Posts tagged with "Allison Christensen"

Allison Christensen Illustrates a Music Business Article for 360 MAGAZINE

VEVA Sound X Quansic

VEVA Sound announced Tuesday that users of its platform are now able to register for an ISNI number for free.

An ISNI is an International Standard Name Identifier, a number uniquely identifying an individual in the music industry.

VEVA Sound verifies archived projects for clients. By partnering with Quansic, a leader in ISNI services, to facilitate registrations, it is now easier for creators to get credit and payment for their work.

FX Nuttall, the founder of Quansic, said the partnership made perfect sense for the company, as both Quansic and VEVA Sound share a vision that creators should be able to be identified easily and early in the creative process.

“As this partnership continues into the future, we are enthusiastic about introducing VEVA Collect’s users to our products — starting with ISNI registration before addressing the allocation of ISRC for Recordings and BOWI for Works,” Nuttall said. “We at Quansic are focused on enabling 100% identifier coverage for all, and our friends at VEVA provide an unprecedented opportunity for the independent creative community to do just that.”

President of VEVA Sound Deborah Fairchild said she is excited about the partnership and for the new opportunities for artists and creators who use VEVA Collect for payment for their work.

“FX Nuttall is widely respected in our industry, and we are proud to avail his expertise to our users through Quansic,” Fairchild says. “We believe it is imperative that we empower creatives with every resource available to receive authenticated credit for their work.

VEVA Sound was founded in 2002 and works to spearhead the movement to define, create and implement the standards for how sound is preserved and monetized. They now have offices in New York City, Los Angeles, Nashville and London where they work with clients to verify and archive audio and metadata.

To learn more about VEVA Sound, you can click right here. You can also follow them on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

You can learn more about Quansic by clicking right here.

Allison Christensen Illustrated a Food Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Cooks Who Feed

Food waste adds up. Whether we’re leaving our plates uncleaned, cooking too much or letting food expire on our watch, it can add up to quite a bit of waste.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that 30 to 40% of America’s food supply is wasted while the World Health Organization estimates that more than 800 million people around the world do not have access to a sufficient supply of food.

Cooks Who Feed, an organization that sells fashionable aprons, has taken it upon themselves to be the middle man in the collection of surplus food and delivery to those who need it.

Seema Sanghavi, the founder of Cooks Who Feed, said something had to be done about food waste and world hunger.

“We help make it easier to get involved in helping to end world hunger,” Sanghavi said. “One of our aprons will top the list of many gift buyers this season.”

Cooks Who Feed teamed up with renowned chefs to design aprons that help spread food to parts of the world where it’s needed.

Working with charitable organizations that collect extra food available to donate, Cooks Who Feed is able to provide 100 meals to those in need for each apron purchased.

The company also looks to address the environmental impact of wasted food. Over a third of its profits go to partnered charities, like Rescuing Leftover Cuisine, Second Harvest and Zamato Feeding India. The aprons are also environmentally friendly, made with natural and recycled fabrics, combining sustainable with fashionable in the kitchen.

On top of providing meals and environmental help, they also support underprivileged women in India. All aprons are made in a fair-trade facility, which provides the women with jobs to earn a living and feed their families.

They’ve also partnered with celebrity chefs that make the perfect gift for fans and loved ones.

The first chef they partnered with is Art Smith, an award-winning chef and co-owner of restaurants like Blue Door Kitchen & Garden, Art and Soul and Southern Art and Bourbon Bar. He was Oprah Winfrey’s personal chef for ten years and is known for his fried chicken.

Christine Cushing is also a decorated chef and a judge on Food Network’s Wall of Chefs. She won the 2020 Taste Award for “Best Chef” in a television series for her food and travel documentary titled “Confucius Was a Foodie.”

Romain Avril was a judge on Top Chef Canada All-Stars and has worked at a one and two Michelin star restaurant. He has worked at restaurants like Colborne Lane, Origin North Bar and La Société Bistro.

Devan Rajkumar is an executive chef at Luxe Appliance Studio after several years with the Food Dudes, a high-end catering service.

Gaggan Anand is known for his progressive Indian cuisine and has placed on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. He earned two Michelin stars in 2018 and opened a restaurant in Bangkok in 2019. He was also profiled on Netflix’s Chef’s Table.

