Posts tagged with "journalism"

Hypeach for use by 360 Magazine

HYPEACH

Miami Swim Week wrapped up this weekend and one of California’s hottest new women’s fashion brands, Hypeach, made their debut appearance at the event.

As a young company that launched in early 2020, Hypeach has managed to quickly become a Southern California breakthrough brand, with the company being covered in Forbes, Access Daily, Telemundo and numerous other media outlets in its first year alone.

At Miami Swim Week, Hypeach showcased its recently released California Fresh Summer Collection, which included sexy yet tasteful eye-catching swimwear designs from their Los Angeles-made line, Hypeach Swim™. And, in addition to being a playful and feminine fashion line, one of the Hypeach core values is fashion that gives back. The company practices this by donating a portion of its sales to Global Girl Media, a non-profit organization that works to equip girls from underserved communities with training skills in journalism and media.

The Southern California brand was founded by Marlo and Brian Hovis. The husband & wife team are no strangers to the retailing world. Brian was VP of Marketing at Nordstrom & Head of Global Digital Marketing at Citibank before starting a line with his wife at the creative helm. Marlo is the Chief Brand Officer and Creative Director at Hypeach overseeing all brand strategy, product, creative and strategic partnerships. Last week, we got the chance to ask Marlo and Brian about their brand and partnerships.

What is Hypeach founded on?

Hypeach is a breakthrough California-based fashion brand that is inspired by the coastal lifestyle of Southern California. Hypeach offers affordable, stylish clothes that are distinctly Californian in aesthetic, hence its “California Fresh” style. Launched in 2020 to evolve the fast fashion ecommerce market space, Hypeach offers consistently high-quality apparel, unbelievable prices, and an exceptional customer experience.

Fashion That Gives Back is our mission. We donate a portion of every purchase to our charity partner, Global Girl Media, which equips young women from underrepresented backgrounds with journalism training and equipment to help reshape the media. We believe together we can accomplish so much more.

What was the experience like of being a standout successful fashion brand and landing a coveted spot at Planet Fashion TV’s Miami Swim Week showcase?

Miami Swim Week is like no other fashion event. Smoldering temperatures, sexy beautiful people, and styles, plus a distinct electricity in the air. We were honored to be able to debut our swim collection there. Putting together a fashion show at swim week truly was a dream and we were proud to be able to showcase our Made in Los Angeles Hypeach Swim line and represent California.

We brought our fun and flashy collection of swim and summer ready styles and everything about our show was simply happy & hopeful. Joy Corrigan, a Victoria’s Secret model and fashion icon, opened and closed our show and her younger sister Gina walked for the first time with us!

What is the partnership with Global Girl Media? How does Hypeach work to uplift the voices of underrepresented girls in media and journalism? 

Before we established Hypeach we knew we wanted to use fashion as a force for good. The business presented an opportunity to support causes in a larger way through collective giving with every purchase.

Global Girl Media (GGM) is such a powerful, female-run organization global in reach but HQ in Los Angeles. They equip young girls from marginalized communities with journalism training equipment & training to tell their own stories and contribute to the media landscape. They empower young women with media literacies to become positive agents of change.

Not only do we donate a portion of every purchase, but we periodically host participants at our HQ to create content, dress up, and have a unique experience in front of the camera. We’re currently exploring the possibility of refugee makeovers and how our partnership can deepen its connections. Marlo also sits on the executive board, and we are exploring how we can also work with fashion influencers and strategic partners to help support the mission and participants in creative ways.

Learn more about Hypeach here.

La Costa Duo by Hypeach for use by 360 Magazine

Hypeach for use by 360 Magazine

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Bill Muster Photo Awards Open July 1

Submissions for the prestigious Bill Muster Photo Awards, presented by the Society of American Travel Writers (SATW), will be accepted beginning today, July 1, through July 31. Open to amateurs as well as professionals who are members of SATW, this contest is one of the most highly respected and sought after by the most talented photographers in the travel industry.

The Bill Muster Photo Awards recognizes excellence in photography and is named for the renowned photographer, publisher, and tourism executive, Bill Muster. Since 1981, SATW has presented the Bill Muster Photo Awards and cash prizes for travel photography in a range of categories awarded at the annual convention.

Award categories range from culture, people, and nature to single subject and overall portfolios that represent a more comprehensive look at a photographer’s work. All images must have been shot between July 1, and June 30. Photos do not need to have been published in order to be submitted.

