Posts tagged with "Curated"

Conison, Blake Holmes and Connor Morton article inside 360 MAGAZINE

CONISON: OUR CHAT WITH HIGH-END STREETWEAR LABEL FOUNDER, CONNOR MORTON 

By Blake Holmes

A celebration of the LA dream, Conison is an up-and-coming, high-end streetwear brand from Melbourne, Australia. 
Recently, we caught up with Founder and Creative Director, Connor Morton, to chat vision, inspiration and what’s in store for the year ahead. 

TELL US ABOUT CONISON..

Conison is a high-end streetwear and design brand. 

At the heart of Conison is a message of inspiration. I want to encourage people to express themselves, providing an avenue for them to explore their own sense of style and creative potential through fashion and design. 

WHAT’S YOUR WHY? 

I’ve always endeavoured to express my creativity through outlets available to me, from DJing and music, to clothing customisation and art. I think everyone deserves this opportunity and my dream is that Conison will provide that for others; an inspiration source that spreads positivity and reinforces the idea that everyone has the power to shape their reality. 

WHAT’S IN STORE FOR YOUR UPCOMING COLLECTION? 

Collection 2 Rise & Fall is a two-part capsule. This collection celebrates an ascension to your highest self and the fall of negative energy. These ideas are expressed in my messaging and I’ve catered to both the NZ/Aus and US/Euro markets, with different materials and designs. 

WHO/WHAT INSPIRES YOU? 

There are countless brands and creators that fuel my fire. Designers like Reese Cooper and Heron Preston, brands like Riot Hill and photographers like Kyle Caulfield to name just a few. 

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED? 

I believe motivation is something you have to seek constantly. This can be challenging at times and the interruptions of this year have been a prime example. 

Regularly contacting my mentors, listening to podcasts, and painting have kept me in the zone this year. There’s always motivation to be found if you look hard enough. 

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY LOOK LIKE FOR YOU? 

Every day is different but I start and end them in the same way. I usually wake up with a warm/cold soak to get focused, then have breakfast while watching motivational content on YouTube. From then I work ‘til i’ve felt i’ve done enough, which means late nights a lot of the time. I also work other jobs and fit in time at the gym or some form of exercise each day. I end the day with business content on YouTube to get inspired for the day ahead.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST FINANCIAL STRAIN WHEN RUNNING YOUR OWN BRAND? 

Being a one-man band with no backing at 22 has been a struggle. There are definitely financial challenges and they’ve taken a lot of practice, help from mentors and learning to overcome. In saying that, I’m feeling confident in the belief that now is the time to be bold, take risks and bet on myself. When you believe in your brand and the message you’re trying to share, anything is possible. 

WHAT’S THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED? 

My mentor sent me a message a few weeks back. I think it’s spot on and something I struggle with at times. “Your art is not about how many people like your work, your art is about if your heart likes your work, if your soul likes your work, it’s how honest you are with yourself”. I try to follow this ethos daily and remind myself of this at times I’m questioning my vision and creative direction. I’ve implemented this into my work daily and it’s become more authentic as a result. 

WHAT’S NEXT FOR CONISON? 

The sky’s the limit. I want to push creative boundaries, not just with Conison but in the global fashion and lifestyle brand space. This means everything from painting collections and exclusive pieces to furniture. 
Most importantly, I want to continue telling the Conison story in an authentic way. Giving people a story to truly connect with is what drives me and the best way to keep people engaged and on-board for the journey. 

I’m learning and growing every day and Conison will continue to evolve with me. I can’t wait to share it with everyone.

LEAVE US WITH A FAVOURITE QUOTE..

I’ve got a few. ‘Ignore the boos, they usually come from the cheap seats’. This one has been really important to me. As a young person, you often face a lot of negativity and doubt from others about your ability to step outside the norm and succeed. I’ve learnt not to take this to heart and stay true to myself, which is something I think we should all strive to do. 

Another favourite is, ‘an arrow can only be shot forward by pulling it backward’. This one’s all about resilience to me, and the idea that on the other side of struggle and hardship is success, fortune and prosperity. I try to remember this with every minor setback and keep a positive mindset no matter the circumstances. When you do, nothing can discourage you from achieving your dreams. This is what Conison is all about. 

Rise & Fall Part 1 drops 7th December, 7:00pm EST
at www.conisondesigns.com 

Rita Azar Illustrates an Entertainment Article for 360 MAGAZINE

The Cosby Show And Me

One woman’s journey after she learned The Cosby Show was based on her family in the 1980s.

By Ann-Marie Adams, Ph.D. | @annmarieadams

What if I told you that The Cosby Show was partly based on me and my family during the 1980s? You would probably not believe it. But it is true.

That’s the conclusion after a seven-year investigation by private investigators and government officials. Providence guided us during this lengthy investigation when I lived in Avon, and political operatives prepared me in 2014 to run for Congress against former Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty–an academic exercise worth noting. It was during this “prep” time that I learned about this connection with The Cosby Show.

This fortuitous story of the connection began when former President Ronald Reagan visited Jamaica on April 7, 1982. During that one-day visit, Reagan’s security detail reportedly made contact with me and my family. My father was an electrical engineer while working at the Government Printing Office. He owned a home in a suburb of Kingston. And my mother worked with a transportation company. If former President Barack Obama did not visit Jamaica on April 9, 2015, while I was covering the White House, I wouldn’t have believed this story. That’s because it was Obama’s first visit as president, and he was only the second sitting president to visit the Caribbean nation since its independence in 1962, according to MSNBC.

