Posts tagged with "cooking"

Image by Ivory Nguyen for use by 360 Magazine

Top Ten Things to Know When Moving into Your First Apartment

By: Skyler Johnson

Moving into your first apartment can be a very stressful experience. From taking care of your electricity bill to installing Wi-Fi, there’s a lot to consider. Here are the top ten things to know.

  1. Be Aware of Space

This doesn’t just mean measuring your couch, it also means knowing which outlets are connected to a switch and how much closet space you have. Knowing where to plug in a lamp should be one of the first things you need to understand, as it can make life much easier down the road in terms of the arrangement of furniture and electronics. Keeping track of where each closet is can also allow for a serious consolidation of space. Find ways to maximize your closet space HERE.

  1. Make a Grocery List

While this may seem like it’s self-explanatory, it’s not something you ever want to forget, especially if you’re hungry. Chances are you’re not going to remember all the ingredients to a certain dish or dishes you’re making. Making this list should be something you do once or twice a week to make sure you don’t take more trips to the grocery store than you need.

  1. Choose Your Meal Plan Carefully

Going grocery shopping is something you’ll have to do every week and making a list of meals is essential. However, ingredients can be expensive if you’re not choosing correctly. Therefore, it’s important to only buy products you’re going to use at least twice. That way, you can save money in terms of how much you buy. If you’re buying zucchini, make sure to use it both for a fried zucchini and a pasta with zucchini and pesto. If you have the money, but not the time to shop, check out Instacart, where you can have someone go shopping for you.

  1. Keep the Lights Off

Remember, you have an electricity bill now. Make sure not to keep the lights on for too long or that bill will start to seriously increase. Make sure to turn off all lights when leaving the apartment, but make leave a light on when using a phone or laptop, as that’s been proven to deteriorate your eyesight.

  1. Keep Organized

Keeping organized might be something you’re already semi-aware of, but you’re operating on a much larger scale now. Putting shoes in their proper place and keeping brooms and mops in a closet or contained area can help you in the long run especially when doing chores. Having to scrounge through all your belongings to find a simple thing is a mild inconvenience when it happens one time in your room or dorm, but it becomes more of an issue when everything you have becomes lost.

  1. Remember to Get Fresh Air

With your apartment, unlike with your dorm or house, you don’t have to do much moving around for long periods. The kitchen is right there and doesn’t require as much walking as in a house. Nevertheless, it is good to get out of the house at least once a day. Social isolation can lead to depression.

  1. Magnets, Tupperware, and Air Freshener

These are all things you might not think you need, but you will. Magnets are great for your fridge. They can be used to hang up notes, grocery lists, and even hand towels. Plus, they make great decorations. Tupperware is good for storing food, which will become necessary. It’s always good to have leftovers, especially for busy study/work nights. Even for the nose blind, an air freshener is great for kitchen smells which will permeate a small space.

  1. Know how to do Laundry

Most apartment complexes have some form of a laundry room, and it’s important to know where yours is located, and more importantly how much it costs. You don’t want to be stuck with a lot of clothes to be washed without know how to wash them. Some laundry machines are more intuitive than others. For example, some may use Shine, a platform that allows for easy mobile payments for laundry. You can find out if your complex uses one by checking if there’s a baby blue sticker on the machine.

  1. Don’t Be Afraid to Make Cooking Mistakes

Cooking is one of the many things that are unique to moving into your first apartment, and while you may liken yourself to be a chef, try doing it every night. Food preparation mistakes are common but can also be great learning experiences. Either way, there’s always take-out if your food is inedible.

  1. Give yourself Space

When first moving into your apartment, you will have to deal with a lot of anxiety from living on your own. It’s not an easy transition, and you shouldn’t expect it to be. If you can, take a few days off from working to transition into your new space and get used to your environment. You won’t regret it.

Image via Bricoleur Vineyards for 360 Magazine

Bricoleur Vineyards Gains Award-Winning Chefs

James Beard Award-Winning Chefs Charlie Palmer and Nate Appleman Partner with Bricoleur Vineyards as Culinary Advisors

The winery’s first joint event with Chef Palmer is Project Zin on August 21st, which is already sold out

Bricoleur Vineyards is excited to announce that James Beard Award-winning chefs Charlie Palmer and Nate Appleman are joining the Bricoleur Vineyards team as Culinary Advisors. The winery’s first join event with Chef Palmer will be Project Zin, a sold out fundraiser for Down Syndrome Association North Bay, at Bricoleur Vineyards on August 21st. 

We couldn’t be more thrilled. Our family has long admired Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman’s talent, said Bricoleur Vineyards’ co-founder Mark Hanson. Our culinary team already creates amazing wine & food experiences for our guests, which will be enhanced by working with Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman. A mutual friend introduced us, and we really connected with Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman on our shared values of supporting philanthropy, our local community, and great wine and food. We’re excited to add their expertise and collaborative enthusiasm to our team.

Bricoleur Vineyards opened in the Sonoma County town of Windsor, just south of Healdsburg, last spring in the midst of the pandemic and in a short time has already earned recognition from San Francisco Bay Area press as the region’s Best New Emerging Winery and Most Romantic Winery.  A 40-acre picturesque destination with 21 acres of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay vineyards that have produced critically acclaimed, award-winning wines, the sustainably farmed estate also features expansive culinary gardens, fruit trees, olive groves, chickens, and honeybees.

Chef Palmer brings his signature Progressive American Cooking to Bricoleur Vineyards and will team up with the estate’s culinary team on menu creation and concept to further elevate the winery’s already robust offerings. With 13 acclaimed restaurants and rooftop bars across the United States, Palmer has chosen Sonoma County as his home, designing wine-forward tasting menus for Bricoleur Vineyards that emphasize the fresh, seasonal produce grown on the estate, reflecting the bounty of the land that Palmer knows so well.

I’m excited to work with the team at Bricoleur Vineyards as Culinary Advisor, said Palmer. A close friend brought me to the estate for a tasting earlier this year and I was impressed with their tasting menus and the way their wines pair so beautifully with dishes made from their estate-grown fruits and vegetables. I cannot wait to collaborate further on wine and food experiences and events in the future.

