Posts tagged with "nutrition"

Body positivity — a balancing act

By Janna Breslin

Body positivity is a phrase we hear more and more often, lately. It’s a push to alert people—especially impressionable children and teens—that there are many harmful media representations out there, especially for women.

Just as people once wrung their hands over Barbie’s unnatural shape, the Kardashians and other airbrushed social media influencers make certain “desirable” body shapes seem naturally attainable. We’re all guilty of it to a certain extent. Who doesn’t use strategic selfie angles to mask our “imperfections?”

The body positivity movement is aimed at normalizing all body types, rather than focusing on and celebrating only super-ripped Abercrombie and surgically-enhanced Victoria’s Secret models. Realistically, no matter how much we diet and exercise, the majority of humans can’t achieve those standards. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t wear the clothes we enjoy or avoid photos with friends.

But acceptance is a balancing act. We should all recognize that our bodies are constantly changing, and to hold ourselves to impossible ideals is detrimental to our mental health. On the other hand, body positivity isn’t a substitute for physical wellness. Luckily, physical health also comes in a number of different packages.

The push to normalize all body types

Your body image is how you feel about the way you look and feel, when you look in the mirror or at photos of yourself. Healthy body image is not merely not hating the way your body looks, but actively accepting it without trying to change yourself to fit arbitrary standards. For example, if you tell yourself, “I’ll look better once I lose fifteen pounds,” that’s not a healthy body image—even if you actually need to lose that weight to be healthy. In fact, it can actually promote unhealthy behaviors.

Body positivity initially started as a plus-size movement, and has grown more inclusive over time. The movement includes people of any shape, size, gender, race and physical ability (or disability). The point is to challenge the way society presents the physical “ideal” in pop culture, media, and more. That ranges from putting plus (or even average)-size models in ads to workout videos hosted by plus-size yogis.

How acceptance can help you stay healthy

For some people, the idea that you can be healthy and physically active, even if you’re plus-sized, is nothing short of revolutionary. Of course, there’s plenty of blowback—detractors accuse body positivity advocates of “glorifying obesity.” Since the movement is diverse, you may come across conflicting options from different sources. The key is that weight stigma hurts your mental health—and when you’re struggling emotionally, it’s that much harder to get fit and enjoy life.

Judith Matz, a clinical social worker cautions people not to put off activities until they reach a certain weight or fitness goal. The key to body acceptance (and staying or getting fit) is to continue to practice healthy behaviors regardless of your current size. When you consistently get the message that you’re not worthy of taking a barre class while you’re thirty pounds overweight, or you can’t wear a crop top until you’re perfectly toned, you’re more likely to give up.

That’s how body positivity can help: it reminds us that we all have the right to exist in and enjoy our bodies just as they are, right now. That includes engaging in healthy exercise and enjoying balanced nutrition.

Body positivity is no substitute for physical wellness

With that said, body positivity isn’t a substitute for physical health. That doesn’t mean that you can’t be a physically fit person at a higher weight. As long as you and your doctor are happy with your fitness and body size, healthy bodies really do come in all shapes and sizes.

The key is to balance the mental health benefits of body acceptance with physical fitness. You don’t have to be the “perfect” BMI (and in fact, research suggests that is an outdated metric) with ripped abs and biceps to be healthy or to love your body. However, if you struggle to get off the couch and get any physical activity at all, chances are you could stand to get back into fighting shape. You wouldn’t be alone, either. During the COVID-19 pandemic, more people are struggling now than ever—which feeds right back into negative body image.

The goal for everyone should be to accept ourselves as we are—works in progress—and prioritize our physical fitness over whether we fit into arbitrary aesthetic standards. When we do that, we make healthier decisions.

Janna Breslin is a well-known fitness model, certified personal trainer, health coach, and
nutrition expert. With Evan DeMarco, she co-founded Complete Human, the new
multi-media platform that takes a deep dive into the areas of mind, body, soul, and planet while
exploring what makes us who we are and what will make us better. Their flagship podcast can be found on all major streaming podcast players including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Play, and their namesake streaming video channel is online at YouTube.

Instagram | Facebook | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Youtube

23 Vitals

Illustration by Kaelen Felix

Get the total immune support your body needs to stay healthy all in one cost-effective place!

23 Vitals was created in response to founder Tom Elliott wanting the best immunity support on the market without the cost or hassle of buying multiple products and taking handfuls of pills or powders a day. After talking to several leading doctors in nutritional medicine and realizing most immune products out there simply weren’t good enough, Elliott realized a better solution was needed. Working with his team of experts, they created an all-in-one, best-in-class product that supports your immune system and makes sure it is working optimally with the breakthrough 23 Vitals.

Highlights include:

•  23 Key Ingredients for Total Immune Support, Overall Health & Vitality in a ready-to-mix powder

• One scoop, one time a day is all it takes to get 23 immune-enhancing vitamins and nutrients!