Also at play were these facts: In Jamaica, we were a middle-class family Reagan’s cabinet allegedly felt they should watch. After Reagan’s visit, several individuals made plans to put a family sitcom together. And it was called The Cosby Show, according to sources close to the U.S. federal, state, and local governments. The show aired on NBC from April 30, 1984, to September 20, 1992.

The Cosby Show’s character, Denise Huxtable, was based on me, I’m told. The character’s persona and likeness were exploited without our consent.

And the revelation about the origins of the show can also be found in Bill Cosby’s interview about how he came up with this idea.

Cosby first pitched the show about a working-class Honduran family. My father’s ancestors are from Honduras and Nicaragua. We had a wonderful life that included Sunday dinners and picnics in the park, but we weren’t exempt from obstacles. Although The Cosby Show was mainly focused on Cosby’s observations of family life, some of those observations were of my family. Moreover, the basic concept of the middle-class family depicted on the show is evident in my family: My older sibling wanted to be a doctor. Also, I wanted to be a lawyer. Those plans of ours were interrupted by government officials, according to sources close to the investigation.

In previous interviews, Cosby also stated the original conceptualization of the show: a working-class family that raised a successful child. (side note: Cosby’s wife suggested the show be based on a well-to-do family). The original premise and casting choices for the sitcom, however, reaffirmed the initial concept in the pitch that was identical to my family and me.

So I’m telling my story.

Several scenes were points of recognition of my family’s life in Jamaica and the U.S., especially my time at Brooklyn College. I also learned during the investigation that the casting directors and writers had our family in mind when they selected the actors. There are frighteningly similar personas in my family and the characters on the show. And a picture of The Cosby Show family and my family bears a striking resemblance. For example, Denise Huxtable is my doppelganger–and the investigators discovered the character’s traits are similar to mine. Theo is my brother’s doppelganger and a few scenes reflect the relationship with him and my father. Vanessa is my sister Andrea’s doppelganger and several scenes reflect her relationship between us. Rudy’s character is based on my brother. Articles about the casting claimed that the casting directors tried to find a boy at first but they couldn’t; so they used a girl for the role. Rudy is my niece Janel’s doppelganger. And the character Olivia is my other niece Franchista’s doppelganger. The optics resonate well to claim theft of services and copyright infringement.

Other similarities include Sondra, who shares traits with my cousin Carleen. Elvin is based on my brother Lloyd. Also, Aunt Vi is based on my cousin, Doreen, Lt. Martin Kindall, Denise’s husband is based on my cousin, Raymond. And of course, Claire Huxtable was based on my mother and older sister, Marcia. The patriarch of the television family, Cliff Huxtable portrays similar traits as my handsome father. Huxtable is my father’s doppelganger–not twin. Cosby’s conviction as a sex offender was not echoed in my family. In fact, my father has never been arrested for any crimes. This information, I believe, will allow people to differentiate between the actor and the individual the show was based on when talking about the circumstances around this NBC hit comedy in the 1980s and 1990s.

In addition to those facts, several scenes were premised on the interpersonal dynamics of the relationships between me and my sisters, brothers, and cousins. This was too much of a coincidence to those who were investigating us during the recent investigation and prep for Congress. The public must know that The Cosby Show itself is a creation by several actors, comedians, writers, and producers who may be unfamiliar with our family. However, a few undisclosed individuals close to the recent investigation of Bill Cosby and the creation of the show gave me this information. So the very idea that it was based on our family was plausible to investigate further, officials said. I also learned that the 1990s spin-off, A Different World, was based on me and my years at college. And the show, That’s So Raven, was based on my niece, Franchista.

Why we were picked for this social experiment will perhaps remain a secret to Reagan, his staff, and others close to the show. The Caribbean’s strategic location to the Panama Canal gave us a clue as to why our family was at the center of a Cold War project. We requested other documents to uncover this mystery and are still waiting. Also, the United States Secret Service has disallowed open documentation of Reagan’s visit to Jamaica in 1982. But one thing was clear. After this revelation to me, while I was covering the Obama White House, my family and I were the victims of a hate crime and cover-up–because of the revelation of our connection to The Cosby Show.

Cosby and his associates are suspects in this crime, using unorthodox methods by Lansana Koroma of Philadelphia. So I reached out to Andrew Wyatt, his publicist. According to Wyatt, Cosby doesn’t want to talk about this affair right now.

Looking through old photographs, it was clear that the casting director used our family’s faces and likeness as a guide to casting those on the show. They were, indeed, our doppelgangers. The old pictures confirmed that much. After discovering we looked like the actors, who were selected for the pilot season that debut on September 20, 1984, we all were the victims of a hate crime to assault our faces and distort our images on television, print, and with online photos.

This insidious plot to strip us of our individual identities and image as a middle-class and Christian family the show was based on also included an incredible effort to secretly strip us of our financial resources, including houses, cars, and jobs. All this orchestrated crime during the long investigation was to hide our true identities and our impact on the show. Therefore, this sinister approach to the secret investigation must be addressed with force.

Perhaps the Bill Cosby trial in Philadelphia was divine justice when he was indicted on a day close to my father’s birthday. Also, Cosby failed to acknowledge our contributions to the show and as a result, his new family comedy slated for 2015 was canceled. But the United States State Department, state, city officials, and other individuals used to invade our privacy owe us more than an apology.

