Posts tagged with "diet"

Art illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 magazine

Transformed Grief – Estefana Johnson, LMSW

When COVID-19 hit, there was an instant collective response of panic. People rushed to fill their pantries with nonperishables and toilet paper.  Schools closed, businesses closed, and lives were flipped upside down as our routines were disrupted by lockdowns and uncertainty. In a moment in which we most needed comfort and connection, we were forced to isolate for fear of spreading the virus to our loved ones. I remember countless sleepless nights where I obsessively checked the dashboards and reviewed the little data provided on how this virus operated, who was being affected, and the odds of survival. I called my parents frequently to remind them to “stay home, wash your hands, wear your masks”. I knew then if my father were to become infected, he would not survive. He was elderly and his lungs had much damage from decades of exposure to dust and cement as a mason. 

My father was the humblest, hardest-working man with the biggest faith I’ve ever known. He taught me patience, integrity and to never take life seriously as it is but a journey in the span of our existence. As an emigrant from Mexico with an 8th grade education, he faced adversity with relentless courage, and boundless humor. When he contracted COVID in July 2020, my heart shattered and my heart plunged into agony. Even then, Dad persisted: “no te preocupes mija, todo va estar bien” (don’t worry, my daughter, all will be well.) And yet, on July 27th, he passed. 

How can things be “well” when our world is shattered as we face our worst fear? Grief is the price of love. Years of working with trauma survivors as a clinician have allowed me to see that not all people can withstand the weight of tragedy and loss. Grief rips away our sense of normalcy, leaving us feeling broken, raw, and exposed. Many people lapse into survival mode to weather grief, a constant battle of managing misery and pain. Unresolved anguish, like unattended mold, can weaken our body structure, infect our attitude with anger, cloud our vision with resentment and spread toxic spores of bitterness towards others. And yet, there are those who rise up in the midst of adversity, seemingly fueled by the pain, and transformed to a more resilient, truer self. Like steel, refined through the fire. But how?

Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl wrote, “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” The human race has continued to thrive through plagues, war, genocide, famine and tragedy. Death is not the only loss we experience; we also grieve the loss of hope, health, relationships, or such as in this pandemic, loss of “normalcy.” Loss creates change. Change is only constant in life and outside of our control. It is in the acceptance and embracing of change that we can refine and solidify the core of what defines us. Even in the face of death, my father’s courage did not relent as he reaffirmed his identity: “I am a soldier and I will fight till the end – bruised and battered, I will fight until I am called home.” And fight he did.

Just like many other ‘essential’ workers, my sisters, both of whom are nurses, and I had to return to work. With the raw pain of loss, we found ourselves facing others in the midst of the tragedy we had just endured. I had never felt such gratitude for the tool that had become my specialty: Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART), an evidence-based technique that enables clients to reframe their memories of troubling events. Without ART, I could not have held space for the grief many clients brought to my office.  When we experience severe emotional events, the memory is imprinted into our subconscious mind through images. It is this deeply-rooted, emotionally-laden memory that causes our body to experience reactive responses such as extreme fear or panic long after the event has passed. Talking about painful memories can sometimes exacerbate symptoms since we cannot reason our way out of the pain. The subconscious does not speak in words; it speaks in images. Thus, metaphors are the language of emotion.  

Clients often share an inability to forget the image of their loved one’s death as it haunts them both in their waking life through flashbacks. ART targets these images through a brief, succinct process called voluntary image replacement. Grief work enables us to redefine the connection to our loved ones through memories of their life, rather than their death.  ART helps to facilitate that process. It has enabled me to transform my suffering to fuel my purpose as I help others navigate through the process of healing and post-traumatic growth.  Post-traumatic growth is an undergoing of a significant shift in one’s relation with the self and the world. It’s the ability to extract wisdom from suffering, create purpose from the pain and become more of our truest, most powerful selves as we break through perceived limitations. It leads us to acceptance of reality and enables us to feel more connected to our own humanity and that of others as we embrace our vulnerability.

Through ART, I now hold the memory of my father in a space full of love and resoluteness. I see him sitting in my sister’s living room, watching his children chat and grandkids play with a look of blissful pride on his face. It brings comfort to the void left by his departure, a reminder that life is finite.  And every time a client returns to my office after an ART session and tells me “The images are gone –  all I see is my mother’s smile,” my heart is filled with hope.

For additional information on Estefana Johnson go here.

