Posts tagged with "Indiana University"

Carly Weinstein via 360 MAGAZINE

Carly Weinstein

Listen to 360 MAG‘s podcast interview f/ Carly Weinstein on SPOTIFY.

Watch 360 MAGAZINE‘s interview with Carly Weinstein YOUTUBE.

Carly Weinstein is fast becoming Gen Z’s Carrie Bradshaw. With a strong emphasis on popular culture, mental health as well as body positivity, this charismatic content creator engages on a wide spectrum of topics with her new podcasts–Hot Girl Talks and Ok, Stop Wine-ing. Of late, she participates in bantar alongside of Vaughn Lowery about her meeting with Drew Barrymore and what the cards may hold for her future.

With an aggregate following of a half million and over 38 million likes on TikTok, Carly is this generation’s everyday gal-pal. Her comedic content focuses on everyday, real-life challenges which people in their twenties experience. Along with her two co-hosts and best friends, Hailey and Jaz, the trio hosts “Hot Girl Talks” – a weekly series that pinpoints Gen Z growing pains in NYC.

On a lighter note, Carly co-hosts “Ok Stop Wine-ing” alongside her mom. She says , “a great lesson for a mother and a daughter.” The duo executes weekly confabulations while offering advice on how to meticulously navigate life.

Following in the footsteps of the iconic bloggers of the 2000s’, Carly self-taught herself how to code and build websites. During her adolescence at Indiana University (IU), she developed “All Things C.” It provided her with an opportunity to create a safe space where she openly spoke about her eating disorders and body dysmorphia to a relatable demographic of her peers. “No matter what I’m talking about… I make sure the basis of my brand always has those underlying messages of ‘you’re beautiful no matter what,’…and giving people advice on how to combat some of those hard times in life.” “I’ve been through plenty of mental health issues in my life, so I speak to my following as if I’m speaking to my younger self or a younger sibling.” Priding herself as the “mom” of group, Carly has always possessed a knack helping those in need.

After graduating from IU, Carly relocated to NYC as a social media manager. Subsequently, she expeditiously transitioned into an avid TikToker, garnering recognition for her unapologetic approach. Thus, she discovered her niche as a creator.

In her leisure, she traveled and grew fond of pickleball while building strong ties to her community.

“I’m very involved with Jewish youth organizations like BBYO… My family is really big with making donations to cancer charities, also mental health organizations like the National Eating Disorders Association.”

Carly Weinstein

In the near future, Carly hopes to become an advocate for mental stability.

INSTAGRAM / TIKTOK

By: Jess Chen, Vaughn Lowery

IKUE NEWSON

Ikue Newson was born in Indiana of African, Indian and European ancestry. Growing up as the youngest of six children, she always reached maturity and speed in her life decisions. Ikue obtained a BA in Philosophy from Indiana University, and quickly after moving to Los Angeles to pursue a career in modeling. Modeling has been an outlet for Ikue’s unique fashion sense. Ranging from athleisure to avant-garde, Ikue revels in a multitude of editorial and lifestyle campaigns. In addition to modeling, she loves creative writing, horseriding and spending time with her standard poodle, Ghost. After gaining status as a notable model, she aspires to attend law school.

BOOK

Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Top mode Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Ikue Newson top model via 360 MAGAZINE
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.

height: 5’8″
hair color: brown
eyes: honey
bust: 32″
waist: 23″
hips: 33″
shoes: 7

DIGITALS

Ikue in 360 MAGAZINE
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model Ikue Newson inside 360 MAGAZINE.
Model intro video Ikue Newson for 360 MAGAZINE.

Runway

Instagram

Twitter

Tiktok

Krish Narsinghani of 360 Magazine in the 2021 Rolls Royce Wraith shot by Jeff Langlois for 360 Magazine

Krish

Photography by: Jeff Langlois

Krishan (Krish) Narsinghani exemplifies passion and creativity in all facets of his short career. Graduating from Indiana University with a degree in Informatics and concentrations in Business and Marketing, he’s grasped the constant change of the digital space and learned to move quickly in any endeavor.

With a background in the music industry – marketing music artists like 5 Seconds of Summer, James Arthur and the John Coltrane Estate (to name a few), he’s built an incredible raport identifying talent and scaling their careers through social media and digital strategy. Bringing that sense of direction to 360 Magazine, along with the journalism skills groomed over the past several years with the company, strengthens his vision for the brand as the current managing editor.

Krishan has written for other publications including Popshift Magazine and spirituality pieces for the Sant Nirankari Mission LA.

Follow Krish: LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram

Walter Cancer Foundation Invests $11 million in IU and Purdue

The Walther Cancer Foundation will invest $11 million to advance collaborative cancer research at Indiana University and Purdue University by supporting scientists through bioinformatics — an increasingly critical aspect of their work.

Bioinformatics involves managing and analyzing the massive amounts of data generated by scientific research — turning data into knowledge that could lead to new cancer treatments.