We are asking for the perpetrators of this crime to be held accountable with prison time–just like Bill Cosby–for the evil and covert attacks on our family to cover up this truth in the country. More importantly, we ask for reparation for our family because of years of disruptions and adverse experiences to discredit our claim to The Cosby Show.

Enough is enough. We want restorative justice–reparations.

Dr. Ann-Marie Adams is an award-winning journalist and U.S. History Professor. She is also the founder of The Hartford Guardian, the first nonprofit, hyper-local publication in Connecticut. Previously, she was a journalist at The Hartford Courant, People Magazine, NBC 4 New York, the Washington Post, other regional publications, and television newscasts.

Rita Azar illustration for 360 MAGAZINE travel stories

Tips for Reducing Holiday Stress and Staying Mindful While Traveling

The holiday season is typically the busiest time of the year for traveling. People enjoy going to see family members or exploring new locations as they have time off from their jobs and schoolwork. This year, traveling may come with a bit more stress and anxiety due to the pandemic that people are facing around the world. The good news is that there are some things you can do to help reduce holiday stress, as well as stay safer while traveling.

“There may be fewer people traveling this holiday season, but there will still be a lot who do, and they need to know how to make it more enjoyable,” explains Katie Sandler, personal development and career coach. “Mindful travel is the key to reducing stress, staying safer, and making the most of your time traveling. This year will be a great exercise in mindfulness, which is something to be excited about.”

As an expert at using mindfulness, Sandler helps people not only reduce their stress, but also reach new goals. The key to traveling safely during the pandemic, as she points out, is in using the technique throughout the experience. By remaining mindful, travelers will go about their experience in a way that is conscientious and intentional. Just as with many things in life, this is an issue that comes down to learning to be more focused and plan ahead.

Sandler has created a recipe for mindful safe travel in the era of COVID, which includes the following tips:

  • Forget being spontaneous. This is not the time to be spontaneous. In order to help reduce risks and stress. Figure everything out ahead of time. Know about everything before you go do it. This goes for restaurants, excursions, and even visiting others. Call ahead so you can plan out as much as possible.
  • Know the rules and regulations. The rules today differ by city and state, so it’s important to know what they are for where you are heading. Get the information you need so that you are prepared. Whether it means all meals will be takeout, you will have to wear a mask, or you need to limit the number in your party, avoiding surprises will help keep things stress-free.
  • Get tested before you go. Getting a COVID test before you travel is a good way to help reduce stress and the spread of the virus. This way you will know that you are not unknowingly spreading it around wherever you may go.
  • Create a checklist to use. A checklist is a great way to ease the hassle of ensuring you have everything covered. Make a list of what needs to be packed, calls that need to be made, things that must be done before heading out, etc. This will prove much easier than trying to simply remember everything.
  • Make reservations wherever possible. This is a great time to make reservations for everything possible. Whether it’s at a restaurant, a tour company, or something else, this is a great way to help them limit the number of guests allowed in any one place at the same time.
  • Be kind and patient. People you come across while you are traveling are doing things differently, too, and it may cause them to be stressed out and provide slower service. Take that time to remind yourself to be in the here and now, and focus on being kind and patient.

“The holidays are a special time, and most of us still want to travel,” added Sandler. “While we shouldn’t live in constant fear of the virus, we should strive to keep being keenly aware of the situation and our surroundings. When we do that, we will reduce the stress and anxiety, help to keep everyone healthier, and still be able to enjoy life, even more than when we travel without being so focused.”

Through her personal development and career coaching services, Sandler has helped people in many different ways. From helping them to identify things holding themselves back to being able to achieve personal goals, she brings a crucial, helpful outsider’s perspective. In addition to personal achievements, she helps many people with their career goals, as well as working with companies to provide their team with impact training. Through her efforts, companies have been able to reduce absenteeism rates, motivate their team, reduce stress levels, engage their employees, and create a better workplace.

Sandler offers impact retreats, corporate impact events, and one-on-one coaching services. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in mental health counseling, has a strong foundation in mindfulness-based stress reduction, and has worked in hospitals and private practices. She has also spent time as a research assistant at Johns Hopkins. Upcoming retreats include Reignite in Tulum, Mindfulness in Mykonos, Rewire and Renew in The French Alps, and Mindfulness & Mindset in The Hamptons. To learn more about Katie Sandler and her services, or to see the retreat schedule, visit the site: https://katiesandler.com/.

Body positivity — a balancing act

By Janna Breslin

Body positivity is a phrase we hear more and more often, lately. It’s a push to alert people—especially impressionable children and teens—that there are many harmful media representations out there, especially for women.

Just as people once wrung their hands over Barbie’s unnatural shape, the Kardashians and other airbrushed social media influencers make certain “desirable” body shapes seem naturally attainable. We’re all guilty of it to a certain extent. Who doesn’t use strategic selfie angles to mask our “imperfections?”

The body positivity movement is aimed at normalizing all body types, rather than focusing on and celebrating only super-ripped Abercrombie and surgically-enhanced Victoria’s Secret models. Realistically, no matter how much we diet and exercise, the majority of humans can’t achieve those standards. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t wear the clothes we enjoy or avoid photos with friends.

But acceptance is a balancing act. We should all recognize that our bodies are constantly changing, and to hold ourselves to impossible ideals is detrimental to our mental health. On the other hand, body positivity isn’t a substitute for physical wellness. Luckily, physical health also comes in a number of different packages.