Art Smith said we learn our greatest lesson from our family: share our food.

“By being a part of this great program I’m living that lesson, because every apron purchase shares food with the world. It’s a great feeling to be a part of doing that,” Smith said.

The aprons start at $55 and ship for free in the United States.

To learn more about the aprons or to order one, you can click right here.

Social Distancing: The Silent Heartbreaking Pandemic

By Dr. Stephen Sinatra, cardiologist, Healthy Directions

If the COVID-19 pandemic has made you stressed, you’re not alone. There’s no shortage of things to worry about—from the fear of catching the virus to activities and milestones missed, not to mention the economic toll it’s taken on us individually and collectively. All you have to do is turn on the news to see this play out in real-time.

But beneath these obvious stressors churning in your mind and blowing up your social media newsfeed, there’s also a silent stressor in our midst – one that concerns me greatly as both a cardiologist and trained psychotherapist. It’s the impact that quarantining and social distancing has had on both our emotional health and our physical health. 

In many ways, social distancing is the “silent pandemic”—and, if left unchecked, can lead to serious health issues.

We are “Hardwired” to Need Social Connections

Human connection is vital to reducing stress levels. When you spend time with others—whether it’s grabbing a beverage with a close friend or hugging a family member—your body releases dopamine. This feel-good hormone, sometimes referred to as natural morphine, boosts your mood and calms your sympathetic nervous system.

So, while social distancing is necessary for curbing the spread of the COVID-19, it has limited our ability to spend time with friends and family, which has led to an uptick in anxiety, depression and overall emotional stress.

Emotional Stress Can Directly Impact Your Health

You can’t separate your body and mind – your emotions have a very strong impact on your physical health. That’s why when I became a cardiologist, near the end of the Vietnam War, I studied to be a psychotherapist as well because I realized that many of the serious heart issues I would see in returning soldiers were related to emotional stress.

When you’re stressed, the hypothalamus (the tiny control center in your brain) stimulates your body to release cortisol, which is often referred to as the “stress hormone.” Cortisol puts your body into fight-or-flight mode by raising your blood sugar levels, heart rate, blood pressure and breathing. 

If there’s an immediate threat – like if you would need to run away from a lion – your body is ready. But when the threat is gone, your body quickly returns to normal. While this type of occasional stress response doesn’t concern me at all, the persistent stress we’re all experiencing during the pandemic is a different story. It’s as if we’re being chased by a lion continuously!

When you’re in a heightened state of stress, your cortisol levels stay elevated which can have a far-reaching effect on your health, impacting your sleep, blood pressure, heart rate and more.

Good News – You Can Protect Your Health

While there’s no magic pill that can remove all of the stress and heartache we’re experiencing during this pandemic, there are many things you can do to manage stress while safely regaining some of the human interactions we’re all craving.

1. Allow yourself to cry. We’re all living under a massive umbrella of fear right now —whether it’s fear of the virus itself, getting sick or transmitting it to others. There’s also fear of losing a job, losing a home or of not having enough food. On top of that, many of us are angry and upset by what we’ve lost and the ability to control our own lives.

Emotions like anger and sadness are the Achilles’ heel of the cardiovascular system. When you hold your emotions in, it affects you physically, leading to everything from headaches to high blood pressure. 

The solution is to permit yourself to release that stress and anger by crying. I know that for many people that can be difficult to do. I came from the generation when parents often said, “If you don’t stop crying, I’ll give you something to cry about.” So, we used to shut off our emotions. It’s important to realize that crying is not a sign of weakness, but rather the opportunity to release all of that negative energy, stress and tension you’ve been holding in.

2. Breathe. Did you know breathing is related to laughing and laughing is related to crying? All three — whether you laugh deeply, cry deeply or breathe deeply — free up an overcharged sympathetic nervous system and support heart rate variability, which has a calming affect on your mood.

One of my favorite techniques is alternate nostril breathing. Begin by taking a deep breath in and out through your nose. Next, use your right thumb to close your right nostril and inhale slowly through your left nostril. Then, close both nostrils and hold your breath for a moment. Now, open your right nostril and breathe out slowly. Repeat the same exercise with your left nostril. Then, alternate back and forth between nostrils to destress.