This year’s registration and submission period is July 1, 2021, to July 31, 2021. The entry fee is $35. Late registration is from August 1 until August 7 and will be at an increased fee of $55. This year’s three outstanding judges include a publisher and two art directors. Full competition rules and information on how to enter are found here. All contestants regardless of their status have an equal opportunity to enter and win cash prizes, up to and including the $1,000 Photographer of the Year award.

Winners of the Bill Muster Photo Awards will be announced at SATW’s annual 2021 Convention held this year at the lakeside city of Milwaukee. Registration for the 2021 SATW Annual Convention in Milwaukee is now open. New members are welcome and applications are available on their website.

SATW is working hand in hand with Visit Milwaukee to offer an exciting and informative meeting that includes world-class professional development, speakers, and tours of the local art and architecture, culture, and the city’s stunning natural assets that are driving it forward as a thriving urban destination.

Known as a big city of little neighborhoods, Milwaukee’s 191 unique neighborhoods are what make up the city’s one-of-a-kind culture. From Bay View to Bronzeville and from Clarke Square to Riverwest, Milwaukee’s unique neighborhoods are the backbone of the city. As they say, there’s no such thing as business as usual in Milwaukee.

SATW: A Welcoming and Vibrant Community

Founded in 1955, SATW remains the nation’s premier professional travel media organization comprising nearly 1,000 of the travel industry’s most experienced journalists, photographers, editors, broadcast/video/film producers, bloggers, website owners, media relations experts, and hospitality industry representatives from the United States, Canada and beyond. All members must meet and maintain the industry’s highest standards of productivity, ethics, and conduct, and support SATW’s mission of inspiring travel through responsible journalism.

SATW and its members are forever meeting and overcoming the challenges of the changing media landscape. As a result, the organization is a vibrant resource in and to the travel industry and is a valuable platform for bringing travel media and destinations together. SATW welcomes new applications and you can find information on the website.

Image via Transmedia Group for 360 Magazine

Maryam Henein – Q×A

Here at 360 Magazine, we were lucky enough to be able to speak with acclaimed journalist and activist Maryam Henein. We got to speak with her about her controversial and brave ongoing investigations as well as her work with her company HoneyColony. Read the entire conversation below.

So, you have a reputation as the most censored woman, even more censored than Laura Loomer, what aspects of your investigations and reports do you think have led to this?

I started feeling the wrath of technofascism, which is a term that I’ve popularized, as early as 2017, and in this case, it was in regard to selling CBD before mostly being on the front lines. Now today, everyone and their mother sells CBD, but back then it was novel. I started feeling censored for sharing information on the health benefits of CBD. Initially, we got shut down several times by different merchant processors, including PayPal, Stripe, and QuickBooks. My first ban was PayPal back in 2018. Then as I started doing investigations into the politics of CBD, I experienced even more censorship. I was a victim of Google’s ‘Medic Update’ and my website, HoneyColony was buried. Then I started doing research into Google and I was already covering vaccine safety, which is not a topic that the mainstream embraces. I discovered that Google is basically a drug company. And I went and reached out to Google whistleblower Zach Vorhies when I came upon his disclosure. As a result of Google’s algorithmic changes, we lost 67% of our traffic on HoneyColony. I was getting 500,000 unique visitors a month on our magazine and that all went to hell. And then slowly, as I started covering the Coronavirus, given that medical freedom and health are my beats, I got censored even more for peddling supposed “medical misinformation” because YouTube takes its directives from the World Health Organization, a.k.a “China.” I started covering politics and today I’m shadow banned on Twitter. I’m on my second strike on my second YouTube channel and banned from PayPal, Kiva, and GoFundMe. Square booted me the day of the “Deadly Insurrection.” I was a part of their CBD beta program and had signed an NDA, and for absolutely no reason, we lost our account. We went four months without being able to generate money. I soon learned that Dorsey owned Square up until a few months ago. So, I have been digitally assassinated, or they’ve tried to digitally assassinate my voice and my work. Back in 2017, I was telling people, Roseanne Barr today, you tomorrow. Well, here we are.

The topics of your stories have a wide range of backgrounds, from police brutality to animal extinction. It is obvious these issues are near to your heart. What inspires you to move on to a new and wildly different topic or area?

Just to set the record straight. I’m not really looking at police brutality, per se, that’s a subtopic of this multilayered psycho that I call George Floyd. Sometimes I cover stories by accident. I caught a lie by CNN or a kind of lie rather than by the mainstream media and I was driven to learn the truth. I am driven to show people how the mainstream media lies and deceives and doesn’t give a shit about details or accuracy. As far as the bees, they flew into my life and kind of stuck. Pun intended. Bees are wonderful teachers, they feed us, and they are working for the greater good. So, I am not sure what triggers my interest other than injustice, or something that I see will impact people on a global scale and it’s very hard to decipher fact from fiction. So, one has to be discerning and there’s a lot of corruption out there from actual journalists that are supposed to share the news with you. So, I’m an eclectic person, a lot of interests, I’m an intellectual. And I’ve also really dedicated many years of my life to empowering people to be their own best health advocate, having suffered from a chronic illness. Consider that today more and more information regarding health and wellness is buried.