“We hope this gift enables scientists at IU and Purdue to dig more deeply and refine their studies so they can point out new pathways to good patient outcomes in cancer,” said Tom Grein, president and CEO of the Walther Cancer Foundation. “Sometimes you have so much data, it’s hard to comprehend where it’s leading you. I hope the data-driven analysis will uncover nuggets of opportunity that would otherwise never be seen.”  

Income from the new Walther Cancer Foundation Bioinformatics Fund will continuously support bioinformatics personnel, technology, and other tools shared by the cancer research programs at both universities. In addition, IU and Purdue will make their own investments into the fund. 

“The Walther Cancer Foundation leadership understands the central importance of data and analytics in developing better treatments and, ultimately, cures for cancer,” said  IU School of Medicine Dean Jay L. Hess, MD, PhD, MPH. “We are tremendously grateful for their support and the confidence they have in our work.” 

Timothy Ratliff, the Robert Wallace Miller Director of the Purdue Center for Cancer Research, said the latest gift from the Walther Foundation is a continuation of a longstanding collaboration, commitment and investment that will build on the center’s success in cancer drug discovery and development — and will help sustain the center’s computational genomics and bioinformatics core for years to come. “Once again, we are grateful to the Walther Cancer Foundation’s vision and generosity, which is so important to our research and success. This continuing partnership, plus our own investments and fundraising, will secure what we’ve already established and enable us to grow into the future.”

Kelvin Lee, M.D., named this week as the new director of the IU Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center and the H.H. Gregg Professor of Oncology, said having strong capabilities in bioinformatics is essential to cancer research.  

“The genetic, biochemical, cellular and immune pathways that can lead to cancer are extraordinarily complex and intertwined. Recent cutting-edge advances in technology means that researchers now have unprecedented amounts of data on these pathways, but this seriously challenges our ability to analyze these huge mounds of information to make sense of what is actually going on,” Lee said. “We are fortunate that the Walther Cancer Foundation understands that breakthroughs require the expertise and the tools, like artificial intelligence, to help us analyze all this data so we can understand what’s really important.”

This level of collaboration and sharing of a key resource like a bioinformatics core is unusual among a pair of National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers. But it also reflects the complementary nature of the two institutions.

Purdue’s Center for Cancer Research is a basic science cancer research center with more than 110 researchers that is a leader in biomedical engineering and cancer drug development.

The IU Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center is a comprehensive cancer center with nearly 250 cancer researchers who conduct basic lab work and drug development but who are also engaged in clinical care and population health research.

“Each of them has different capabilities, different levels of expertise, different interests,” Grein said. “But when you get scientists to collaborate, the outcomes are better.” 

Since its founding in 1985, the Walther Cancer Foundation has invested more than $165 million in cancer-focused medical research and in research and education aimed at supporting cancer patients and their families.

Walther has previously supported cancer bioinformatics at IU and Purdue on a year-to-year basis. This new gift establishes a fund that will ensure the bioinformatics work continues in perpetuity.

The Walther Foundation endowment provides the opportunity to develop the expertise and the tools that are needed to face current and future challenges in biology and the cancer field, said Majid Kazemian, an assistant professor in Purdue’s departments of Biochemistry and Computer Science. His research focuses on integrating computational and experimental approaches to study pathogen interaction with host cells and immune system in infectious diseases and cancers caused by pathogens. 

“The Purdue University Center for Cancer Research has nearly 100 investigators who are actively engaged in understanding molecular mechanisms of various diseases including lung, liver and prostate cancers, many of which have begun to utilize genomics data in their studies,” Kazemian said. “Large genomic public data on many diseases generated over the last decade are a treasure trove of unexplored information. Walther Foundation’s funds endowment will enable analysis of big data generated by our center’s members and collaborators as well as an exploration of growing public genomics data to contextualize and translate our findings.”  

Less-costly access to bioinformatics expertise and resources enabled by Walther Foundation will open up new avenues for many of the Purdue center’s scientists to broaden the impact and clinical translation of their discoveries, Kazemian said. “It will also encourage our scientists to perform large-scale genomics assays and will foster new collaborations.”

Harikrishna Nakshatri, Ph.D., the Marian J. Morrison Professor of Breast Cancer Research at IU School of Medicine, said he relies on bioinformaticians to design experiments, analyze data and assist him in publishing research results more quickly. The Walther Foundation gift supports that very expensive process, and the collaboration means researchers have more bioinformaticians available when they are needed. All of it combines, Nakshatri said, to enable scientists to reach conclusions that have real benefits for patients.

“If you really believe in your hypothesis,” Nakshatri said, “now you have a chance to test it because you are not burdened by the financial aspects.” 

According to Hess, the new resources will allow IU’s partnership with Purdue to continue to improve the health of Hoosiers. “We have worked closely for decades,” Hess said. “This new collaboration in data sciences will accelerate our ability to benefit cancer patients across the state and far beyond.”

