Posts tagged with "diet"

David Belford Headshot from Molly Jacobson from Lean N Fresh for use by 360 Magazine

Fresh N Lean Names David Belford Chief Financial Officer

America’s leading organic Ready-to-Eat (RTE) prepared meal delivery company, Fresh N’ Lean today announces that David Belford has been named Chief Financial Officer at the growing, profitable family business that is disrupting the direct-to-consumer (DTC) meal delivery space.

“With his extensive financial expertise and network, David is a key executive to lead Fresh N’ Lean into the next phase of our growth,” said founder and co-CEO Laureen Asseo. Asseo, named to Forbes 30 under 30 in 2019, founded the company eleven years ago in her apartment making fresh, organic meals for family and friends. The company has since grown to become the largest independent organic meal delivery company in the U.S. and is leading the revolution in healthy eating.

As CFO, Belford will focus on capital markets initiatives to support the company’s continued growth trajectory and to transition from a family-owned business into the top player within the RTE space. The company has generated positive EBITDA for over five years and was named to the Inc. 500 list in 2019. In 2020, Fresh N’ Lean grew sales by over 200% as consumers continued to embrace healthier options and the convenience of direct delivery.

Prior to joining Fresh N’ Lean, Belford served as Chief Credit Officer and Head of Asset Management for Colony Credit Real Estate, Inc. (NYSE: CLNC), a $5.0 billion mortgage REIT, and as Deputy Portfolio Manager for Colony Capital, Inc.’s (NYSE: CLNY) private funds series with over $3.0 billion of assets under management. His previous roles at Colony Capital included the head of US co-investments and the co-head of the London office.

“Fresh N’ Lean is an incredibly compelling combination of DTC technology, marketing and manufacturing that is perfectly positioned to use tailwinds to grab market share away from incumbent grocers and CPGs” said Belford. “We’re in the midst of a food revolution in this country where the entire landscape is shifting under our feet. No one could have imagined the dramatic surge we’ve seen recently in the demand for organic ingredients, sustainability and convenience. I’m excited to be joining the company at this crucial juncture to help take the business to the next level.”

“David’s experience and network will be a critical factor in our company’s expansion,” added Thomas Asseo, Laureen’s brother who serves as co-CEO. “He has a deep understanding of our brand, the consumer and the marketplace which will play a valuable role in our future.”

Belford holds a bachelor’s degree from Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada, an MBA from the Wharton School and a Master of International Affairs from the Joseph H. Lauder Institute at the University of Pennsylvania.

About Fresh N’ Lean

Fresh N’ Lean is the leading independent technology, marketing & manufacturing platform currently disrupting the Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) sector for healthy, Ready-to-Eat (RTE) meals. The company specializes in over 100 organic-sourced dishes covering keto, paleo, vegan, protein and vegetarian diets, all completely free of preservatives, gluten, hormones, and added sugars. Founded in 2010 and led by sister-brother duo Laureen and Thomas Asseo, Fresh N’ Lean continues to lead the revolution in human potential through healthy eating delivered fresh to your door.

Sean and Myra Anderson illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Big Sean × Myra Anderson

BIG SEAN & HIS MOTHER MYRA ANDERSON LAUNCH WELLNESS VIDEO SERIES PRESENTED BY THE SEAN ANDERSON FOUNDATION TO COMMEMORATE MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS MONTH

Today, multi-platinum artist, entrepreneur and philanthropist, Big Sean, and his mother, Myra Anderson, have announced the launch of their wellness video series presented by their non-profit, the Sean Anderson Foundation. Beginning May 1st, a new video will be released every Saturday during the month of May at 12pm EST/9am PST to commemorate Mental Health Awareness Month. The videos will live on the Sean Anderson Foundation’s IGTV HERE and will also be featured on the Sean Anderson Foundation website HERE.

In each episode, Sean and Myra will have a 10 – 15-minute candid conversation surrounding a specific area of wellness. Topics include mindset, sleep/circadian rhythms, meditation, diet/exercise and the emotional freedom technique (EFT).

“I feel that Mental Health Awareness Month is the perfect time to talk with my mom about some of the things I have learned from her that have helped me along the way, and I hope will help others,” says Big Sean.

“Sean and I wanted to share some of the no or low-cost techniques that we have used over the years to help us attain and maintain emotional balance. In the future, we may do a deeper dive into some of these techniques and other tools that we use,” says Myra Anderson.