Your film, Vanishing of the Bees was a massive success, what inspired you to convert your journalism into film? 

At that point, I was already working on independent projects of many kinds as a researcher and a producer, I wanted to make my own project and I decided. George Langworthy and I decided to collaborate and then the bees flew into our lives, and I had just recovered from a near-death experience where I was given a second chance and I wanted to cover something that is pertaining to all of us because we all eat, and we all take bees for granted. I wanted to give back and be in service to make the most out of my life.

Your current cases and investigation on the George Floyd case, what inspired you to research and investigate on your own?

As I mentioned earlier that kind of accidentally fell into the story when Zach Vorhies, the Google whistleblower, asked me about a year ago in Costa Rica, while we were under lockdown to recreate the George Floyd kneeling on his neck. So, he asked me to put my knee on his neck. And I asked, who’s George Floyd?  I don’t think anyone’s going to ever ask that question again and I interviewed the medical examiner’s office because I said, if you really want to look at how he died, let’s look at the death certificate autopsy report. I was told that it would take weeks and weeks, and I found another local publication that had said the same thing. Then, the next thing I saw was CNN had put out this preliminary report. So, they were trying to sow discord in the narrative. Soon, we had this tale of two autopsies that emerged and with Benjamin Crump and Michael Baden on the scene, which raised some suspicions that I was collecting. I just didn’t tap out of the story, and I was covering it. The different hearings and such and keeping a close eye. Then I decided, well, I’m probably suited to write the most comprehensive book out there because I’ve looked under lots of rocks, and I’m very detail oriented. So, I will have a lot of very interesting factual tidbits to offer people to show what really happened, and not what the mainstream wanted you to see, and what the corrupt government officials wanted you to see by sitting on the camera, body worn camera for four months.

What do you think is the biggest misconception about the George Floyd case? And what is the source of that misinformation?

The sources, definitely the mainstream media and the government officials behind the narrative and their objectives, whether it’s to defund the police, to destabilize America, to give the illusion that there’s systemic racism across the country. So, the biggest misconception, which is not really a misconception, because Keith Ellison, after all of this, went on 60 minutes and stated that this had nothing to do with race. This case has nothing to do with race. And that’s how it was painted. And while it could have characteristics of police brutality, it had nothing to do with race. And then you have the Attorney General. He also puts this emphasis on the many talking points that I discovered or that are obvious, but he believes in what you see with your eyes. Well, that’s a crock of shit, hello, movie magic, hello, eyes can deceive you. So many things are happening behind the surface. And that’s part used to trick human beings and to have them make decisions based on a lack of proper information and emotion. If you don’t have all the information your perception is skewed and you’re not able to make a proper conclusion or decision. So just really like many multi layered SOPs are just great examples of the lies, whether you want to call it the deep state or the mainstream media, which is the deep state bitch. They work hand in hand to deceive the people.

We know you got to speak with medical examiners to the 911 transcriptsand other information concerning the police department’s handling of the case, what were you able to find? And what was the most shocking piece of evidence you can speak on?

Well, I’m still gathering, still conducting investigations. So right now, I’ve uncovered a cover up. I’m not quite sure what the cover entails if it entails an informant. Clearly, someone I’m trying to speak to is gatekeeping the story and I’ve found some lies. I’ve done 911 calls. Well, there’s three, one from the store and two of the bystanders to the bystanders. Those were released and featured in the trial, but the main call has not been released. And in Minnesota, there’s a statute that only the caller can release the call. So, what is the prosecution asked for those bystanders to release the call, not the call from cut foods. I know who made the call. I know who identified the people in the store. And I’ll leave it at that for now. I have also obtained the death certificate. Just basically showing that George Floyd died of a heart attack while being restrained not because of being restrained. That one word has a big impact and can be debated emotionally and viciously. Probably I’d like to just pose well would have George Floyd died if he had not gathered lots of drugs. In that position now, Derek apparently had his knee on the neck of a team for 17 minutes and not much smaller child person survived. George Floyd was at least six foot four, 230 pounds. It took for three people to restrain him. So, would he have died? Without the drugs? Would he have died without the knee on the neck? Maybe not. So that was interesting to see what the death certificate is. I’m, I’m still trying to obtain some other records. I’ve just obtained the actual archival exhibits pretrial exhibits, so it’s much clearer and I’m putting together a short documentary. 

