Posts tagged with "pandemic"

monkeypox LA via 360 Magazine by 360 Magazine

MONKEYPOX LA

The United States declares monkeypox a national health emergency

Unfortunately, Los Angeles is plagued by monkeypox. As mysterious as it has become, human scientists have defined it as a disease that is further from the truth. In fact, many authoritative sources have labeled it a disease of gay men, when in fact it is closer to the dermis than a medical skin condition. A rash that begins to appear like chickenpox. These are the types of hybrids of ebene pimples that he obtained through several seasons. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it is widely spread through kissing, anal, oral, vaginal, skin-to-skin contact, and soiled bedding such as towels. TikTok, the social media platform, has come to the rescue with recorded testimonials assuring us that ghee we are not gay and that they got it from the masseur during a spa service or a night out with a woman. Yet with more than 6,000 cases moving from west to east as covid unfolds, one wonders if hospitals will be overwhelmed during their intersection. One thing is for sure as Los Angeles’ coronavirus numbers flatten. Click HERE for Los Angeles County’s Weekly Monkeypox Case and Vaccine Summary.

Although where the Monkeypox is most inclined is in three states: The states of Washington, New York and Georgia have the highest concentration of cases. Most infections have happened among homosexual men. The World Health Organization (WHO) prescription of reducing the number of partners for men who have sex with men to curb the disease has offended the gay community, which fears that a stigma like that experienced with HIV will be repeated. Efforts to combat monkeypox are not being enough to prevent its rapid spread in the United States. For this reason, the Joe Biden government has decided to declare a national health emergency regarding the disease, a step that it has resisted taking until now. The WHO already declared an international emergency on July 23.

Limit Concealed Carry Guns

After conducting investigations on the homeless, they seem to be in the direct line of danger. Pleading for water and a cell charger around 3am in central LA, this is bar far from the most marginalized group at risk. During a probe of Pico Blvd, we witnessed the indigent in search of finding electricity for their small appliances. On the other hand, this walking case study began at a popular bar in Santa Monica and ended at a Brazilian restaurant with hanging canopy lights attached to an exposed extension cord and plug.  Once both our cell and smart watch died, this became a lifeline for us to grab am shared ride as there were no law enforcement in site for well over seven hours. With petty crime and murder on the climb, there’s a huge demand to own a concealed weapon in both LA and NYC. The new law in New York establishes a strict licensing process to obtain a concealed carry permit and a list of places considered “sensitive”.

Click HERE for Los Angeles crime statistics and citywide traffic statistics.

Apply for a License

Every day, New York residents seeking a CCW permit begin their gun permit certification process with US Concealed (New York state approved agency). To find out if you can have a gun license in New York State, US Concealed has put together a simpler online concealed carry permit qualification survey and see if you could get a license. click HERE for further information.

Article: Vaughn Lowery

Growing heart illustration

MENTAL HEALTH – DR. ALEX ALVARDO

Even though we have made great progress in bringing people into therapy during the pandemic, there is still a huge stigma about therapy – that it doesn’t work. In order to really change this perception, we must do more upfront work to make sure people are being matched correctly to qualified therapists and psychologists who can care for, and treat, that person’s individualized needs. To achieve this successfully requires more than a simple Internet search or app signup.

One of the biggest missteps someone can make when searching for a therapist is blindly accepting the most convenient option. This could come in the form of a quick Internet search (just because something pops up in the No. 1 position on Google does not mean it is the best option for you); or taking a referral from a friend or family member (just because a therapist is right for someone else, does not mean it is the best match for you). Additionally, skipping the therapist interview step, and rushing to the hiring step (or signing up on a mental health app), can make you feel committed or trapped with a therapist that was never the right match for you in the first place. It is true that the year 2020 will likely be known as one of the most stressful years in our time, and the first time that many Americans sought out a therapist. While this is a good thing and shows progress for improving mental health, we now face a lesser-talked about “second pandemic” of mental health issues – of which includes finding the right therapist – that could affect our future perception of mental health and our willingness to seek help.