In keeping with their shared devotion to philanthropy and supporting the local community, Chef Palmer is excited to host the 11th Annual Project Zin event at Bricoleur Vineyards on August 21, 2021. Project Zin is a celebratory event hosted by Winemaker Clay Mauritson and Chef Palmer that benefits Down Syndrome Association North Bay. Palmer and Mauritson launched Project Zin in 2012, and the annual event has raised over $1,000,000 for DSANB. This year’s event is sold out, but to learn more about Project Zin and Down Syndrome Association North Bay, please visit their website.

At Bricoleur Vineyards, we’re all about celebrating life’s moments with wine and food, while supporting charities across the country and here at home, added Bricoleur Vineyards’ co-founder Sarah Hanson Citron. Bricoleur Vineyards is a beautiful place to gather, where social connections are fostered, and communities are built. Chef Palmer and Chef Appleman share our enthusiasm for bringing people together and we’re excited to welcome them to our team.

Bricoleur Vineyards is open Thursday – Monday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. by appointment only and reservations can be made by visiting their website or by calling 707-857-5700. Bricoleur Vineyards is close to the Santa Rosa airport, which accommodates both commercial and private planes, and it’s only an hour north of San Francisco. Bricoleur Vineyards is located at 7394 Starr Road in Windsor, California and can be found on Instagram.

Here is a link that includes photos of Chef Palmer, Chef Appleman, Mark Hanson, Sarah Hanson Citron, and beauty shots of Bricoleur Vineyards.

About Bricoleur Vineyards

Bricoleur Vineyards, which launched its first vintage in 2017 and opened its tasting room in 2020, is tucked away in Sonoma’s Russian River Valley – just south of Healdsburg. Founded by the Hanson family, Bricoleur Vineyards can be found at the end of a winding road in the charming, bucolic town of Windsor, only an hour north of San Francisco – and very close to the Santa Rosa airport. The distinctive name, Bricoleur, is French for one who starts building something with no clear plan, adding bits here and there, cobbling together a whole while flying by the seat of their pants.

The Bricoleur Vineyards estate produces two families of critically-acclaimed, award-winning wines – Bricoleur and Flying by the Seat of Our Pants. Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Viognier, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc, Rosé of Pinot Noir and Zinfandel are crafted under the Bricoleur label, while Rosé of Grenache and Brut are produced under the humorous, irreverent Flying by the Seat of Our Pants label. The wines are crafted by veteran Winemaker Cary Gott and Assistant Winemaker Tom Pierson.

In addition to Bricoleur Vineyards, the Hanson family also owns Kick Ranch Vineyard in Sonoma County’s Fountaingrove District AVA. The Hanson family’s roots run deep in Sonoma County. Mark Hanson was born in Santa Rosa, and Beth Wall Hanson’s great grandfather, Pietro Carlo Rossi, was the original oenologist for Sonoma County’s historic Italian Swiss Colony. Rossi revolutionized California winemaking in the 19th century and under his direction, the Italian Swiss Colony became one of America’s leading wineries. 

Bricoleur Vineyards is open Thursday – Monday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. by appointment only and reservations can be made by visiting their website or by calling 707-857-5700. Bricoleur Vineyards is located at 7394 Starr Road in Windsor, California and can be found on Instagram.

Art by Nicole of 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

How to Cook with Cannabis Butter

Everything’s Better With Homemade Cannabis Butter

While edibles have been around for some time, it’s not as simple as throwing buds into dough and calling it a day. There are steps that you need to take to make your own cannabis edibles and one of the most versatile things you can make is butter.

Also known as cannabutter or weed butter, cannabis butter can be used in cooking your favorite recipes in much the same way regular butter is used. At a basic level, cannabis butter is butter that contains marijuana properties, including the all important THC. But before you start dropping raw weed into some softened butter and calling it done, you need to learn how to make it work the right way.

How to make your own batch of cannabutter

Why isn’t it just a matter of putting a spoonful of green goodness into your favorite pasta sauce or pancake mix recipe?  An excellent question! Here’s why:

  1. Your body can’t process raw weed. In fact, the psychoactive properties won’t be activated at all because the cannabinoids won’t enter your bloodstream. In the best case scenario, you would just digest the weed like you would kale. If you aren’t so lucky though, you could end up reacting to the raw plant. Gastrointestinal problems, like vomiting and diarrhea, are a definite possibility.
  2. Have you ever tasted raw weed? It’s pretty nasty. Now imagine that flavor in your favorite brownie or waffle recipe. Gross, right? If you haven’t made the mistake of tasting raw weed, it’s got a really foul flavor, with a strong odor and bitter aftertaste.
  3. It’s necessary to decarboxylate your weed before you attempt to use it, in order to activate the THC and CBD properties. Decarbox… What now? Read on!

What is decarboxylation and why does it matter?

Basically, decarboxylation is the process of removing  a chemical from an organic substance. In this case, the chemical COOH. Raw and dried cannabis contains tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) and cannabinolic acid (CBDA). It also contains C02 and that is the compound that stands between you and usable levels of THC and CBD in your weed.

The process of decarboxylation happens naturally when you smoke weed by the very act of lighting it up. But you can’t light your cookie dough on fire, so you need to find another way to decarboxylate your weed to create edibles that actually contain THC. It also needs to happen at a lower temperature than fire and for a longer period of time, to be effective. Why longer at a lower temp? Well, that’s because of the terpenes.

Terpenes are natural oils in cannabis that give your weed that noticeable odor, and taste. Different strains will have different flavors because of the combination of terpenes in them. But they’re not just about flavor: terpenes work with the cannabinoids in your weed to create some of the effects you experience when you consume it.

Terpenes are important to know about before you try to create your edibles so that you understand the process: these oils will break down at temperatures above 310 degrees fahrenheit. That isn’t a problem when you’re smoking your weed because it’s a short distance from the burning end of your joint to your lungs.

But when you are decarboxylating weed for edibles, you need to use a temperature below 310 degrees, so by default, you need a longer period of time to bake your buds for them to ultimately contain active ingredients in your final edible product.

Once decarboxylated, you can use your weed in a lot of ways: You can sprinkle it on your salad or even infuse it into a drink or tea. But the easiest way to use it is to turn it into cannabis butter. Anything you make or bake probably contains butter—from sautéing veggies and greasing a pan for Sunday morning eggs, to adding a little THC to your toast—so this makes cannabis butter a flexible edible option. 