What significance did the George Ford case have on you personally and your brand HoneyColony?

It has no impact on my brand HoneyColony. As far as on me it’s been very revealing to see how information in this day and age is scrubbed by the Ministry of Truth and if you’re not there, covering it, and paying attention to the details, you will probably be a victim of what I call narrative supremacy, and you’ll probably be bamboozled. I’ve seen people who are well versed in this case, repeat a slight of numbers. For instance, George Floyd was arrested for aggravated robbery. The tale says the woman was pregnant, but the actual court document that I’ve read does not saying anywhere that she was pregnant. So, I don’t know where that piece of the puzzle or sorry that that detail started. But you have to be very, very detail oriented and specific. So, it’s, it’s taught me more than more than ever reminded me how the media lies, and how you have to be paying attention and really look at details because they should matter.

What did you learn about George Floyd’s life that you think more people should know about?

Well, George Floyd isn’t innocent and that doesn’t justify his death. But George Floyd was a career criminal, he spent the last 20 years of his life in and out of jail, and he was, according to some, bad news. He has appeared in at least one porno; he’s pretended to be a part of the water department and dressed in costume to help carry out this robbery. And so, we know that he can kind of act, play act and take on different personas if need be. So, let’s just keep that in the back of our minds. I do believe he was not an evil, or rather, you know, I think Lester, his friend, was a much bigger stand back. So, he certainly apparently was meant to change America, as one person stated. I don’t know what that means, but he was not supposed to die, and he was supposed to change. So do what you will with those phrases right now. 

What was the most difficult part in gaining sources and information about George Floyd’s life and death?

Well, it’s still currently difficult. I’m still under undertaking an investigation. And the hardest thing is people who can talk on behalf of Derek Chauvin. Nobody wants to say anything because they might wake up with a pig’s head on their doorstep. I’m not able to find any family members, very weird. So that’s been a challenge, contacting people from the force. I mean, I haven’t started trying to reach people on George Floyd’s side. I can tell you, for instance, I didn’t have any luck getting the initial second autopsy, independent from Michael Baden and Alicia Wilson. So where is that actual report? Was it just a verbal press release? He’s just the Hollywood medical examiner? Why wasn’t his autopsy even used in the trial of Derek Chauvin? Okay, sorry, I’ll just add that a lot of information has disappeared. I’ve been able to catch some of it because I was doing it in real time and when this first happened, but now it’s not like who owned that SUV Mercedes Benz. It’s not George. And you can’t find who the owner is. Although I do have a name. But yeah, so basically just information scrubbed, addresses. Very interesting that George lives in Texas at 3333. There’s a lot of three threes in this story. And six sixes.

Where can we learn more about you and your findings about the George Floyd case?

You can find me on my telegram channel at Truth Lives Here. Lady be on gab. And that book will be coming out next year. So, you can also contact me at Maryam@honeycolony.com 

Maryam Henein is an investigative journalist and functional medicine consultant. As founder and editor-in-chief of HoneyColony, an online magazine for health and wellness, she shares her wisdom with thousands of followers. She is also the director of the award-winning documentary film Vanishing of the Bees, narrated by Elliot Page. For more information, visit her website.  

HoneyColony is dedicated to cross-pollinating with companies who uphold high-quality standards that value planet, humanity, honesty, and fair-trade practices. HoneyColony is committed to unite the growing number of people adopting healthy lifestyles and seeking to cut through the hype and claims about natural products and remedies.  For more information, visit HoneyColony.

Krish Narsinghani of 360 Magazine in the 2021 Rolls Royce Wraith shot by Jeff Langlois for 360 Magazine

Krish

Photography by: Jeff Langlois

Krishan (Krish) Narsinghani exemplifies passion and creativity in all facets of his short career. Graduating from Indiana University with a degree in Informatics and concentrations in Business and Marketing, he’s grasped the constant change of the digital space and learned to move quickly in any endeavor.

With a background in the music industry – marketing music artists like 5 Seconds of Summer, James Arthur and the John Coltrane Estate (to name a few), he’s built an incredible raport identifying talent and scaling their careers through social media and digital strategy. Bringing that sense of direction to 360 Magazine, along with the journalism skills groomed over the past several years with the company, strengthens his vision for the brand as the current managing editor.

Krishan has written for other publications including Popshift Magazine and spirituality pieces for the Sant Nirankari Mission LA.