Green covid by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

Tuberculosis Bacteria Paradox

TB-causing bacteria remember prior stress, react quickly to new stress

Tuberculosis bacteria have evolved to remember stressful encounters and react quickly to future stress, according to a study by computational bioengineers at Rice University and infectious disease experts at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

Published online in the open-access journal mSystems, the research identifies a genetic mechanism that allows the TB-causing bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to respond to stress rapidly and in manner that is “history-dependent,” said corresponding author Oleg Igoshin, a professor of bioengineering at Rice.

Researchers have long suspected that the ability of TB bacteria to remain dormant, sometimes for decades, stems from their ability to behave based upon past experience.

Latent TB is an enormous global problem. While TB kills about 1.5 million people each year, the World Health Organization estimates that 2-3 billion people are infected with a dormant form of the TB bacterium.

“There’s some sort of peace treaty between the immune system and bacteria,” Igoshin said. “The bacteria don’t grow, and the immune system doesn’t kill them. But if people get immunocompromised due to malnutrition or AIDS, the bacteria can be reactivated.”

One of the most likely candidates for a genetic switch that can toggle TB bacteria into a dormant state is a regulatory network that is activated by the stress caused by immune cell attacks. The network responds by activating several dozen genes the bacteria use to survive the stress. Based on a Rice computational model, Igoshin and his longtime Rutgers NJMS collaborator Maria Laura Gennaro and colleagues predicted just such a switch in 2010. According to the theory, the switch contained an ultrasensitive control mechanism that worked in combination with multiple feedback loops to allow hysteresis, or history-dependent behavior.

“The idea is that if we expose cells to intermediate values of stress, starting from their happy state, they don’t have that much of a response,” Igoshin explained. “But if you stress them enough to stop their growth, and then reduce the stress level back to an intermediate level, they remain stressed. And even if you fully remove the stress, the gene expression pathway stays active, maintaining a base level of activity in case the stress comes back.”

In later experiments, Gennaro’s team found no evidence of the predicted control mechanism in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a close relative of the TB bacterium. Since both organisms use the same regulatory network, it looked like the prediction was wrong. Finding out why took years of follow-up studies. Gennaro and Igoshin’s teams found that the TB bacterium, unlike their noninfectious cousins, had the hysteresis control mechanism, but it didn’t behave as expected.

“Hysteretic switches are known to be very slow, and this wasn’t,” Igoshin said. “There was hysteresis, a history-dependent response, to intermediate levels of stress. But when stress went from low to high or from high to low, the response was relatively fast. For this paper, we were trying to understand these somewhat contradictory results. ”

Igoshin and study co-author Satyajit Rao, a Rice doctoral student who graduated last year, revisited the 2010 model and considered how it might be modified to explain the paradox. Studies within the past decade had found a protein called DnaK played a role in activating the stress-response network. Based on what was known about DnaK, Igoshin and Rao added it to their model of the dormant-active switch.

“We didn’t discover it, but we proposed a particular mechanism for it that could explain the rapid, history-dependent switching we’d observed,” Igoshin said. “What happens is, when cells are stressed, their membranes get damaged, and they start accumulating unfolded proteins. Those unfolded proteins start competing for DnaK.”

DnaK was known to play the role of chaperone in helping rid cells of unfolded proteins, but it plays an additional role in the stress-response network by keeping its sensor protein in an inactive state.

“When there are too many unfolded proteins, DnaK has to let go of the sensor protein, which is an activation input for our network,” Igoshin said. “So once there are enough unfolded proteins to ‘distract’ DnaK, the organism responds to the stress.”

Gennaro and co-author Pratik Datta conducted experiments at NJMS to confirm DnaK behaved as predicted. But Igoshin said it is not clear how the findings might impact TB treatment or control strategies. For example, the switch responds to short-term biochemical changes inside the cell, and it’s unclear what connection, if any, it may have with long-term behaviors like TB latency, he said.

“The immediate first step is to really try and see whether this hysteresis is important during the infection,” Igoshin said. “Is it just a peculiar thing we see in our experiments, or is it really important for patient outcomes? Given that it is not seen in the noninfectious cousin of the TB bacterium, it is tempting to speculate it is related to survival inside the host.”

Gennaro is a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. Igoshin is a senior investigator at Rice’s Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.

The research was supported by the Welch Foundation (C-1995) and the National Institutes of Health (GM096189, AI122309, AI104615, HL149450).

Food illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Eating Disorders in COVID-19

More than 30 million people in the U.S. suffer from eating disorders, and these tendencies can be exacerbated due to the coronavirus. The difficulty of accessing specific foods and the discourse surrounding weight gain in quarantine can make those who struggle with eating disorders feel out of control and helpless. COVID-19 can be a nightmare for them because of the following triggers:

 

·      Empty grocery shelves

·      Feelings of uncertainty and loss of control

·      Social media messages about avoiding the “Quarantine 15” pound weight gain are especially harmful to those with existing eating disorders.