About the Walther Cancer Foundation

The Indianapolis-based Walther Cancer Foundation is a private grant-making foundation that supports and promotes interdisciplinary and inter-institutional cancer research, both bench and clinical. The clinical research it supports encompasses clinical trials as well as behavioral studies, the latter as part of the foundation’s commitment to Supportive Oncology. The Walther Foundation has two primary goals: to support cancer research with the aim of discovering better treatments, if not cures, and to develop a comprehensive approach for supporting patients with cancer and their families. Since its founding, the foundation has invested over $165 million cancer-focused research.

About the Purdue Center for Cancer Research

Since 1978, the Purdue University Center for Cancer Research has been a National Cancer Institute-designated basic-research cancer center. Only seven institutions in the United States have earned this title. Being a basic-research center means it does not treat cancer patients directly. Its work focuses on investigating cancers where they begin — at the cellular level — to investigate the cause of, and cure for, one of the most devastating killers of our time. Doctors and scientists throughout the world use the center’s discoveries to develop methods, medicines and medical devices to save and enhance patient lives. 

About the IU Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center

The Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center is home to the cure of testicular cancer, the world’s only healthy breast tissue bank and is just one of 51 NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the nation. The prestigious comprehensive designation recognizes the center’s excellence in basic, clinical, and population research, outstanding educational activities, and effective community outreach program across the state. Its physician-scientists have made protocol-defining discoveries that have changed the way doctors treat numerous forms of cancer.

Image courtesy of Purdue University

New Purdue Pharmacy Programs

Purdue pharmacy programs take innovative approach to saving lives

Programs designed to provide much-needed health care services to rural families in Kenya are leading to a new generation of medical professionals and innovators – who are helping save the lives of those facing financial and mobility constraints.

Purdue University’s College of Pharmacymhas a strong presence in Kenya, with multiple programs supporting the health care needs of families. Purdue is one of a handful of schools involved in the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) program, which promotes and fosters a comprehensive approach to address the multifaceted needs of the western Kenyan population AMPATH serves.

This program has helped to permanently change the trajectory of the millions of citizens it serves. One such example is Benson Kiragu, who was one of the first Kenyans the AMPATH program reached. Benson’s experience with AMPATH serves as a microcosm of the impact AMPATH and consortium partners like Purdue can have in unlocking the potential of vulnerable populations.

When Kiragu first met AMPATH staff, he was one of many street youth with an extensive list of health issues that impeded his desire to break the poverty cycle. He suffered from eye conditions, which could have easily led to permanent blindness, and life-threatening asthma that has nearly taken his life on several occasions.

However, through the support of a team of faculty from Purdue and Indiana University, Kiragu has been able emerge from his humble beginnings to become the leader of several initiatives that now prevent other Kenyans from being trapped in the same poverty cycle he once found himself in.

Now, Kiragu is leading programs focused on providing education to street kids and treating cardiovascular and other diseases in the clinic and in homes.

“I know from my own experiences that working together as teams has helped to dramatically improve health care in Kenya,” Kiragu said. “Western Kenya now has some of the best access to health care in sub-Saharan Africa and this infrastructure is being used to help people of all ages and incomes.”

Through Kiragu’s training as a pharmacist, he has been able to become a part of the transformation in the roles that pharmacists play in Kenya through the support of the Purdue’s College of Pharmacy, Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, and Moi University School of Medicine.

“Pharmacists are now seen as experts in providing health care support to patients,” Kiragu said. “We know how certain medications will likely impact patients and which ones are the most likely to improve their lives with minimal side effects.”

Kiragu said he was inspired by the work of Julie Everett, an associate professor of pharmacy practice from Purdue who was based full time in Kenya. Everett had suffered an unexpected health emergency and passed away in 2006 but was able to inspire individuals like Kiragu to follow in her footsteps and address the needs of the Kenyan population.

“Kiragu was determined to become a pharmacist and carry on the great work Julie had started with the people of Kenya,” said Sonak Pastakia, who was hired in 2007 to lead Purdue’s presence in Kenya. “I continue to be thankful that programs like AMPATH and people like Julie have been able to inspire vulnerable youth like Benson to become the change agents the country needs to prevent additional generations of Kenyans from succumbing to treatable illnesses or being trapped in the poverty cycle.

“It is because of AMPATH’s years of collaborative efforts that I have the good fortune of working alongside people like Benson who have a deep firsthand knowledge of the challenges Kenyans face and then work tirelessly to overcome them.”

Pastakia and his team in Kenya have worked with the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization to patent some of their technologies and approaches. They are looking for additional partners as they work to take their proven approaches and expertise to other parts of the world. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization at otcip@prf.org

About Purdue Research Foundation

The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Established in 1930, the foundation accepts gifts; administers trusts; funds scholarships and grants; acquires property; protects Purdue’s intellectual property; and promotes entrepreneurial activities on behalf of Purdue. The foundation manages the Purdue Foundry, Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, Purdue Research Park and Purdue Technology Centers. The foundation received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.