Follow Krish: LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram

Jarry Lee Q×A

360 MAGAZINE was lucky enough to sit down with Jarry Lee, a model, actress, musician and influencer from the UK. Lee has over 700,000 followers on Instagram, 30,000 TikTok followers and more than 700,000 Spotify streams.

She has also been seen in VOGUE Italia, POPSUGAR, Mic, Elite Daily, NY Daily News, AM New York, Women Fitness Magazine, Cliché Magazine, The New York Times, Thrive Global and more. She will also be featured in two upcoming books, “Tell Her She Can’t” by Kelly Lewis and “The Little Things” by Oliver Charles.

Authority Magazine named her one of 2020’s “Inspirational Women in Hollywood” while StarCentral Magazine called Lee a “rising star to watch in 2020.” You can click right here to see everywhere she has been featured.

360: How did you find a creative outlet in journalism?

Jarry Lee: I’ve always loved writing (everything from poetry to screenplays), and it was my childhood dream to write professionally. I feel lucky that I was able to do so as a paid, full-time job and that I was able to pitch and take on stories I was personally interested in. Writing is a cathartic process for me.

360: What was the biggest hurdle transitioning from writing for BuzzFeed to being in front of the camera?

Jarry Lee: I didn’t have much prior experience beyond taking some acting classes in the past in school and performing in a playwriting festival in prep school that I wrote for, so I did dozens of test shoots with photographers to practice and learn my best angles and posing. Speaking on camera felt natural, but I had to learn how to pose more naturally.

360: How has your experience in telling stories as a journalist and analyzing stories as the Deputy Books Editor helped you to tell the stories of others as an actress and model?

Jarry Lee: It has definitely helped me with more easily imagining the inner lives and motivations of my characters. Every time I interviewed sources for an in-depth piece, I felt that I gained insight into how other people’s minds worked. When I was writing a feature about Instagram in 2017, for example, I interviewed over 30 individuals and a few businesses, and their stories were really fascinating and completely changed my understanding of how people interact with social media.

360: How has being an influencer and online personality changed through the pandemic?

Jarry Lee: There are almost no in-person events, so in that aspect it’s become less interactive, but there are also more people online since everyone’s bored indoors. I’ve adapted to become a lot more self-sufficient — I rarely work with outside photographers anymore and instead have learned to shoot myself. Earlier this year I bought professional lighting and photography equipment, and recently even purchased a green screen! I’ve really enjoyed honing my video production and editing skills this year. Maybe that’s one small silver lining to the pandemic.

360: What is your favorite platform for creating content and why?

Jarry Lee: I love Instagram for being so curated and aesthetic-focused, but Twitter is my favorite platform for sharing thoughts and seeing others’ (as well as for really silly memes). I originally joined Twitter in 2009, way before I joined Instagram (in 2013).

360: How does your time as a model help you as an actress?

Jarry Lee: I think acting helps more with modeling than vice versa, but becoming more comfortable on-camera as a model has definitely helped me act more naturally, as well. Both require drawing your inner emotions out, onto your facial expressions and how you hold yourself generally.

360: How do you use your platform and large reach to influence ideas and actions of your audience?

Jarry Lee: Three topics I try to bring more awareness to via my platform are: Asian representation in entertainment, bisexual/LGBTQ+ representation and anxiety/mental health. All three are still not spoken about enough, so I think it’s important to share my experiences with my audience. I still frequently receive messages about how I came out as bisexual on the Netflix show “Dating Around,” for example, and it has really resonated with some of my followers when I’ve shared my past experiences with panic attacks and anxiety. I try to show the behind-the-scenes of my entertainment career, in part because there were very few Asian public figures in the entertainment industry when I was growing up. I hope that my non-traditional career path inspires others to take a risk and pursue their passions.

You can learn more about Jarry Lee by clicking right here. You can also follow her on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, Facebook and Spotify.

Rolls-Royce illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 MAGAZINE

Tips for Getting a Job Related to Pop Culture

If you know a lot about pop culture, you might have considered working in the field before. When it comes to getting a job, having a lot of knowledge will give you an advantage over your competitors as long as you know the right way to use it. Believe it or not, there are many chances to start a new career, especially if you’re considering integrating graphic design or writing. 

Preparing to Start a New Career

No matter what field you’re considering entering, having the right training can boost your resume. So, before you start applying to jobs, consider getting a degree in your chosen field. For example, if you’re thinking about going into writing, you might major in journalism or English. And if graphic design appeals to you more, get the training you need with a graphic design degree. Many times, students worry about paying for school, and other times, students are lucky enough to receive their parents’ help. For parents who take out Parent PLUS loans to help their children go to college, the good news is that these loans can be refinanced, leading to a reduced interest rate and the possibility of paying off their debts sooner. That’s why you might want to look into taking out a private student loan. Before signing the papers, it’s a good idea to do your research. For example, consider using a student loan repayment calculator to estimate what your monthly payments may be. That’ll help you create a realistic repayment plan, so your debt doesn’t overwhelm you.