Compounding this problem is the anxiety, financial stress, politics, substance abuse, isolation, job worries, relationship problems, health concerns and other issues that have intensified since the start of the pandemic, which has overwhelmed therapists with new patients, many of whom go on a waiting list or get referred out to less qualified resources. Mental health professionals are not immune from the stress of the pandemic either, often citing burnout and fatigue from heavy patient loads, while also struggling to handle their own stress at home.

All of these factors contribute to a more complicated and challenging mental health environment that requires increased navigation and guidance from the mental health industry to make sure that those seeking help are receiving evidence-based therapies from qualified professionals who have the bandwidth to invest in the client for the long run. To improve first-time encounters with therapy, I developed a free online matchmaking platform at Thriving Center of Psychology that vets and validates licensed professionals, then matches them to individuals seeking help, based on the person’s specific therapy needs and the professional’s area of expertise and therapy process.

To begin the process of finding the right therapist is simple. Start by filling out a 3-minute questionnaire that helps uncover the style of therapist that may be the best fit for your specific situation and preferred type. Questions cover everything from therapy approach to gender and ethnicity, including what specialty of a therapist are you seeking? Are you looking for a goal-oriented or reflective therapist? Do you want your therapist to have a holistic approach (including recommending yoga, meditation, and journaling)? and so on.

This filter then quickly matches individuals seeking help to a vetted database of qualified therapists who are licensed to work in the state in which the person lives. I developed this therapist matchmaking platform because so many friends and family members would ask me for therapist referrals. What I came to realize was that when people finally decide they should find a mental health therapist, they are often faced with a huge hurdle: finding a qualified therapist. Finding a therapist is not easy, especially if you are not a professional in the mental health industry and do not know all the right questions to ask. Mistakes can be easily made as many people either skip or rush through the research and interview step of finding a therapist.

If it is a person’s first time in therapy and it is a bad experience, it is most likely they will never return to it.
Once you find your therapist match, you should still interview 2-3 therapists before
committing to a paid session with anyone. Face-to-face office visits or video sessions
are ideal. During the interview, be sure to check the therapist’s credentials with state government sites, and have a clear understanding of his or her treatment style, therapy process and verify whether or not that therapy approach is evidence-based as defined by the American Psychological Association. Also, ask the therapist if he or she has ever treated anyone with similar concerns to yours. This will give you a clearer picture on the therapist’s treatment approach. It is important in this initial interview with the therapist, that you do not do all the talking.

You can share at a high level about what is going on (like, I’m grieving from the death of my mother), but do not get into the
details. Let the therapist do the majority of the talking so you can get a really good feel for his or her compatibility to you and your needs. Additionally, make sure that the therapist you select is licensed to work in your state. The increased popularity of virtual sessions since the start of the pandemic has opened many more options for people
seeking counseling, but if you go the virtual route, you still need to make sure the therapist is licensed to work in the state in which you reside. Ultimately, to live a truly fulfilled life, remember that it is just as important to place a high
priority on your mental health as it is for your physical health. You deserve the chance to unlock your true potential and live the life you have always dreamed of so do not let anything get in the way of your mental health, which is part of your overall health.

Start with the research step and find the therapist that is the best match for your specific needs – then the rest of the journey will be less stressful from there.

Dr. Alex Alvarado 

The Frontline names Bukky Ojeifo apart of their "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine

Frontline 40

The Frontline is a group of individuals dedicated to finding solutions to solve mass societal and political problems that inflict the United States.

After the tumultuous past few years we’ve all endured, a number of causes have been raised to the attention of people all around the world. From the effects of the pandemic to the ever-present racism, The Frontline makes it their goal to achieve change that lawmakers haven’t thus far. 

Standing stronger together, the group urns to see a reshaping of the world we live in today. The Frontline believes in the power of unity; that together, they can achieve whatsoever they set their minds to.

Members of The Frontline volunteer their time in hopes of implementing lasting changes. From connecting with others to spread the word, or even working local polls, The Frontline members work on all different levels to accomplish advancements.

Driven by the Movement for Black Lives, United We Dream and the Working Families Party, The Frontline has awarded a select group of people who continue to ensure just and equal opportunity for all. 