 

A recent study conducted by the International Journal for Eating Disorders found that symptoms worsened across the board for people with anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating disorders nationwide since the lockdowns in March. Among respondents, 62% of people with anorexia have experienced more severe restriction and food fear during the pandemic, while 30% of those with bulimia and binge-eating disorder reported experiencing more binge-eating episodes, and a greater urge to binge.

 

Some of the facts about eating disorders are sobering:

 

·       9% of the US population will suffer from an eating disorder in their lifetime

·       Almost 1% of us suffer from anorexia nervosa

·       Between 2-3% of us have bulimia nervosa

·       Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder. Unlike more widely known eating disorders which disproportionately effect women, 40% of those with BED are men.

·       10% of those with eating disorders lose their lives as a result

·       Eating disorders are second only to opioid overdose as the deadliest mental illnesses

·       About 26% of people with eating disorders attempt suicide

 

However, if you or a loved one are struggling with an eating disorder, talking to a licensed professional and receiving treatment can help.

vegetables by Nicole salazar for 360 magazine

Show your heart some love on more than just Valentine’s Day 

By Nutrition Myth Buster Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS

Experts aren’t sure why people are more likely to have a heart attack during the winter than any other time of year. If Valentine’s Day and Heart Health Month are inspiring you to take better care of your ticker, here’s big news. 

A 12-month human clinical study involving 577 participants conducted in Malaysia reveals we aren’t doing our hearts any favors by eating a high-carb diet. Researchers looked at different patterns of eating, from high-fat to low-fat, high-carb to low-carb, and measured the effect each way of eating had on the risk for heart disease. Turns out, fat intake didn’t move the risk needle one way or the other. The higher carb diets, on the other hand, were associated with greater cardiovascular ris. 

I wasn’t the least surprised by this study’s findings! I’ve been saying for years that fat has been wrongly demonized. If anything, it’s sugar – not fat – that’s causing us to go off the metabolic rails. In this study, low-carb diets performed considerably better than high-carb diets.

The study found that healthy adults who ate higher proportions of carbohydrates (compared with the amount of proteins or fat they consumed) tended to develop several elevated risk factors for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and more plaque-promoting small LDL cholesterol particles. Higher proportions of dietary fat intake were not associated with elevating these risk factors.

A hormone called insulin – and a condition called insulin resistance – are at the core of pre-diabetes, and are turning out to be early warning signs for heart disease. And the results of this study showed that insulin measures were considerably better when people ate diets with a lower amount of carbs, and that was true regardless of the amount of fat consumed. 

It’s insulin resistance, not cholesterol, that is the root cause of heart disease and, according to other research, probably many other chronic underlying conditions plaguing our world. 

The good news is that insulin resistance is treatable, preventable and mostly reversible by diet alone. It’s time we get off the toxic diets that are causing this condition in the first place! It’s time we understand that saturated fat and cholesterol are not the problems. When you remove that outdated thinking, the current dietary guidelines collapse like a house of cards. 

What’s good for the heart is good for the brain, and vice versa. I haven’t found one exception to that case. The right diet for the heart looks exactly like the right diet for the brain. And sadly, the  diet we SHOULD be eating is exactly the opposite of the diet we’ve been told is heart-healthy. 

Easy, no-fail heart-healthy eating changes

Most attempts to eat healthier fail quickly because the changes are too big and unmanageable. Instead of trying to completely overhaul your diet, start by making a few small changes. Here are a few simple suggestions that may have a healthy impact on your heart: 

First, remove these items from your kitchen: 

  • Corn oil and canola oil. These seed oils are filled with omega-6 which is very pro-inflammatory. 
  • Sugar. Let’s be realistic. I know you’re probably not going to give up your favorite sweets entirely. But be kind to your heart by restricting those goodies to just a few days a month.
  • Canned soups, salad dressings and pasta sauces. These are often loaded with hidden sugars and a ton of sodium. Instead of relying on these cooking shortcuts, do an internet search for simple recipes you can make from scratch.  
  • White flour and white rice. These are heavily processed and raise your blood sugar almost as much as pure sugar. And – don’t shoot the messenger – products made with ‘whole grains” don’t do much better. Whole grains still raise blood sugar, and still contain gluten, so they may not be the solution for everyone. 