• Other products fall short of addressing the critical players of the immune system with low-value conventional ingredients, while 23 Vitals is the Ultimate Immune Solution with premium, clinically studied nutrients

• Add to your smoothie, yogurt, water- you choose!

• Two delicious flavors include Strawberry Lemonade or Orange Creamsicle (yum)!

Before 23 Vitals, if you were to try to buy all of the same immune support ingredients individually, it would cost you over $350 (!!!) and you would have to take over 30 pills and a couple of powders each day.  So, 23 Vitals got to work with a collective of expert formulators and physicians to craft a product of naturally occurring “Immune-Potentiating” ingredients to help train, remodel, and rejuvenate the Immune System – all in one great-tasting, ready-to-mix formula. 

Premium, clinically studied world-class ingredients include ResistAID (an amazing Larch tree extract for optimizing Innate and Adaptive Arms of the Immune System!), Wellmune (one of the most clinically studied beta-glucan ingredients for immune health!), 23 Vitals Immune FactorsTM  (Lactoferrin enriched colostrum proteins that protect and “train” immune cells), Bl-04 (specific probiotic strain with proven Immune, Microbiome & Gut health benefits), OptiMSM and N-Acetyl Cysteine (maintains healthy inflammation response, antioxidant & cellular health), ActivAloe (amazing source of Acemannan prebiotic for supporting gut and immune cells), VasoDrive-AP (unique tripeptide to support healthy blood flow and circulation), Other immuno-resilient nutrients, vitamins and minerals like Elderberry, Quercetin, Astragalus, Vitamin C, D3, Zinc, Selenium, Copper and many more!  

Buyer’s say:

“23Vitals has changed my vitamin regimen for the better from day one.” 

“With 23Vitals, I’m able to adhere to a simple daily regimen that ensures my body has everything it needs to stay healthy. If you’re on the fence about this one, give it a go. Your body and your taste buds will thank you!”

“It’s so easy – just one scoop once a day and then I am all set for the day. I definitely recommend this product and will continue to use it!”

23Vitals was created out of our love for our families, our parents, our communities, and our bodies’ amazing ability to keep us safe when we give it the love it deserves. This all-encompassing ultimate immune solution lets your body prepare, defend, support, and recover from day-to-day stress and seasonal challenges. It goes beyond just supporting since it contributes to rejuvenating and remodeling the immune system into a more effective and resilient one. 

Ready to make your immune system resilient and antifragile with 23 essential vitamins, minerals & premium ingredients in one easy step? 

Check out 23 Vitals!

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 $99 for 30 servings – Available on https://23vitals.com/

And coming soon on Amazon!

Adaptogens for Athletic Performance: What You Should Know

Could adaptogenic supplements and herbs help improve athletic performance? Well, every athlete is looking for an edge, and it should be something that will make them better than their competitor – legally, of course. At the very least, it should help them improve endurance, focus, strength, oxygen utilization, mood elevation, and recovery from long workouts faster.

While various solutions can help them reach peak performance levels, the list of natural solutions is relatively small. Some synthetic solutions are banned for their specific sports, while others come with side effects. Finding a natural solution that will elevate their performance without these side effects can be a blessing for the typical athlete.

Luckily, adaptogens offer just that. All an athlete will need to do is to introduce them into their diet. Here is what you should know about adaptogens and how they can elevate an athlete’s performance:

What Are Adaptogens?

Adaptogens are non-toxic plants that help the body cope with stress better, whether physical, mental, or biological. These herbs have been around for centuries and have been used in Chinese and Ayurvedic healing traditions. While some can be consumed as part of a diet, others are mainly brewed into teas or consumed as supplements. Each herb’s benefits might differ from one herb to another, but the general benefit is stress relief.

How Adaptogens Work?

Adaptogens help maintain the right balance in the adrenal system, which is responsible for releasing the stress hormone. Anytime you are dealing with stress, you are likely to develop adrenal fatigue. While stress is supposed to be a temporary state of wellbeing, people are always stressed in today’s environment.

Stress might arise from heavy workout sessions for athletes, having their name circulated in the media, and even family and career problems. The faster they can deal with this stress, the easier it will be to focus on improving their performance.

Sadly, this constant stress often leads to adrenal fatigue. This results in people experiencing symptoms like having a craving for salty foods, extreme fatigue, weakened immune system, and irritability. Different adaptogens relieve the body of this stress in a variety of ways. Here are three adaptogens every athlete should consider trying:

  • Ashwagandha

Athletes who want to perform optimally can always rely on Ashwagandha benefits. Being among the most vital Ayurvedic herbs, Ashwagandha is known to improve brain health, boost adrenal functions, increase stamina and endurance, and improve moods. It also plays a crucial role in controlling cortisol levels in the body.