The awardees, also known as “Frontline 40,” caught the eyes of The Frontline as they continue to fight against the crises that conflict the US. Of the recipients, some of the main causes being fought for include securing access to clean water in Flint, Michigan, discovering what an anti-racist society would look like and finding an end to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Of the New York winners, the “Frontline 40” consists of Bukky OjefioChanelle ElaineDiana BerrentDrew DixonGabe TobiasJanvieve Williams ComrieJune MosesQiana Mestrich and Sil Lai Abrams.

“These aren’t the talking heads you see every night on cable news,” stated Tiffany Flowers, campaign director of The Frontline. “These are the real people on the frontlines of our communities making a real change. It’s time we honor them and say, ‘thank you,’ for all the work they do and do what we can to uplift and support their critical work to end white nationalism and advance liberation for our communities.” 

Stay tuned for an array of events hosted by The Frontline, including the recent panel that saw Lavender Rights Project executive director, Jaelyn Scott, director of Flint Rising, Nayyirah Shariff, Omisade Burney-Scotts from The Black Girl’s Guide to Surviving Menopause, and Dr. Sarah L. Webb from Colorism is Healing speak about their initiatives and plans to ensure just change. 

June Moses apart of the "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine
June Moses
Chanelle Elaine apart of the "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine
Chanelle Elaine
Janvieve Williams Comrie apart of the "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine
Janvieve Williams Comrie
Qiana Mestrich apart of the "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine
Qiana Mestrich

Images courtesy of Frontline

Israel Tourism

The Israel Ministry of Tourism continues to help the local tourism industry, to increase the accommodation supply to lower prices. The Investment Administration in the Tourism Ministry has recently received 107 applications from entrepreneurs seeking grants to build and expand hotels.

Investors, who are optimistic about the rehabilitation of Israel’s incoming tourism industry, are seeking to establish and convert existing buildings to hotels and expand existing buildings or restore them to their original purpose. 70 applications were submitted in the building permit tracking, 22 requests as part of a track to restore buildings to hotel use and convert existing buildings into hotels, and 15 applications were submitted in the implementation track by companies who have a building permit. This year’s grant budget stands at NIS 165 million. The directives of the Investment Administration for 2022 were published last April and the deadline for applications to be submitted was mid-May 2022.

The Israel Minister of Tourism Yoel Razvozov spoke about Israels current tourism opportunities, “There is a great deal of optimism and interest among the tourism industry. This year, we broke the record for the number of grant requests for opening new hotels in Israel, with over one hundred applications submitted. The Israel Ministry of Tourism continues to invest vast efforts in increasing incoming tourism traffic to Israel and shortening the amount of time it takes to build hotels. This will inject billions of shekels into the state coffers.”

As is well known, the corona crisis interrupted the upward growth trend in incoming tourism, which culminated in record figures in 2019 of over 4.5 million tourists. During the crisis, the Ministry of Tourism focused on preserving and nurturing the tourism infrastructure and continued assistance to entrepreneurs. This is to prepare for the return of growth. According to the Ministry of Tourism, the tourism industry’s annual contribution to the economy (before the pandemic) stood at about NIS 40 billion. The ministry is working to restore incoming tourism traffic to Israel and for the industry’s recovery following the crisis.

Despite the effects of the pandemic, progress has been registered in both planning new hotel projects and in building projects that were planned before the outbreak of the pandemic. The ministry continues to work to realize the potential inherent in hotel investments, to increase the number of tourists, and, as a result, to increase revenue from tourism to the economy.

Alien Liberty International lead singer Leo Imamura performance at inside the first take via 360 MAGAZINE

ALIEN LIBERTY INTERNATIONAL

Listen to Vaughn’s complete discussion with Leo on the 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

Alien Liberty International, more commonly known as ALI, is a renowned hip-hop/funk band that is comprised of multinational members from Japan, Europe, America, Asia, and Africa. Initially, the collective was formulated in Shibuya, a special ward in Tokyo, Japan.

In 2019, their musical journey began. Helmed by vocalist Leo Imamura, ALI offers a unique perspective to the industry today. 360 MAGAZINE’s very own Vaughn Lowery had an opportunity to sit down with Leo and chat all things about ALI.