The push to normalize all body types

Your body image is how you feel about the way you look and feel, when you look in the mirror or at photos of yourself. Healthy body image is not merely not hating the way your body looks, but actively accepting it without trying to change yourself to fit arbitrary standards. For example, if you tell yourself, “I’ll look better once I lose fifteen pounds,” that’s not a healthy body image—even if you actually need to lose that weight to be healthy. In fact, it can actually promote unhealthy behaviors.

Body positivity initially started as a plus-size movement, and has grown more inclusive over time. The movement includes people of any shape, size, gender, race and physical ability (or disability). The point is to challenge the way society presents the physical “ideal” in pop culture, media, and more. That ranges from putting plus (or even average)-size models in ads to workout videos hosted by plus-size yogis.

How acceptance can help you stay healthy

For some people, the idea that you can be healthy and physically active, even if you’re plus-sized, is nothing short of revolutionary. Of course, there’s plenty of blowback—detractors accuse body positivity advocates of “glorifying obesity.” Since the movement is diverse, you may come across conflicting options from different sources. The key is that weight stigma hurts your mental health—and when you’re struggling emotionally, it’s that much harder to get fit and enjoy life.

Judith Matz, a clinical social worker cautions people not to put off activities until they reach a certain weight or fitness goal. The key to body acceptance (and staying or getting fit) is to continue to practice healthy behaviors regardless of your current size. When you consistently get the message that you’re not worthy of taking a barre class while you’re thirty pounds overweight, or you can’t wear a crop top until you’re perfectly toned, you’re more likely to give up.

That’s how body positivity can help: it reminds us that we all have the right to exist in and enjoy our bodies just as they are, right now. That includes engaging in healthy exercise and enjoying balanced nutrition.

Body positivity is no substitute for physical wellness

With that said, body positivity isn’t a substitute for physical health. That doesn’t mean that you can’t be a physically fit person at a higher weight. As long as you and your doctor are happy with your fitness and body size, healthy bodies really do come in all shapes and sizes.

The key is to balance the mental health benefits of body acceptance with physical fitness. You don’t have to be the “perfect” BMI (and in fact, research suggests that is an outdated metric) with ripped abs and biceps to be healthy or to love your body. However, if you struggle to get off the couch and get any physical activity at all, chances are you could stand to get back into fighting shape. You wouldn’t be alone, either. During the COVID-19 pandemic, more people are struggling now than ever—which feeds right back into negative body image.

The goal for everyone should be to accept ourselves as we are—works in progress—and prioritize our physical fitness over whether we fit into arbitrary aesthetic standards. When we do that, we make healthier decisions.

Janna Breslin is a well-known fitness model, certified personal trainer, health coach, and
nutrition expert. With Evan DeMarco, she co-founded Complete Human, the new
multi-media platform that takes a deep dive into the areas of mind, body, soul, and planet while
exploring what makes us who we are and what will make us better. Their flagship podcast can be found on all major streaming podcast players including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Play, and their namesake streaming video channel is online at YouTube.

Instagram | Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Youtube

Jet Boys photographed by Deen Harrison

Jet Boys

This shoot brings forth a new age of men’s wear with high fashion athletic men’s garments. With silk fabrics, these clothes are perfect for comfortable travel in style.

Photographer: Deen Harrison
Stylist: Winnie Stackz
Photographer: Deen Harrison 
Stylist: Winnie Stackz
Photographer: Deen Harrison 
Stylist: Winnie Stackz
Photographer: Deen Harrison 
Stylist: Winnie Stackz
Photographer: Deen Harrison @deensvision Stylist: @winniestackz
Photographer: Deen Harrison 
Stylist: Winnie Stackz
Kaelen Felix illustrates article for 360 MAGAZINE

Finding New Light

by Sonya Keshwani, two year breast cancer survivor & founder of StyleEsteem Wardrobe

There are many things no one tells you about getting diagnosed with breast cancer at 29 years old. How you will meet physical limits you didn’t know existed, and then keep pushing beyond them. How your entire identity – past, present and future – will be viewed through the lens of your diagnosis. And how the diagnosis and healing process are much more challenging and tough than pinkwashed TV commercials would have you believe. 

Through all these instances, every cancer patient experiences moments when they have to make a decision to either see themselves as a continuous human being experiencing cancer and healing, or as a new person who is living a second chance life. I saw a third option for myself. I decided that the person who was going to be a “survivor” deserved to wear her challenges as beautiful accomplishments, while also appreciating the fullness of her new life. 

Since a young age, fashion had been a medium for expressing my joy and vibrancy. So when I lost my hair to chemo, I channeled that same approach into the creation of fashionable turbans. Through the lens of beautiful fabrics and patterns, I learned that challenging situations are wrought with beauty and sparkle. I started the shift from seeing my bald head as a symbol of cancer, to seeing myself – my true character and strength – as beyond skin deep.  I went from creating new styles between chemo sessions, to launching a company that empowers women through cancer and hair loss, called StyleEsteem Wardrobe. This company and the mission to help others became my “why” on the path to healing.

One of the greatest blessings of my “why” is how it has enabled me to connect with other profound individuals and organizations on a similar mission – to improve and empower the quality of life for cancer patients. Earlier this year, my “why” brought me to A Silver Lining Foundation gala in Chicago, where I met Twist Out Cancer Advisory Board Member Gudrun Wu Snyder. We instantly connected as she told me about Twist Out Cancer, a place where cancer patients’ stories are turned into inspirational works of art. Their mission and the story of their founder, Jenna Benn Shersher, spoke to me like a glittering beacon of hope, similar to the one that inspired me during the creation of StyleEsteem. Right away, I knew I wanted to get involved, so Gudrun encouraged me to apply to the Brushes with Cancer program. 