The Sean Anderson Foundation is committed to improving the quality of life for underserved youth and their families. Previously, the foundation hosted a Mental Health Awareness panel, which explored the narrative and stigma around mental health in the Black community. Throughout the past year, Sean and the foundation have engaged in a variety of initiatives to help those in need during these unprecedented times. Sean hosted virtual fundraisers to benefit COVID-19 response efforts, as well as partnered with McDonalds for their Black & Positively Golden Mentors Program. The Detroit native was recently appointed Creative Director of Innovation for the Detroit Pistons, where he and the foundation work with the team to create opportunities and programs in the Detroit area.

About the Sean Anderson Foundation


The mission of the Sean Anderson Foundation is to assist in the education, health, safety and well-being of school aged youth in underserved communities across the country.

Sean is a living example of what can be accomplished through focus, determination and hard work. He strives to serve as an instrument of encouragement for us to help support ourselves and to support one another.

The Sean Anderson Foundation’s signature program is “Mogul Prep”, a digital and live event curriculum that focuses on developing entrepreneurial skills, preparing students for college and/or the workforce, and ultimately for a successful life. In addition, the Foundation partners with a number of existing charitable programs whose objectives are consistent with the objectives of the Foundation. 

For more information about SAF, visit the Sean Anderson Foundation.

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Health image by Nicole Salazar for use by 360 Magazine

A Guide to Fresh Foods and Diet Balancing Without Feeling Guilty

When it comes to dieting, you may dread it because you think it involves omitting your favorite foods. The good news is a balanced diet can include many of your favorite foods. Here is a guide to fresh foods and balancing your diet without feeling guilty.

What Is a Balanced Diet?

A healthy and balanced diet includes foods from all food groups, such as:

  • Fruits and vegetables.
  • Starchy foods.
  • Dairy.
  • Protein.
  • Fat.

Fruits and Vegetables

Your diet should include a daily serving of fruits and vegetables. You need to consume at least five servings of fruits and vegetables. These foods are essential diet components because they provide your body with important minerals and vitamins. Fruits and vegetables help prevent disease, helps with digestion, and lowers cholesterol. The foods in the fruits and vegetables food group are low in fat and help with satiety, feeling full.

What Counts as One Portion of Vegetables and Fruits?

  • Half an avocado or grapefruit
  • One slice of a large fruit (pineapple, melon)
  • Two plums (or similar sized fruit)
  • A dessert bowl filled with salad
  • One pear, apple, or banana

Keep in mind canned, dried, and frozen fruits and vegetables also count towards your daily serving for this food group.

Starchy Foods

Starchy foods include bread, potatoes, pasta, and rice. This food group should account for one-third of the food groups you eat. Starchy foods are an essential source of fiber and energy. These starchy foods also provide ample amounts of vitamins, calcium, and iron. Avoid adding extra fat sources to these foods by not using spreads, butter, jam, oil, or cheese.
A good diet technique to practice is to base most of your meals around high-starch foods. Consider starting your day with a whole grain breakfast cereal and having a sandwich made on whole grain bread for lunch. Your dinner can include rice or potatoes with your meal.

Protein

The protein food group contains many foods, including fresh seafood.

Pulses

Pulses include beans, lentils, and peas. These foods are naturally low in fat and a good source of vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Pulses are great additions to soups, sauces, and casseroles because they provide additional flavor and texture to your meals. Other sources of vegetable protein include Quorn, tofu, mycoprotein and bean curd.

Fish

Fish is an excellent source of vitamins, minerals, and proteins. You should try consuming at least two portions of fish weekly. One portion of fish should be oil rich, and the other portion should be tinned, frozen or fresh fish. Oil-rich fish includes mackerel and salmon that contain Omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids promote heart health and are a great source of vitamins A and D.
You also have the option of white fish and shellfish. Skate, haddock, hake, plaice, cod, and coley are white fish that are low in fat and contain different vitamins and minerals. These fish are healthy meat alternatives. When you’re buying fish tinned in brine or smoked fish, check the high salt content label.
Marlin, shark, and swordfish are other protein options. You should not consume more than one portion of this type of fish per week because it contains mercury, a toxin that can cause liver and kidney damage, among other adverse health effects. You can prepare fish by baking, steaming, grilling, and frying it, but fried fish is the option that contains more fat.