Cortisol is a stress hormone that is mainly released by the adrenal glands to respond to stress. If the cortisol levels in the body become chronically elevated, the athlete can experience increased fat storage in the abdomen and high blood sugar levels.

  • Rhodiola Flower

The impact of Rhodiola on athletic performance and recovery is an issue that has been widely researched. The plant boasts anti-fatigue, anti-hypoxic, anti-stress, immune-enhancing, antioxidant, and sexual stimulation properties. Besides increasing oxygen rate use in the muscles, it also helps produce creatine phosphate and ATP.

The fact that it is also an antioxidant and can lower elevated cortisol levels also makes it ideal for athletes’ consumption. These benefits can help enhance muscle strength and stamina during periods when peak performance is required. Research has also shown that the herb can also help with perceived exertion, assisting athletes in working harder for longer.

  • Ginseng

Ginseng has, for long, been a prized energy enhancer in Chinese medicine. The adaptogenic herb has its primary active ingredients in its roots, which are known as ginsenosides. These active ingredients increase strength by enhancing creatine production. In one Canadian research, ginseng was administered to rats for four days. Observations showed that the rats extended their exercise time to exhaustion since the herb encouraged the body to burn fat for fuels and spare glucose.

This proved that the herb could increase endurance and aid in fat loss. Ginseng also helps lower muscle fatigue by inhibiting the production of serotonin in the body. Since the body has low levels of hormones that signal exhaustion, you can train for longer.

How to Include Adaptogens in Your Diet

For athletes to enjoy the benefits adaptogens have in store for them, they need to include them in their diet. While they are used to complement well-balanced nutrition plans, adaptogens aren’t in any way meant to substitute living a healthy lifestyle. They should be included in a diet that already has whole food components like carbohydrates, proteins, and vitamins within them.

In case you want to add them to your diet, you might only need to buy premixed powder before using it to spice up your food. Alternatively, you can also mix most of these herbs with teas or combine their tinctures with water.

Some adaptogens are also sold as capsules to be taken as supplements. However, athletes need to be careful with the specific pills they choose. Reading the ingredient list will help them assess whether the supplements will improve their workout routines and performance, without causing any side effects.

Adaptogens Contribute To Your Long-Term Health

When taken consistently, adaptogens will do more than enhance an athlete’s performance in the gym or a sport. They promise long-term health benefits without the side effects of most exercise supplements, such as sleep disruption and irritability. Unlike other supplements that the body forms a tolerance towards and demands more of, to enjoy the same effects, adaptogen benefits increase with usage.

The more you use adaptogens, the more you can enjoy their stress-reducing qualities. These herbs are also known to adjust themselves to the specific needs of the user. For instance, if one user has low cortisol levels, they can encourage the body to produce more. Ideally, the herb you opt for during your training will depend on the benefits you need and its availability.

Adaptogens Are Great for Your Overall Health

Your training sessions and performance need every boost they can find out there. Adaptogens happen to offer performance enhancements while improving your overall health. Consider including them into your diet today to enjoy the above benefits and more. 

Jonny Bowden’s Nutrition Advice

Have shelter-in-place comfort foods
put your healthy diet on the back shelf?

Nutrition Myth Buster Jonny Bowden says toss out the old nutrition advice along with the junk food. It’s time to start fresh before you start having health issues.

It’s no big surprise that some processed foods, such as boxed macaroni and cheese, have been enjoying a renaissance lately. People are stressed. Grocery prices are rising. And given all the confusing nutrition advice coming at us, surely someone … somewhere … has done a study that says sugary snacks are good for you. Yeah, not so fast. Step away from the toaster pastries.

“Many high salt, high carb comfort foods are only going to make you gain weight, feel worse and could ultimately damage your health,” cautions Nutrition Myth Buster Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS. “You’ll actually start feeling better and have more energy once you begin eating more nutritious foods.”  

But here’s the dilemma: When it comes to dietary advice, who do you believe? 

Some dietary advice on mainstream websites is decades out of date

“The dietary advice issued by various organizations is often a mix of old and new data. It’s not in line with what those of us who study this continually are telling people today. It takes way too long for some of these big organizations to incorporate the current scientific thinking into the mantras that they’ve been repeating for sometimes decades,” says Bowden. 

“Another reason why it’s so hard to get a straight answer about foods is that they don’t fall into perfect categories. For example, some saturated fats are very healthy for you. And some unsaturated fats should be avoided at all costs!” 

He elaborates, “Saturated fats such as ghee, palm oil, butter and coconut oil have been absolved of being bad for your health. Meanwhile, canola, sunflower, corn and soy are now known to be highly inflammatory!”  

Film exposes the misinformation and why we’re so confused! 

In the new feature length documentary Fat Fiction, Bowden and other leading health experts examine the facts and myths of saturated fats in the human diet, and question why medical advice has remained the same for decades as health issues proliferate in America. 