When I was selected as an inspiration for the Brushes with Cancer 2020 Chicago cohort, it was an emotional experience for me. Like we are told when we are young “you can be anything you want to be when you grow up”, I similarly told myself this as a cancer patient. That I could be anything through cancer – inspirational, fashionable, fierce and graceful. Two years into my survivorship, what I had told myself in my heart was being amplified by others in my community, and this alone was such a powerful experience for me. 

My pairing with my artist, Sujata Gazder, a talented, intuitive and bold fashion designer, couldn’t have been more perfect. She saw beneath the surface of my diagnosis, into a story of family unity, broken stereotypes, and audacious hope. She saw my diagnosis as a catalyst for taking back control of my joy and my purpose in life. And we both agreed that hair loss was not loss entirely, it was the adornment of something new and beautiful in my life. 

Due to the pandemic, as well as Sujata being based out of Chicago and me being based out of New York, creating the final masterpiece had unique requirements from each of us. Phone catch ups, Zoom fittings, and photo sneak peeks of her work in progress.  The dress beautifully and perfectly honored each element of my survivorship, from my hair journey and attitude, to my family and spiritual roots. I was amazed at how Sujata could create something I so deeply connected with after knowing me for such a short period of time. 

Outside of my experience with Sujata, being part of this cohort has bonded me with countless other individuals who found their own path to beauty through the darkness of diagnosis. I am proud to stand among them as a survivor and a supporter. And I am so grateful for this space where our stories are transformed into inspiring works of art and unforgettable experiences.

Today I look forward to our virtual gala where we will celebrate each other’s stories, and to seeing my gown in person for the first time when I meet Sujata. This process has taught me that diagnosis is like a crystal. Whoever is holding your crystal in their hands can see new beauty, color and light in your story. And when you exercise vulnerability and trust to let that happen, you can find new meaning and purpose in your own path.

Lewis Hamilton illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Lewis Hamilton sets record with 92nd career win

Lewis Hamilton took pole position in career victories after securing his 92nd career win at the 2020 Portuguese Grand Prix on October 25, 2020. The record haul puts him one win above one of the sport’s all-time greats, Michael Schumacher. Data presented by Safebettingsites.com takes a look at a list of Hamilton’s major accomplishments and milestones in what is already an illustrious career.

Lewis Hamilton’s father, Anthony Hamilton, dedicated an emotional tribute to his son after Lewis Hamilton recently won the championship. The video was released by Formula 1 here.

Hamilton Breaks Schumacher’s Unbeatable Record

When Michael Schumacher broke the record for career wins and then eventually set the bar at 91 total victories, many thought the record will never be broken, or at least not for some time. Yet, less than 15 years later Hamilton has taken the top step of the podium from Schumacher and looks well underway to breaking the once unfathomable century mark.

The setting for the milestone was Algarve International Circuit in Portimao, Portugal. The track does not normally feature in the F1 calendar with the last f1 race held in 1996. But with the COVID-19 pandemic throwing chaos in the F1 racing calendar, officials decided to add the track to maximise the number of races for the season.

Hamilton Breaking Records Since He Was A Rookie Driver

Lewis Hamilton made his debut in 2007 and showed his potential early on with what is considered to be the best rookie season in Formula 1 history. His debut season saw him break several records on his way to losing the world championship by merely a point. As of writing, Hamilton still holds the record for; most debut season victories(4), most debut season pole positions (6), and most points in a debut season (109). In setting all these records he became the youngest driver to lead the world championship at 22 years old, a record he still currently holds.

Lewis Hamilton A Career Full Of Superlatives

After a scintillating start to his F1 career, Hamilton has gone from strength to strength and has set many other records along the way to breaking Schumacher’s record. As of writing, Hamilton leads in the following categories; most pole positions (97), most podium finishes (161), most wins from pole position (57) and most podium finishes in a season (10) just to name a few.

These are just a few from a myriad of milestones Hamilton has set in his quest to become Formula 1’s  Greatest of All Time.

You can read more about the story with more statistics and information at: https://www.safebettingsites.com/blog/2020/10/28/lewis-hamilton-sets-record-with-92nd-career-win-a-breakdown-of-hamiltons-milestones/

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Woman at Computer

What happens to the home and economy when women leave the workforce?

The pandemic-induced recession forced many women to drop out of the workforce, with research showing they were much more likely than men to give up jobs so they could take care of children when schools went online.

The consequences of these decisions may go beyond each individual, though. 

“They could have large repercussions for the economy, the home, and society as a whole, says Andi Simon (www.andisimon.com), a corporate anthropologist, founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants, and author of the upcoming book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business.