Eggs

Eggs are a part of a balanced diet because they are a great source of vitamins, protein, and minerals. Although there are no limitations on the number of eggs you can consume, avoid adding unhealthy fats, such as oil and butter. Eggs are the healthiest when they are boiled, scrambled or poached. If you prefer frying your eggs, use vegetable, olive or rapeseed oil.

Meat

Meat is an excellent source of B12, a vitamin that is solely found in food from animals. Meats are also a good source of vitamins, proteins and minerals. You have the option of red or processed meats. Red meat includes venison, beef, pork and lamb. Processed meats include salami, sausages, burgers, ham, bacon, and other cured meats. Consuming an excessive amount of red or processed meats increases your risk of developing bowel cancer.
You should limit your meat consumption, red or processed, to 70 grams per day (about two slices of roast meat or equal to two sausages). Consuming ample amounts of meat that is high in saturated fats increases your risk of developing heart disease, having a stroke, and increases your blood cholesterol levels.

Fat

The fat food group includes oils and spreads. Many fats in diets are essential, such as those found in olive oil, vegetable oil, and rapeseed oil. These oils contain unsaturated fats, which help reduce your risk of developing heart disease and lower cholesterol.
Some foods contain unhealthy fats, such as cakes, full-sugar soft drinks, biscuits and snacks, such as chips and snack cakes.

Hydration

Hydrating yourself with water is excellent for your overall health and well-being. Drinking water flushes toxins from your system and improves every aspect of your body’s functions.
When you’re dieting, consider each of the five food groups to ensure you’re maintaining a healthy, balanced diet. Following the food pyramid will help you understand your food needs, and you will not feel guilty about many of the foods you consume daily.

Tips for Getting More Activity into Your Life

Are you interested in changing your lifestyle to make it more active? If you’ve always been more of a couch potato than a weekend warrior, it can be hard to get motivated to move more. However, there are plenty of ways to ease into a more active lifestyle, and some of them even allow you to keep doing the same favorite activities you’d do from your couch.

Indoor Machines

If you have a lot of sporty friends, they’re probably always touting the benefits of the outdoors to you, but let’s face it: the drawbacks include things like heat, cold and bugs. If you don’t love the outdoors and you aren’t a fan of exercise classes and really all you want to do is keep watching your favorite streaming comedy or drama, you can have your cake and eat it too. Stationary exercise bikes and treadmills allow you to watch whatever you like or even read while you move. You might be surprised at how easily the miles slip away when you’re distracted.

Starting Small

Maybe you actually love the idea of being the kind of person who heads out happily for a 10-mile run or a 50-mile bike ride but you’re intimidated by the idea of getting started. Those first steps can be the hardest, but starting small doesn’t just make it easier for you. It’s actually the key to success. If you try to do too much, you’ll quickly get discouraged, but taking a short walk on your lunch break or making an effort to get more active with your kids are easy ways to slowly make activity a more regular part of your life. 

You might also look at ways to ensure that physical activity is enjoyable and comfortable for you. If you want to get into hiking, you don’t have to sleep in a tent every night. You can take day hikes and still sleep in your own bed every night. If the thought of cycling up big hills or on hot days intimidates you, you may want to consider an eBike. These battery-operated bikes essentially let you put in the amount of effort you feel comfortable with. If you do choose cycling, make safety a priority and wear a helmet. This can save your life if you are in accident.

An Active Desk

If you spend a lot of time working at a desk, this is actually a prime opportunity to get some movement in throughout the day. Sitting on an exercise ball instead of in a chair can help you strengthen your core while a treadmill desk lets you pedal while you work. You can even try out a standing desk.

Join a Group

A great way to get motivated to make a change in your lifestyle is by joining a group, either virtually or in person. On social media, you’ll find many different options based on activity, age or other factors. This can be especially helpful if you don’t have friends or family members who have particularly active lifestyles.

Medical illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Top 5 YouTube Doctors

Since YouTube was founded in 2005, it has become something we take for granted as a source of information. If you want a taste of other ways of life, search YouTube. If you need to know how to do something, watch a YouTube video. If you need advice, find an expert on YouTube.

When it comes to the medical profession, however, YouTube experts need to walk a delicate line. Giving general advice regarding medical treatments can put undiscerning viewers at risk. At the very least, it can cause the doctor tremendous legal and career issues.

The best YouTube doctors have found that balance and give information and tips without crossing over into medical guidance. Here are the 5 doctors who do it best.