“In the film, we share more than a decade of published research confirming that fat, particularly saturated fat, was wrongly demonized. It is not a causative factor in heart disease. Worse, the low-fat dietary guides we’ve been following since the 1980s were never based on hard science,” says Bowden. 

So what should we be eating? 

Bowden, the best-selling author of “The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth,” gives three tips for choosing what foods to include in your diet: 

  1. “Check your sources for all articles on health and nutrition. A single study should never be the basis of your nutritional decisions, because studies contradict each other all the time. And don’t buy into the infomercial stuff about “clinical studies” supporting the latest fat-burner. Those are usually done in someone’s office and not subject to any peer review.

“Wait for multiple studies, completed by reputable universities, confirming the same outcomes. And even then be aware of things like who funded the study and who benefits from the results. There may be no way to avoid commercial interests in scientific research, but at least it’s good to be aware of it.”

  1. Be open to learning about ingredients you may want to add to your diet. “For example, some people are hyper-focused on palm oil. They’d have you believe that it’s bad for you and the environment. They also are stuck in the old 1950s notion that “saturated fat is bad for you.” Both beliefs are wrong. Some countries — notably Malaysia — are passionately committed to the environment. The palm oil from Malaysia is sustainably produced. Real Malaysian palm oil is one of the healthiest cooking oils I know of.

“Malaysian palm oil is also a rich source of vitamin E tocotrienols which support heart and brain health. And heart health is a huge concern in this country! It’s also a nutritious replacement for trans fats.” 

  1. Eat real food: food your great-grandmother would have recognized as food. “Eat from what I call the “Jonny Bowden Four Food Groups”: food you could hunt, fish, gather or pluck. Stay away from overly processed and get back to basics.”  

To learn more about studies related to saturated fats and health, visit www.palmoilhealth.org

Biography: Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., CNS

Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, also known as “The Nutrition Myth Buster” ™ is a nationally known board-certified nutritionist and expert on diet and weight loss. He has appeared on the Dr. Oz Show, Fox News, CNN, MSNBC, ABC, NBC, and CBS as an expert on nutrition has contributed to articles in The New York Times, Forbes, The Daily Beast, The Huffington Post, Vanity Fair Online, Men’s Health, Prevention, and dozens of other print and online publications.

Dr. Jonny is the best-selling author of 15 books including The 150 Healthiest Foods on Earth, Living Low Carb (now in its fourth edition), Smart Fat (with Steven Masley, MD), and The Most Effective Ways to Live Longer.

The eagerly awaited and completely updated edition of his best-selling book, The Great Cholesterol Myth (co-written with cardiologist Stephen Sinatra, MD) will be out in October, 2020.

Follow him @jonnybowden

www.jonnybowden.com

Facebook: Dr. Jonny Bowden

Susan Bowerman on how to beat diet boredom for 360 Magazine

Beating Diet Boredom

How to Beat Diet Boredom in the “New Normal”

By Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND, Sr. Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training, Herbalife Nutrition

If you’re bored with your diet, you probably won’t stick with it.  Here are some tips to help you beat diet boredom.

Many of us are still spending more time at home during these uncertain times which can lead to boredom – tired of our same routines, limits on autonomy and for some, bored with our diet. While being bored with your diet could be good news it might also be bad news. 

The good news is this: if you’re bored with your diet, it probably means that you’ve been sticking pretty solidly to your meal plan – at least for the moment – and it’s likely you’re seeing some results. When you eat the same foods day in and day out, you do tend to eat less overall.  But the bad news is that the reason you’re eating less is because you’re simply bored with your diet – and that can spell trouble.  When your diet gets boring, you’re more easily tempted – and you’re more likely to stray off your plan.

Why You Get Bored on A Diet

I think there are a couple of reasons people get into ruts with dieting – and they’re legitimate reasons.  For one thing, if you stick to a plan and you’re getting results, you might be worried that if you eat anything else your progress will slow down.  And, if you eat the same thing every day – as boring as it may be – it just makes it easier; you don’t have to do much planning since you know exactly what you’re going to eat at every meal and snack.

But here’s something to keep in mind.  When you say you’re ‘bored on your diet’ it suggests that at some time you’ll be ‘off your diet’…(and, therefore, ‘not bored’).  I’ve said this before, but it’s worth repeating – weight loss is simply practice for weight maintenance.  In general, the foods and meals you eat while you’re losing are pretty much the same as the ones you’ll be eating when you shift into maintenance mode.  If you’re bored with your diet now, it’s a safe bet that you won’t be able to keep eating this way indefinitely.  And before you know it, you’ll be slipping back into old habits and watching your weight creep back up.

Routine is good – but sometimes you can take things too far.  Just because your diet plan suggests grilled chicken and steamed spinach for dinner doesn’t mean you have to eat exactly those foods every single night.  There are plenty of things you can do that can keep things interesting and help keep you on your plan.