Writing and Pop Culture

If you’re interested in writing, you might have a successful career path. For example, you could work as a freelance or staff writer and write about celebrities. Or you could be a content creator and create pieces for pop culture blogs. If you want to do more serious work, consider working in journalism. You may be able to create pieces on famous actors or other celebrities. If writing doesn’t appeal to you, consider going into editing, where you help the pieces created by others flow smoothly. You might feel that you’re interested in this job, but you may not want to leave your current job. Or you may still be in school and want to see what the career involves. You may consider working part-time as a freelancer, so you gain some experience. That’ll help you decide if this career is for you.

Graphic Design

You might decide that graphic design fits your skills better. If that’s the case, you could choose a career that involves making logos for pop culture events or making covers for magazines. You could also make posters for events or movies. And you could even get a job that includes making memes for social media accounts. If you study graphic design in college, you’ll get the skills you need to be successful. And if you decide not to go to college, you can still find online courses to get the experience you need. 

Tips for Success

It’s easy to tell yourself that a job doing freelance writing or creating logos isn’t an important job and doesn’t relate to your career goals. But this is not the case. For example, if you can create a social media post that goes viral, you’re already on the path to success. No matter what you ultimately want to achieve, it’s important to begin small. So, if your end goal is to work at an important magazine creating art, you’ll have to focus on getting the needed experience and skills first.

Maria Soloman illustration for 360 MAGAZINE journalism article.

The War on Journalism

by Justin Lyons

What a time it is to be a journalist.

During an era in which news is a divisive, politicized topic, one man seems to have been spearheading the charge against modern media. That’s what a brand new documentary from Juan Passarelli aims to cover, at least in part.

“The War on Journalism – the case of Julian Assange” takes the case of the controversial WikiLeaks founder. Assange now faces 175 years after his site published leaked documents with information sensitive to the United States government. Now we face the never-ending battle of journalistic principles versus legality.

The thing that sticks out to me at first thought is the idea that leaks have existed as long as governments and corruption have existed, which dates back to the beginning of time. As a journalist myself, I think we consider our job as watchdogs one of the most important jobs in a functioning society. If journalists aren’t delivering news telling consumers what they need to know and why they need to know it, we’d be missing a huge opportunity to hold powerful figures accountable.

Theodore Roosevelt once called journalists “muckrakers” because they, well, rake through the muck. They dig through the dirt to find that key that might be even dirtier than the dirt itself. While it doesn’t sound like an endearing term, journalists seem to take it as a compliment.

This documentary looks at the realities of being a reporter in the middle of the action, and it seems to no longer be safe to gather information about government action. It opens with what looks like a reporter being pepper sprayed by police and proceeds to show government officials claim they will not agree to refrain from prosecuting journalists for doing their jobs.

Assange was indicted under the Espionage Act with 17 counts. The Espionage Act is a United States law published in 1917 that aims to prevent interference in foreign relations.

While it might seem that the First Amendment could guarantee freedom for press to publish information with the public good in mind, John Kiriakou, described as a CIA torture whistleblower, brought up a really interesting point.

Kiriakou was charged in the Eastern District of Virginia and hired the lawyer who won cases for O.J. Simpson and George Zimmerman. That lawyer decided that Kiriakou’s case was impossible to win in the Eastern District of Virginia. His jury would have comprised of members of the CIA, the FBI, the Pentagon, intelligence community contractors and the Department of Homeland Security.

The same applies to Julian Assange. He was charged in the Eastern District of Virginia, where Kiriakou said no national security defendant had ever won a case.

Journalists aren’t seeking more freedom than the average U.S. citizen, but they should be protected with clearly defined rights. When the Sixth Amendment guarantees the right to an impartial jury, it can make you wonder how Kiriakou’s story is possible in the first place. It seems that seeking protection for the government has overwhelmed the protection of journalistic freedoms.

Overall, the documentary is definitely an interesting looking glass into what it’s like to be a journalist right now. I also think it’s an interesting look at journalistic protections. When thinking about people like Assange or Edward Snowen, who also appears in the documentary, I wonder where their protections start and end and how those protections are recognized if we consider them journalists.

In 2020, anyone can be a journalist, and using that freedom of press for information of public interest is something that is quite clearly protected by the Constitution.