1. Doctor Mike

Dr. Mikhail Varshavski is a Russian-born American medical expert. He became popular online when he was named People Magazine’s Sexiest Doctor Alive. However, he is far more than a pretty face (with an adorable dog). Doctor Mike has millions of followers, to whom he provides health tips (but not medical advice). He explains different medical conditions and terms as well, along with lifestyle changes for improved health.

During the early days of the COVID-19 crisis, he used his channel to debunk false information, providing a clear vision of the real risks of the virus.

2. Dr. Joseph J. Allen

In the realm of eye care, there is no one better than Joseph J Allen OD. Dr Allen dispenses information via his YouTube channel, Doctor Eye Health. He is also the CEO of Vision Excellence Eye Consulting LLC.

In his videos, Dr. Allen shares interesting facts about the eye, important eye health tips, and insight into both common and rare eye conditions. He also recommends some of the best eye care products available. With over 250,000 subscribers to his channel, he is extremely influential and uses his platform carefully and responsibly.

Go to GlassesUSA.com to read some of the latest health articles, with whom Dr. Allen collaborates.

3. Dr. Dray

There is one type of health care that is a basic responsibility of each and every person. Skincare. Not everyone takes skincare as seriously, but proper care is not only important for aesthetic reasons but for general health as well. Skin issues may be a sign of illness, and overexposure to sun can contribute to skin cancer.

Dr. Dray is a dermatologist who uses her channel to dispense tips and review various skincare products. Considering that the variety of skincare products is huge, it is great to get a professional opinion on which actually work.

4. Dr. Robert Morsand

Dr. Morsand differentiates himself from the other doctors on this list because he doesn’t just provide general tips. He posts extensive Q&A sessions in which he answers people’s questions about a myriad health issues in depth.

There is a lot to learn from Dr. Morsand’s decades of experience, and you’ll find more specific information on his channel than on most others.

5. The Junior Doctor

Dr Ezgi Ozcan is a junior doctor in the UK who records vlogs about her life. Rather than providing medical advice, she shows what the daily life of a junior doctor is like. If you’re unfamiliar with the term, junior doctors are essentially the British equivalent of American residents.

Having recently given birth, she is portraying what it is like to be a mother in this line of work as well. Her channel is entertaining, informative, and she is incredibly personable.

Tea illustration for 360 MAGAZINE

Tea Drunk

Tea Drunk is a Certified Minority and Women Owned Business Enterprise in New York City and is known for being the most prestigious Chinese tea house in the North America. Founder and Tea Expert Shunan Teng travels to the historic tea mountains of China each spring to commission some of the rarest tea in the world to showcase their top terroir, superb craftsmanship, and true-to-origin varietals. 

Shunan commissions and sources teas in the most conservative fashion to bring discerning connoisseurs the utmost traditional essence of historical teas. Teas that are meticulously curated like Gua Pian Green Tea (Melon Seed Tea) from Lu An. Lu An is one of the oldest tea-making regions in China with over 1000 years of tea-making history. This historically famous style of tea goes through a unique La Da Huo processing step that gives the tea a pleasantly toasty flavor that compliments its grassy umami taste, buttery mouthfeel and bold sugary undertone. We feel this flavor profile and mouthfeel rivals that of the hip Japanese Matcha. Gua Pian is being highlighted as the next trend in tea, with whole loose leaves, there is a lower extraction rate of caffeine, allowing your body to get all of the benefits of the complex compounds found in green tea (such as l-theanine and catechins) with a more body friendly level of caffeine. 

Although many different flowers and herbs can be dried, steeped in hot water, and called “tea,” actual tea leaves come from the plant camellia sinensis. From just this one plant alone, humans discovered that through manipulation of heat, moisture, and physical disturbance of the tea leaves, this one plant can yield almost endless variations in taste and aroma. It’s a fragile ancient art form and through education and access, Tea Drunk aims to cultivate awareness in preserving it for years to come. 

You can also increase your level of tea savvy straight from the source with Tea Drunk. Experience teas such as Gua Pian right from the comfort of your home (or wherever you may be) with Tea Drunk’s Educational Tea Club. Their twice monthly expert led Zoom sessions allow you to travel deep into your cup and senses in a welcoming community of tea lovers. They have two tiers of sessions, a Sampler and a Reserve, with the Reserve specializing in the highest tier of rare teas. Each box is hand curated based on concepts such as vintage, location, or theme to help you develop your palate in comparative tastings. The tea club grants you unparalleled access to transparency and high-quality education while having a blast exploring teas with others virtually. 