How To Make Cannabis Butter

Tools and ingredients: Oven, Stove, Baking Sheet, a bud of your favorite strain, medium saucepan, butter, bowl for finished product, cheesecloth, rubber band, string or tape

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 240 degrees fahrenheit. While you’re waiting for the right temperature, spread your marijuana on the baking sheet. You’re looking to create one layer of weed.
  2. Bake the cannabis on the middle rack for about 40 minutes. Most ovens have a side that cooks hotter than the other so turn the sheet a couple of times to get an even bake. Decarboxylation activates the THC and the CBD, which makes it possible for your body to absorb it. After 40 minutes, the marijuana should be dry and crumbly. That’s the consistency you need to mix it into the butter.
  3. How much butter is the right amount? A good measure is four sticks of butter to one ounce of marijuana. You can adjust as needed. If you are using four sticks of butter, your next step is to put four cups of water into the saucepan. Bring the water to a boil and once it’s boiling, add in your butter. Yes, into the boiling water! Stir the mixture until the butter has completely melted.
  4. Once the butter has melted, add your marijuana to the water/butter mix and reduce the heat to low. At a level to boil water, you could end up burning your weed. What you want is the water to be barely simmering. Now you have to wait. 
  5. Let the butter/water/weed mix simmer on low for three hours. You can go on to step 6 while you wait, and then come back to this step. Basically, the three hour simmer is reducing the water content, as if you were creating a sauce with your weed. When you get close to the three hour mark, check the top of the mixture. When it’s done, it will be shiny, with a thick texture. Take the saucepan off the heat.
  6. While your mixture is reducing, you can get prepped with the other items that you’ll need. Get out a large mixing bowl. Pyrex, plastic or metal are fine: it just needs to be able to handle the heat of your mixture. Put two layers of cheesecloth over the top of the bowl and hold them fast with the rubber band, string, or tape. The mixture will be heavy and if you don’t fix the cheesecloth in place, they could get pulled into the mix, rather than staying in place. Of the three, string is the most effective: just make sure it’s tight and that you secure the string on the lower and smaller part of the bowl, so it can ride up while you are straining!
  7. Slowly pour the hot mixture through the cheesecloth. What goes through the cheesecloth will eventually be the weed butter. You’ll throw out the stuff on top of the cheesecloth. 
  8. When your entire mixture has drained through, pick up the cheesecloth by the four corners, twist them together to keep everything inside. It should look like a small bag out of it. Now squeeze the cheesecloth bag to make sure that you get every ounce of that delicious butter.
  9. Now you wait. Again. But it’s so worth it! Place the mixing bowl in the refrigerator so that the cannabis butter can cool. While it’s cooling, the butter will separate from any remaining water. How will you know when it’s done? When the top layer is solid.
  10. Run a knife around the edge of the solid butter, to separate it from the mixing bowl. Now you can lift it out and put it on a cutting board. If there is still some moisture, just dab it dry with a clean towel.

You’re done! You can cut up the weed butter into smaller pieces for easy storage at this point, or leave it whole.

Cooking with weed butter

If you need some inspiration for recipes to cook with your weed butter, the internet is the right place to look! But before you start cooking or baking, if you’re not used to edibles, there are a few things you should know, as the experience is quite a bit different from smoking weed.

  •     The effects of the THC / CBD can take anywhere from 30 to 190 minutes to kick in. This is because of the way food is digested in your stomach and how long that takes. The flip side is that you won’t need as much weed to achieve a good high as you would with a joint. A typical joint is about ½ a gram of weed. But a starting point with edibles is more like 0.001 grams (or one milligram), which shows you just how potent edibles can be. Because of this delay, it’s important to be patient if you don’t feel anything right away, rather than eating more of your new edible. Too much THC can result in paranoia, anxiety, nausea, and a general bad feeling. Start with small quantities of weed and take it slow.
  •     Eating marijuana-laced food has a tendency to be a lot more intense because the THC is sent directly into your bloodstream through the process of digestion, instead of being filtered through your lungs. 
  •     Finally, the high from edibles can last a lot longer than smoking, so it’s something to consider if you have plans later in the day!

Edibles are a great option for those who don’t want to smoke weed but still want either the pain relief or the high, or both! Just take it slow, and when in doubt, visit your local dispensary and see what they recommend!

Bio

Anthony Franciosi, also known as Ant, is an honest to goodness farmer whose fingers are as green as the organic cannabis he grows. He is the proud founder of Honest Marijuana– an all natural, completely organic marijuana growery in Colorado.

 

Popcorn illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Entertainment at Home: How to Spend Lockdown with Benefits?

The lockdown has ended up becoming a blessing in disguise. It is the perfect opportunity for you to be able to pick up a new skill. However, that is just the tip of the iceberg. If you are able to use the lockdown wisely, then you can surely benefit from it a lot. Use this to your advantage and spend a little more time with yourself. Who knows? By the end of this lockdown, you might evolve into an even better version of who you are now. Read on to find out all the various ways to spend your time productively during the lockdown.

Spending Time Productively in Lockdown

Learn to Cook

This is the time when you find yourself in close proximity to the kitchen the whole day. Ordering in might be a risky bet considering that it might provoke the spread of COVID. So, instead of ordering food from a delivery app, cook it yourself. Start with the simpler things at first like making tea, boiling eggs, etc. As you learn more every day, you can eventually take up cooking initiatives that you never imagined before.

Try New Things

This lockdown, try something that you normally wouldn’t. Spend your time picking up a new skill. There is an endless world out there. Take online gambling for instance. You can get 100 free spins no deposit in UK if you visit online casinos. In this pandemic, as people spend more time at homes, the popularity of online casinos has skyrocketed. More and more people are exploring the world of online gambling because it is thrilling and fun. So, go ahead and explore.

Read More Books

This is the ideal time to read a book. If you are not an avid reader, you might be depriving yourself of one of the most beautiful experiences in life. We all receive books as gifts on our birthdays. On most occasions, those books end up getting dragged to one corner of our shelf and keep collecting dust. Now is the time to get those books out and experience the beautiful stories they tell.

Bond with Family

We live in an age of preoccupations. Everyone is preoccupied with something or the other. Children are busy studying; parents are busy working. We are hardly able to make time for each other. However, the lockdown has changed it, even though temporarily. In the lockdown, a unique phenomenon has taken place. Every member of the family is under one roof. Children are getting to attend online classes and parents are getting to work from home. So, start spending more time with each other. Begin with the simpler things like eating at the dinner table together or watching a movie.

