Posts tagged with "architecture"

Immersive Van Gogh Chicago 9 - Photo Credit Michael Brosilow.

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago Extends Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit 

DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND, LIGHTHOUSE ARTSPACE CHICAGO ANNOUNCES EXTENSION FOR IMMERSIVE VAN GOGH EXHIBIT THROUGH NOV. 28

Initial Block of Tickets Sold Out; New Block of Tickets on Sale Wednesday, April 7 at 10 a.m.

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a new venue within Chicago’s recently renovated landmark Germania Club Building, today announced that due to popular demand the U.S. premiere of the blockbuster art experience Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit will extend its dates to November 28, 2021 after having sold out the current block of tickets. Tickets go on sale Wednesday, April 7 online and by phone at 844-307-4644.

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a three-story facility located at 108 W. Germania Place, is dedicated to immersive art presentations, merging the boundaries between entertainment and culture to give visitors the sense that they are encountering art as never before. Utilizing the building’s Victorian Era architectural details, 35-foot-tall walls and multiple levels (including balconies), the venue will present vibrant immersive art exhibitions that surround the viewer on all sides.

The venue’s first presentation,Immersive Van Gogh, is a visually spectacular digital art exhibition that has received widespread critical acclaim. Immersive Van Gogh invites audiences to “step inside” the iconic works of post-Impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh, evoking his highly emotional and chaotic inner consciousness through art, light, music, movement and imagination. The Italian creative team who pioneered digital experiences in Paris has created a custom design to fit the gracious Neo-Classical architecture of the exhibition’s Chicago home.

The hour-long, walk-through experience has been designed with health and safety as a priority. Capacity will be limited in accordance with the City of Chicago’s safety protocols. Additional safety precautions include touchless ticket-taking, temperature checks upon arrival, hand sanitizer stations, social distancing markers throughout the venue, and digitally projected social distancing circles on the gallery floors to ensure appropriate spacing. All guests must wear a face covering at all times during their visit to Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago.

Immersive Van Gogh was designed by creative director and Italian film producer Massimiliano Siccardi, with original, mood-setting music by Italian multimedia composer Luca Longobardi,who provided a score that combines experimental electronic music with pure, ethereal and simple-seeming piano.Vittorio Guidottiis the Art Director. Siccardi and Longobardi are both pioneers of immersive digital art experiences in Paris, where they were part of the team that created the world-renowned Van Gogh, Starry Night exhibition, among others. With more than 70 projectors illuminating over 15,000 square-feet, visitors to Immersive Van Gogh are encircled from head-to-toe in Van Gogh’s brushstrokes and colors, including animated details from works such as Self Portrait with Felt Hat (1888), The Bedroom in Arles (1889), Irises (1889) and The Starry Night (1889).

Immersive Van Gogh is a new way of encountering art, as it quite literally surrounds viewers on all sides with the brilliant work of one of the greatest painters of all time,” said Immersive Art Space Co-Producer Corey Ross. “Both connoisseurs and new admirers of Van Gogh’s work are guaranteed a breathtaking perspective on the influential artist’s oeuvre. Merging state-of-the-art technology, theatrical storytelling, animation and some of the finest works of art ever created, Immersive Van Gogh is a uniquely mesmerizing experience that seemingly transports the viewer into the artist’s mind to see these timeless works as never before.”

“Despite being unknown throughout his life, Van Gogh’s artwork has created a lasting impact through its emotional richness and simple beauty,” said Massimiliano Siccardi, Immersive Van Gogh designer. “Both myself and Luca Longobardi are very excited to once again bring Van Gogh’s legacy to life in a way that is unique to the beautiful architecture of the Germania Club Building.”

The premiere of Immersive Van Gogh in Chicago was described as “a feast for your eyes” by WTTW Chicago and “impressive…(with) clever touches (and) emotional resonance” by the Chicago Tribune.  The Daily Herald said the exhibit “reimagines masterpieces for a digital age” and TimeOut Chicago called it “a visual spectacle… the future of experiential art.”

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago is operated by Immersive Art Space LP, a partnership between co-producers Corey Ross, Svetlana Dvoretsky, Maria Shclover and Irina Shabshis. The venue also features a merchandise/gift shop. Future plans include additional immersive art shows as well as live performances.

Ticket prices start at $39.99 for adults ($24.99 for children 16 or younger) with untimed and flexible ticket options available. The venue is easily accessible by public transportation and has ample parking in the nearby James House parking garage. For more information about Immersive Van Gogh, visit this website or call 844-307-4644.  Follow the exhibition on social media on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

About Vincent van Gogh

Legendary Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh (1853 – 1890) is recognized as one of the world’s greatest and best loved artists. He was born in the Netherlands to his father, Theodorus van Gogh, and his mother, Anna Cornelia Carbentus, a moody artist whose love of nature, drawing and watercolors was passed on to her son. He worked at his uncle Cornelis’ art dealership when he had already been fluent in French, German and English, as well as his native Dutch. He fell in love with English culture when he was transferred to the Groupil Gallery in London in 1873.