Now that Assange is appearing in court for his extradition case, I look forward to the outcome, as it could become another landmark case for journalism in the United States.

If you’re interested in seeing “The War on Journalism – the case of Julian Assange” for yourself, you can check it out right here.

Rita Azar illustrates a photojournalism article for 360 MAGAZINE

Thomson Reuters Foundation x Omidyar Network

The Thomson Reuters Foundation has joined forces with Omidyar Network to document the devastating effects of COVID-19 on millions of people around the globe.

Using photography and journalism, COVID-19: The Bigger Picture aims to tell the stories of those most affected and most vulnerable to the pandemic that has changed the lifestyles of each person on the planet.

Antonio Zappulla, the CEO of the Thomson Reuters Foundation, said, “This pandemic is a global crisis like no other, affecting every person on the planet. The world is grappling daily to understand its scale and severity against an onslaught of information and misinformation. It has never been more critical to lean on the power of journalism excellence to cut through the noise with accurate and impartial storytelling.”

The Thomson Reuters Foundation works to advance media freedom and promote human rights while Omidyar Network is committed to building inclusive and equitable societies. Though the impact has been widespread, the goal of the project is to show how social inequality that existed before the inception of the virus has only been magnified by the spread of the pandemic.

“This virus has devastated lives and livelihoods across the globe. By combining the storytelling capabilities of the Thomson Reuters Foundation with photos from people whose lives have been upended by the pandemic, we will not only see the impacts on everyday life but also the systemic inequalities that brought us to this dire moment,” said Mike Kubzansky, the CEO of Omidyar Network.

COVID-19: The Bigger Picture, consists of two parts. First, a photojournalism competition allows anyone to submit a photo capturing the devastation of the coronavirus. Entrants may submit one photo with the prize being a photojournalism class taught by Thomson Reuters Foundation’s trainers. Photos may be entered beginning August 12th.

The documentation also includes a series of photo essays focusing on the United States. Experienced and decorated journalists will uncover the stories of workers assisting the elderly in Florida, caretakers of children in North Carolina and more. The photoessays will be released over the next three months, and readers can sign up to be notified when each essay is published.

“By capturing individual experiences, The Bigger Picture will document a wider story. It is only then, that we can truly change the narrative,” Zappulla said.

Laura Basset is the co-founder of the Save Journalism Project

Laura Bassett QxA

Laura Bassett is co-founder of the Save Journalism Project. She was formerly a senior culture and politics reporter at HuffPost before being laid off in 2019. She currently writes for GQ Magazine, the Washington Post, Rolling Stone, Marie Claire, the Daily Beast, and other publications. Along with John Stanton, she began the Save Journalism project after losing her job, when she became interested in why so many great news publishers were beginning to go under and having to lay off staff.

  1. How did you first get interested in journalism and politics and have these always been passions of yours?

I’ve always had a passion for writing, but wasn’t sure what direction it would take. I was in a graduate program for English Literature in 2008, thinking I wanted to go on and do a Ph.D. when Obama first ran for president. I became kind of obsessed with the election and started blogging on the side, and then I realized I enjoyed doing my politics blog a lot more than I enjoyed sitting in a library writing research papers that only one or two people would read. So I applied for a reporting internship at HuffPost, and the rest is history!

  1. Which are some of the biggest issues with modern journalism and how have they coincided with your career so far?

I think there are three big ones: Lack of diversity in newsrooms, the question of what objectivity in political journalism means in the age of Trump, and the financial/existential crisis facing the industry as a result of the digital age and big tech’s monopoly on ad revenue. The last one affected me the most directly, as I was laid off in 2019 after ten years at HuffPost. The site just wasn’t generating enough profits, having to compete with tech giants like Google and Facebook for ad money, and I lost my job along with scores of other journalists. I never expected to be freelancing for the first time, involuntarily, in the middle of my career, but it has proven to be a great exercise for my writing.

  1. What have been the most valuable skills/pieces of knowledge that you have learned from working at HuffPost?

I never went to journalism school, so most of what I know about reporting I learned at HuffPost. I learned how to write a compelling lede and nut graf, how to draw interesting things out people in interviews, how to show both sides of an issue without necessarily drawing a moral equivalence between them. I learned how to build source relationships and hustle for scoops. And I developed a deeper knowledge of politics and my particular beat, which for a long time was women’s rights issues. I learned how to own up to mistakes immediately and correct them in a transparent way, how to accept constructive criticism, and how to tune out the internet trolls and harassment. All the basics!