Exercise

You don’t necessarily have to go to a gym to work on your fitness. A free hand workout is the best form of fitness routine. The best thing about it is that it can simply be done at home. So, this lockdown, use the opportunity to work, on your fitness, from home. Go to the terrace, do some stretching. Do some crunches and push-ups. Use the extra time you get at home to improve your health because it will not only help you physically, but also mentally.

Meditate

A lot of people turn out to be rather skeptical when it comes to meditation. However, experts certify meditation to be a genuinely helpful habit. It can result in profound improvement of your mental health and stability. Even more so, in the stressful situation of the global pandemic, you need to calm yourself down. So, practice meditating. It can do wonders.

Watch TV

In the age of Netflix and Amazon Prime, we have gained access to a seemingly endless plethora of interesting shows on TV or computers. Some of the shows have thousands of episodes, each having a running time of at least an hour. Normally, you don’t get the scope to fully watch your favorite shows in the middle of work. Also, by the time you return home, you get too tired. Nevertheless, this is your chance. Switch on the television and watch something with your family.

Do Chores

Use the free time in your hand to perform household chores. Usually, we see the mothers and daughters of the house taking up this crucial responsibility, but why should the men be left out? Pick up the mop and duster. Go ahead and clean your place up. Get into all those remote corners of the room that you have never even looked at before. Reorganize the furniture. Give your humble abode a refreshing new look.

Make a Garden

Gardening can be an extraordinarily soothing way of passing the time. Plants take time to grow and flourish, but when they do, they teach you so much about how delicate life is. Gardening has proven to have hugely positive effects on mental health. An added benefit of doing this is not having to shop for fruits and vegetables outside. After all, you are locked down. You can’t visit the marketplace for buying your cooking ingredients. So, rather grow them at home.

Plan for Future

Since you have more time in your hand, you can concentrate on drafting a course of action for your future. Our lives revolve around various aspects. We have a family to take care of. We have careers to build. We have our own dreams to fulfil. This is the perfect chance of working them all out through meticulous planning.

Try Art

Have you ever explored the artistic side of your personality before? This is the ideal occasion for that. Pick up a paint brush and go ahead. It is also a highly beneficial mental exercise because it helps you work on your precision and focus. There are so many things to take inspiration from. Maybe, try your hand at some glass painting too while you’re at it.

Detox

Enough of indulging in vices, let this lockdown be a detox phase. Rid your body of all the toxins. No smoking and no drinking because, after all, you can’t even if you want to. All the stores are closed. So, might as well use this as a way of benefiting yourself. Use this lockdown to quit your bad habits.

Conclusion

So, we told you about many different ways of using your time productively in the lockdown. However, we saved the best for last. Here it is. As we said earlier, this lockdown offers you the chance to spend some time with yourself. That is very important. So, use this time to write a letter to your future self. When you spend time with yourself, there are thoughts and ideas that you stumble upon which you would normally never even comprehend. Before you end up forgetting them, write them down as a letter for reminding yourself in the future. Make yourself promises. Make your memories immortal. Get a pen and a piece of paper. Then, write your heart out. You will cherish it when the time comes.

Mighty Sesame Sauce illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini

NEW MIGHTY SESAME HARISSA TAHINI PUTS A SPICY SPIN ON A CONSUMER FAVORITE

Mighty Sesame Co. Adds a Bold New Variation to its Popular Squeeze & Serve Line

Mighty Sesame Co., the maker of all-natural, squeeze-and-serve tahini, is upping the tahini game with the first-ever harissa flavored tahini on the market.

Tahini continues to trend globally as consumers and chefs discover new ways to use the creamy, nutrient-rich condiment. With the rollout of Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini, it’s easier than ever to add extra zip to everything from dressings and dips to meat and veggies.

The sesame experts make their tahini from the finest Ethiopian sesame seeds and serve it up in shake-and-squeeze bottles—the first tahini packaging of its kind in the U.S.—for maximum convenience. The new variety contains a blend of 100% natural harissa spices for a distinctively aromatic, roasted-chile pepper flavor profile with a kick.

Mighty Sesame’s Chef Gregg is available to whip up a great Mom’s Day brunch recipe.  See him in action on this YouTube video.

Like all Mighty Sesame tahinis, the Harissa variety is ready to use with just a shake and a squeeze, no stirring required. It is packed with protein and contains 260mg of calcium per serving. Organic, vegan, gluten- and dairy-free, kosher, and halal, it’s a 100% guilt-free option for everyone.

The original Mighty Sesame Organic Squeezable Tahini, introduced in 2018 and was anointed The Best Tahini You Can Buy, by Epicurious Magazine.

Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini comes in 10.9 oz / Master Pack of 8 bottles with an MSRP $4.99 per 10.9 oz. bottle. Mighty Sesame is distributed by Kayco, headquartered in Bayonne, NJ.

About Kayco Beyond

Kayco is one of the largest manufacturers and suppliers of specialty and kosher foods. Kayco Beyond Division sources and distributes new products to the general market beyond kosher to meet the demands of consumers looking for optional products that are healthful, convenient, or for restricted diets and lifestyles. These brands include Dorot Gardens, Absolutely Gluten Free, Beetology, Mighty Sesame, Tuscanini Foods, and new Wonder Melon.

Wine illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

California Wines × Down to Earth

California Wines Livestream & Video Series Celebrates Down to Earth Month in April

Facebook Live & Instagram Events Share Tips on Enjoying Sustainably Grown & Produced Wines

For “Down to Earth Month” in April, California Wines is celebrating the state’s global leadership in sustainable winegrowing with a series of fun and informative virtual events and videos on Facebook Live and Instagram. Throughout April, the free livestream events and videos will present a variety of discussions, cooking demonstrations, and virtual wine tastings focused on sustainability.

Hosts for the Facebook Live events include Napa Valley sommelier Amanda McCrossin of SommVivant and Aida Mollenkamp, Food Network personality and founder of Salt & Wind Travel.

Videos shared on the California Wines Instagram channel will demonstrate recipes, how to pair and enjoy California wines, and what makes a wine sustainable. Programs will feature food and beverage influencers, including Meg van der Kruik of This Mess Is Ours, Jerry James Stone of the Jerry James Stone blog, Britney Brown Chamberlain of Britney Breaks Bread, and Sarah Gim of The Delicious Life.

To view details on all Down to Earth Month events, visit California Wine’s website.