Founded initially by a selection of four members, ALI started as a group of young people seeking a change in their everyday lives. Inspired by the connection that music creates, ALI was formed to relay the message of unity in the community.

Motivated by the legacy of Muhammad Ali, the band decided to name themselves ALI. Capturing the essence of the legend himself, ALI asserted that they would have strong energy and overall presence to embrace more union throughout the world.

Always hosting and cultivating community around his childhood home, Leo has been intrigued by different cultures all his life. Growing up listening to his parents’ favorite artists like Janet and Michael Jackson, Leo has admired funk and R&B for quite some time. Mainly inspired by the sense of harmony that funk music carries, the group began covering old songs in the genre that blended smoothly with hip-hop roots. 

With such a diverse group of individuals in ALI, they made it one of their key goals to show how differing people can come together to fight for peace. It has been vital for Leo to be able to showcase the diversity that Japan encompasses, to reveal what the country indeed looks like and stands for.

Having grown up in the city of Shibuya, Leo is passionate about where it comes from and how it helped him transform into the man he is today. Caring deeply for Shibuya, Leo remembered how there were varying sides to the city that he admired. The rich fashion and cultural influences that his home was full of set it apart from the rest.

Music is what truly matters. With such a deep culture that celebrates lifting up uniqueness, ALI embodies this through and through. Utilizing music as a bridge to bring people together, ALI hopes to demonstrate to the world that they’ve never cared what people look like. 

“Music is what can break the wall,” stated Leo.

In 2021, ALI went on a hiatus after controversy erupted with the band’s ex, then-drummer. When discussing the conflict, Leo and another former member of the band Alex explained how one group member having a battle would further impact the rest of the band. In the Japanese culture of some of the band members, dealing problems with authority is looked down upon and not accepted.

Enduring, too, the pandemic during this time, ALI has proved their impeccable persistence despite their struggles. Their creative outlet was forced off for a long time, with Japan shutting down everything entertainment-related.

Nonetheless, ALI is now making their come back. As such an exclusive grouping that stands alone from anything we’ve seen before, their journey is exceptionally admiring. This summer, ALI is fully immersed back into the scene, playing at upcoming festivals for the first time since the pandemic began. 

Make sure you check out ALI’s captivating performance on Japan’s most innovative YouTube channel, THE FIRST TAKE. With more than six million subscribers, powered by Stagecrowd, fans of all nationalities can now tune in and support their favorite musicians in streaming INSIDE THE FIRST TAKE.

For additional information on ITFT go HERE.

Article by: McKinley Franklin, Andrea Esteban, Iris Li x Vaughn Lowery

Ukraine's Kalush Orchestra via 360 Magazine by 360 Magazine

How did the pandemic affect culture? These 3 new pieces of work will tell you 

We all know how much the world has been affected by the pandemic since March 2020. Social habits, travel, and sanitary measures are just three areas that have changed drastically in that time, and it will take a while for these to return to normal. 

In the art world, however, the changes haven’t been as well documented, even though the shock was just as severe for artists, writers, and museums.  

Three new pieces of work are about to change that, offering perspectives from a bookstore owner, a musician, and a museum curator during lockdown.  

All released in spring 2022, they’re part of an important seam of work emerging from the chaos of the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Hello, Bookstore 

When Matt Tannenbaum launched a GoFundMe campaign shortly after lockdown, it was the culmination of an ongoing trend.  

Even before the pandemic struck, his bookshop was affected by the dominance of online sellers. In the era where people shop online instead of walking to the shops, play on an online casino instead of visiting a real-life venue, and stream movies instead of going to the cinema, it’s hardly surprising that people choose to purchase books online, too. 

Yet, not even Tannenbaum could have predicted what would happen next. The fundraising campaign doubled its target amount as sympathetic book lovers flooded the store with cash. Within just two days, the total had hit $120,000, meaning that the owner was out of debt for the first time in his career. 

The reason was clear: the pandemic had brought home just how much independent bookstores meant to their local communities, or the ‘lifeblood’ as documentary creator Adam Zax put it. Far from doubling down on internet sellers, book buyers were showing support for those small book sellers that exist for the love of reading, not profit. 