3. Reach out to others. It’s important to remember that even when we can’t connect with others in-person, we can connect with them virtually. I refer to it as connecting at the “heart level.” Zoom, Skype, Facetime, WhatsApp and other similar applications have made it easy to not only hear from family and friends but to see them as well. One of the positive reframes we can take from the coronavirus is that in many ways, technology has brought us closer together.

Our family has been connecting quite a bit on Zoom during this pandemic. My son, Drew, has been doing Zoom exercise classes with his brother-in-law — he leads the whole family through a circuit-training workout. Plus, my wife and I have had regular virtual visits with the grandchildren. During one call, my grandson Luca showed me his new cowboy boots, so I went to get mine to show to him as well!

I also encourage you to think creatively. Many people are having virtual book club meetings, playing games with others online and having socially distanced dinners with friends. I know one family that cooks together once a week. The “head chef” sends out a recipe in advance so everyone can buy the ingredients, then they all cook together online.

4. Harness the mood-boosting power of exercise. Exercise is one of the most powerful mood boosters there is. When you exercise, it releases stress from your muscles, reduces your levels of the “stress hormone” cortisol and boosts your body’s level of feel-good endorphins. Some studies have shown that aerobic exercise is a quicker mood elevator than an antidepressant.

What type of exercise should you do? My answer to that question is always the same — the type you’ll enjoy and keep doing day-in and day-out. Even just a 20-minute walk or dancing to your favorite songs can make a powerful difference in your stress levels and improve how you feel!

5. Spend time in nature. One positive aspect of COVID-19 is that people are spending more time outdoors. Not only is it safer from the perspective of spreading the virus but being outside has many healing benefits in and of itself. Getting outside; soaking in the fresh air; and gazing at the trees, birds and other wilderness reminds us that there’s a bigger world out there. This all helps us to reframe our perspective.

Another powerful benefit of getting outside is that if you leave technology behind and put your phone away, it allows you to relax and regroup away from the news, social media and other persistent reminders about the stress in our world. If you can, take a family member with you when you go outdoors or meet a friend for a socially distanced walk. 

If you can’t get outside, you can also “get back to nature” within yourself. You can do that with deep breathing, meditation, yoga, Qigong or Tai Chi. My son, Drew, a practicing naturopathic physician, has started each day of the pandemic by meditating for 20-minutes each morning and has found it to be a real game-changer in getting through this difficult and challenging time. Meditation not only releases stress but allows you to cope more easily with the stressors you encounter throughout the day.

6. Practice grounding. One of my cardinal principles of health is grounding, also known as earthing. It’s an amazingly simple concept that involves nothing more than reconnecting the human body with the natural energy that’s present in the ground we walk on.

The Earths’ surface contains free electrons that are continually replenished through solar radiation and lightning strikes, and your body naturally absorbs those particles when you make physical contact with the ground. These electrons help to keep your body’s innate electrical circuitry properly balanced, which lowers stress and increases calmness in the body by moderating heart rate variability, nervous system activity and stress hormone secretion. Plus, it helps to promote normal blood pressure.

If conditions allow, just go barefoot outside. Grass, sand, dirt and concrete are all conductive surfaces from which your body can draw the Earth’s electrons. If going barefoot outside isn’t realistic, a warm basement with a concrete floor will also work. Sit there, read or just relax with your bare feet resting on the ground.

7. Take ashwagandha. This powerful herb is part of a group of herbs called adaptogens that help your body adapt to stress. It works by helping to stabilize your body’s stress feedback loop, so it releases less cortisol. I’ve been taking it myself for more than 20 years, and it has made an enormous difference.

The best form of ashwagandha I’ve found is called, Sensoril. In studies, it has been shown to help people manage anxiousness due to stress, while also balancing healthy cortisol levels.

Participants in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study saw a reduction in serum cortisol levels, anxiousness, fatigue and irritability brought on by stress within two months of using Sensoril Ashwagandha. Additionally, participants experienced an improvement in sleep quality, physical mobility, mood and concentration, all of which can positively impact emotional well-being and heart health. It’s so impressive that I added it to my Omega Q Plus ULTRA supplement formula, in addition toother top-recommended nutrients to support your heart and overall health.