How to Avoid Diet Boredom

Try new fruits and vegetables.  Bite for bite, fruits and vegetables are have fewer calories than protein foods or grains – and they’re loaded with nutrients.  Learning to love a variety of fruits and vegetables helps to keep things interesting, and you’ll be offering your body a whole host of nutrients, too.  If you just can’t face a plate of spinach one more day, try spicy mustard greens, kale or Swiss chard instead.  Just because your meal plan calls for strawberries doesn’t mean you can’t swap in something more exotic like kiwi for a change.

Move meals and meal items around. In general, meal plans are designed to distribute your foods over several meals and snacks throughout the day – partly to help you control hunger, but also to help you maintain your physical and mental energy.  But, that doesn’t mean that you can’t move things around a little bit.  Maybe your plan calls for a mid-morning protein snack, but you don’t feel the need to eat it – by all means, move that snack to later in the day if it works better for you.  If you prefer your larger meal midday, rather than the larger dinner meal that your plan calls for, go ahead and swap.  The time of day that you eat your calories makes little difference as long as you don’t exceed your daily totals.  And, there’s no reason you can’t eat ‘breakfast food’ for dinner and have leftovers in the morning.

Add more seasonings to your food.  It seems to me that some people don’t even try to make their food interesting when they’re dieting.  It’s almost as if they’re trying to punish themselves – and that it would be ‘bad’ to actually enjoy a tasty plate of food. Eating should bring pleasure, not punishment and you can add loads of flavor to foods with seasonings like herbs, spices, citrus juice and zest, garlic, onion or a splash of wine or vinegar.  And don’t forget condiments like mustard, salsa, steak sauce or soy sauce.  Fresh steamed spinach tastes just fine but it’s a whole lot better with a little red onion and a sprinkle of balsamic vinegar.

Give your favorite recipes a makeover.  Diet boredom can also set in when you aren’t eating your usual favorite meals because they’re not very diet-friendly.  But with so many tips and tricks for revamping recipes, you might be able to satisfy your craving for your favorite foods without breaking your diet.  Once you’ve mastered a recipe, share and swap with your friends; it’s amazing how quickly you can build a healthy recipe collection that way.

Find restaurant meals that work with your meal plan.  Dieting can be really boring if you’re convinced you can never enjoy a meal out.  But there’s no reason to avoid restaurants (including curbside pickup) altogether when you’re in dieting mode – the trick is finding items that work with your diet, not against it. Asian and Mediterranean fare, for example, tend to offer diet-friendly vegetables and lean proteins, so that might be a good place to start.  And take advantage of online nutrition information which can be a big help in pre-planning what you’ll order.

Rita Azar, illustrations, nutrition, 360 MAGAZINE

Counting Carbohydrates

By Ingrid De La O

Remember the 90’s? The world-wide-web was invented, Google was born and fanny packs were all the rage (and apparently still are).

It was also the time that fats were considered bad, like really bad. In fact, it was in fashion to buy fat-free everything, even fat-free mayo was a thing. Today the really bad crown has gone to carbohydrates while fats are rising in style by the keto industry. I’m glad the world changed its stance on fats. The myelin sheath that protects your nerves is coated in fat. Lack of high-quality fats break down this myelin sheath, and I’d be getting on your nerves right now.

The mentality today is counting calories and carbohydrates. We become mathematicians in some cases and excessively only tunnel vision at these two when looking at the back of the label. The problem is that it is not the macronutrients we should be scared of, but the quality of these macronutrients. The intake of toxins that are rising in our food consumption starting with the use of herbicides and pesticides–which cause a cascade of reactions in the body that promote fat storage, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

Let’s talk about a super-nutrient that most of America is deficient in– fiber. This super-nutrient is a type of carbohydrate. Gasp!

“Only 5% of people in the US meet the recommended daily target of 25 grams for women and 38 grams for men. That amounts to a population-wide deficiency — what nutritionists call the fiber gap”

Fiber is a super-nutrient since it’s a part of so many different foods. Eating a fiber-rich diet is associated with better gastrointestinal health and a reduced risk of heart attacks, strokes, high cholesterol, obesity, type 2 diabetes, even some cancers. That’s because fiber is fantastic in many ways: It slows the absorption of glucose — which evens out our blood sugar levels — and also lowers cholesterol and inflammation. More on that in a second…

But first let’s talk about other important stuff found in carbohydrates–antioxidants! These are abundant compounds primarily found in fresh fruits and vegetables, and evidence for their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases is continuously emerging.

Antioxidants and polyphenols are commonly found in nature bound to macronutrients such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. In fruits, and vegetables, carbohydrates are the major component that makes up their matrix. It turns out you need the fibers found in these fruits and vegetables to make the antioxidants bioavailable, that’s because once in your gut they bind to macromolecules such as fiber that improve their bioavailability.