Facebook Live: Thursdays, 10 am PST

Livestream hosts Amanda McCrossin of SommVivant and Aida Mollenkamp of Salt & Wind taste and discuss sustainably grown and produced California wines. Event replays will be available on the site for later viewing.
 
April 1 – What Is Sustainable Wine?
It’s time to clear up the confusion around what defines sustainability! Participants will learn what sustainable winegrowing and winemaking practices are and get the inside story on California’s sustainable certification programs, including the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA) program.
 
April 8 – What Are Biodynamic and Organic Wines, and How Are They Sustainable?
Explore the differences between organic and biodynamic practices and learn how they fit into the sustainability equation.
 
April 15 – Why Is There a Chicken in the Vineyard?
Chickens, sheep, and goats don’t just look adorable in California vineyards—each has an important job to do. Learn how animals are helping California vintners in their sustainable farming efforts.
 
April 22 – How to Look for Sustainable Wines
Finding sustainable wines is easy—if you know what to look for. Participants will learn about the sustainable certifications, logos, and terms to look for on wine labels.
 
April 29 – How California Is a Leader in Sustainable Wines & Sustainable Farming
California is not only a world leader in sustainable winemaking and winegrowing practices, but producers also embrace sustainability in dairy and other agricultural areas. Learn about California’s innovative farming practices and how the state leads in sustainable wine and food.

IGTV Videos: Tuesdays 10 am PST

Every Tuesday in April, videos from well-known food and beverage influencers will be shared on the California Wines Instagram channel, each demonstrating a recipe inspired by the Wine Country Table cookbook paired with sustainably made wines from California. Recipes and information about sustainability will be shared on each influencer’s website and social media platforms.
 
April 6 – Meg van der Kruik of This Mess Is Ours
 
April 13: – Jerry James Stone of the Jerry James Stone blog
 
April 20 – Britney Brown Chamberlain of Britney Breaks Bread
 
April 27 – Sarah Gim of The Delicious Life
 

Kia Damon illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Chef Kia Damon: Culinary Compassion In The Kitchen

By: Emily Bunn

This Women’s History Month, 360 Magazine sat down with Chef Kia Damon. Kia is the founder of Kia Feeds The People (KFTTP) and is a cofounder of Auxilio, both of which are non-profits aimed at combating food apartheid. We dished with Kia on how she discovered her passion for cooking, pathways towards increased Black and QTPOC representation in the culinary industry, and her upcoming video release with EFFEN Vodka and Queer Foods, which can be viewed here.

When did you first begin cooking? When did you realize you wanted to pursue it professionally?

“I started cooking in my early preteens. I have younger brothers as well, so once we were too old for day care, I had to step up as the older sibling to make sure we ate, especially more so during the summertime because I have working parents. But, it wasn’t until some years later when I started cooking independently for my own health reasons that I truly saw my strengths in cooking and realized that cooking professionally wasn’t a world that was so far away for me, that it was actually extremely attainable and extremely real. So I took the plunge, and to this day some of my family’s still very surprised, because I was definitely burning pots of rice, and they were like ‘this girl has no talents for the kitchen.’ Now I’m cooking and they still can’t believe it.”

We all know foods brings communities together. Are there any experiences you’ve had with community members through Kia Feeds The People that have stuck with you?

Yes! Honestly, the most connective part was before I even started cooking with KFTTP people when I was looking for guidance from a lot of my friends in the cooking community. Because KFTTP was birthed in a really tumultuous time, I felt like I couldn’t quite gather my thoughts and my feelings. I just felt so emotionally charged and stunted that I felt like I couldn’t even work or think or move because I felt so emotional about everything. But being able to lean into my friends and my chosen family who see me for who I am, who know me intimately and know my heart, they were able to guide me to where I am now and toward my mission for KFTTP. I’m super grateful. These are people that I’ve been able to cook with before, these are people that I’ve literally eaten with before–we’ve shared food out of deli containers at 3am–I’m very grateful for them. And I definitely could not have got to this place without them.”

Are you looking to expand KFTPP outside of Brooklyn, or just focus on this specific community?

“Because I am a Sagittarius, I definitely am looking to expand and looking to grow. I definitely have to make sure I build and flesh KFTTP out as much as possible in Brooklyn before I start thinking about moving other places. But I do have visions, not necessarily to just expand Kia Feeds The People, but to collaborate with other mutual aid organizations and non-profits that already exist in other cities, so that I can support them and [they] have more coverage where they are. I’m not the only one who’s doing this kind of work and it is definitely a collaborative, lifelong mission, so I want to lend hands to the people who are already in this game.”

What do you think is the biggest obstacle facing overcoming food apartheid?

Personally I think the biggest obstacle is still convincing people that it exists, because we live in such a individualistic world. If something doesn’t affect the next person, then they’re more likely to ignore it, you know. That’s why I think COVID really shook things up, because a lot of us were collectively put on our butts. you know. We’re like “whoa, wait a minute, is this one thing that is really proactively affecting us.” But regarding food apartheid, a lot of people are still familiar with it in terms of a “food desert.” Food desert is a word that’s been used for many years to describe this situation, and a “desert” implies that it is natural, because the world naturally created deserts. When you apply “food desert” to that idea, it implies that this place without food, this place without access to meals, is natural and that’s just the way that it’s supposed to be. But it’s completely unnatural, it’s completely systematic, and [after recognizing that] then we can start looking at it as something that is created by is created by systems. Then, we can put some realness to it and find how all of us are truly affected by them. So I think right now, it’s making sure people know what food apartheid is, and that it actually exists.”

Do you have a favorite meal or cocktail to prepare when you’re bringing family or friends together?

“My favorite meal is red beans and rice. I love a good pot of Louisiana-style red beans and rice, because honestly that–with some corn bread on top and so hot sauce– that really is the whole meal. You think you would need something else on the side but that’s really it. It’s so fulfilling, it’s so delicious, and I definitely try to bring it out when I get to be with my friends and family.”

The culinary world is a male-dominated industry. How can the culinary industry work to become more diverse, and have more Black, QTPOC chefs?