The documentary attempts to show the day-to-day life of the business, rather than just a series of talking heads. In it, viewers can see Tannenbaum talking to customers and reading pieces of literature out loud at random points during the day. Zax wanted to ‘capture the soul’ of the shop, which he started filming before the pandemic as part of a multi-year timeframe. 

It means that the pandemic, and the subsequent cash windfall, comes along coincidentally, but ends up adding to a remarkably insightful piece of work.  

Charli XCX – Alone Together 

What effect did lockdown have on the mind of a musician? Charli XCX’s fourth album, Alone Together, attempts to provide an answer. Produced in just 40 days, the record is a fascinating glimpse into how the singer and her partner dealt with an enforced period of cohabitation. 

At the start of the lockdown, Charli revealed how she was going to ‘open up’ the process of making a record to an online audience: she promised to share demos, get real-time feedback, and even crowdsource lyrics with fans during production.  

The whole process was captured on video, which became the basis for an accompanying documentary for the album. Both pieces of work share the same name: a description of how, even though everyone involved was isolated, they collaborated to form a record. They were ‘alone together’.  

The record is an interesting experiment, and proof that musicians can create entire pieces of work online now, hooking up whole studios to the web and producing music in real-time.  

The Guardian called it ‘a very modern, fusional kind of digital fandom’ and compared it to anime hit show Belle, which depicts a lonely teenager becoming famous in a virtual world of online fans and digital concerts.  

If Charli XCX’s work tells us one thing about the pandemic, it’s that the old way of making music has given way to the digital era. 

The Museum: A Short History of Crisis and Resilience  

The idea of a book about how museums have dealt with crises in the past came to author Samuel Redman before COVID-19 struck. So it was a coincidence when the biggest health emergency of the last 100 years happened just as he was getting into his stride.  

The pandemic goes alongside past crises, such as the Great Depression and the Second World War, in Redman’s investigation into how these institutions adapted to sudden change but have remained committed to core values over the course of centuries.  

According to Redman, though, some events had different effects to others. The Depression, for example, changed the fiscal nature of museums, while the 1970s art strike failed to have a lasting impact.  

The book also has one eye on the future, asking what kinds of crises could affect the world, and whether museums will remain such a crucial part of human life.  

If the institutions continue to show the same resilience, then there’s a good chance they’ll be here for centuries to come, according to Redman.  

Through these three pieces of pandemic art, we can see a common paradox: that is, despite the unprecedented pace of change, many things continue to remain the same.  

On one hand, buying books, recording music, and viewing exhibitions have all taken on a digital veneer: we can now do all three things online, something that was impossible just a few years ago. 

Yet at the same time, the desire to create, consume and remember is as strong as ever, which suggests that the creative side of human nature can handle anything that’s thrown at it – including a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic. 

Five Tips for Finding Peace After Living Through a Natural Disaster

Your entire world can change in the blink of an eye. Few people ever think they’ll see their neighborhood on a news broadcast, but natural disasters affect millions every year. Thanks to climate change, the problem grows more severe all the time.

It takes time and plenty of TLC to put the pieces of your life back together again. Be gentle with yourself as you navigate the process. Here are five tips for finding peace after living through a natural disaster.

1. Seek Necessary Resources

Depending on how the natural disaster affected your property, you might not have a place to call home for a while. What about your children’s school? Your transportation to and from work?

Your first contact is your local emergency manager. They’re your best resource for meeting your immediate needs for food and shelter. After that, please reach out to the following individuals:

  • Your loved ones: Your loved ones deserve to know you’re alright. Fortunately, social media makes it easier than ever. You can mark yourself safe to alert your friends and relatives who also use Facebook. Let people know what they can do to help and how you prefer to be contacted – a flurry of phone calls may or may not be what you need.
  • Your employer: If you weren’t at work when disaster struck, you need to let your employer know how it affected you and what arrangements you can make until it is safe to return.
  • Your insurance company: First, document the damage and make a list. Take photographs. If you have some from before the disaster to prove the extent of your loss, all the better.