Some ramifications of this 2020 exodus from the workforce for women could include:

  • A drop in consumer spending. When one spouse loses a job, whatever the reason might be, it means an immediate and sudden drop in income for that household. “The impact on household earnings will lead to reduced spending,” Simon says. “That will have ripple effects throughout the economy.”
  • An impact on women’s careers and advancement. Eventually, many of these women will no doubt go back to work, but how well they will be able to just pick up their careers where they left off could be another matter, Simon says. “Will they have lost ground in the line for promotions to men who didn’t take any time away from work?” she asks. “Also, depending on how slow the recovery is, rejoining the workforce might not be that quick and easy.”
  • A reduction in demand for family-related industries. When both spouses work outside the home, couples often need to make use of services that developed or grew because one adult – usually the woman – wasn’t around to take care of certain household duties. For households where a mother is now back in the home, that has changed. “They no longer need to pay someone for childcare services,” Simon says. “In addition, the need for house-cleaning services is likely to drop.”
  • Changes to retail markets. A woman who stays home with the kids has different needs than a woman who commutes to an office each day, and those differences could be reflected in the world of retail, Simon says. Just as an example, there could be a drop in demand for makeup. Sales of business attire for women may plummet – or at least take a hit as more casual, comfortable clothes become more important wardrobe necessities. Restaurants could continue to struggle as people eat out less and cook at home more.
  • Entrepreneurial urges could shift to home businesses. Some women could still keep their career mindsets and try to establish their own businesses run from their homes, Simons says. But she cautions that there are questions about just what those businesses might be since some potential areas – such as marketing, consulting, and business coaching – have seen a downshift in demand for their services. “That leaves you to wonder just how viable setting up a home business might be,” Simon says.

Despite all those concerns, some good can come out of this period as well for women who want a better life both personally and professionally, Simon says.

“If you’ve not been satisfied with your career and your life, this could be an opportunity to rethink and rewrite your personal story,” she says. “You need to imagine what you want to become, focus on how to make that possible, and then begin to take steps to make it happen.”

About Andi Simon

Andi Simon, Ph.D. (www.andisimon.com), author of the upcoming book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business, is a corporate anthropologist and founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants (www.simonassociates.net). A trained practitioner in Blue Ocean Strategy®, Simon has conducted several hundred workshops and speeches on the topic as well as consulted with a wide range of clients across the globe. She also is the author of the award-winning book On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights. Simon has a successful podcast, On the Brink with Andi Simon, that has more than 125,000 monthly listeners, and is ranked among the top 20 Futurist podcasts and top 200 business podcasts. In addition, Global Advisory Experts named Simons’ firm the Corporate Anthropology Consultancy Firm of the Year in New York – 2020. She has been on Good Morning, America and Bloomberg, and is widely published in the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, Business Week, Becker’s, and American Banker, among others. She has been a guest blogger for Forbes.com, Huffington Post, and Fierce Health.

Cryptograph platform announced by the 360 MAGAZINE.

Stars on Digital Auction Platform Cryptograph

Notable Music industry artists such as Rage Against the Machine’s Tom Morello, Scott Storch, All American Rejects Tyson Ritter, Eve, The Black eyed Peas’ apl.de.ap, among others, are committed to auctioning off custom digital collectibles via the newly established Cryptograph platform to benefit charitable causes such as Global Wildlife Conservation. The blockchain based digital collectible auction site Cryptograph, which is powered by Ethereum,  features one-of-a-kind music collectibles by these top artists, with Eve’s auction currently underway, and having kicked off with Tom Morello in their music auction block on October 22nd. Today, Tyson Ritter of All American Rejects went live.

The recently launched platform Cryptograph is bringing some new innovations to the music industry, with the introduction of their highly anticipated innovative digital auction house which initially kicked off on July 6, 2020.  Cryptograph is creating a name as a market leader in blockchain based digital collectibles, also known as NFT’s (Non-Fungible Tokens), featuring digital art and memorabilia from a wide variety of world renowned artists and icons, and now also from top music artists.

Cryptograph is positioned to solve some of the major problems currently plaguing the music industry, primarily giving artists and musicians an opportunity to see more of the value form their work, particularly over the long term.

Music Industry producer and songwriter Scott Storch is also participating in the crypto auction platform

“Cryptograph’s blockchain technology will have huge disruptive implications on many industries including music. Blockchain technology has made it possible for my art and my industry to thrive in an autonomous way, allowing the creative freedom to produce and self publish art and control the financial long term value that the work generates in an automated, permission-less , secure, transparent and trustless way.” – Scott Storch

“We want Cryptograph to become the world’s leading publishing, auctioning, trading and discovery platform for the new market of collectible digital assets. Giving creators a new way to truly realize the intrinsic value of their work over the long term and giving collectors something special and historical that they truly own. We intend on achieving all of this whilst at the same redefining the way philanthropy is done forever by bringing charitable giving and fundraising into the future.”  – Co-Founding Partner Tommy Alastra

Cryptograph has already successfully launched digital auctions with celebrities, actors, artists and crypto world leaders, inclusive of Vitalik Buterin, Adrien Brody, Paris Hilton, Ashton Kutcher, Seth Green, Kristin Wiig, Ryan Phillippe, David Arquette, Eve, Retna, Gregory Sif, Alec Monopoly and more. The auctions have benefitted Global Conservation efforts to include wildlife and reforestation, Covid-19 relief , Education, Open Source Tech and other incredible causes and organizations

Cryptograph was founded by a team of entrepreneurs, impact investors and blockchain pioneers who share a joint interest in using technology to do good, inclusive of Tommy Alastra , Edouard Bessire, Guillaume Gonnaud, Anthony John Bryan and Hugo McDonaugh (Who also serves as Cryptograph’s CEO),. We interviewed the founders to give insight into this revolutionary platform.

Each Cryptograph perpetually supports a charitable cause and each one is initially sold at auction and then traded by collectors on the platform’s secondary market, raising money for charity every time they are transacted. These digital works are unlike anything else currently offered on the blockchain, and they will be auctioned off and traded using Cryptographs unique auction system that incentivizes participation.