Shunan, is an avid educator on tea and has spoken at many prestigious institutions including: Yale University; Christie’s; Van Cleef & Arpels; World Tea Expo; and Stony Brook University. She has collaborated with the Metropolitan Museum of Art to execute a temporary Chinese tea house in the museum and is the educator for TED Ed lesson – The History of Tea

It’s truly an experience that goes well beyond any other tea subscription service on the market. You are able to deepen your personal tea knowledge alongside other like-minded individuals and grow together in community while connecting with this ancient art form of traditional tea processing. It’s an act people have been doing for tens of thousands of years, and today we get to do the same thing with people all over the world. With Tea Drunk, tea is not just a beverage; it’s an experience meant to be savored and shared. 

Art illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 magazine

Transformed Grief – Estefana Johnson, LMSW

When COVID-19 hit, there was an instant collective response of panic. People rushed to fill their pantries with nonperishables and toilet paper.  Schools closed, businesses closed, and lives were flipped upside down as our routines were disrupted by lockdowns and uncertainty. In a moment in which we most needed comfort and connection, we were forced to isolate for fear of spreading the virus to our loved ones. I remember countless sleepless nights where I obsessively checked the dashboards and reviewed the little data provided on how this virus operated, who was being affected, and the odds of survival. I called my parents frequently to remind them to “stay home, wash your hands, wear your masks”. I knew then if my father were to become infected, he would not survive. He was elderly and his lungs had much damage from decades of exposure to dust and cement as a mason. 

My father was the humblest, hardest-working man with the biggest faith I’ve ever known. He taught me patience, integrity and to never take life seriously as it is but a journey in the span of our existence. As an emigrant from Mexico with an 8th grade education, he faced adversity with relentless courage, and boundless humor. When he contracted COVID in July 2020, my heart shattered and my heart plunged into agony. Even then, Dad persisted: “no te preocupes mija, todo va estar bien” (don’t worry, my daughter, all will be well.) And yet, on July 27th, he passed. 

How can things be “well” when our world is shattered as we face our worst fear? Grief is the price of love. Years of working with trauma survivors as a clinician have allowed me to see that not all people can withstand the weight of tragedy and loss. Grief rips away our sense of normalcy, leaving us feeling broken, raw, and exposed. Many people lapse into survival mode to weather grief, a constant battle of managing misery and pain. Unresolved anguish, like unattended mold, can weaken our body structure, infect our attitude with anger, cloud our vision with resentment and spread toxic spores of bitterness towards others. And yet, there are those who rise up in the midst of adversity, seemingly fueled by the pain, and transformed to a more resilient, truer self. Like steel, refined through the fire. But how?

Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl wrote, “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” The human race has continued to thrive through plagues, war, genocide, famine and tragedy. Death is not the only loss we experience; we also grieve the loss of hope, health, relationships, or such as in this pandemic, loss of “normalcy.” Loss creates change. Change is only constant in life and outside of our control. It is in the acceptance and embracing of change that we can refine and solidify the core of what defines us. Even in the face of death, my father’s courage did not relent as he reaffirmed his identity: “I am a soldier and I will fight till the end – bruised and battered, I will fight until I am called home.” And fight he did.

Just like many other ‘essential’ workers, my sisters, both of whom are nurses, and I had to return to work. With the raw pain of loss, we found ourselves facing others in the midst of the tragedy we had just endured. I had never felt such gratitude for the tool that had become my specialty: Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART), an evidence-based technique that enables clients to reframe their memories of troubling events. Without ART, I could not have held space for the grief many clients brought to my office.  When we experience severe emotional events, the memory is imprinted into our subconscious mind through images. It is this deeply-rooted, emotionally-laden memory that causes our body to experience reactive responses such as extreme fear or panic long after the event has passed. Talking about painful memories can sometimes exacerbate symptoms since we cannot reason our way out of the pain. The subconscious does not speak in words; it speaks in images. Thus, metaphors are the language of emotion.  