Then, add these items to your fridge and pantry: 

  • Palm oil. You can find this online and in specialty markets. Millions of people around the world use it as their everyday cooking oil. Malaysian certified sustainable palm oil is rich in nutrients such as brain- and heart-healthy vitamin E tocotrienols. 
  • Butter. This was never bad to begin with! It was banished from our tables because of our ill-advised fear of saturated fats. So we replaced it with something much worse!
  • Stevia and monk fruit. These are natural sweeteners that have no effect on your blood sugar.” 
  • Nuts: People who eat more nuts have lower BMIs. Their diets are higher in magnesium, higher in fiber, higher in poly- and monounsaturated fats, all of which can have a profound effect on your health. But nuts are also easy to overeat and contribute to weight gain, so just be careful about the amount you consume.
  • Egg yolks: What a relief that you don’t have to suffer through one more tasteless egg white omelet! The advice to eat egg white omelets is way past its expiration date! 
  • Dark chocolate (minimum 60% cocoa on the label): Chocolate contains cocoa flavanols; beneficial plant-based phytonutrients that support cardiovascular health.
  • Grass-fed beef. Grass-fed beef contains anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids and less inflammatory omega-6s. It’s also free of hormones, a very big plus indeed. If you follow this suggestion, you’ll never have to worry about how much marbling is in your steak, or if your hamburger is 70/30 instead of 90/10 or 80/20. It won’t matter. 
  • Dark meat poultry: The USDA data shows that there are mere milligrams of differences in the nutritional content of white and dark meat. 

Here’s more advice: Stick with the basics. I’ve always said that the only rule you really need to follow in nutrition is to eat real food, food your great-grandmother would have recognized as food. Eat from what I call the “Jonny Bowden Four Food Groups”: food you could hunt, fish, gather or pluck. Stay away from overly processed and get back to basics. 

That doesn’t mean you can never snack. Get organic (non-GMO) popcorn with minimal chemical processing. Get away from that chemical soup called “butter flavoring” and look for a microwave popcorn that contains palm oil, because palm oil doesn’t burn easily so your popcorn will taste better.  

This year, you can finally make commitments to a heart-healthy diet that are easy to achieve. These tips will help you take better care of your heart throughout the winter and may become heart-healthy habits you’ll want to follow all year long.  

Biography: Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS

Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, (aka “The Nutrition Myth Buster”) is a nationally known expert on weight loss, nutrition and health, and the best-selling author of 15 books on health. Dr. Jonny — a former professional pianist and conductor — earned six certifications in personal training and fitness, has a Master’s degree in psychology, a PhD in holistic nutrition and is board certified by the American College of Nutrition. He has written, contributed to or consulted on hundreds of articles in publications as diverse as the New York Times, People, Us, O the Oprah Magazine, In Style, Vanity Fair Online, People, GQ, Forbes Online, Clean Eating, the Huffington Post and countless others.

He is the best-selling author of 15 books, including “Living Low Carb”, “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth” and his latest, the revised and expanded version of “The Great Cholesterol Myth” (2020). 

Nutrition article illustration by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE

BAKING GOODNESS AND WELLNESS IN THE NEW YEAR

Susan Bowerman, Herbalife Nutrition, Sr. Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training

Last year brought a convergence of trends. Consumers sought food and beverage products that tasted great and delivered nutritional benefits. A growing number of people took to making muffins, cakes and even pancake cereal – and social media was filled with images of these beautiful but often calorie-laden creations. With so many people enjoying baking while at the same time concerned about their wellbeing, there was a growing demand for healthy and delicious ways to make these recipes at home.

As a global nutrition company, we love to see our distributors’ and consumers’ creations made with our products, including baked goods, that allow them to enjoy the benefits of Herbalife Nutrition throughout the day. Witnessing the demand to satisfy cravings for nutritious baked items using our products, Herbalife Nutrition introduces Protein Baked Goods Mix. When combined with Herbalife Formula 1 and water, the mix can be used to create mouth-watering and nutritious, high protein muffins, pancakes, waffles, and donuts in minutes.

Globally, consumers are seeking foods that are high in protein – especially plant-based proteins – to help maintain a healthy diet. Protein options throughout the day help keep our diets balanced.  Protein Baked Goods Mix offers a new way for consumers to add protein to their diet throughout the day to help satisfy hunger and keep weight-management goals on track. While some may not consider breakfast to be the most important meal of the day, breakfast foods remain enormously popular. According to one study, half (46%) of consumers enjoy eating breakfast foods at non-traditional times, especially at dinner (56%). The popularity of breakfast foods may be tied to increasing protein-rich options and snacking occasions among millennial consumers.