“I think it’s a starts with actually investing in the lives and careers of these black/brown/trans/ LGBTQ chefs because they exist. I know they exist because they’re my friends. And what happens is that maybe they’re put in positions of leadership or maybe not, but they’re they’re not given the same care, support or investment in their skills and education and their needs. You could put someone in a line chef position or position of leadership or whatever, but if there’s no follow through to make sure that they have what they need to be supported in those positions, they’re usually set up for failure, or set up to be harmed in some way. Or maybe a small business that’s LGBTQ or Black has a good profile, [but they may not be] getting access to grants or money. You have to have the follow through. It’s not that we don’t exist, it’s that we’re not properly supported when we are put at the forefront. That’s when it gets tricky and that’s when we’re left open to harm and failure.”

What are you most excited about regarding this video release with Queer Foods and EFFEN Vodka?

“I’m very excited for mom to see it first of all, I love my mommy and she is my number one fan. And she’s a Gemini, so I’m always looking for her approval. But I’m also excited to get to Kia Feeds The People and Queer Stories in front of the world. I feel like we can’t tell enough queer stories, there’s always someone’s story out there. Even though there’s this myth out there that there’s already enough representation, or that maybe it’s too much to keep talking about queer people, that’s actually far from the truth. I’m proud and honored that EFFEN Vodka wants to support what I’m doing and wants to get my story out there. My story is the story of a lot of other Black and brown and trans people’s stories, and it also feels good to partner with someone who sees me and wants to invest in my story and invest in supporting other diverse artists, both in their representation and practice. It just feels good to be seen, and I’m excited for everyone else to see me and to be seen. Just look! Everyone just look! I want everyone to look and feel pride in who we are.”

How can readers donate to Kia Feeds The People?

“You can head to my GoFundMe if you’re not in the city, or if you’re in Brooklyn you can come to a pop up. Please donate to my GoFundMe, I have it on my Instagram page. Share it with your friends, let them know what’s up. Or if you are in Bed-Stuy, you can find me at a pop-up– I have a few coming up in April, so I’m going to be all over the place. Come get some food or throw some money, either way I’ll be very grateful.”

To learn more about Kia, visit her website.

Kia’s EFFEN Rosé Vodka Grapefruit Cocktail

Ingredients: 

  • 2 parts EFFEN Rosé vodka
  • 1 oz of lime juice
  • ½ oz of cane syrup
  • 2 or 3 parts grapefruit juice

Mix the grapefruit juice, lime juice, simple syrup, EFFEN Rosé vodka and a spoonful of ice in a cocktail shaker. Stir and taste. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with grapefruit, and thyme. Drink responsibly + enjoy!

Kia’s Gumbo Recipe 

Ingredients

  • 8 oz andouille sausage
  • 1lb Boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 2 large yellow onions, diced
  • 4 stalks of celery, diced
  • 2 green bell peppers, diced
  • 2 cups sliced okra, fresh or frozen
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 cup of oil
  • 1 cup AP flour
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 4 tbsp Creole seasoning
  • 1 tbsp of fresh thyme
  • 1 tbsp Smoked paprika
  • ½ tbsp Ground sage
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • Hot sauce to taste
  • Black pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • Fresh parsley

Directions

  • Season the chicken thighs with 2 tablespoons of creole seasoning, salt and pepper. Season well on both sides. Heat a skillet or cast iron to medium heat with enough oil to cover the bottom. When the pan is hot, sear the chicken in batches. Brown the chicken on both sides and set aside. The chicken does not have to be cooked through just yet.
  • In a large pot add the oil and heat to a medium high heat. Add the flour and whisk until it begins to cook. Lower the heat to medium low. Keep whisking the roux over a controlled and steady heat until the flour begins to darken into a deep brown. This takes about 30 minutes, so pace yourself.
  • Turn the heat down on the roux and add in your onion, bell pepper and celery. Stir into the roux, season with a few pinches of salt and sauté until fragrant and translucent. Add in your minced garlic and fresh thyme. Stir for another 2 minutes. Slowly pour in the chicken stock while whisking the roux. Do this part slowly because the roux will begin to thicken. Take your time and continue pouring in the stock until it’s completely incorporated.
  • Bring the pot to a boil, meanwhile slice the sausage in ¼ inch rounds on a slight bias. When the pot begins to boil, reduce to a simmer and add the chicken and sausage. Let the gumbo cook on low for an hour. You want time for the flour taste to cook out.
  • After an hour, add the remaining two tablespoons of creole seasoning, smoked paprika, ground sage and Worcestershire sauce to the pot. Stir and add your sliced okra. Cook for another 10 minutes, add salt and pepper and hot sauce to taste then serve with rice and chopped parsley.
  • Enjoy!

Kia's EFFEN Rosé Vodka Grapefruit Cocktail Photo credit: Solène Michel  Recipe credit: Kia Damon, Kia Feeds The People for use by 360 Magazine

Photo credit: Solène Michel Recipe credit: Kia Damon, Kia Feeds The People

Kia Damon image shot by Elina Street for EFFEN Vodka and Queer Foods for use by 360 Magazine

Photo Credit: Solène Michel 

Beignet illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Air Fryer Hacks × Grilling Tips

Air fryer hacks and grilling tips
for tastier, healthier and greener meals

The Sustainable Chef Gerard Viverito has tips
and recipes to improve your spring and summer cooking

You may have heard that fat equals flavor. It’s why we love a beautifully marbled steak, butter-rich shortbread, or premium ice cream. Fat is also what makes fried foods such as potato chips and chicken nuggets so deliciously crispy and addictive. Today, many people are swapping their deep fryers for air fryers.

This trendy appliance uses swirling super-heated air, instead of hot oil, to cook. But air fried food can also be dry. The Sustainable Chef and culinary instructor Gerard Viverito says the results can be as impressive as oil-fried dishes – and full of crave-worthy crunch – if you follow his tips. Bonus: some of these hacks can also be used on your outdoor grill.

Brush on oil for crave-worthy crunch

“The right air frying techniques will help protect your health and produce more flavorful meals,” says Chef G. For restaurant-quality results, he suggests brushing oil onto your food both before you cook and again half-way through the cooking process. You can also apply it using a spray bottle. “Canned cooking spray will damage the non-stick coating of your air fryer; it may include questionable additives.”  

Use the right fats and cooking oils on your grill

Chef G. suggests you first get to know your cooking fats. “Using the wrong oil is why grilled foods sometimes taste so bad. The oil burns which make the food taste rancid,” he explains. “Some cooking oils are also not as healthful as others.” 