Fiber is able to safely and effectively transport polyphenols to the colon where these compounds may have a protective effect on colon health as they are released during plant fiber fermentation by gut bacteria. That means the more nutrients you get for your gut bacteria including antioxidants, polyphenols, and fibers, the higher the reward for your system, this will boost your immunity, prevent signs of aging, and lend to better overall health and weight-loss success.

No more meal math: Eating high-quality foods—including plenty of high-quality fats—is the new golden rule of weight loss. When you eat the right quality and balance of whole foods, your body can do the rest on its own.

Processed carbohydrates—foods like chips, soda, crackers, and even white rice—digest quickly into sugar and increase levels of the hormone insulin. This is why the keto diet is so darn popular these days!

Sugar is not the problem, the problem is that these toxins found in these foods create inflammation and hinder your overall ability to use sugars as energy. Some of these toxins are artificial colors that create inflammation, rancid fats that are free radicals, artificial flavors that are hormone disruptors, preservatives that kill your gut bacteria, heavy metals that are a wrecking ball to your entire system, nano-plastics that disrupt the liver, brain, and gut, and lots of glyphosate that hurt your liver enzymes along with your thyroid for metabolism.

Antioxidants are the antidote to inflammation, the diversifier of your gut microbiome, the hormone balancers, and a long list of benefits.

So let’s save our math for counting sheep. And pay more attention to the toxins.

Snack Smarts: Raise Your Nutrition IQ

By Simon Sum, DCN, RDN, ACSM-CPT, FAND, Director of North America Scientific Affairs, R&D at Herbalife Nutrition
 
The good news: nearly 90% of consumers read nutrition labels. The bad news: people don’t always understand the vital nutritional terms on labels. Nutrition IQ is critical to supporting healthy eating habits and reducing the risk of chronic disease. For example, according to The International Food Information Council Foundation, nearly two in three people have heard of nutrient density, but far fewer can explain what it means. And while many consumers now understand that protein is a vital addition to meals, they are less picky about their protein when it comes to snacking.
 
First, let’s first review why protein is critical to our daily diets. Proteins are essential macronutrients that help to maintain our immune systems and build muscle, bone, skin, and hair. Without consuming the appropriate amounts of protein, you run the risk of missing out on these essential functions. Eventually, that could lead to problems, such as a loss of muscle mass, failure to grow, weakened heart and lung function, and even early death. Available evidence indicates that it’s the quality of protein (or the protein “package”), rather than the amount of protein that likely makes a difference for our health. 
 
Nutrient density is the measure of how much nutrition you get per serving or per calorie eaten and vital to achieving a nutritious diet. When choosing between two food items with the same calorie amount, one food choice can provide your body with the protein, fiber, healthy fats, vitamins, and minerals we need every day. In contrast, another option may provide empty calories from sugar and saturated fat with no other significant nutritional benefits.
 
Snacking often gets a bad rap because many options are loaded with sugar, saturated fat or excessive salt. And the food industry has responded to this challenge with endless “low sugar” and “low sodium” snacks – but that does not mean that the nutritional benefits are increased. The next evolution in the quest for better-than snacks has come in the form of protein labeled options. But while protein is good, not all protein snacks are created equal, and consumers may end up with a food solution that sounds healthy but is not.
 
One of the challenges with finding nutrient rich snacks is that until recently, there was no tool available for health professionals or food manufacturers to determine the nutrient density of protein snack products. Working with a team at Herbalife Nutrition, we created an index to identify the comprehensive profile of nutrient rich protein snacks. And the results were illuminating for consumers wanting to grab a bite that satisfies their hunger needs but also supports their desire for good quality protein snacks. 
 
Our study, entitled “A Modified Nutrition Rich Food Index to Assess Nutrient Density of Protein Foods and Snacks” presented at last month’s American Society for Nutrition annual meeting, demonstrated that good source protein food products are snacks with vitamins A and D, calcium, and fiber. At the same time, consumers should also look for products with a low amount of saturated fat, sugar, and sodium. As for calorie count – a healthy snack should be 100-150 calories to prevent hunger and maintain satiety before the next meal. So next time you grab a yogurt, shake, or protein bar – don’t just count calories, but also the vitamins and fiber to increase your healthy food options and raise your snacking IQ.
 

The Smoothie Bar VIA Tammy Fit

Fitness Expert Tammy Hembrow Launches The Smoothie Bar VIA Tammy Fit

Tammy Hembrow is launching The Smoothie Bar on her hugely successful exercise app Tammy Fit, today, Friday 15 May.

The delicious smoothies come from Sydney naturopath and nutritionist Maddie Bingham, who was approached by Tammy earlier this year to formulate recipes for the app.

“I have followed Tammy for years on Instagram as she’s a real inspiration fitness-wise,” Maddie says. “I’m delighted to be sharing my knowledge and recipes – and we could all do with an immune booster right now.