During his short life he painted more than 2,000 artworks ranging from ordinary household items and self-portraits to surreal landscapes that inspire awe. Van Gogh was a post-Impressionist painter whose work — notable for its beauty, emotion and color — highly influenced expressionism in 20th-century art. He struggled with mental illness and remained poor and virtually unknown throughout his life.

He was tragically admitted to a psychiatric hospital after offering his severed ear to a woman at a local brothel. For hope, he turned to painting and nature, until one day when he went out to paint in the morning with a loaded pistol in his hand and reportedly shot himself in the chest. In his 37 years alive, Van Gogh only sold one painting, The Red Vineyards, to his brother Theo.

Look Book Image Shot by Courtesy of Lennert Madou for Christian Wijnants for use by 360 Magazine

Christian Wijnants Fall/Winter 2021 Collection

If given the opportunity to explore an empty museum, how would you fill the space? This is the question that inspired Christian Wijnants’ Fall/Winter 2021 collection as he was given unique access to the Antwerp Royal Museum of Fine Arts, a place that has been so dear to him. Over the past 10 years, the museum has been closed for renovations, only previewing its restored 19th century structure and newly constructed minimalist addition to Christian, inviting him to fill the grandiose rooms and hallways with his creations. A poetic moment for the designer who first visited the museum as a student on the brink of his career, beginning his to-become namesake’s brand connection to art. However, this time, as the museum sits empty, Christian relied on his memories and vision to fill the space and walls that once held the same Flemish Primitives and Baroque paintings that have inspired him today.

The silhouettes are exaggerated, full of volume, designed to physically fill the oversized rooms and elongated, just like the art that used to hang on the walls and doors that welcome you in. There is a down cape and complimenting puffed bags that wrap around you like a blanket providing the feeling of safety and warmth, cocoon coats designed to appear as though they are cut out of woolen blankets, and peasant shapes that draw from medieval underpinnings. Heavy wool fabric is draped into skirts and swept by fringe, like a curtain grazing the old wooden floors. The knitwear brings in a Bicolor Plissé dress and the ottoman stitch, utilized as stripes. A long-sleeve floor length dress is styled with a down scarf worn as a hat, materializing the old paintings that stood out in Christian’s memory

Floral patterns feel like an ancient tapestry, overdyed and overlarge. Stripes are inspired by the chevron wood floors throughout the museum, construed in various ways, from quite fine lines cutting diagonally on down jackets and lengthening dresses to magnified stripes seen as a two-tone knit. The colors are strategically chosen to reflect the feeling of exploring the various rooms, misty yet bright and historic, but refreshed. It consists of cooler hues such as antique pink, mint, fresh lime, and pistachio, paired with warmer tones such as emerald, bronze and rust.

The hair is imperfect and reminiscent of historic times, a young girl’s modernized adaptation of the medieval knots and curls she has only seen in paintings and make-up is tonal and blurred, imagined to be misconstrued as just the reflection of the green walls. The Fall/Winter 2021 collection comes to life in the collection film, allowing you to explore Christian’s vision, hear the echo of footsteps wandering the space and escape to a feeling of serenity that being in an empty museum provides.

Credits

Makeup: Inge Grognard

Hair: Ed Moeland

Photography: Lennert Madou

Backstage Photography: Klaartje Lambrechts

Video: Erik Peiren

Music: Senjan Jansen

Models: Britt Ensink

Ilona Desmet

Laura Meier Hagestad

Marie-Ange Gueye

Sponsor: L’Oréal Paris

About Christian Wijnants

Christian Wijnants is a Belgian fashion designer praised for its vibrant colors, artisanal knitwear and rich graphics.

Christian Wijnants graduated in 2000 from the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts. His graduation collection won the Dries Van Noten Award and was awarded the Grand Prix at the prestigious Festival Hyères.

After working for Dries Van Noten and Angelo Tarlazzi, Christian launched his own eponymous label in 2003. His feminine, poetic collections are available in luxury department stores and boutiques around the world. Over the years, Christian Wijnants has been recognized with many prestigious awards, such as the Swiss Textiles Award (2005), the ANDAM Fashion Award (2006) and the International Woolmark Prize (2013).

In 2015, Christian opened his first flagship store in Antwerp: a unique place that celebrates the designer’s love of nature, art, and architecture. Four years later in 2019, he successfully debuted his first menswear collection.