When combined with Formula 1, Protein Baked Goods Mix will make a nutrient dense meal with protein and other key nutrients to help satisfy people’s hunger in a nutritious and delicious way. The Mix is gluten-free and low glycemic [i], and is suitable for vegetarians [ii] and diabetics [iii].

To make a protein muffin, just combine a serving of Protein Baked Goods Mix with a serving of Formula 1 Shake Mix and water, put it in a mug, and microwave for 3 minutes. The result is a warm, tasty, filling, high-protein meal with 24grams of protein, 190 calories, 21 vitamins and minerals, and 5 g of fiber. No eggs, no milk needed.

As a nutritionist, one of the top questions I get from consumers worldwide is how to add more protein to their diet. They love our shakes – but want new ways to enjoy our high protein products. With the addition of our Protein Baked Goods Mix, we are unleashing people’s creativity to enjoy a range of options – from muffins to pancakes and waffles – that will make a healthy, satisfying and delicious addition to a healthy diet.


[i] When combined with Formula 1 that is made with no artificial sweeteners, is Gluten-Free and Low GI.

[ii] Products do not contain any meat, poultry, fish, seafood, or insects.

[iii] Herbalife products do not treat diabetes, but diabetics can use them. When prepared with Formula 1.

A SHOC ENERGY BEVERAGE INSIDE 360 MAGAZINE

Join the A SHOC Challenge!

Adrenaline Shoc (aka A SHOC), a modern fitness enhanced energy drink designed for an active lifestyle, recently launched their first fitness challenge. 

www.ashoc.com/challenge

A SHOC Challenge Description:

Join the A SHOC community from November 2nd to 22nd and complete in their virtual challenge: A 3-week fitness virtual event with 2 main challenges and multiple bonus challenges presented by pro athletes. The main challenge is to crush 300 minutes of activity each week and to get outside and cover 10 miles of distance. Any sport, any time; run, bike, walk, or surf, just get after it. Compete with top Olympic, X Games, and professional athletes from Billy Kemper, Big Wave Surf World Champion, to Gwen Berry, U.S. Olympic Hammer Thrower, who will guide you through some of their unique workouts. View your results on the leaderboard for motivation to push your limits. Whether you are a runner, cyclist, speed walker, weight lifter, or weekend warrior– you were made for this challenge.

About A SHOC

Stay Energized this Fall with Adrenaline Shoc’s newest flavors Blue Raspberry and Orange Freeze, which just hit shelves.

Adrenaline Shoc (aka A SHOC) is a modern fitness enhanced energy drink designed for an active lifestyle, and is growing in popularity by the day amongst fitness enthusiasts. Designed as a performance energy drink, A SHOC was created to inspire people everyday to live an active and healthy lifestyle, offering a natural smart energy blend that is a guilt-free boost to maximize the day.

With 300mg of natural caffeine sourced from yerba mate, green coffee beans, coffee fruit extract and guarana, electrolytes sourced from ocean minerals, 9 essential amino acids to boost performance, and BCAA’s for muscle recovery, A SHOC is the smart energy and a guilt free choice.  But it doesn’t stop there! A SHOC also contains zero sugar, zero chemical preservatives, zero artificial flavors, and zero artificial colors, what more can you ask for?

A SHOC is sold at retailers nationwide including 7-Eleven, Target, CVS, and is now available on Amazon. The flavor offerings include Acai Berry, Shoc Wave, Peach Mango, Frozen Ice, Cotton Candy, Fruit Punch, Watermelon and Sour Candy, with two new flavors  Blue Raspberry and Orange Freeze. To find a store near you visit the store locator on www.ashoc.com
 
Follow A SHOC on Instagram  @AShocEnergy #ReachYourPeak 

Adaptogens for Athletic Performance: What You Should Know

Could adaptogenic supplements and herbs help improve athletic performance? Well, every athlete is looking for an edge, and it should be something that will make them better than their competitor – legally, of course. At the very least, it should help them improve endurance, focus, strength, oxygen utilization, mood elevation, and recovery from long workouts faster.

While various solutions can help them reach peak performance levels, the list of natural solutions is relatively small. Some synthetic solutions are banned for their specific sports, while others come with side effects. Finding a natural solution that will elevate their performance without these side effects can be a blessing for the typical athlete.

Luckily, adaptogens offer just that. All an athlete will need to do is to introduce them into their diet. Here is what you should know about adaptogens and how they can elevate an athlete’s performance:

What Are Adaptogens?

