology of hiding behind a mask. The compositions and subject matter of the work speak to communal experiences of feeling disconnected as we emerge from the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
 

Maxwell Sykes is a Los Angeles-based painter who focuses on oil painting and draws inspiration from color and figure. Maxwell learned basic skills from working with his father’s construction company in South Central LA at the age of 13. His work can be found on Instagram.

Spencer Flores, a Mexican American artist, is influenced by his obsession with music and music videos and an endless fascination with comics, cartoons, and film. Ren & Stimpy is one of his biggest influences when it comes to storytelling and exaggerated art styles. As an artist, he is constantly in search of the nostalgia of his youth. His work can be found on Instagram.

Everyday Goddess by Liliana Rasmussen

June 24 – June 27

Liliana Rasmussen is a Brooklyn-based artist from the West Coast whose work emphasizes feminine energy and agency and seeks to capture the beauty of women of color. A multi-disciplinary artist, she also creates tufted rugs, mirrors, and wall pieces. Her work can be found at Lily & Papaya and on Instagram

Rise of a Movement: BLM by Divine Williams

July 1 – July 10

Divine Williams, a Trinidadian photographer based in Brooklyn, has been documenting the evolving Black Lives Matter movement for more than seven years. This exhibit features her collection “We March for our Brother” (Trayvon Martin, 2013); “Uprising in Ferguson” (Michael Brown, 2014); “Memorial of Sterling” (Alton Sterling, 2016); and “The Last Straw” (George Floyd, 2020). Her work can be found on Instagram.

Faces and Memories by Frida Vargas

July 15 – July 18

Frida’s artwork evokes emotions drawn from experiences in the journey of her life, reflected in colors and abstract shapes. About “Faces and Memories,” Frida has [said / written]:

Sometimes the journey is tough. So much so that as a result of the pandemic, I learned the hard way that people aren´t forever, but art is. Unfortunately, I’ve lost loved ones, I’ve even lost myself. Life, despite everything, is astounding and unexpected, and we must accept it as such. In these difficult events, painting was the only way I could cope with these tragic circumstances, and it has been quite an experience. So, in this collection, I´m taking the human form by a different approach. What does it mean? The rest is up to you.

Born and raised in Chihuahua, Mexico, Frida is an artist and architect. In her works, she experiments with a wide range of different techniques, especially oil on canvas. Her paintings can be described as abstract and colorful compositions. Frida’s work can be found on Instagram.

For more information about the inaugural Summer Exhibition Series, visit Blank Slate.