8. Make your health a priority. It’s much easier to cope with stress when you’re rested and eating well. Strive to get at least 7-8 hours of sleep a night. Go to bed early rather than staying up late to watch the news or peruse social media feeds – all of which can rev up your stress levels. Keep your room cool and dark and remove all electronics from your sleeping space. If you have trouble calming down, try drinking a cup of valerian tea.

It’s also important to avoid the urge to stress eat – something people have been doing a lot of during the pandemic. And there’s a real physical reason driving that urge. When your cortisol levels are high, it increases your appetite and makes you more likely to reach for sugary treats and simple carbohydrates to lift your mood. But the boost is only temporary and can leave you feeling even worse once the “sugar high” wears off.

Instead, eat foods that protect your health and boost your mood. DHA omega-3 fatty acids are a powerful mood-booster, helping to build receptors for the “feel-good hormone” serotonin. It can be found in foods like wild-caught salmon, flaxseed, nuts and seeds and DHA-fortified eggs.

Dark chocolate also contains a mood-boosting biochemical called phenylethylamine, which is the same chemical that causes the euphoric feeling we equate with love. For maximum health benefits, you want to look for organic dark chocolate that contains at least 70% cacao. Plus, remember that a little goes a long way. I allow myself to have a small piece every few days as a heart-healthy treat.

Finally, remember that no matter how difficult this stretch of time has been, there will come a time when things adapt and get better. We’ll reconnect with our loved ones, get back to the activities we enjoy and have more freedom to plan for the future. And if we can all take this time to practice some extra self-care habits, we’ll come out the other side even better off than before.

Bio: Dr. Stephen Sinatra is one of the most highly respected and sought-after cardiologists whose integrative approach to treating cardiovascular disease has revitalized patients with even the most advanced forms of illness. He has more than 40 years of clinical practice, research and study, starting his career as an attending physician at Manchester Memorial Hospital in Connecticut. Here, he then went on to serve as chief of cardiology, director of medical education, director of echocardiography, director of cardiac rehabilitation and director of the weight-reducing program. He is known as one of America’s top integrative cardiologists, combining conventional medical treatments for heart disease with complementary nutritional, anti-aging and psychological therapies. He is an author, speaker and adviser for the research and development of nutritional supplements with Healthy Directions. Sinatra is a best-selling author of more than a dozen books, including, “Heartbreak and Heart Disease,” “The Great Cholesterol Myth,” “Reversing Heart Disease Now,” “The CoQ10 Phenomenon,” “Heart Sense for Women,” “The Sinatra Solution,” and “Metabolic Cardiology.”

Allison Christensen Illustrates a Skin Care Article for 360 MAGAZINE

COCOOIL

While on a trip to Fafa Island in 2011, the creators of COCOOIL had an idea. They wanted to create a a luxury skincare product made with certified fair trade cold-pressed organic coconut oil. Here in 2020, they have it in COCOOIL, which only uses sustainably produced coconut oil from the Pacific Islands.

COCOOIL can guard against UV rays using their protective products like COCOOIL Tanning Oil SPF6COCOOIL Beach’n’Body Oil SPF15 and COCOOIL Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF30.

COCOOIL Tanning Oil SPF6 protects from harmful UV rays and delivers a beautiful tan while laying on the beach or next to the pool. COCOOIL Beach’n’Body Oil SPF15 and COCOOIL Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF30 offer even more protection against UV rays and come in packages that fit just right in your purse or travel pack.

They also have the COCOOIL SPF50 Broad Spectrum, which is made with natural botanical oils to hydrate and nourish skin.

The protective products are complimented by COCOOIL Face Oil with RosehipCOCOOIL Body OilCOCOOIL Baby Oil with Lavender and COCOOIL Ocean Spray.

COCOOIL Face Oil with Roseship leaves your face feeling luxurious and non-greasy. COCOOIL Body Oil is the perfect daily moisturizer while COCOOIL Baby Oil with Lavender will nourish your little one’s skin and provide a calming scent. COCOOIL Ocean Spray gives your hair waves, volume and texture.

Products come in regular size 200 mL bottles or in mini 100 mL bottles. They even have bundles that come with a COCOOIL tote, perfect for your next trip to the beach.