Look Book Image Shot by Courtesy of Lennert Madou for Christian Wijnants for use by 360 Magazine

Look Book Image Shot by Courtesy of Lennert Madou for Christian Wijnants for use by 360 Magazine

CARTA Medallion image by Sarah Hernandez for 360 Magazine

TONKINSON FOUNDATION TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCE THROUGH NEW CARTA MEDALLION

By: Sarah Hernandez

Imagine learning musical techniques first-hand from a Grammy Award winner, or getting acting tips from a renowned Hollywood actor as part of the curriculum. Wouldn’t it be great, if while earning a degree, students had the opportunity to learn directly from the leading actors, musicians, designers or architects in the field? That’s exactly the kind of experience the College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts and the Tonkinson Foundation will provide students with its newly endowed CARTA Medallion program.

The medallion bridges the gap between prominent figures in the creative fields and CARTA students.  It seeks to enhance their experience by creating unique joint programming with recipients including, but not limited to, lectures, workshops, performances, exhibitions and masterclasses. The medallion was created to honor an exemplar multi-disciplinary expert, artist, communicator or designer whose work has made a significant contribution to society – while also giving them a platform to bestow their wisdom on future creators.

According to philanthropist and chairman of CARTA Dean’s Leadership Advisory Board, Rick Tonkinson, whose foundation is funding the endowment, the project is truly “visionary” as CARTA will further be recognized for its wide spectrum of nationally ranked areas of interest all housed together under one roof. “This recognition will not only enhance the college’s curriculum, but is a celebration of the awardee and CARTA itself.”

The pillars of what encompasses a medallion recipient include positive influence through impact to the local, national and international community; contribution to social awareness, mental health and/or mutual understanding of public issues; or bringing about positive change to communities, government entities and other societal structures.

“Mr. And Mrs. Tonkinson’s support of FIU CARTA over the years has made tremendous impacts in our students’ lives,” stated CARTA Dean Brian Schriner. “Their latest gift expands upon those efforts and further advances the primary goal of our 2025 strategic plan: students’ success.”

Each year, Schriner, along with CARTA donors and a committee of experts, will convene to nominate candidates. Once a candidate is confirmed and has accepted, programming will be designed around the awardee’s area(s) of expertise. Because each awardee will have a varied set of strengths and preferences, the programs will be built around their respective disciplines and communally agreed-upon preferences.  The endowment is similar to that of an artist in residence, encompassing visits with students, exhibitions/performances, masterclasses, etc. Endowments are permanent, which means that they last in perpetuity.

Programming will be closely coordinated with the recipient based on their specific expertise.  “We want to play to the strengths of the recipient to maximize the impact of the medallion,” explained CARTA senior director of development, Oliver Ionita.

This prestigious award will not only be a “celebration” of well-known creators for their accomplishments, but will foster accessibility to unique experiential learning opportunities for CARTA’s students.

The CARTA Dean’s office is currently accepting and reviewing nominations and expects to announce its first CARTA Medallion award recipient in early 2021.

 

 

Bronx Point Renderings by John DeSio (Risa Heller Comms) for use by 360 Magazine

TIME 2 BUILD CAMPAIGN

Campaign To Build the Universal Hip Hop Museum Begins

February 24, 2021 marks the official virtual announcement of the $100 Million global capital campaign, “Time 2 Build” for the permanent home of the Universal Hip Hop Museum in the South Bronx, the cradle of Hip Hop culture. As we enter Phase 2, after raising $23M during Phase 1 for initial construction, The UHHM is launching its capital campaign to support the museum’s “Fit Out” of its interiors. The future home of the Universal Hip Hop Museum is poised to become the premier cultural institution founded to preserve, protect, and present the historic cultural influence of Hip Hop worldwide. This soft launch is designed to engage, excite, and drive donations from Hip Hop lovers locally and globally. With a targeted opening date of 2023 that coincides with the 50th anniversary of Hip Hop, the UHHM will rise with the support and generosity of generations of “Hip Hop Heads” and their passion for the culture.

At 2:00 pm EST veteran radio host on the SoundChat Radio network, Barbara “Roxie” Delaleu, will be joined by Rocky Bucano, Founder and Executive Director of the Universal Hip Hop Museum, with remarks offered by Civil Rights icon, Dr. Benjamin Chavis of Black Press USA. Joining them will be DJ Spark of iHeart Radio, and MC Lyte’s Hip Hop Sister’s Network, and Monalisa, host of Dublab’s Paths of Rhythm. Former New York State Assembly Member and Chair of the Capital Campaign and UHHM Chief Strategist, Michael Blake, and more will join this event to share why donating to build the Universal Hip Hop Museum in the birthplace of Hip Hop, as the “Official Record of Hip Hop,” is so vital culturally. Register in advance for the Universal Hip Hop Museum’s Time 2 Build Capital Campaign fund by visiting this website.