You might also reach out to local animal shelters if you have pets that you could not evacuate on time. They’ll take a description and reunite you with your beloved companion if they locate them before you do.

2. Give Yourself the Gift of Time

Surviving a natural disaster takes time. This statement isn’t fluff – it’s a physiological fact. While some people recover from a shock to the system more quickly than others, you need time for your body and mind to return to homeostasis.

If possible, take time away from work to heal with those you love. The Federal Emergency Management Agency offers programs for disaster survivors that provide housing and medical assistance. The Small Business Association provides aid to those whose livelihoods suffered the impact of hurricanes, floods, and fires.

It’s important to be aware of the potential that you may develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Post-traumatic stress disorder is a mental health condition that’s triggered by witnessing or experiencing a terrifying event. Symptoms can include nightmares and anxiety, as well as uncontrollable flashbacks and thoughts about the event. Evidence suggests that the chances of PTSD and even suicide increase after someone survives a natural disaster. 

A natural disaster can shatter your world in the blink of an eye. You and your loved ones could find yourselves without shelter or food, and understandably stressed and anxious. However, if you begin to feel like what you’re experiencing goes beyond normal stress, you may be experiencing some form of PTSD. In either case, it’s a good idea to make an appointment with a certified mental health professional in the wake of surviving a natural disaster. They will be able to help make sense of what you’re experiencing and prescribe an appropriate treatment plan.

If you don’t have the resources to see a mental health professional in person, look into free online resources, counseling and rehabilitation groups and even text therapy, which can be more accessible for some.

3. But Also, Safety First

Your first instinct is to heave a sigh of relief once the twister disappears in the distance and you and your family take your first tentative steps out of the basement. Inhale, exhale, and contact everyone who’s not in your immediate vicinity who should be. Then, take stock of the second shock wave – the illnesses and infections that often follow natural disasters.

For example, after a flood, mold becomes a serious health concern. The CDC has recommendations for assessing your risk and handling the potential hazards to your health. Untreated cuts and scrapes can lead to blood poisoning and tetanus. Get a booster if need be and wash all wounds, dress them with triple antibiotic ointment, and clean, sterile bandages. Pay attention to signs of discoloration and streaking lines around the injury.

It’s not unusual to become sick in the wake of a natural disaster’s wake. Storms stir up germs and displacement introduces you to new ones when your immune system is already compromised by stress. Please take a COVID-19 test and adhere to the required quarantine – even if you don’t have the novel coronavirus, you need a few days to rest and recover.

4. Stay Close to Your Loved Ones

Natural disasters make you cherish the ones you love. Nature intended for you to cling to each other in its wake. Honor that instinct.

Stay close to your loved ones. If you have children, they will need your guidance and support to heal. They don’t have an adult frame of reference to cope with what happened – they’ll need your help to process big feelings and make sense of the senseless.

Spending time with your loved ones also soothes your soul. Disasters have a way of reminding you what matters most. You can’t take material things with you, but the love you leave behind survives.

5. Accept Offers of Help

You might not realize how wide your friendship circle extends until you survive a disaster. However, please take advantage of offers of help. Don’t let pride deny you and your family the support you need to heal.

Please take advantage of available social services. You might not have ever needed a food bank before, but visiting one is better than letting your children go to sleep hungry.

If you’re spiritual, your house of worship is another sanctuary that may open its arms to you and your loved ones. Shelter yourself and those you care about in the arms of your faith, letting members of your congregation accept you and uplift your spirits.

Shanghai during COVID-19 lockdown via Hannah Zhong for use by 360 Magazine

Shanghai Navigates COVID Lockdown

On March 28, the urbanist city in China of Shanghai began to lockdown. As of now, all people continue to be quarantined at home, with schools and businesses closed.

During the extended quarantine of Shanghai, the number of infections has continued to climb. A few things about the gravity of the lockdown are worth noting.

First is the treatment of positive patients. In most countries, people with mild infections only need to be quarantined at home to wait for self-recovery. China differs from often countries as they have adopted centralized quarantine, which includes quarantine of close contacts.