  • Choose vegetable oils carefully. Most canola, corn, soybean oils in the U.S. are made with genetically engineered crops. Many oils, such as corn, sunflower, soybean oil is pro-inflammatory.
  • Be aware of which oil to use for high-heat cooking. “Olive oil is ideal for drizzling over veggies but begins to degrade at 380 degrees. I like to use Malaysian palm oil for high-temperature cooking because its smoke point, the temperature at which it starts to burn and smoke, is in excess of 450 degrees Fahrenheit. It’s also nutrient-dense and sustainably produced.”  
  • Use butter for rich flavor. Chef G. is a fan of grass-fed butter because it has more flavor and a stronger nutritional profile. The downside of butter is that it burns easily at high temperatures. “My trick is to put a little red palm oil in the pan with the butter to protect the flavor. Palm oil and butter go together. Palm oil is a nutritious fat for people and even animals. When cows eat palmitic acid, a component in palm oil, they produce more milk with higher fat content.”  

Use sauces and marinades for big flavor

Chef G.’s chicken wing sauce uses bold ingredients such as gochujang Korean chili paste, ginger, and garlic. It also includes a sweetener that comes with a warning: “Sugar burns very quickly at high heat, so it’s important to add sugar-based sauces to your meat just in the last few minutes.” 

He suggests including an oil in your marinade. “Oils are an essential part of a marinade. I like to use garlic, black pepper, and spices. These seasonings are fat-soluble, so you need an oil to carry their flavor into the meat.”

Visit this website for more palm oil recipes. 

Malaysian Inspired Marinade

Recipes by Chef Gerard Viverito

Marinade for two pounds of meat

  • 3 Tbsp Malaysian Red Palm Oil
  • 2 stalks lemongrass, white parts only
  • 3 slices fresh ginger
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 6 shallots, peeled
  • 2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp coriander powder
  • 1 tsp ground cumin powder
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1/2 Tbsp salt 
  • 2 Tbsp Palm Sugar

Instructions

Blend all the marinade ingredients in a food processor. Add a little water to thin if needed.

Use this marinade for chicken or shrimp. It can be kept for 6 hours in the fridge or is best overnight.

Air-Fryer Beignets

Mardi Gras may have just come and gone, but there is no reason to deny yourself the taste of New Orleans any time you want it! As much as I try to maintain a low-carb life, these little bits of heaven are always a welcome treat and remind me of being in the French Quarter.

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup lukewarm water (90 degrees)
  • 2 teaspoons of sugar (for yeast proofing)
  • 1 teaspoon of active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • ¼ cup of sugar
  • 2 tablespoons of salted butter, brought to room temperature
  • 3 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • ½ cup evaporated milk
  • 1/2 cup of melted butter and Malaysian Palm Oil, equal parts
  • 1 ½ cups of confectioners’ sugar

Combine the lukewarm water, 2 teaspoons of sugar and the yeast in a bowl and let proof for 5 minutes. This mixture should froth a little. If it doesn’t, your yeast is not active, and you should try again with a new yeast. Also mind the temperature. If it is too hot, you will kill the yeast.

Mix the flour, a pinch of salt, the room temperature butter and the sugar in a large bowl. 

Add the egg, evaporated milk and yeast mixture to the bowl and mix with a wooden spoon until it just comes together in a sticky ball. If your dough isn’t forming, add a little more flour, but in really small quantities to avoid having tough beignets. Move the dough to an oiled bowl in a warm place and cover with a clean kitchen towel. Let rise until doubled, about 2 hours.

The longer you let it rise, the better for flavor development. By allowing the dough to rest in the refrigerator overnight, which is completely optional, you will develop a deeper flavor, but it is imperative that you bring it to room temperature before proceeding to the next steps.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to ½-inch thickness. Cut the dough into 24 2”x3” rectangular pieces. 

Preheat your air fryer to 350ºF.

Brush or mist the beignets on both sides with some of the melted butter and palm oil mixture and air-fry in batches at 350ºF for 6 minutes, turning them over halfway through if desired. 

Be mindful to leave some space between the beignets for better and more even browning. 

Once the beignets are finished, transfer them to a plate or parchment lined baking sheet and dust with the confectioners’ sugar.

Enjoy with some nice chicory coffee!

Korean Inspired Air-Fried Gluten Free Chicken Wings

Servings: 4 people

Here’s a fun fact about chefs: As much as we love outdoing each other in the kitchen, we always gravitate back to the simple dishes to soothe our souls after a grueling shift. Just Google favorite chef recipes and you will usually find sandwiches or a 3-step meal. Not to say I don’t love oysters, truffles, and foie gras, but sometimes you just want some down-home fried chicken comfort. With the rise in popularity of Korean-style fried chicken, I took it to a new level with the air fryer.

Traditionally, Korean Fried Chicken is double fried in oil for a spectacular crunch and then covered in a delicious spicy, sweet-and-sour type sauce. 

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. chicken wings
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • Malaysian Palm Oil and butter to cover wings (approximately 1 Tablespoon each)

Chicken Sauce

  • 2 Tbsp gochujang Korean chili paste
  • 3 tbsp agave syrup or honey depending on the level of sweetness desired
  • 2 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp tamari gluten-free soy sauce
  • 1 tsp ginger, minced
  • 1 tsp garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp shallot, minced
  • ½ tsp salt
  • Chopped green onions for garnish

Instructions

Place the chicken wings in a large non-reactive bowl and season with garlic powder, onion powder and ½ tsp salt.

Cover the chicken with cornstarch, let sit for 5 minutes. With a set of tongs to keep your hands clean, stir, to evenly coat the chicken piece. Lightly shake each piece of chicken to remove the excess corn starch and place it in the air fryer basket.

While the wings are sitting, heat a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add oil and butter, heat gently to melt. 

Place the wings in the air fryer basket and lightly spray or brush the tops with the oil and butter mixture.

Close the basket and cook chicken wings at 390 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes, turning and rotating chicken about every 10 minutes.

While the chicken is cooking, make the sauce.

Korean Air-Fried Chicken Sauce

Combine all sauce ingredients in a small, non-reactive saucepan over medium heat and whisk until combined. Bring the sauce to a boil and reduce the heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and reserve.

Once the chicken is done cooking, place the sauce and the wings into a bowl and toss to evenly coat.

*Oil may be used to spray and coat the chicken pieces if cornstarch still appears on the chicken after frying. It can be done without oil as the chicken will produce its own oil during cooking.