Viewers will be led on a dynamic 3D virtual tour of the Universal Hip Hop Museum, by the UHHM’s Director of Design, architect Michael Ford, founder of the Hip Hop Architecture Camp. He’ll preview the museum’s design within Bronx Point–the award-winning mixed-use, waterfront. 1 million square foot, affordable housing development project in partnership with the New York Economic Development Corp. (EDC), Empire State Development (ESD), and L & M Development Partners. The Universal Hip Hop Museum is the New York City Council’s designated cultural anchor at Bronx Point. And the “Award for Excellence in Design,” has been awarded by the New York City Design Commission to L&M Development Partners for Bronx Point, the future home of Hip Hop culture.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz said “Bronx Point is a tremendous step forward for our borough. Inclusion of the Universal Hip Hop Museum as part of this project will help showcase our role in the creation of that worldwide cultural movement for generations to come.”

Rocky Bucano, Executive Director states, “It is a pivotal time now more than ever that we bring this museum to life. It is a cultural timestamp that will bridge the Hip Hop and Bronx community with a permanent place to call home, but we can not do it without your support. This capital campaign is a call to action to ensure we preserve the culture.”

Michael Blake said as the Chair of the UHHM Capital Campaign, Chief Strategist and former Assembly Member (79th District, The Bronx), “The time for Hip Hop to have its home has come. Now, it’s Time 2 Build. Our $100 Capital Campaign, which is in five phases to signify the five elements of Hip Hop, will ensure that the Official Record of Hip Hop is cemented where it should be, in the South Bronx, the South-South Bronx!”

About The Universal Hip Hop Museum
Anchored in the birthplace of Hip Hop culture, the Universal Hip Hop Museum will break ground in the Bronx in 2020. Built as a space for audiences, artists, and technology to converge and create unparalleled educational and entertainment experiences, the museum is slated to open in Bronx Point in 2023.  The UHHM will celebrate and preserve the history of local and global Hip Hop music and culture past, present, and future.

Bronx Point Renderings by John DeSio (Risa Heller Comms) for use by 360 Magazine

Bronx Point Renderings by John DeSio (Risa Heller Comms) for use by 360 Magazine

The new Kunsthaus Zurich (Credit: KEYSTONE / CHRISTIAN BEUTLER) for 360 Magazine

KUNSTHAUS ZURICH MUSEUM EXTENSION

The $230-million, environmentally pioneering project will make it the largest art museum in Switzerland

The Kunsthaus Zurich, one of Switzerland’s most acclaimed museums with art collections ranging from the 13th century to the contemporary, will unveil a massive extension designed by David Chipperfield Architects, which will double the museum’s size, in October 2021.

Intended to breathe new life into the urban landscape and establish the museum as a cultural hub, the extension boasts multi-purpose workshops, a large event hall and art garden, plus a shop and bar. Many of the facilities will be open to the public outside museum hours, providing a space for artistic engagement and interaction for Zurich locals and visitors alike.

The extension is connected to the existing building by a 70-yard underground passage, which opens to a central lobby, made with recycled exposed concrete, light oak wood, white marble, and elegantly contoured limestone columns. Perhaps more notable than the sleek design, however, is the pioneering energy efficiency. Due to the building’s compact form, geothermal synthetic pipes, light-censored installations, and LED lighting, the total energy required for construction and operation marks a 75% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

The new extension makes the Kunsthaus the largest art museum in Switzerland, with a total of more than 120,000 square feet. An integral part of the extension is “Tactile Lights,” a large-scale project by Pipilotti Rist that can be experienced around the museum’s surrounding Heimplatz Square. The exhibition includes an artistically designed mast that projects round, colored patches of light onto the surrounding facades in the evening, while videos are projected onto statues nearby.

Throughout April and May 2021, the Kunsthaus will host a sound installation by Choreographer William Forsythe. The grand opening will take place on October 9 and 10, 2021, with the Kunsthaus Collection being presented for the first time along with the prestigious private Bührle, Merzbacher and Looser collections.

Downtown Gateway Arches on Las Vegas Boulevard Photo Courtesy of City Of Las Vegas

Vegas’ New Gateway Arches Illuminated Tonight

Tonight, the City of Las Vegas will illuminate its new, 80-foot-tall Gateway Arches spanning Las Vegas Boulevard between St. Louis and Bob Stupak avenues at the base of The STRAT Hotel, Casino & SkyPod. Conceived and designed by Selbert Perkins Design and fabricated and installed by YESCO, the 100-year-old company synonymous with Las Vegas’ most iconic signs, the archway marks travelers’ official arrival into the City of Las Vegas.

“Las Vegas is known worldwide as the getaway for the best in entertainment, fun, dining and convention business,” Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman said. “What better way to invite everyone into historic downtown than by this passing through this massive, new archway into the heart of a revitalized Las Vegas.”

“Ward 3 is a dynamic part of the city of Las Vegas and I am so excited to represent the home of this beautiful new gateway,” Ward 3 Councilwoman Olivia Diaz said. “I am sure these iconic arches will become synonymous with the fun and excitement of our city, as well as being a point of community pride for years to come.”