COCOOIL also has a cruelty free policy, meaning that they don’t buy any products or ingredients that have been tested on animals. In place of animal testing, they test all of their products on human volunteers in Australia.

They say they will not use any sources who are not just as committed as they are to their code of ethics, morals and standards.

To see all COCOOIL products, you can click right here. You can also read their story and learn more about their mission by clicking right here.

Allison Christensen Illustrates a Sports Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Tyrod Taylor

By Justin Lyons

Justin Herbert lined up under center on the first drive Sunday for the Los Angeles Chargers, which was a surprise.

Herbert was selected with the sixth overall pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, but Tyrod Taylor was supposed to be the starter while Herbert learned from the bench. Herbert had a successful day, scoring on his first drive and going on to throw for 311 yards and a touchdown, but he came up a bit short of the Patrick Mahomes-led Chiefs in overtime.

It’s now clear why Taylor didn’t play quarterback Sunday. Chargers head coach Anthony Lynn told ESPN’s Shelley Smith that Taylor’s lung was punctured by a team doctor attempting to administer a pain relief injection just before kickoff.

Lynn told Smith that the injury is not career-threatening, and Taylor isn’t mad or upset. Lynn appeared to reaffirm Taylor’s status as a starter when he is cleared to return, saying there was a lot the Chargers didn’t get done with Herbert as their quarterback and that Herbert is a backup “for a reason.”

George Atallah, the assistant executive director of external affairs for the NFL Players Association, tweeted that the union’s medical and legal teams are looking into the incident. He also confirmed that the NFLPA has initiated an investigation.

According to ESPN, the injection is not uncommon, but the doctor is unable to see where the needle is going, which can be difficult. Though the procedure is standard, it is rare that a player’s lung is punctured.

Lynn said Herbert will start Sunday at home against the Carolina Panthers, as Taylor won’t be fully healthy.

“I am looking forward to seeing him play with a week of preparation and knowing he is the starter,” Lynn said.

The Panthers and Chargers will kick off at 1:05 p.m. local time Sunday.

Allison Christensen Illustrates a Sports Article for 360 MAGAZINE

2020 Summer Olympics

by Justin Lyons

The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo are following the old show business gospel of “the show must go on.”

John Coates, vice president of the International Olympic Committee, spoke with AFP to say the Olympics would indeed begin in July 2021, whether COVID-19 is still around or not.

The summer games were originally scheduled to take place this summer, but complications from COVID-19 delayed them until next year.

Coates said the next Olympiad will be “the Games that conquered COVID.”

According to BBC, chief executive of the Tokyo Games Toshiro Muto also said it was possible for a limited audience to be in attendance and wanted to avoid having no spectators.

BBC also reported that Muto said a vaccine was not necessary for the games to go on.

Sports were warmly welcomed back in the United States in July, and the National Football League will return this week. Though basketball, baseball and hockey are finishing their seasons without fans, plan for fans in football stadiums remain tentative.

Fans around the country will have their eyes on the situation, and we obviously hope to see fans cheering on their home countries next year in one of the most unifying events in the world if conditions so permit.

Allison Christensen illustrates a sports article for 360 MAGAZINE

Orlando Sports & Entertainment Smart District

Downtown Orlando is about to get a major overhaul.

The hotspot will undergo a $500 million renovation in the form of the ambitious Orlando Sports & Entertainment Smart District.

Situated right across from the Amway Center, which houses the Magic and the Solar Bears, it will include a 300-room hotel, over 400,000 square feet of offices, 80,000 square feet of event space, more than 100,000 square feet of retail and an open-air plaza.

SISCO, who will provide the technology for the project, agreed to terms with the project owners, Cityzenith, and will use Cityzenith’s SmartWorldPro2™ Digital Twin platform. The platform integrates all software and services for large scale projects such as the Orlando Sports & Entertainment Smart District.

Michael Jansen, CEO of Cityzenith, said he is delighted to work with SISCO, and called the project “the most-advanced and feature-rich 3D Digital Twin model of a city in the United States.”

Jansen also said he aims to boost Cityzenith’s “Clean Cities – Clean Future” mission.