Jacob de Neergaar by Hotel d'Angleterre Copenhagen for use by 360 Magazine

Hotel D’Angleterre Appoints Jakob de Neergaard as Head Chef

Chef Jakob de Neergaard to Take the Helm on April 1st

Chef Jakob de Neergaard, one of Denmark’s greatest masters of French cuisine, will lift Marchal at d’Angleterre in Copenhagen to new heights with his enormous knowledge and experience in classic gastronomy, both French and Nordic.

The level of gastronomy in Scandinavia is at an all-time high, especially when it comes to the “new” Nordic cuisine, which for many years has repeatedly put the restaurants of Denmark high on the list of “world’s best.”

The Hotel d’Angleterre has always aimed for the head chef of its gourmet restaurant, Marchal, to have deep roots in French cuisine and, at the same time, have both a love and an understanding of Nordic gastronomy. This is the primary reason the hotel chose the highly experienced and respected Jakob de Neergaard as its new head chef.

Jakob de Neergaard has worked for many years throughout Europe with French cuisine at the highest Michelin level, including at the iconic Ritz Hotel in Paris; at Paris’ three-star Alain Ducasse; and the three-star Restaurant Bruneau in Brussels – alongside one of the world’s most innovative chefs: Jean-Pierre Bruneau.

“Jakob de Neergaard has a special veneration and a huge talent for classic French cuisine,” says Lucas Johansson, General Manager of Hotel d’Angleterre. “And while Marchal will stick to its Nordic roots, we also want to integrate and emphasize the influence of French cuisine; and we are confident that Jakob will lift Marchal to an even higher level.”

Chef de Neergaard has represented Denmark as a judge at the World Championships for Chefs, won the award as “Restaurant of the Year,” and in his nine years as head chef at Denmark’s countryside Søllerød Kro, earned the restaurant its first Michelin star. He is married with two children.

“In my gastronomic life journey, I have never been prouder and more honored than to have been given the opportunity to lead Marchal forward as Head Chef,” says de Neergaard. “Marchal is one of my absolute favorite restaurants and it’s my ambition and determination to cultivate and combine the best of Nordic and French cuisine into unique and beautiful gastronomic harmony.”

When Marchal reopens in the spring, the menu will be redrawn to reflect de Neergaard’s gastronomic vision.

For more information about Marchal and the Hotel d’Angleterre, visit this website.

ABOUT HOTEL D’ANGLETERRE
Located on Copenhagen’s Kongens Nytorv (The King’s Square), Hotel d’Angleterre has long been the city’s address of choice for royalty, statesmen and the illustrious. The d’Angleterre has had an extremely colorful history, from its origins as a restaurant opened in 1755 by Jean Marchal, to its transformation into the d’Angleterre in 1795, the opening of the current building in 1875 and its rebuilding just before World War I. After a short change in ownership, The Remmen Foundation once again re-acquired and closed the storied hotel in 2011. The hotel reopened May 2013, revealing the results of massive remodeling and re-imagining: a lighter and more elegant color palette; 90 spacious rooms & suites (created from the existing 123 rooms); restaurant Marchal helmed by Michelin-rated Jacob de Neergaar; Amazing Space Scandinavian spa; and Balthazar, Denmark’s first Champagne bar.

Groceries by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

TASTING HISTORY COOKBOOK

SIMON & SCHUSTER’S TILLER PRESS TO PUBLISH ‘TASTING HISTORY’ CREATOR AND HOST MAX MILLER’S DEBUT COOKBOOK BASED ON MILLER’S HISTORICAL RECIPE YOUTUBE SHOW

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The Food and History Show Celebrates Its One-Year Anniversary with a Special Episode on the Medieval Dish Cockentrice. Watch Here.

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Simon & Schuster’s Tiller Press announced that it will publish a historical cookbook by Max Miller based on his popular YouTube show, ‘Tasting History. The untitled cookbook, slated for publication in 2022, will feature some of the show’s most popular and unusual ancient recipes.

On ‘Tasting History,’ Miller recreates historical recipes from the Medieval and Renaissance Eras, Ancient Greek and Roman times and beyond, and spotlights traditional foods from around the world. The show’s popularity has exploded since the channel’s inception in February 2020. Amid nationwide stay-at-home-orders, ‘Tasting History’ has amassed over 570K+ subscribers and 23M+ total channel views, with viewers tuning in faithfully each Tuesday for their latest culinary history lesson, and perhaps to catch a glimpse of Max’s beloved feline companions, Jaime and Cersei.

“Here at Tiller Press, we love to discover emerging voices. Max’s voice has exploded with his ‘Tasting History’ show and we are thrilled to translate that voice to the written page, complete with his recreated recipes and the history behind each one,” said Anja Schmidt, Executive Editor, who acquired the title.

As today marks the channel’s one-year anniversary, Max will celebrate in true ‘Tasting History’ fashion with a special episode that will focus on the history behind the legendary medieval dish called Cockentrice, which consists of a suckling pig’s upper body sewn onto the bottom half of a capon. The full episode can be viewed here. 

For more information visit his Youtube and follow Max on Instagram.

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ABOUT SIMON & SCHUSTER

Simon & Schuster, a ViacomCBS Company, is a global leader in general interest publishing, dedicated to providing the best in fiction and nonfiction for readers of all ages, and in all printed, digital and audio formats. Its distinguished roster of authors includes many of the world’s most popular and widely recognized writers, and winners of the most prestigious literary honors and awards. It is home to numerous well-known imprints and divisions such as Simon & Schuster, Scribner, Atria Books, Gallery Books, Tiller Press, Adams Media, Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing and Simon & Schuster Audio and international companies in Australia, Canada, India and the United Kingdom, and proudly brings the works of its authors to readers in more than 200 countries and territories. For more information visit our website.

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ABOUT ‘TASTING HISTORY’ 

‘Tasting History’ is a food and history show hosted by Max Miller on YouTube that explores the recreation of culinary delights from the Medieval and Renaissance Eras, to Ancient Greek and Roman times, and spotlights traditional foods from around the world. Since the channel’s inception in February 2020, ‘Tasting History’ has garnered over 570K+ channel subscribers, and over 23M+ total views. For more information, visit his Youtube, and follow Max on Instagram and on Twitter. Miller is represented by Jeremy Katz at The Katz Company and Innovative Artists.