The blue illuminated arches form a towering gateway to the city’s burgeoning Downtown and feature a pink, retro-inspired Las Vegas emblem suspended above the boulevard. While the Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign at the south end of the Strip enjoys world renown, many people do not realize it lies outside the City of Las Vegas’ boundaries in unincorporated Clark County, Nevada. The new, brightly lit, Gateway Arches will welcome visitors to the city of Las Vegas as they travel north on Las Vegas Boulevard. 

“YESCO has a long history of fabricating, installing and maintaining Las Vegas’ most internationally recognizable signs, and the Gateway Arches represent the newest monumental addition to that portfolio,” said Jeff Young, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of YESCO. “This project is history in the making, and we’re proud to have partnered with the City of Las Vegas and Selbert Perkins Design to bring it to life.”

Added Stephen Thayer, vice president and general manager at The STRAT, “The Gateway Arches are a striking landmark to designate what has long been the gateway from the Las Vegas Strip to the City of Las Vegas. We are thrilled that this beautiful monument has been erected just steps away from our iconic tower.”

“Selbert Perkins Design has been designing city gateways, public art and landmarks for over 30 years. We are honored to have worked with the City of Las Vegas to design its newest gateway which welcomes all to historic downtown,” said Robin Perkins, partner of Selbert Perkins Design. “Our thanks to YESCO for fabricating and installing this complex work. It’s been a fantastic collaboration all around!”

FUN FACTS:

  • One leg of the Gateway Arches weighs 18,400 pounds
  • Number of lights on the arches: 13,016 
  • City Of Las Vegas emblem measures 20-feet x 40-feet and weighs 7,300 pounds
  • The entire arch draws over 61,000 watts of power
  • The arches are comprised of over 13,000 + RGB light-emitting diode (LED) pucks that are individually programmable
  • Over 700 feet of fully programmable RGBW LED Flex Neon, each pixel is 4.92 inches 
  • Fully programmable, the color-changing sign contains more than 170 IP addresses
  • Each arch leg spans 140 feet across Las Vegas Boulevard
  • 900-plus LED lamps in the southern face of the hanging “Las Vegas” cabinet
  • Four footings were drilled with a drill rig and are 20-feet in depth x 4-feet wide with a steel reinforced cage

Other high-profile Las Vegas projects YESCO has fabricated and installed during its centennial year include the sign package for Allegiant Stadium, as well as interior and exterior signage for Downtown’s new Circa Resort & Casino. 

The Gateway Arches will be illuminated every day beginning at dusk.

Design illustration for 360 magazine.

How to Design a Modern House

Being able to design a house with a modern look which will be set apart from the old and unappealing houses is a dream of many. The good news is that it can be done! Many people choose to design their own homes and find this is the only way they will be completely pleased with a house. It allows you to choose which features are a must and the odd things that you could just do without.

This article will tell you everything you need to know about starting the design process, what it involves and how you can have a great involvement in the creation of your house. You could design a house from start to finish or you could plan the renovation designs of a pre-built building.

First, Consider Getting Experience 

Architects are most often the ones behind the design process of a house build. They must have completed a wealth of years’ training and education to be allowed to work as an architect. If you wanted to design your home and work with an architect to do so, that would be your safest option. However, if you wanted to gain some of your own experience and be able to do more of the design process yourself you could consider taking a course in something like Structural Engineering, House Designing or something similar. These would allow you to tailor your designing to meet your modern house visions. It may not be something that an architect could do to meet your wants and needs. In a structural engineering course, you would learn things like engineering drawings, structural fundamentals, design and computing and more. These are all things that you would have to know to make any designing plans for your modern house.

Make the Plan

Before you begin throwing your ideas at construction workers, you will need to make a plan for your modern house. For example, the number of bathrooms and bedrooms, drawings of the structure of the buildings, the sorts of shapes you want to be consistent across the build and the way you would like to optimise light and incorporate insultation.

You will also have to work with the site, planning out which way your bedroom windows would face for the best view and how you would optimise the space.

You will then have to either work with your architect or on your own, draw 2D and 3D drawings of the site, and plan dimensions and measurements. This is when having experience really comes in useful and you will be able to incorporate more into the project before asking for additional help (which would also cost lots!)

One crucial aspect of the planning process is also considering materials and budgeting. The materials you choose could be highly expensive and you want to make sure your modern house design plans will fit with your chosen budget. 

In addition, you may want to plan the design in ways that you will like for the foreseeable future. For example, if you design a windy staircase which looks pretty but is hard to navigate, will you be comfortable with that staircase for years to come? Or will the way you have placed the windows allow you to have privacy when you need it? The great thing about modern designs is that they are quite simplistic, there would not be any crazy designs that you would be unsure on when your design tastes change. In addition, the style suits everyone in the household, male or female.