“The Green Goddess smoothie is incredibly nutritious. It’s full of healthy fats from the avocado, and hemp seeds which are great for hormonal health, as well as keeping your skin, nails and hair looking vibrant.

“It is also rich in antioxidants from the mango, spinach and pineapple. Pineapple also contains the enzyme Bromelain, which can aid with digestion and support immune health, which makes this smoothie a great breakfast option to promote your health and wellbeing and keep you feeling satisfied.”

Maddie’s other Tammy Fit Smoothies include:

Strawberry Smoothie Bowl
Berrylicious Smoothie Parfait
Papaya Smoothie Boat
Matcha and Coconut Smoothie
Mocha Smoothie
Snickers Smoothie
Tropical Smoothie

Mum-of-two Tammy is one of Australia’s biggest influencers, with over 11 million followers
on Instagram (the rest are Hollywood A-listers) and over a million on YouTube – platforms
she has leveraged to promote her health and fitness brands, with spectacular results.

Tammy Fit workouts have more than doubled since lockdown began. The app has been
downloaded 55,000 times in the last four weeks.

For more information or to sign up, visit tammyhembrow.org

Nutrients to Keep You Healthy, While You #StayAtHome

By Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND, Sr. Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training, Herbalife Nutrition.
 
While we shelter in place and practice social distancing, many of us may feel wary of the one errand we’ve generally taken for granted– the grocery run.
 
Now, going to the grocery store takes even more planning as the visits are less frequent and options are more limited. Because of these restrictions, it’s easy to make selections that are not the healthiest or to be tempted by high-calorie comfort foods – which often contain too much fat, salt and sugar.
 
Now more than ever, our health should be a top priority. This means making choices to nurture our bodies even more so than we did before COVID-19 impacted our lives. When we make poor choices – such as selecting foods that are high in calories but short on important nutrients – we can be overfed and yet undernourished. Starches and sugars may fill our bellies, but we may be lacking many important nutrients that support overall health, including the health of the immune system. 
 
Nutrients We Need More Of
 
Every few years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture releases data that reveals the state of the American diet. Reports have previously highlighted that many of us are eating plenty, yet lacking certain nutrients from our meals. In particular, we are losing out on what can be found in fruits, vegetables and whole grains.
 
Here are essential nutrients we should pay more attention to:

Fiber – Best known for helping with regularity, high fiber foods are filling and relatively low in calories, making them one of the best allies when it comes to weight management. Certain fibers can also encourage the growth of ‘good’ bacteria in your digestive tract. These beneficial bacteria help support immunity because they serve as an initial line of defense, by crowding out potentially harmful bacteria that might enter the digestive tract. You can get more fiber by including more fruits, vegetables and whole grains in your diet. Use fruits and veggies as snacks, add them to smoothies, sandwiches, salads, soups and stews, and replace refined grains with whole grains.

Magnesium – While it’s not a mineral we typically think about, magnesium contributes to hundreds of bodily functions. Magnesium supports the health of your immune and nervous systems, supports muscle function, and assists your cells in producing energy.  Magnesium is abundant in plant foods like leafy greens, nuts, beans and whole grains, so try snacking on nuts, or toss some beans into a leafy green salad.

Vitamin D – Most people associate calcium with healthy bones, but your bones need Vitamin D too, since it helps your body absorb calcium from your diet.  Vitamin D is also needed for proper muscle function and supports the activity of the immune system. Good dietary sources of vitamin D include eggs and fortified dairy products; a daily walk outside can help too, since your body produces vitamin D when your skin is exposed to sunlight.

Potassium – This mineral supports the function of nerves and muscles and helps regulate blood pressure. Potassium also supports chemical reactions in the body that generate energy from food. One reason many people don’t get enough potassium is because they don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables – the most abundant sources of this important mineral.

Many women also don’t get enough calcium or iron:

Calcium – Calcium is critically important for bone health. Adults need at least 1,000 mg of calcium each day, or the amount found in three glasses of milk. However, many women don’t eat enough dairy products, either because they simply choose to avoid them, are following a vegetarian or vegan diet, or because they are sensitive to lactose. However, calcium can also be obtained from leafy green vegetables and some fortified foods.

Iron – One of iron’s key functions is to support the transport of oxygen to cells and tissues. Women who are premenopausal lose iron routinely with their monthly cycle, which is why it is so important to ensure they have adequate intake. Meat is an excellent source of iron, but those on a plant-based diet can obtain iron from beans and fortified cereals.

 Eating for Wellness
 
The great news is that most of these nutrients can be found in foods that are easy to buy in bulk and maintain a long shelf life until your next essential grocery run.
 
