Posts tagged with "eating disorders"

Carly Weinstein via 360 MAGAZINE

Carly Weinstein

Listen to 360 MAG‘s podcast interview f/ Carly Weinstein on SPOTIFY.

Watch 360 MAGAZINE‘s interview with Carly Weinstein YOUTUBE.

Carly Weinstein is fast becoming Gen Z’s Carrie Bradshaw. With a strong emphasis on popular culture, mental health as well as body positivity, this charismatic content creator engages on a wide spectrum of topics with her new podcasts–Hot Girl Talks and Ok, Stop Wine-ing. Of late, she participates in bantar alongside of Vaughn Lowery about her meeting with Drew Barrymore and what the cards may hold for her future.

With an aggregate following of a half million and over 38 million likes on TikTok, Carly is this generation’s everyday gal-pal. Her comedic content focuses on everyday, real-life challenges which people in their twenties experience. Along with her two co-hosts and best friends, Hailey and Jaz, the trio hosts “Hot Girl Talks” – a weekly series that pinpoints Gen Z growing pains in NYC.

On a lighter note, Carly co-hosts “Ok Stop Wine-ing” alongside her mom. She says , “a great lesson for a mother and a daughter.” The duo executes weekly confabulations while offering advice on how to meticulously navigate life.

Following in the footsteps of the iconic bloggers of the 2000s’, Carly self-taught herself how to code and build websites. During her adolescence at Indiana University (IU), she developed “All Things C.” It provided her with an opportunity to create a safe space where she openly spoke about her eating disorders and body dysmorphia to a relatable demographic of her peers. “No matter what I’m talking about… I make sure the basis of my brand always has those underlying messages of ‘you’re beautiful no matter what,’…and giving people advice on how to combat some of those hard times in life.” “I’ve been through plenty of mental health issues in my life, so I speak to my following as if I’m speaking to my younger self or a younger sibling.” Priding herself as the “mom” of group, Carly has always possessed a knack helping those in need.

After graduating from IU, Carly relocated to NYC as a social media manager. Subsequently, she expeditiously transitioned into an avid TikToker, garnering recognition for her unapologetic approach. Thus, she discovered her niche as a creator.

In her leisure, she traveled and grew fond of pickleball while building strong ties to her community.

“I’m very involved with Jewish youth organizations like BBYO… My family is really big with making donations to cancer charities, also mental health organizations like the National Eating Disorders Association.”

Carly Weinstein

In the near future, Carly hopes to become an advocate for mental stability.

INSTAGRAM / TIKTOK

By: Jess Chen, Vaughn Lowery

Eating disorder illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Eating Disorders × Covid-19

Eating Disorders and Covid-19

More than 30 million people in the U.S. suffer from eating disorders

COVID-19 can be a nightmare for thembecause of the following triggers:

  • Empty grocery shelves
  • Feelings of uncertainty and loss of control
  • Social media messages about avoiding the “Quarantine 15” pound weight gain are especially harmful to those with existing eating disorders.

A recent study conducted by the International Journal for Eating Disorders found that symptoms worsened across the board for people with anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating disorders nationwide since the lockdowns in March. Among respondents, 62% of people with anorexia have experienced more severe restriction and food fear during the pandemic, while 30% of those with bulimia and binge-eating disorder reported experiencing more binge-eating episodes, and a greater urge to binge.

Some of the facts about eating disorders are sobering:

  • 9% of the US population will suffer from an eating disorder in their lifetime
  • Almost 1% of us suffer from anorexia nervosa
  • Between 2-3% of us have bulimia nervosa
  • Binge eating disorder (BED) is experienced by between 2-3% of us
  • 10% of those with eating disorders lose their lives as a result
  • Eating disorders are second only to opioid overdose as the deadliest mental illnesses
  • About 26% of people with eating disorders attempt suicide

Eating Recovery Center is the nation’s largest eating disorder treatment center (with offices around the country, & virtual treatment options).  Eating Recovery Center provides comprehensive treatment for anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, and other unspecified eating disorders.

Feeding Our Warriors Daughters

IN THE TREATMENT OF ADULT WOMEN, we often hold discussions on powerful women being “warriors” in recovery, overcoming the trials of an eating disorder and likely other hardships.

IN WORKING WITH ADOLESCENT GIRLS, I sometimes hear comments on how “sweet” the work of younger girls must be by comparison, or sometimes even how “sad” it must be to see younger girls’ struggle. In response, I routinely say that these girls are the truest warriors – a path less refined by age, but sometimes with just as many battle marks.

SO, HOW DO WE EMPOWER our adolescent girls to be warriors in their recovery while also holding space for them to stay at a developmentally-appropriate place in their life and recovery work?

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

Clementine Adolescent Treatment Programs Director of Nutrition Services Amanda Mellowspring, MS, RD/N, CEDRD-S is a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian with over a decade of experience in program development and clinical application working with eating disorders at various levels of care.

Demi Lovato’s Overdose

25-year-old American singer, songwriter, and actress, Demi Lovato was found lying unconscious in her home on Tuesday after a suspected overdose. She is currently recovering and receiving treatment at a hospital in LA. Lovato has stated how she has previously had issues dealing with eating disorders, self-harm, addiction, and mental health problems. She had also made a documentary regarding her struggles that affected her daily life along with trying to stay sober, but in June 2018 Lovato released a new song titled Sober in which she sings “I’m not sober anymore.” Her documentary went on explaining how these problems began at a very young age, such as having suicidal thoughts and bulimia when she was only 10 years old, and trying cocaine for the first time when she was 17. Even before starting the hit series on Disney Channel’s “Sonny with a Chance” and “Camp Rock,” she had been a huge target for bullying. There were many struggles and pressures on her as she drove quickly to fame at such a young age. Lovato is currently receiving lots of support from fans and celebrities throughout social media while wishing her a quick recovery.