Planning a Modern Renovation 

You may want to have a modern house, but not build an entirely new one. You could decide to renovate your existing house with modern touches. In order to do this you might want to take an online course. There are many courses in design and especially for emerging trends in interior design. Of course, you may not want to take a course and you could find other ways of learning about designs such as using platforms such as Pinterest and Instagram. These are both filled with accounts on various interior design ideas. Further, you could watch programs like Grand Designs which are often modern builds. 

A modern house usually has a block-type style to it. They are usually very minimal and look clean and open. It is a great design style to aim for if you have a relatively small space and want it to appear larger and more open. 

After you have gathered your ideas and made 3D and 2D drawings for renovations then you will be able to hand them over to the construction workers and start the process. Plans for building need to adhere to a number of standards and therefore it is very important that the designs are suitable.

The great thing about renovations is that you can do a lot with an existing house framework. You may be able to cut costs by doing this rather than building a new one.

Final Thoughts

Planning to build a modern house is not easy. You will need a wealth of experience and drawing skills. The majority of people will work with architects and tell them what they would like before receiving housing plans to approve or edit. However, there is something about doing that whole process yourself which would be very rewarding. 

Designing can be hard as many people are not sure that they want but they know that they would like a combination of things. This is where having a designer for you can be very beneficial. You would be able to choose the right designer for you who specialises in modern houses. 

Some people even go on to take part in the building process themselves because they believe that they know exactly how the building should look or they simply enjoy the building process. A total DIY house project would be a lot of time though and may not be suitable for those who work full time or have other commitments. 

Hotel illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Healing Through Hospitality

By Shannon Suess

There has been a lot of speculation in every industry about how today’s reality will affect tomorrow’s possibilities. In June, The New Yorker released an in-depth exploration of what the future of architecture could look like, with the roots of modernist design having grown from the sterile lines and quiet colors of Tuberculosis-era sanatoriums in days past. It paints a future full of pandemic-inspired changes, but the truth is, the evolution is already deep underway, even if we don’t realize or acknowledge it.

When it comes to the idea of traveling—of spending an extended period of time, for business or pleasure, in a hosted space outside our own homes—our psyches have subconsciously rewritten what is most important in order for us to not only feel comfortable with but actually enjoy our experience. 

For the hospitality industry, the emotional, physical, and psychological toll of a global pandemic will likely underpin travel trends that were already on the rise: biophilic designs rooted in nature, experiences rich in culture, and environments that promote both physical and mental health and wellness. But for brands looking at what’s next, there are numerous pieces of the puzzle that must come together to make guests truly feel comfortable with traveling once more.

FLEXIBILITY IS KEY TO RESILIENCE

Adopting the mentality of “one day at a time”, the ability to change and adapt spaces to fit present-day climates will be critical. With venturing outside of our own regions likely to remain difficult for the foreseeable future, travelers will instead seek out unique local destinations. They’ll gravitate toward dramatic hospitality spaces that can flex or change quickly in scale; the ability to easily flow from a multi-purpose, spacious area to a personal, private sanctuary will be paramount. 

Flexibility of this caliber will give way to opportunities for new, hybrid spaces, allowing hotels and resorts to consolidate, reimagine, and deeply personalize their offerings. Simultaneously, guests will have the opportunity to discover new experiences at various intervals during the day: Bars offering breakfast service for takeaway in the mornings gives way to an open-concept lounge or coworking space in the afternoon. By rotating “dual purpose” spaces, hosts naturally reduce footprints and create a natural time to clean and sanitize spaces.

LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY TO ELEVATE SAFETY

Technology integration into hospitality experiences is a fickle thing: With how swiftly electronics evolve, expensive hardware upgrades can often be out of date within months of being implemented. Entering a room filled with aging technology can be a visually stark reminder of just how many people have touched those devices. Instead of letting technology hinder our relaxing experience, how can we use it to subtly support guests in feeling comfortable and safe?

The all-inclusive ticket to enabling this experience could be the one device many can’t live without. Subsequently, it’s one that we’re familiar with, comfortable with, and most importantly, feel safe using: our smartphones. The integration of subtle push notifications—for example, confirmation of your room’s scheduled daily cleaning, when housekeeping is actively there, and when they’ve vacated the space—have the opportunity to set and continuously keep a guest’s mind at ease.

Concurrently, granting visitors a familiar “no-contact” medium through which requests can be made—empowering a more comfortable experience—opens up a world of possibilities. Guests could use their phones to order room service, request additional towels, reserve a socially distant seat by the pool, at the bar, or in a coworking pod. The list goes on and on.  And, the more guests utilize these digital services, the more in-depth their digital profile becomes, making loyalty programs more enticing through a safe yet personalized touch.

There is a double-edged sword here, though: designers cannot rely too heavily on technology as a substitute for, or complete replacement of, social interaction. Humans crave physical connection with one another, and hospitality experiences will still need to provide the option for us to embark on that journey if we so choose.