Dry goods like oatmeal, lentils and whole grain pastas and cereals can be great sources of fiber, iron and magnesium, and some cereals are also fortified with Vitamin D. The most important feature is to ensure that you’re buying “whole grain” to get the full benefit, so read labels carefully.
 
Produce that lasts the longest includes apples, citrus, onions, potatoes, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and carrots.  And keep in mind that frozen fruits and veggies pack the same nutritional punch as their fresh counterparts, so stock up on them when you find them.  Fruits and vegetables are great sources of fiber and potassium and a single carrot provides a days’ worth of beta-carotene, which helps protect the health of cells, including cells in the immune system. The body also converts beta-carotene to vitamin A which supports the health of the skin, including the specialized immune cells that reside there. 
 
Finally, fermented foods are also great options that provide beneficial probiotics (the ‘good bacteria’) to the digestive system. Some fermented foods, like tempeh or Greek yogurt, are also excellent sources of plant-based protein (and yogurt is a great source of calcium) and both foods have relatively long shelf lives. Protein supports immune function in a number of ways – among them, the body uses protein to manufacture antibodies, and protein supports the health of the skin and the cells lining the digestive and respiratory tracts. 
 
How Supplementation Can Help
 
A well-balanced diet should provide the essential nutrients to optimize your body’s healthy functions. However, the reality is that even with a balanced diet, no one eats perfectly every day – particularly during these uncertain times when our usual foods may not be as readily available.  That said, this is when the right supplementation can really help. For example, suppose you can’t get the recommended 25 grams of fiber from fruits, veggies, and whole grains, or enough vitamins from your usual foods. In that case, you can add supplements like Bacillus Subtilis probiotic supplement into your diet to help boost your overall immune system. It may also help your body fight off respiratory infections. A daily multi-vitamin or the use of fortified foods – like cereals or meal replacement shakes or bars – can also be consumed to help supply the vitamins and minerals your body needs to perform at its best.
 
During this time of uncertainty and social distancing, use it to your advantage to take care of yourself and your body. Plan out your grocery list and stock your freezer, refrigerator and cupboards with healthy staples. Focus on the important nutrients you may need to increase in your diet and choose foods accordingly. It’s a great time to start getting creative in the kitchen–you may even be surprised at what tasty meals you can put together with what’s already in your pantry!
 

Sara Sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, illustration

Top 5 nutrition tips when working from home

1. Look for nutritious alternatives

If you’re worried about not being able to continue to eat well as particular ingredients are no longer in stock, try exploring other foods that could offer similar health benefits. We have put together a shopping list of alternative food options to ensure you’re not missing out on your essential vitamins and minerals. The key advice here is nutrition should still come first, but you may have to switch up some of your routinely used ingredients.

2. Stick to your routine

Spending more time at home can also impact when you eat. Whether or not you’re working from home, try to create (and stick to) a routine. This will help you avoid snacking on unhealthy foods. Eat your typical set number of meals a day and around the same time each day. If you don’t cook much or have more time on your hands than previously, now is a great time to start.

3. Stay hydrated

Keeping well hydrated is important for overall well-being, particularly cognitive function. If you’re working from home, keep a glass of water by you and drink throughout the day. Drink several cups of fluid each day including water, tea & coffee (though not too much!), fruit teas and sugar-free drinks.

4. Don’t forget your fresh veg

Fresh fruits and vegetables may have taken a back seat for you. Fruit and vegetables provide loads of essential nutrients and there are ways to extend their shelf-life and make them more convenient. For example, soups and sauces can be made straight away and then frozen. You can make a concentrated stock which you can then freeze in ice cube trays and, voila, homemade, low salt stock cubes!

5. Keep your stress at bay

There are many ways to reduce stress. Try to minimize the amount of alcohol you drink, especially during the week, which will also help you stick to a routine. Keep an eye on the number of caffeinated drinks you’re having and try switching to decaf options during the afternoon. This can help you sleep and focus better.

ABOUT HUEL:

Launched in 2015, Huel’s mission is to make nutritionally complete, convenient and affordable food, with minimal impact on animals and the environment.

Offering consumers “complete nutrition” means that each Huel meal serves customers a good balance of protein, carbs, fibre, essential fats and phytonutrients, plus an optimum level of all essential vitamins and minerals required on a daily basis. Formulated by Registered Nutritionist, James Collier, Huel is vegan, lactose-free and soya-free.

Along with Huel powder (including a gluten-free and reduced carb option), Huel offers a number of nutritionally complete products, including the world’s first nutritionally complete granola and an on-the-go bar which makes for the perfect snack. Most recently, Huel launched their first Ready-to-drink meal, acting as an innovative solution for time-poor consumers.

Each Huel packet has a year-long shelf life and produces zero food waste with minimal packaging waste which makes less of an environmental impact on the planet than many other food products.

Visit Huel:

Instagram: @huel @huelusa @huel_de @huelglobal
Twitter: @gethuel @huelusa
Website: huel.com