Clients often share an inability to forget the image of their loved one’s death as it haunts them both in their waking life through flashbacks. ART targets these images through a brief, succinct process called voluntary image replacement. Grief work enables us to redefine the connection to our loved ones through memories of their life, rather than their death.  ART helps to facilitate that process. It has enabled me to transform my suffering to fuel my purpose as I help others navigate through the process of healing and post-traumatic growth.  Post-traumatic growth is an undergoing of a significant shift in one’s relation with the self and the world. It’s the ability to extract wisdom from suffering, create purpose from the pain and become more of our truest, most powerful selves as we break through perceived limitations. It leads us to acceptance of reality and enables us to feel more connected to our own humanity and that of others as we embrace our vulnerability.

Through ART, I now hold the memory of my father in a space full of love and resoluteness. I see him sitting in my sister’s living room, watching his children chat and grandkids play with a look of blissful pride on his face. It brings comfort to the void left by his departure, a reminder that life is finite.  And every time a client returns to my office after an ART session and tells me “The images are gone –  all I see is my mother’s smile,” my heart is filled with hope.

For additional information on Estefana Johnson go here.

Green covid by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

Tuberculosis Bacteria Paradox

TB-causing bacteria remember prior stress, react quickly to new stress

Tuberculosis bacteria have evolved to remember stressful encounters and react quickly to future stress, according to a study by computational bioengineers at Rice University and infectious disease experts at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

Published online in the open-access journal mSystems, the research identifies a genetic mechanism that allows the TB-causing bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to respond to stress rapidly and in manner that is “history-dependent,” said corresponding author Oleg Igoshin, a professor of bioengineering at Rice.

Researchers have long suspected that the ability of TB bacteria to remain dormant, sometimes for decades, stems from their ability to behave based upon past experience.

Latent TB is an enormous global problem. While TB kills about 1.5 million people each year, the World Health Organization estimates that 2-3 billion people are infected with a dormant form of the TB bacterium.

“There’s some sort of peace treaty between the immune system and bacteria,” Igoshin said. “The bacteria don’t grow, and the immune system doesn’t kill them. But if people get immunocompromised due to malnutrition or AIDS, the bacteria can be reactivated.”

One of the most likely candidates for a genetic switch that can toggle TB bacteria into a dormant state is a regulatory network that is activated by the stress caused by immune cell attacks. The network responds by activating several dozen genes the bacteria use to survive the stress. Based on a Rice computational model, Igoshin and his longtime Rutgers NJMS collaborator Maria Laura Gennaro and colleagues predicted just such a switch in 2010. According to the theory, the switch contained an ultrasensitive control mechanism that worked in combination with multiple feedback loops to allow hysteresis, or history-dependent behavior.

“The idea is that if we expose cells to intermediate values of stress, starting from their happy state, they don’t have that much of a response,” Igoshin explained. “But if you stress them enough to stop their growth, and then reduce the stress level back to an intermediate level, they remain stressed. And even if you fully remove the stress, the gene expression pathway stays active, maintaining a base level of activity in case the stress comes back.”

In later experiments, Gennaro’s team found no evidence of the predicted control mechanism in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a close relative of the TB bacterium. Since both organisms use the same regulatory network, it looked like the prediction was wrong. Finding out why took years of follow-up studies. Gennaro and Igoshin’s teams found that the TB bacterium, unlike their noninfectious cousins, had the hysteresis control mechanism, but it didn’t behave as expected.

“Hysteretic switches are known to be very slow, and this wasn’t,” Igoshin said. “There was hysteresis, a history-dependent response, to intermediate levels of stress. But when stress went from low to high or from high to low, the response was relatively fast. For this paper, we were trying to understand these somewhat contradictory results. ”

Igoshin and study co-author Satyajit Rao, a Rice doctoral student who graduated last year, revisited the 2010 model and considered how it might be modified to explain the paradox. Studies within the past decade had found a protein called DnaK played a role in activating the stress-response network. Based on what was known about DnaK, Igoshin and Rao added it to their model of the dormant-active switch.

“We didn’t discover it, but we proposed a particular mechanism for it that could explain the rapid, history-dependent switching we’d observed,” Igoshin said. “What happens is, when cells are stressed, their membranes get damaged, and they start accumulating unfolded proteins. Those unfolded proteins start competing for DnaK.”

DnaK was known to play the role of chaperone in helping rid cells of unfolded proteins, but it plays an additional role in the stress-response network by keeping its sensor protein in an inactive state.

“When there are too many unfolded proteins, DnaK has to let go of the sensor protein, which is an activation input for our network,” Igoshin said. “So once there are enough unfolded proteins to ‘distract’ DnaK, the organism responds to the stress.”