IMPERFECTION IS PERFECTION

It’s no surprise that, as we’ve found ourselves trapped indoors the past few months, our bodies are inherently drawn to the idea of becoming reacquainted with nature; not just for the fresh air and sunshine, but for the fundamental healing properties that simply being closer to nature provides us. 

By employing the concept of biophilic design, we focus on natural over synthetic as an overarching theme, tapping into the psychosocial wellbeing that humanity is currently craving the world over. Natural color palettes that seamlessly transition outdoor experiences inside create a continued sense of calm while indoors. The addition of plants throughout both cleans the air and provokes a sense of relaxation. Removing clutter to reveal clean lines, white space, and invoke a “less is luxury” mindset. Interior design is witnessing a return to these authentic, raw, and “imperfect” materials—ones where the hand of the maker is visible, they aid us in feeling more grounded, and reinforce a sense of place.

The question that hosts must ask themselves as they look toward the future, “How can I design my experience offering to reduce anxiety and make guests feel more naturally at ease?” Using Maslow’s hierarchy of needs as a guide, we have the opportunity to comfort guests holistically. The key to a reassured, tranquil mindset isn’t to simply coat everything in copper; designers will need to thoughtfully expand and go deeper to offer a sense of security and comfort beyond what’s on the surface.

A MULTIFACETED FOOD & BEVERAGE UPGRADE

One of the things we miss the most, undisputedly, is the ability to dine out and spend time with friends and family. We don’t just crave the energy and social activity, we long for the semblance of normalcy tied to the experience itself. 

While the industry has taken a hit to their traditional dine-in offerings, consumers are demanding more than ever before from the F&B industry: meal and cocktail kits, picnic baskets for outdoor excursions, easy curbside pickup, reliable room service, rapid and safe home delivery. 

There is ample opportunity to adapt existing room service and F&B experiences, which are anticipated to see not only a resurgence but a higher demand for gourmet-level quality. And, with a renewed focus on safety and convenience, offering grab-and-go contactless options in restaurants or lobbies that can digitally be charged to one’s room opens up new avenues for revenue and differentiation.

With an added focus on finding space outside of personal rooms that guests still feel safe in, how can restaurants take advantage of a rise in take-out by enabling positive, memorable moments? Establishing outdoor spaces that guests can retreat to for picnics or morning coffee in solitude; remodeling rooms to better allow for comfortable dining during a night in; hosts have the opportunity to allow guests to write their own stories defined by their comfort levels, and designers have the chance to enable that journey.

THE ROAD AHEAD

As brands and venues that offer hospitality experiences look toward the future, it won’t be about creating a compromised version of what we’ve known to be normal in the past, but cleverly designing and strategically implementing layers to more easily adapt for the unknowns that lie before us. 

Over the past century, the desire for machine-made perfection was palpable. Today, as we strive to become closer with nature in a primal effort to heal our bodies and minds, hosts that embrace the perfect imperfection of raw edges, materials, and palettes—as well as provide variable spaces both indoors and outside—can help guests maintain a fundamental sense of safety and comfort as they embark on their journeys.

People will not feel comfortable traveling unless they feel safe. Those who create hyper-personalized, dynamic, memorable spaces that guests can not only escape to, but ones where they can wholeheartedly focus on physical and mental rejuvenation, will come out on top. After all, isn’t that what vacation is for?

SHANNON SUESS is an award-winning interiors and hospitality designer who has dedicated over 25 years of her career to crafting world-class destinations. Working with clients around the globe, she seamlessly fuses interiors, exteriors, and the spaces in between to create memorable venues that harmonize local culture and brand. Shannon thrives on finding unique solutions to programming barriers and solving complex architectural challenges with holistic design.

An agile problem-solver dedicated to cultivating meaningful partnerships in order to bring out the best in projects, Shannon is often inspired by the music, art, and local traditions she encounters during her travels. She consistently fuses cutting-edge trends with timeless designs to sculpt extraordinary, one-of-a-kind experiences for hotels, residential, casinos, wineries, and everything in between.

Madam Walker House illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund

The call to action by American citizens during this year has made us all rethink how we view American history. Protestors have demanded the nation target injustice and fix the systems that promote the unequal treatment of African Americans. The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund was founded at a similar time of crisis, after the 2017 rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that led to the creation of a national preservation campaign meant to uplift and honor the Black American experience.

 “The AACHAF was created out of the recognition that we in the field of preservation needed to do more,” said Brent Leggs, executive director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund. “We realized that the American story we often tell repeatedly negates the transformative contributions of African Americans, whose capability, intellect, and creativity were and still are invaluable to the building of this nation. The Trust decided then and there to create the Action Fund as a way to help fill in those gaps. We realized that preservation of historic sites, where African Americans changed the American landscape, could be one way our nation comes to understand the need to create a more fair and just society. We saw a more inclusive approach to historic preservation as one step on the long road to heal the divisions between us.”