After the outbreak, countless shelter hospitals were built in Shanghai, with some schools, office buildings, and stadiums were requisitioned to build shelter hospitals. Because the speed of construction could not keep up with the spread of the virus, many covid positive patients waited at home for more than a week for treatment and were later sent to shelter hospitals even after testing negative. Many patients even spend whole days in transfer cars because all the shelter hospitals are full.

The conditions of shelter hospitals are also very diverse. Some places have sufficient food supply, and the environment is very hygienic. However, the sanitary conditions of some hospitals are shocking. Hundreds of people share one restroom, and in severe cases, toilets may even be filled with excrement.

Next, it is important to dicsuss the lack of food, specifically outage of all packages and restaurant delivery. The government issued a statement on March 28th, which entailed the Pudong district being locked down from March 28th to April 1st. Remaining areas would be locked down from April 1st to April 5th. Many people stored food for four days as directed by the government, but Shanghai’s lockdown was not lifted by the fourth day.

The government distributes food and daily necessities to residents, but the food everyone received could not sustain a month-long confinement. Some open supermarkets began taking orders in the morning hours, but a community with tens of thousands of people can only take hundreds of orders, leaving most citizens with no way to order food.

As a result, some people spontaneously initiated group purchases, with a resident of the community as the leader, negotiating with food suppliers, and then ordering the food needed by the entire community, and then distributing them by themselves. In communities with few households, everyone can only rely on supermarket deliveries.

Lastly, non-COVID-19 patients have not been receiving adequate treatment. During the quarantine period, all citizens were unable to leave their homes, which led to the difficulty of seeing a doctor for patients with underlying diseases. There are many patients who need hemodialysis, chemotherapy, and surgery that cannot be treated in time.

For emergency patients, it is even more difficult, because hospitals need Covid PCR test reports within 24 hours before they can accept patients. There are some acutely ill patients, such as myocardial infarction, renal failure, etc., who died at the hospital gate because they were waiting for the PCR test report.

As April 21, Shanghai had been closed for 24 days, with the number of infected people beginning to slowly decline on April 17. The government declared that “Zero-Covid policy” must be implemented. It remains to be seen where Shanghai will go in the future.

Article by: Hannah Zhong

Shanghai during COVID-19 lockdown via Hannah Zhong for use by 360 Magazine
Piggy Bank illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

DBDT Recieves ARP Grant

Dallas Black Dance Theatre (DBDT) is pleased to announce they have been approved to receive an American Rescue Plan grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to help the arts and cultural sector recover from the pandemic. Dallas Black Dance Theatre is recommended to receive $100,000 and may use this funding to save jobs, fund operations and facilities, secure health and safety supplies, and provide marketing and promotional efforts to encourage attendance and participation. In total, the NEA will award grants totaling $57,750,000 to 567 arts organizations in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Washington, DC.

“Our nation’s arts sector has been among the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. The National Endowment for the Arts’ American Rescue Plan funding will help arts organizations, such as the Dallas Black Dance Theatre, to rebuild and reopen,” said Dr. Maria Rosario Jackson, chair of the NEA. “The arts are crucial in helping America’s communities heal, unite, and inspire, as well as essential to our nation’s economic recovery.”

“Dallas Black Dance Theatre is extremely grateful for this NEA grant which will be used to support the 10 dancers in our second professional training company, DBDT: Encore! over the next two years,” said Zenetta S. Drew, Executive Director of Dallas Black Dance Theatre. “These artists provide critical services for Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s growing dance education programs, community outreach services, and artistic collaborations.”

The American Rescue Plan was signed into law in March 2021 when the NEA was provided $135 million for the arts sector. The funding for organizations is the third installment providing more than $57.7 million for arts organizations. In April 2021, the NEA announced $52 million (40 percent) in ARP funding would be allocated to 62 state, jurisdictional, and regional arts organizations for regranting through their respective programs. The second installment in November 2021 allocated $20.2 million to 66 local arts agencies for subgranting to local artists and art organizations.

For more information on the NEA’s American Rescue Plan grants, including the full list of arts organizations funded in this announcement, click HERE.