Gennaro and co-author Pratik Datta conducted experiments at NJMS to confirm DnaK behaved as predicted. But Igoshin said it is not clear how the findings might impact TB treatment or control strategies. For example, the switch responds to short-term biochemical changes inside the cell, and it’s unclear what connection, if any, it may have with long-term behaviors like TB latency, he said.

“The immediate first step is to really try and see whether this hysteresis is important during the infection,” Igoshin said. “Is it just a peculiar thing we see in our experiments, or is it really important for patient outcomes? Given that it is not seen in the noninfectious cousin of the TB bacterium, it is tempting to speculate it is related to survival inside the host.”

Gennaro is a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. Igoshin is a senior investigator at Rice’s Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.

The research was supported by the Welch Foundation (C-1995) and the National Institutes of Health (GM096189, AI122309, AI104615, HL149450).

Food illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Eating Disorders in COVID-19

More than 30 million people in the U.S. suffer from eating disorders, and these tendencies can be exacerbated due to the coronavirus. The difficulty of accessing specific foods and the discourse surrounding weight gain in quarantine can make those who struggle with eating disorders feel out of control and helpless. COVID-19 can be a nightmare for them because of the following triggers:

 

·      Empty grocery shelves

·      Feelings of uncertainty and loss of control

·      Social media messages about avoiding the “Quarantine 15” pound weight gain are especially harmful to those with existing eating disorders.

 

A recent study conducted by the International Journal for Eating Disorders found that symptoms worsened across the board for people with anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating disorders nationwide since the lockdowns in March. Among respondents, 62% of people with anorexia have experienced more severe restriction and food fear during the pandemic, while 30% of those with bulimia and binge-eating disorder reported experiencing more binge-eating episodes, and a greater urge to binge.

 

Some of the facts about eating disorders are sobering:

 

·       9% of the US population will suffer from an eating disorder in their lifetime

·       Almost 1% of us suffer from anorexia nervosa

·       Between 2-3% of us have bulimia nervosa

·       Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder. Unlike more widely known eating disorders which disproportionately effect women, 40% of those with BED are men.

·       10% of those with eating disorders lose their lives as a result

·       Eating disorders are second only to opioid overdose as the deadliest mental illnesses

·       About 26% of people with eating disorders attempt suicide

 

However, if you or a loved one are struggling with an eating disorder, talking to a licensed professional and receiving treatment can help.

vegetables by Nicole salazar for 360 magazine

Show your heart some love on more than just Valentine’s Day 

By Nutrition Myth Buster Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS

Experts aren’t sure why people are more likely to have a heart attack during the winter than any other time of year. If Valentine’s Day and Heart Health Month are inspiring you to take better care of your ticker, here’s big news. 

A 12-month human clinical study involving 577 participants conducted in Malaysia reveals we aren’t doing our hearts any favors by eating a high-carb diet. Researchers looked at different patterns of eating, from high-fat to low-fat, high-carb to low-carb, and measured the effect each way of eating had on the risk for heart disease. Turns out, fat intake didn’t move the risk needle one way or the other. The higher carb diets, on the other hand, were associated with greater cardiovascular ris. 

I wasn’t the least surprised by this study’s findings! I’ve been saying for years that fat has been wrongly demonized. If anything, it’s sugar – not fat – that’s causing us to go off the metabolic rails. In this study, low-carb diets performed considerably better than high-carb diets.

The study found that healthy adults who ate higher proportions of carbohydrates (compared with the amount of proteins or fat they consumed) tended to develop several elevated risk factors for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and more plaque-promoting small LDL cholesterol particles. Higher proportions of dietary fat intake were not associated with elevating these risk factors.

A hormone called insulin – and a condition called insulin resistance – are at the core of pre-diabetes, and are turning out to be early warning signs for heart disease. And the results of this study showed that insulin measures were considerably better when people ate diets with a lower amount of carbs, and that was true regardless of the amount of fat consumed. 

It’s insulin resistance, not cholesterol, that is the root cause of heart disease and, according to other research, probably many other chronic underlying conditions plaguing our world. 

The good news is that insulin resistance is treatable, preventable and mostly reversible by diet alone. It’s time we get off the toxic diets that are causing this condition in the first place! It’s time we understand that saturated fat and cholesterol are not the problems. When you remove that outdated thinking, the current dietary guidelines collapse like a house of cards. 