Adaptogens are non-toxic plants that help the body cope with stress better, whether physical, mental, or biological. These herbs have been around for centuries and have been used in Chinese and Ayurvedic healing traditions. While some can be consumed as part of a diet, others are mainly brewed into teas or consumed as supplements. Each herb’s benefits might differ from one herb to another, but the general benefit is stress relief.

How Adaptogens Work?

Adaptogens help maintain the right balance in the adrenal system, which is responsible for releasing the stress hormone. Anytime you are dealing with stress, you are likely to develop adrenal fatigue. While stress is supposed to be a temporary state of wellbeing, people are always stressed in today’s environment.

Stress might arise from heavy workout sessions for athletes, having their name circulated in the media, and even family and career problems. The faster they can deal with this stress, the easier it will be to focus on improving their performance.

Sadly, this constant stress often leads to adrenal fatigue. This results in people experiencing symptoms like having a craving for salty foods, extreme fatigue, weakened immune system, and irritability. Different adaptogens relieve the body of this stress in a variety of ways. Here are three adaptogens every athlete should consider trying:

  • Ashwagandha

Athletes who want to perform optimally can always rely on Ashwagandha benefits. Being among the most vital Ayurvedic herbs, Ashwagandha is known to improve brain health, boost adrenal functions, increase stamina and endurance, and improve moods. It also plays a crucial role in controlling cortisol levels in the body.

Cortisol is a stress hormone that is mainly released by the adrenal glands to respond to stress. If the cortisol levels in the body become chronically elevated, the athlete can experience increased fat storage in the abdomen and high blood sugar levels.

  • Rhodiola Flower

The impact of Rhodiola on athletic performance and recovery is an issue that has been widely researched. The plant boasts anti-fatigue, anti-hypoxic, anti-stress, immune-enhancing, antioxidant, and sexual stimulation properties. Besides increasing oxygen rate use in the muscles, it also helps produce creatine phosphate and ATP.

The fact that it is also an antioxidant and can lower elevated cortisol levels also makes it ideal for athletes’ consumption. These benefits can help enhance muscle strength and stamina during periods when peak performance is required. Research has also shown that the herb can also help with perceived exertion, assisting athletes in working harder for longer.

  • Ginseng

Ginseng has, for long, been a prized energy enhancer in Chinese medicine. The adaptogenic herb has its primary active ingredients in its roots, which are known as ginsenosides. These active ingredients increase strength by enhancing creatine production. In one Canadian research, ginseng was administered to rats for four days. Observations showed that the rats extended their exercise time to exhaustion since the herb encouraged the body to burn fat for fuels and spare glucose.

This proved that the herb could increase endurance and aid in fat loss. Ginseng also helps lower muscle fatigue by inhibiting the production of serotonin in the body. Since the body has low levels of hormones that signal exhaustion, you can train for longer.

How to Include Adaptogens in Your Diet

For athletes to enjoy the benefits adaptogens have in store for them, they need to include them in their diet. While they are used to complement well-balanced nutrition plans, adaptogens aren’t in any way meant to substitute living a healthy lifestyle. They should be included in a diet that already has whole food components like carbohydrates, proteins, and vitamins within them.

In case you want to add them to your diet, you might only need to buy premixed powder before using it to spice up your food. Alternatively, you can also mix most of these herbs with teas or combine their tinctures with water.

Some adaptogens are also sold as capsules to be taken as supplements. However, athletes need to be careful with the specific pills they choose. Reading the ingredient list will help them assess whether the supplements will improve their workout routines and performance, without causing any side effects.

Adaptogens Contribute To Your Long-Term Health

When taken consistently, adaptogens will do more than enhance an athlete’s performance in the gym or a sport. They promise long-term health benefits without the side effects of most exercise supplements, such as sleep disruption and irritability. Unlike other supplements that the body forms a tolerance towards and demands more of, to enjoy the same effects, adaptogen benefits increase with usage.

The more you use adaptogens, the more you can enjoy their stress-reducing qualities. These herbs are also known to adjust themselves to the specific needs of the user. For instance, if one user has low cortisol levels, they can encourage the body to produce more. Ideally, the herb you opt for during your training will depend on the benefits you need and its availability.

Adaptogens Are Great for Your Overall Health

Your training sessions and performance need every boost they can find out there. Adaptogens happen to offer performance enhancements while improving your overall health. Consider including them into your diet today to enjoy the above benefits and more. 

Jonny Bowden’s Nutrition Advice

Have shelter-in-place comfort foods
put your healthy diet on the back shelf?

Nutrition Myth Buster Jonny Bowden says toss out the old nutrition advice along with the junk food. It’s time to start fresh before you start having health issues.