Cryptograph puts forward a new and unique model for ‘crypto collectibles’ with a sustainably philanthropic business model underpinning their whole platform, which has already rolled out unique creations from top crypto leaders like Vitalik Buterin, Emin Gun Sirer and other celebrity tech innovators like Ashton Kutcher, and pop culture icons like Paris Hilton. They continue to position themselves as a new market leader in this ever evolving and exciting young market, now allowing for top music artists to come and use the Cryptograph platform to showcase their talent and creativity in a completely new way. Cryptographs are an entirely new form of collectible that collectors can trade and collect in perpetuity.

One of the biggest challenges faced today by music artists, in our digital society, is making a financial living off music while still maintaining control over rights and publishing. Royalty rates from streaming platforms like Youtube and even Itunes are fairly low. Spotify yields success if the streams amount, but payouts do not occur for months and it takes heavy  playlist rotation to really earn the dollars. This evolving revenue element of the music business continues to be navigated by many artists with the exception of top-selling artists who have big label leaders behind them. It has however  led many artists to self publish, in order to control all earnings.

Further adds Alasta, “Today’s digital content is all based on followers, likes, and views and it is monetized by selling attention (Youtube, Instagram etc) or access (Netflix, Pateron etc). Now, imagine a world where digital content can be truly owned and digital content can be truly scarce. Each person can have their own collection of unique digital assets that they truly own and that cannot be counterfeited, and people can curate, share and trade/make money directly from these new digital assets thanks to blockchain technology. This new opportunity for digital content is what we at Cryptograph find extremely exciting and the vision of a new digital world where the value of content is not just based on likes and views but rather real ownership and scarcity is what we are working towards and where we believe the future is. We at Cryptograph want to help build this future and at the same time find a new way of putting philanthropy at the core of all of it.”

Whilst the Cryptograph platform centres around the concept of using NFTs to benefit charities and provide new revenue streams to creators, it also opens the door for a new forum of music ownership and digitization. Musical artists can use the platform to create new musical works and then publish these works as Cryptographs.They can attach the various commercialization and catalog rights as they choose,  directly to the specific Cryptograph token. This revolutionary system of self-publication that bypasses the big music distribution oligopolies of today. Combined with the innovative price discovery and trading system of the Cryptograph platform, and its unique philanthropic business model. Cryptograph presents a new way for music to be published, bought and sold in a fairer,  more secure,  and more transparent way.  It provides musicians with a whole new avenue to explore, when it comes to publishing and monetizing their work while simultaneously doing good with the charity fundraising element built in.

Cryptographs are one-of-a-kind digital collectibles created by world renowned icons and artists that perpetually support charitable causes. Each Cryptograph is sold at auction and then traded by collectors on the platform’s secondary market, raising money for charity every time they are transacted. These digital artworks are unlike anything else currently offered on the blockchain, and they will be auctioned off and traded using Cryptographs unique auction system that incentivizes participation.

Using smart contract technology to process and automate all transactions in a secure and transparent environment, Cryptograph makes sure that their charity and creator partners will always get a share of the perpetual revenue not just from the initial auction sale, but also from every single bid and subsequent sale that occurs on the secondary market. This powerful model ensures that the interests of the all parties involved in the Cryptograph ecosystem remain forever aligned and that they are continually incentivized to deliver further value over the long term to the community of Cryptograph collectors.

Cryptographs are one-of-a-kind digital collectibles created by icons and artists that support good causes forever, founded by a team of entrepreneurs, impact investors and blockchain pioneers that all share a joint passion in using technology to do good. Thanks to blockchain technology, each Cryptograph is 100% owned by the purchaser and cannot be forged or destroyed. A Cryptograph is a digital legacy.  Cryptographs are sold at auction and then traded by collectors on the platform, raising money for good causes every time they are transacted.  The platform makes charitable fundraising easier, instantly global and perpetual in nature.  It offers a new way to do philanthropy in the digital age.

Will. I. Am From the Black Eyed Peas image courtesy of Cryptograph.co

Image courtesy of Cryptograph.co

Allison Christensen, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery

10 Times Teen Movies and TV Shows Portrayed Mental Illness in a Helpful Light

By Shay Siegel

The importance of learning about mental health and debunking the stigmas that come along with it has been expressed more and more in recent years. Mental illness is a valid struggle in the everyday lives of people from all different backgrounds and circumstances—it does not discriminate. Representation of mental health is especially important for teenagers who already deal with issues of identity and belonging simply as part of growing up and all the external pressures they are exposed to. Art and entertainment forms that explore mental health and real societal issues are contributing to these discussions. 

These ten shows and movies (some of which are based on wonderful books) have explored mental illness in one way or another and shed some much-needed light, helping teens realize they are not alone.

1. Degrassi 

This was my favorite show when I was in high school, and it has done a great job not only shifting to keep up with current times, but it has always confronted a variety of important issues that teens face. I usually think of Degrassi: The Next Generation, because that’s the segment of the show I grew up with, but the new version Degrassi: The Next Class with a different cast for a new generation is exactly what the show has always been about, while keeping up with the current atmosphere. Degrassi consists of a big cast, which is one of the things to love about it and shows a multitude of characters that struggle with different issues, both external and internal. Mental health has always been portrayed in Degrassi and manifested in many ways, from eating disorders, to self-harm and suicide, to anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, to identity issues, peer pressure, sexual assault, substance abuse, and so much more. The show is confronting, and it raises awareness and leads to deeper thinking and conversation-starting in a helpful and positive way. Degrassi is my number one pick for a series that shows all the raw and relatable issues teens face, especially mental illness.