What’s good for the heart is good for the brain, and vice versa. I haven’t found one exception to that case. The right diet for the heart looks exactly like the right diet for the brain. And sadly, the  diet we SHOULD be eating is exactly the opposite of the diet we’ve been told is heart-healthy. 

Easy, no-fail heart-healthy eating changes

Most attempts to eat healthier fail quickly because the changes are too big and unmanageable. Instead of trying to completely overhaul your diet, start by making a few small changes. Here are a few simple suggestions that may have a healthy impact on your heart: 

First, remove these items from your kitchen: 

  • Corn oil and canola oil. These seed oils are filled with omega-6 which is very pro-inflammatory. 
  • Sugar. Let’s be realistic. I know you’re probably not going to give up your favorite sweets entirely. But be kind to your heart by restricting those goodies to just a few days a month.
  • Canned soups, salad dressings and pasta sauces. These are often loaded with hidden sugars and a ton of sodium. Instead of relying on these cooking shortcuts, do an internet search for simple recipes you can make from scratch.  
  • White flour and white rice. These are heavily processed and raise your blood sugar almost as much as pure sugar. And – don’t shoot the messenger – products made with ‘whole grains” don’t do much better. Whole grains still raise blood sugar, and still contain gluten, so they may not be the solution for everyone. 

Then, add these items to your fridge and pantry: 

  • Palm oil. You can find this online and in specialty markets. Millions of people around the world use it as their everyday cooking oil. Malaysian certified sustainable palm oil is rich in nutrients such as brain- and heart-healthy vitamin E tocotrienols. 
  • Butter. This was never bad to begin with! It was banished from our tables because of our ill-advised fear of saturated fats. So we replaced it with something much worse!
  • Stevia and monk fruit. These are natural sweeteners that have no effect on your blood sugar.” 
  • Nuts: People who eat more nuts have lower BMIs. Their diets are higher in magnesium, higher in fiber, higher in poly- and monounsaturated fats, all of which can have a profound effect on your health. But nuts are also easy to overeat and contribute to weight gain, so just be careful about the amount you consume.
  • Egg yolks: What a relief that you don’t have to suffer through one more tasteless egg white omelet! The advice to eat egg white omelets is way past its expiration date! 
  • Dark chocolate (minimum 60% cocoa on the label): Chocolate contains cocoa flavanols; beneficial plant-based phytonutrients that support cardiovascular health.
  • Grass-fed beef. Grass-fed beef contains anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids and less inflammatory omega-6s. It’s also free of hormones, a very big plus indeed. If you follow this suggestion, you’ll never have to worry about how much marbling is in your steak, or if your hamburger is 70/30 instead of 90/10 or 80/20. It won’t matter. 
  • Dark meat poultry: The USDA data shows that there are mere milligrams of differences in the nutritional content of white and dark meat. 

Here’s more advice: Stick with the basics. I’ve always said that the only rule you really need to follow in nutrition is to eat real food, food your great-grandmother would have recognized as food. Eat from what I call the “Jonny Bowden Four Food Groups”: food you could hunt, fish, gather or pluck. Stay away from overly processed and get back to basics. 

That doesn’t mean you can never snack. Get organic (non-GMO) popcorn with minimal chemical processing. Get away from that chemical soup called “butter flavoring” and look for a microwave popcorn that contains palm oil, because palm oil doesn’t burn easily so your popcorn will taste better.  

This year, you can finally make commitments to a heart-healthy diet that are easy to achieve. These tips will help you take better care of your heart throughout the winter and may become heart-healthy habits you’ll want to follow all year long.  

Biography: Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS

Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, (aka “The Nutrition Myth Buster”) is a nationally known expert on weight loss, nutrition and health, and the best-selling author of 15 books on health. Dr. Jonny — a former professional pianist and conductor — earned six certifications in personal training and fitness, has a Master’s degree in psychology, a PhD in holistic nutrition and is board certified by the American College of Nutrition. He has written, contributed to or consulted on hundreds of articles in publications as diverse as the New York Times, People, Us, O the Oprah Magazine, In Style, Vanity Fair Online, People, GQ, Forbes Online, Clean Eating, the Huffington Post and countless others.

He is the best-selling author of 15 books, including “Living Low Carb”, “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth” and his latest, the revised and expanded version of “The Great Cholesterol Myth” (2020).