Through its African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund, the Trust is investing more than $1.6 million in grants to 27 sites and organizations across 22 states and the District of Columbia. Thanks to our partnership and a generous grant provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, we are funding communities to protect, restore, and interpret African American historic sites and uncover hidden narratives of the African American contribution to the American story. 

“The Action Fund plays a crucial role in elevating Black voices and stories in our national dialogue about arts and culture, and in expanding our collective knowledge and understanding of African-American history,” remarked Mellon Foundation President Elizabeth Alexander. “We are thrilled that the 2020 Action Fund grants will continue to provide transformative support to Black cultural organizations and heritage sites throughout the country.

Leggs underscored the importance of this work, noting, “The recipients of this funding exemplify centuries of African American resilience, activism, and achievement, some known and some yet untold, which tell the complex story of American history in the United States.  Over the past two years, the Action Fund has funded 65 historic African American places and invested more than $4.3 million to help preserve landscapes and buildings imbued with Black cultural heritage. With urgency and intention, the nation must value the link between architecture and racial justice and should fund these and other cultural assets to ensure their protection and preservation.”  

Grants are given across four categories: capacity building, project planning, capital, and programming and interpretation. The list of all 27 grantees and a short blurb about each is attached.  A link to a fuller web version of the list can be accessed HERE.

The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is a multi-year initiative led by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to make an important and lasting contribution to our cultural landscape by elevating the stories and places of African American resilience, activism, and achievement. 

For 70 years, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has led the movement to save America’s historic places. A privately funded nonprofit organization, we work to save America’s historic sites, tell the full American story, build stronger communities, and invest in preserving the future.

Follow The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Ivory Rowen, illustration, 360 MAGAZINE

Heckfield Place Reopens

England’s Heckfield Place Reopens July Fourth

Heckfield Place, the country-house hotel less than an hour from London, will reopen on July 4. Set in its own 438-acre estate of ancient woods, lakes, working farmland and gardens, the 18th-century Georgian House will once again welcome guests. “We’ve obviously had to make some changes to address the coronavirus era,” says General Manager, Olivia Richli, “and the closure and required protocols have challenged us to come up with some lovely creative concepts.”

There are many safety protocols enforced as the beautiful hotel reopens. One development is that guests can choose to enjoy Culinary Director Skye Gyngell’s delicious cuisine not only at socially-distanced tables in the Marle and Hearth restaurants, but with picnics and BBQs out and about the grounds. In addition, the hotel staff will be wearing chic masks as they greet and serve guests. Luggage will be brought to guests’ rooms and then sanitized as the guests watch. One small change is that guests will be asked to bring their own Wellington Boots if they plan to tramp through the woods – as Heckfield Place’s boot supply is off-limits during the pandemic. Another change is that exercise classes will be held in the open air instead of indoors.

Fortunately, many of the exciting events hosted at the hotel will continue. “The hotel’s elegant cinema will be open for guests on July 4, and our curated series of lectures, talks, performances and demonstrations, known as ‘The Assembly,’ will resume in September,” Richli continued; “our team will be leading guided runs and bike rides and even I will also be leading an idle bike ride once a week to enable guests to explore the lovely extent of the countryside surrounding the estate.”

From July 4 through December 19, 2020, Heckfield Place will be offering a new Safe Haven package for guests who want to escape to nature for an extended stay and enjoy the solitude of the estate’s sprawling grounds, which even when the hotel is at full occupancy, affords all guests a minimum of 4.8 acres to themselves. The offer includes seven nights in a Chamber Room (or any higher room category) for the price of only five nights. And for families and large groups interested in renting out the entire house for a week or more, there is also a new exclusive-use offer that can be booked by contacting the Heckfield Place reservations department directly. For more information about Heckfield Place, visit: www.heckfieldplace.com

About Heckfield Place:

A Georgian family home dating to the 1700s, Heckfield Place has been lovingly restored to its classic origins and rewoven into its surrounding 400 acres of farmland, ancient heather and woodlands. The estate’s farm, two walled gardens and orchards nourish renowned chef Skye Gyngell’s epicurean cuisine, bringing the outside gloriously into the property’s three restaurants–Marle, with its outdoor balcony overlooking the property, the Sun House, a unique space for up to 30 guests in the Upper Walled Garden, and the open-flamed Hearth. Aiming to be as sustainable as possible, the estate has a biomass energy center to power hotel water and central heating; an aerobic digester to process all recyclable waste and provide compost for the garden and pellets for the biomass energy center; harvests rainwater and captures spring water. As part of the Assembly, the hotel’s event rooms can host up to 120 guests and the new state-of-the-art, Dolby Atmos surround sound cinema can accommodate 67 viewers. There is also an extensive wine cellar and tasting room, as well as the full service Little Bothy Spa.