2. 13 Reasons Why

I loved the book 13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher, so naturally I was excited when it was made into a series. I know it has received a ton of backlash and been accused of glorifying suicide, and yes, the show may definitely be triggering and problematic in areas. There are many positives to be gleaned as well, though. The story confronts the very ugly side of suicide and the lasting effects of trauma like sexual assault and bullying on the psyche. It’s not meant to be comfortable because these issues are uncomfortable, and the show can help in processing tough topics. The story provides encouragement to think about how our actions affect others and how we can’t know what others are going through. And regardless of whether the show is hated or loved, it has absolutely started important conversations and raised suicide awareness.

3. All the Bright Places

I actually have not yet read the book by Jennifer Niven, but I watched the movie recently and thought it was a really realistic, while also heart-wrenching, take on depression. It’s helpful for teens to see two characters with different past traumas coping in different ways, and the idea expressed that some are able to heal while others still struggle. There is no one set of symptoms when an individual has depression and that was clearly portrayed in this film. The message of hope to find the bright places everywhere even when we might not feel like one of those places within ourselves is beautiful.

4. Looking for Alaska

Looking for Alaska is an adapted series based on John Green’s popular novel from 2005, which I also loved, but the series expands upon the book and incorporates updated ideas and messages that fit our current times and conversations, especially those that address mental health. The story unfolds as a mystery, and at times it’s lighter and a fun coming-of-age tale, but it’s so much deeper as it progresses, especially as the later episodes take on a more ominous tone and Alaska’s inner struggles become clearer. This is another instance of not truly knowing what another person is going through, especially when they don’t reach out for help in a direct way. This is unfortunately a reality of mental illness and one of the reasons is that those struggling don’t fully understand it themselves. The open-endedness of the story is realistic because that’s exactly how life is—nothing gets wrapped up neatly, but we learn about others and ourselves along the way.

5. The Perks of Being a Wallflower

This is also one of my favorite books by Stephen Chbosky, and the movie is every bit as emotional. Charlie is an incredibly realistic character. His feelings of loneliness while continuing on day to day with hope are so accurate and relatable for any teen who has ever felt like an outcast. The deeper past issues that we find out he has repressed are heartbreaking, but I think the story does a great job in portraying that past trauma, while contributing to his current situation, might also not have necessarily created it because there are many layers to mental illness and there is no off button once a “reason” is realized.

6. It’s Kind of a Funny Story

This movie is based on the YA novel by Ned Vizzini. We get a look into many of the patients’ lives over the course of a few days in a psychiatric hospital, while Craig, the male lead, learns about himself and his circumstances, ultimately taking steps to heal. One of the most positive messages of the story is that Craig takes it upon himself to seek help, which many (or most) don’t feel acceptable doing. This is so important for teens to see. The idea that others can’t save us, and we have to build our own lives and not look to others to make it all better for us is also done well. The author of the book, Ned Vizzini, committed suicide, but he left a message of hope in allowing Craig to work through his struggles and show readers and viewers what goes on in the mind of someone struggling so deeply in hopes that those who need it may seek help.

7. Eighth Grade

This movie was cringe-worthy at times, which was effective because that’s exactly what this time of life is like. If you feel awkward watching someone, just imagine how elevated those feelings are for them on the inside. Kayla, the thirteen-year-old protagonist, is riddled with worry and anxiety about her every decision and encounter, and many of the times her fears are realized, which I think we all can agree escalates anxiety. It was an accurate and upsetting portrayal of what goes on both inside and outside during this impactful transition in life, maybe not for every single teen but certainly for the ones who feel that specific emotional turmoil.

8. To the Bone

This was an interesting take on how mental illness manifests in eating disorders. The idea of knowing how damaging your behavior is but also not knowing how to stop it or do anything different, or even just not wanting to, is relatable to anyone who struggles with mental illness whether it be an eating disorder or otherwise. This film has also been criticized for misrepresenting sensitive subject matter, but again, it has helped start conversations and it has definitely expressed an important message that recovery is not a straight line.

9. The Edge of Seventeen 

I loved this movie, and one of the best things about it is how “normal” Nadine’s mental health issues are treated. Her mental illness is not necessarily what the movie is about, but a driving force behind her as a character, and an accurate portrayal of depression for one unique person, since everyone experiences it differently. Although her struggles may be heightened by exterior circumstances and “being a teen” the way she views herself and the world are real and heartbreaking, and although she might not be in imminent danger she is suffering, nonetheless. The movie is also quite funny in parts! The balance of humor and despair work to provide light to all the darkness that exists.

10. Euphoria

This new series is extremely uncensored, raw, and even shocking, but it definitely captures the issues and pressures of being a teen in this current climate. A realistic and well-done takeaway from the series is how mental illness can completely take over and suffocate a person, even bringing on a terrible feeling of boredom and monotony. Rue, the main character, struggles with addiction, which first became an issue when she was looking for a way to combat her host of mental illnesses, and of course gives her yet another issue to struggle with when she is already in severe pain, if from nothing else then from being born into this world. The uncomfortable honesty in Euphoria is executed with precision and is a look at mental illness, while it has always existed, now in the new generation. 


Shay Siegel is a freelance writer, poet, and editor. Her debut YA novel, Fractured, is available now. For more information, visit shaysiegel.com, or connect with Siegel on Facebook, Instagram and Goodreads.