About Dallas Black Dance Theatre 

Dallas Black Dance Theatre is an internationally recognized professional dance company that engages the cross-cultural community through contemporary modern dance presented from the African American experience. The National Endowment for the Arts designated the 45-year-old company as American Masterpiece Touring Artist in 2008. The company also received the Texas Medal of Arts Award for Arts Education in 2017.

Handcuff art via Allison Christensen for use by 360 MAGAZINE

HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN THE UNITED STATES

Human trafficking can be defined as “a crime that  involves the exploitation of a person for labor, services, or commercial sex.” 

The illegal ring of human enslavement primarily for sex acts has been a problem in the United States for quite some time. The popularity of social media combined with the ongoing stresses from the COVID-19 pandemic have only furthered the presence of human trafficking in the country.

Human enslavement has been a rampant problem often stemming from the Midwest, expanding through the rest of the country. The Midwest serves as the epicenter for trafficking endeavors for several reasons. First off, the number of federal interstates that are common make it easier to transport victims. Commerce tends to be high in areas such as St. Louis and Chicago, simplifying the traveling process of victims. The Midwest has, too, been regarded as a safe part of the country, which masks the existence of human exploitation in this part of the country.

Although servitude of humans has great linkage to the Midwest, it has an intense correlation to the Black community, specifically Black woman. According to the FBI, 53% of all children involved in juvenile prostitution arrests are Black.

This linkage stems back to the racism and oppression prevalent in US history, combined with sexualization of people of color. The Center on Poverty and Inequality generated a study to investigate this point, and found that adults generally regarded Black girls as “less innocent and more adult like than white girls.” Black women continue to be targeted, predominantly by white men. A 2012 research study found that about 85% of people who purchased sex online were white men.

These prejudices impact perpetrator motives, as they are statistically more likely to go after Black girls/ women. A two-year review of alleged enslavement occurrences found that 40% of sex trafficking victims were Black women.

The pandemic and the rise of social media, too, has played its factor in the rise of human subjugation. With many individuals suffering from economic and social deficiencies, trafficking systems have grown exponentially. The victims tend to be vulnerable, often children, in search of some form of attention. Victims often are coerced into enslavement with false promises of jobs or stability.

The growing commonness of human trafficking in the US is alarming and must come to a stop. One of the key problems that prevents victims from being identified is that they often do not believe they are victims. Victims cannot comprehend or see what they’re going through to be considered exploitation, as they often form trauma bonds with their abusers, are hidden in plain sight.

Common signs that can help us identify human trafficking:

  • Physically appearing malnourished
  • Physical injuries
  • Avoidance of eye contact, social communication; primarily with law enforcement
  • Rehearsed replies in social communication
  • Lack of identification documents
  • Staying at hotels/motels with older males
    • Victims refer to males as boyfriend or “daddy” – street slang for pimp
  • Young children serving in family restaurants
  • Individual not allowed in public alone, often spoken for

Trafficking cases continue to grow in numbers, with victims regularly becoming younger and younger. A North Carolina woman was recently sentenced to over 19 years in prison for sex trafficking a 13-year-old girl. This NC proceeding provides insight into common patterns that occur in human enslavement circumstances. It highlights the dominance of social media used in trafficking acts, the susceptibility that victims face and how perpetrators are typically somewhat close to victims.

Authorities were made aware of this case on January 1, 2020, when a 23-year-old girl was a believed victim of sex trafficking. They were able to uncover that from December 2 to the 25 of 2019, Simone McIllwain had been sex-trafficking the young girl in the Charlotte area.

The girl met McIllwain through a shared relationship, when McIllwain started advertising the girl online for commercial sex. She arranged that the 13-year-old girl would perform sex acts in her own hotel room, while she obtained segments of the profits.

She pleaded guilty of sex trafficking of a minor in April 2021, when she was placed in federal custody. Now, she has been sentenced to 235 months in federal prison and 20 years of supervised release.

National Human Trafficking Hotline: 1 (888) 373-7888

SMS: 233733 (Text “HELP” or “INFO”)

Website: http://humantraffickinghotline.org/.

Written By: McKinley Franklin