It’s no big surprise that some processed foods, such as boxed macaroni and cheese, have been enjoying a renaissance lately. People are stressed. Grocery prices are rising. And given all the confusing nutrition advice coming at us, surely someone … somewhere … has done a study that says sugary snacks are good for you. Yeah, not so fast. Step away from the toaster pastries.

“Many high salt, high carb comfort foods are only going to make you gain weight, feel worse and could ultimately damage your health,” cautions Nutrition Myth Buster Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS. “You’ll actually start feeling better and have more energy once you begin eating more nutritious foods.”  

But here’s the dilemma: When it comes to dietary advice, who do you believe? 

Some dietary advice on mainstream websites is decades out of date

“The dietary advice issued by various organizations is often a mix of old and new data. It’s not in line with what those of us who study this continually are telling people today. It takes way too long for some of these big organizations to incorporate the current scientific thinking into the mantras that they’ve been repeating for sometimes decades,” says Bowden. 

“Another reason why it’s so hard to get a straight answer about foods is that they don’t fall into perfect categories. For example, some saturated fats are very healthy for you. And some unsaturated fats should be avoided at all costs!” 

He elaborates, “Saturated fats such as ghee, palm oil, butter and coconut oil have been absolved of being bad for your health. Meanwhile, canola, sunflower, corn and soy are now known to be highly inflammatory!”  

Film exposes the misinformation and why we’re so confused! 

In the new feature length documentary Fat Fiction, Bowden and other leading health experts examine the facts and myths of saturated fats in the human diet, and question why medical advice has remained the same for decades as health issues proliferate in America. 

“In the film, we share more than a decade of published research confirming that fat, particularly saturated fat, was wrongly demonized. It is not a causative factor in heart disease. Worse, the low-fat dietary guides we’ve been following since the 1980s were never based on hard science,” says Bowden. 

So what should we be eating? 

Bowden, the best-selling author of “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth,” gives three tips for choosing what foods to include in your diet: 

  1. “Check your sources for all articles on health and nutrition. A single study should never be the basis of your nutritional decisions, because studies contradict each other all the time. And don’t buy into the infomercial stuff about “clinical studies” supporting the latest fat-burner. Those are usually done in someone’s office and not subject to any peer review.

“Wait for multiple studies, completed by reputable universities, confirming the same outcomes. And even then be aware of things like who funded the study and who benefits from the results. There may be no way to avoid commercial interests in scientific research, but at least it’s good to be aware of it.”

  1. Be open to learning about ingredients you may want to add to your diet. “For example, some people are hyper-focused on palm oil. They’d have you believe that it’s bad for you and the environment. They also are stuck in the old 1950s notion that “saturated fat is bad for you.” Both beliefs are wrong. Some countries — notably Malaysia — are passionately committed to the environment. The palm oil from Malaysia is sustainably produced. Real Malaysian palm oil is one of the healthiest cooking oils I know of.

“Malaysian palm oil is also a rich source of vitamin E tocotrienols which support heart and brain health. And heart health is a huge concern in this country! It’s also a nutritious replacement for trans fats.” 

  1. Eat real food: food your great-grandmother would have recognized as food. “Eat from what I call the “Jonny Bowden Four Food Groups”: food you could hunt, fish, gather or pluck. Stay away from overly processed and get back to basics.”  

To learn more about studies related to saturated fats and health, visit www.palmoilhealth.org

Biography: Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS

Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, also known as “The Nutrition Myth Buster” ™ is a nationally known board-certified nutritionist and expert on diet and weight loss. He has appeared on the Dr. Oz Show, Fox News, CNN, MSNBC, ABC, NBC, and CBS as an expert on nutrition has contributed to articles in The New York Times, Forbes, The Daily Beast, The Huffington Post, Vanity Fair Online, Men’s Health, Prevention, and dozens of other print and online publications.

Dr. Jonny is the best-selling author of 15 books including The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth, Living Low Carb (now in its fourth edition), Smart Fat (with Steven Masley, MD), and The Most Effective Ways to Live Longer.

The eagerly awaited and completely updated edition of his best-selling book, The Great Cholesterol Myth (co-written with cardiologist Stephen Sinatra, MD) will be out in October, 2020.

Follow him @jonnybowden

www.jonnybowden.com

Facebook: Dr. Jonny Bowden

Healthy Lifestyle Tips for Students

Every individual wants to lead a healthy lifestyle. However, when people start thinking about eating well, staying fit, and getting time for themselves, this seems impossible.