  1. What motivated you to co-found the Save Journalism Project and what made it special as an initial idea?

John Stanton, formerly of BuzzFeed, and I were laid off the same week in January of 2019. It was very unexpected for both of us: He was the Washington Bureau chief at the time, and I was a senior politics reporter. There seemed to be very little rhyme or reason to who was laid off that year; news outlets were forced to cut hundreds of staffers and had to make some really tough decisions. At the same time, local newspapers like the New Orleans Times-Picayune were going under entirely. We could see that our whole industry was facing a potentially fatal financial crisis, and we felt like if we didn’t fight for it ourselves, we didn’t know who would. So this project was born.

  1. How can you and your teamwork with or against big tech companies to improve the integrity of news?

Big tech companies are the financial competitors to news publishers, and it isn’t a fair fight right now. They gobble up about two-thirds of the digital ad market, leaving very little money for the actual content creators and publishers from which they also profit. Right now, we are looking to Congress and federal and state antitrust regulators to conduct antitrust investigations into the big four– Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon–and hoping that when they see the devastating impact those companies are having on newspapers, they will break them up and/or regulate them and create a more even playing field.

  1. In the era of fake news and heavy media bias, how can technology be used for the greater good in terms of addressing populations?

“Fake news” is a term the president has thrown at real news outlets because he doesn’t like their coverage of him. By and large, the news stories he calls “fake” are true and factual. But the internet does have an actual fake news problem, which is the disinformation that fringe activists and bad actors spread online, particularly on Facebook and Twitter. I think social media platforms have a massive responsibility to closely monitor and regulate the false propaganda raging through their sites, especially close to election time.

  1. In your opinion, how do you see the future of journalism and how can the Save Journalism Project be a part of this future?

I don’t know what I see for the future of journalism because, especially since COVID, we are on an extremely troubling trajectory. What I hope to see in the future of journalism is a sustainable business model– one in which people are happy to pay for news, and one in which news publishers and magazines don’t have to compete with Google in a David and Goliath-type situation for ad money to survive. And ideally, newsrooms can stop firing and start re-hiring again, because so much talent has been lost in the past few years.

  1. Why is it so important that our country defends the freedom of the press and how can this freedom lead to a more functional democracy?

We’re at the nexus of several historic national crises at the moment, including a deadly pandemic, so journalism–especially local journalism–has never been more important to get life-saving information across to the people and to hold powerful people and institutions to account. At the same time, we have a president attacking the press and encouraging violence against us, along with these devastating financial issues. Without a robust and thriving free press, no one is there to uncover corruption and expose the lies of politicians and inform the electorate and just, basically, keep people aware of what’s happening in their communities and the world at large. That in itself is a massive threat to democracy.

  1. What kinds of opportunities do you have for people who may want to get more involved with the Save Journalism Project?

Please contact us! We’re looking for help raising money, we’re funding freelance stories on local news deserts, and we can always use the voices of other journalists who would like to fight with us to save this industry.

  1. Do you have any clear goals or visions for expanding this Project’s influence, and if so, what are they?

Our primary focus and objective are on policymakers. We aim to get U.S. lawmakers and regulators to address the exploitation of the online marketplace by Google and Facebook which gives them an unfair advantage in the competition for digital advertising revenue. Antitrust regulators in Australia and the U.K. have begun to take these kinds of steps that are necessary and we are encouraged that their American counterparts appear to be on the verge of similar actions.

It is only after the distortions of the marketplace have been addressed that we can rebuild a sustainable business model for journalism in the digital age, particularly local news. Given our focus on policymakers, we are more supporters rather than drivers of changes in the industry. We do not favor any specific model for what kind of journalism industry emerges from these multiple ongoing crises, only that we believe it must include a viable method for news outlets to monetize their content through advertising.

360 Magazine, Protests, VFILES

Journalists × Curfew Orders

Are curfew orders without press exemptions constitutional?

In the wake of widespread protests against police violence and racial injustice, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press published an interactive map tracking curfew orders imposed by cities, counties and states — and whether they included exemptions for the news media.

Since then, the Reporters Committee has been tracking incidents in which journalists have been assaulted or arrested for supposedly violating curfew. A Reporters Committee review of the incidents reveals a troubling trend of law enforcement arresting, detaining, pepper-spraying or tear-gassing journalists who clearly identified themselves as members of the press.

In a special analysis, Linda Moon, the Reporters Committee’s Stanton Foundation National Security Fellow, and Legal Intern Sasha Peters explore the constitutionality of curfew orders that don’t include carve-outs for the press.

“While there are no previous cases in which emergency curfew orders have been challenged for lacking media exemptions,” Moon and Peters write, “related cases suggest that curfew orders that do not contain press exemptions may be unconstitutional under the First Amendment.” Read their special analysis here.