“Currently, 10,000 cities produce 70% of global greenhouse emissions and just 100 – megalopolises like New York, Tokyo, London and Paris – produce 25% of that total. It must change, and SmartWorldPro2™’s ability to create digitally-twinned cities to inventory GHG emissions and streamline sustainable urban redevelopment initiatives makes it the platform of choice for executing energy transition projects on any scale, whether a district, a campus, a city, or an entire country.”

Violence Spikes in Major Cities

By Eamonn Burke

Last month, 65 people were shot in New York City and 87 in Chicago over the course of the 4th of July weekend. Six children were killed that weekend as well. The holiday may have been a peak in homicides, but numbers of shootings and deaths have been trending upward as the nation handles a pandemic and a historic recession. The amount of shootings in NYC from January to July exceeded the total for the entire year of 2019. Other major cities are experiencing high rates of gun violence as well, such as Philadelphia, where more than 240 people have been killed this year and which now has the 2nd highest homicide rate in the nation. Chicago saw a violent July, with 584 shootings and 105 deaths. Even smaller cities like Pheonix and Omaha are seeing rises.

As a whole, homicides are up 24% in the nation since last year. Data shows homicides and shootings trending upward sharply since late May in major cities across the US. However, as a national study shows, gun violence was creeping upward even before the pandemic began.

President Trump blames the rise in violent crime to “radical” Democratic politicians , such as Major Bill DeBlasio, despite signs that this is a bipartisan issue. DeBlasio himself blames the shootings on the virus, among other factors such as the BLM protests and faults in the criminal justice system that have recently been exposed. The Council on Criminal Justice also concluded that the virus is the root issue, and that it must be stopped first in order to reduce homicides. A chart of homicides in Chicago does in fact show a major spike after the beginning of the protests, and the BLM protests in 2014 and 2015 had a similar effect on gun violence. However, further analysis of police data instead points to a decrease in gun-related arrests as a potential cause, as well as the increase in gun purchases in recent months.

Police say that many of these crimes are gang related, and a shortage of staff due to the virus have made it harder to crack down on crime. DeBlasio was adamant about getting back on top of the gun crisis through the courts: “Our courts not only need to reopen, they need to reopen as fully and as quickly as possible.” Chief administrative judge Lawrence Marks fired back, saying the blame of courts was “false, misleading and irresponsible.”

A strange finding amongst this gun crisis is that rates of other crimes such as burglaries have not followed the same trend, and have even decreased in some cases. As this is extremely odd, it’s possible that it’s a matter of what is getting reported given the complications of COVID-19 and the BLM protests on policing.

Allison Christensen is an artist and specializes in illustration art.

Allison Christensen

Allison Christensen, is a New Jersey-based illustrator, attending Moore College of Art & Design. She is heavily inspired by plants and nature. Her style tends to be lighthearted with clean lines and a minimalist neutral color palette. Illustration has always been an outlet for her to express herself. Ever since she was a child, drawing fun and silly pictures have always brought her joy no matter what situation she was in. Allison was bullied excessively and at one point, she even had to be homeschooled for a year.

She always knew she wanted to do something artistic as a career. It wasn’t until her Junior year of high school when she knew what that would be. When she was visiting art colleges and getting portfolio reviews, one of the students introduced her to illustration design. Allison immediately knew that illustration art was what she needed to do for the rest of her life. She wants others to be able to look at her art and make their day brighter, even if it is just for a brief moment.

Camera illustration by Allison Christensen

Artist Introduction: Safaa Kagan

Safaa Kagan is a Los Angeles-based artist specializing in photographs of traditional people around the world

Safaa Kagan’s work celebrates varying cultures around the globe. Her portraiture work allows Safaa to visit and photograph many different tribes, communities, and countries.

Safaa Kagan is a travel photographer based between Miami and Los Angeles. Born and raised in Casablanca, Morocco, Safaa moved to the United States to pursue her dream of becoming a photographer. Safaa studied art and earned a degree in Commercial Photography. She then apprenticed under many National Geographic photographic masters such as Steve McCurry, Sisse Brimberg, and Nancy Brown, working in portraiture and travel photography. This training broadened her horizons to the massive diversity of cultures across the world, triggering her desire to immerse herself in other cultures and traditions.