For students, juggling between classes, academic writing assignments, studying, and curricular activities takes away all their time. Not only do they have assignment deadlines to beat but also exams to prepare for. And since the primary goal is to boost their grades and maintain an outstanding academic performance, most students are bound to forget about all the things they need to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Well, you should not let your studies or assignments hinder you from leading and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. You can always visit the website of a reputable and trustworthy paper writing service and pay for a college essay.

Leading a healthier lifestyle is not that intimidating and burdensome as many people presume it to be. As long as you make some small incremental adjustments, you are good to go. So, to be as healthy as an ox, and enjoy your lifestyle, follow the below daily health tips for students. 

Making healthy food choices

A healthy meal may not sound that exhilarating. However, it can help you keep fit and live your life to the fullest. Many students choose to consume junk foods either because they have too many responsibilities to handle or are lazy to cook. Well, if you are one of them, you should refrain from embracing such a habit. If you have too many tasks to work on, hire a professional writer from a reliable service and ask them to write an essay for you. This will give you enough time to complete your other assignments and get time to prepare a healthy meal. 

Eating in a poor manner results in fatigue, poor concentration, laziness, as well as frustration. Thus, if you want to perform well in your academics and feel fresh and energetic during the day, you need to eat right. Additionally, you should not skip meals. Remember to include fruits in your diet as well. And if you wish to prepare a particular meal and do not know how to go about it, ask a friend for help or check out tutorials on YouTube. 

Getting plenty of physical activity

Doing plenty of exercises aids in maintaining a healthy body as well as a sharp mind. The majority of students find it hard to stick to an exercise routine due to lack of time or monetary funds. But, this should not deter you from getting enough physical activity. As one of the most integral lifestyle tips, you need to stay active at all times. This does not mean that you should work out on a day-to-day basis. You can walk or ride a bike to class rather than take a bus or drive. 

Various learning institutions have outstanding and remarkable fitness facilities. You can visit the gym at your school before, between, or after classes. And if you have a tight schedule, consider doing your physical exercises in your dorm room. You can access a variety of fitness and work out tutorials on the internet. Regular exercise helps boost your muscle strength, improve mood, and control body weight. 

Staying hydrated

The human body is made up of more than seventy percent of liquid water. It is responsible for the overall functions of the body. To keep and maintain proper hydration levels, you should drink plenty of water (about 6 – 8 glasses) a day. With the various schools’ activities that you need to attend to and manage, you may choose to take coffee to help you keep awake, tea or soda to re-energize yourself. Well, doing so is not bad. However, this is not an efficient technique to warranty healthy living in college. Instead of relying on such drinks, choose to drink water. 

Consuming plenty of water helps in improving your concentration levels. Additionally, it helps prevent overeating hence weight reduction. Moreover, staying hydrated charges the body so that you can feel merry and chirpy throughout the day. So, carry a bottle of water with you wherever you go. 

Getting enough sleep

It may be tempting to stay awake till late in the night to complete your research paper project, hand out with friends, or finish a movie. But, you should not embrace such a habit. Depriving yourself of sleep cannot only reduce your brain function but can also lead to fatigue. Additionally, it can cause headaches, as well as weight issues.

Getting enough sleep is one of the health tips for students that you should practice. As a student, you need to sleep for about 8 hours to stay healthy. Also, sleeping or napping during the day can help you feel rested. So, learn to work on your assignments early enough. Or, you can sleep early and get up very early in the morning and work on them. This way, you will not only have had enough rest, but you will also get up feeling fresh and energetic to work on your projects and go about your day. 

Keeping a journal to avoid study stress

College life is, without a doubt, overwhelming. With the heaps of academic writing assignments to manage, extracurricular activities to take part in, budget to maintain, and social life to maintain, it can be challenging to lead a healthy lifestyle. Moreover, you will be more anxious and stressed most of the time. But, with the tips and techniques above, you can avoid facing tense and stressful situations. Nonetheless, journaling is a powerful technique for stress management. Not only does it help clarify your thoughts and feelings, but it also tunes on positive vibes. 

Furthermore, when you journal, you can boost your academic writing skills and enhance your creativity. Thus, you can work on your academic projects with ease and faster, thereby giving you more time for other crucial obligations. But, if you have any complex to handle assignments, you can always enlist a specialist from ResumeThatWorks

In conclusion, the best advice you can get to maintain a healthy lifestyle is to assert yourself. Letting other individuals make uncomfortable health decisions for you renders them powerful. Hence, you will not choose what you want to do or eat without consulting them. So, decide how you want to lead your life and what you should consume. But, you need to keep it healthy if you want to live your life to the fullest. And the above are some healthy lifestyle tips for college students that you can use.