Posts tagged with "decor"

Elle Decor inside 360 MAGAZINE

Elle Decor × Suzanne Dimma

KO Média is excited to unveil the Fall issue of ELLE Decoration Canada, featuring a glimpse of designer Suzanne Dimma’s eco-conscious cottage in Ontario’s Haliburton County. Accessible by water, Dimma’s refuge in the wild is a warm, uncomplicated, relaxed cocoon where nature is the main source of inspiration. “Creating a connection, a conversation with one’s surroundings, is of the utmost importance,” says the designer. With a focus on wood in all its glory, plus a palette of stone greys and sky blues, Dimma honors the notion of the summer cabin—once the final resting place of that old family sofa—into a new, stylish, year-round living space.           

The Fall issue will also introduce readers to another great lover of nature, architect Maxime Frappier, who has rooted his family life in a minimalist glass home amid the forests of Lanaudière, Quebec. Further afield, in the outskirts of Milan, Dutch architect Geert Koster demonstrates how to combine solitude with socializing in a contemporary, sustainable home inspired by the region’s traditional stables. Also in Italy, artist and sculptor Othmar Prenner has crafted an Alpine cabin in the Lunga Valley whose unique design features have got to be seen to be believed.

In keeping with the theme of nature, this issue is an ode to wood in décor, art and home life. We deep-dive into West Coast sculptor Neshka Krusche, who gathers, cinges and shapes cedar logs to make stunning eco-driven art. Readers with kids will also enjoy our list of the latest, greatest and most handsome wooden toys, guaranteed to add natural flair to their rumpus rooms. We also discover a game-changing 1952 design with a spotlight on Danish designer Arne Jacobson’s Ant chair.                             

Finally, in décor we turn to two Canadian gallerists for tips on purchasing (and displaying) art, share our latest favourite Canadian lighting designs and catch up with experts in the carpet industry to get their opinions on the season’s most exciting underfoot looks. We also explore a new kind of online space for vintage design collecting.

The Fall issue of ELLE Decoration Canada will hit stands and Apple News+ on September 26, 2022. 

Most Instagrammable Houseplants via 360 MAGAZINE

Most Instagrammable houseplants

  • The Aloe vera plant is the most Instagrammable houseplant, with over 5 million posts on the platform
  • In second place is the Agave plant with just under 2 million posts
  • Haworthia takes the third spot with just over 800 thousand Instagram posts

New research has revealed the most Instagrammable houseplant, with the Aloe vera plant, taking the top spot in the rankings.

The research conducted by Hollywood Hills real estate experts RubyHome established the most common houseplants and succulents on Instagram and analysed the number of hashtags for both the scientific name of each houseplant and the more commonly used names.

The analysis revealed that the Aloe vera plant (scientifically known as the Aloe barbadensis miller) had the highest number of hashtags on Instagram, making it the most Instagrammable. The plant has 5,155,019 combined hashtags on the platform to date. The plant has been a household favorite for centuries due to its medicinal and cosmetic purposes. The Aloe Vera plant secures its top spot by totalling over five million posts on Instagram from the use of the following hashtags: ‘#aloebarbadensismiller, ‘#aloevera’, ‘#aloeveraplant’, and ‘#aloeverasucculent’.

Agave Americana, otherwise known as Agave, places second with 1,835,178 posts on the platform. Agave plants have a multitude of uses, but their main benefit is that their sap and juices can be used to treat many gut-related issues. It is also rich in nutrients which is why many see it as a more natural alternative to honey and sugar.

The third most Instagrammable plant is the Haworthia plant. Scientifically known as  Haworthiopsis attenuata, the plant has a total number of 824,048 posts on Instagram. The plant’s popularity is due to its ease of care, as it can tolerate many different lighting conditions and can last long periods in dark spaces.

The fourth most Instagrammable houseplant is Sedum which is also known as Stonecrop. The plant is extremely popular among beginners as its appearance is exceptionally versatile; not only is this a great selling point for the plant, but it can also endure harsh conditions and survive prolonged periods without water. The plant has 704,823 posts in total on Instagram.

In fifth place is Mammillaria, also known as Pincushion Cactus, with a total of 529,729 posts. With only 175,000 fewer posts than a Stonecrop plant, the pincushion cactus is popular among cactus lovers because of its small size and ease of care.

The Dracaena trifasciata is the sixth most Instagrammable plant, with 513,093 posts. The plant is also nicknamed the Snake Plant, and they are popular for its interesting skills of purifying the air and releasing oxygen during the nighttime.

The seventh most Instagrammable houseplant is the Hoya Plant, otherwise known as Wax Plant. The popularity of the Wax Plant is due to its sweet scent, attractive and lengthily leaves, and pretty floral accents. To date, the plant has 303,440 posts on Instagram, which secured its seventh position.

In eighth place is the Curio rowleyanus plant, also known as String of Pearls. Despite being an extremely delicate plant, String of Pearls is a beautiful addition to any plant collection. Similar to many other succulents, the plant is straightforward to maintain and has 233,711 posts on Instagram.

Crassula ovata, also known as the Jade Plant, ranks ninth by a whisker with 233,151 Instagram posts, just 560 fewer than the String of Pearls. The Jade Plant is extremely popular, especially in Asia, as it is thought to bring financial luck. Its gorgeous vibrant green leaves are another selling point of this plant which is a beautiful addition to any plant lovers’ collection.

The tenth most Instagrammable houseplant belongs to the Schlumbergera bridgessii, otherwise known as the Christmas Cactus. The plant has a total of 189,128 posts on Instagram, which secures its tenth position. It is a colourful, exciting plant which blooms bright pink or lilac flowers in indoor spaces around Christmastime.

A spokesperson from RubyHome commented on the findings: “Houseplants are an incredible way to incorporate life and colour into any living space, which is why they are an essential part of creating a calm and zen atmosphere in any home.

It is fascinating to see such large numbers of hashtags for so many houseplants, showing how many social media users love watching their homes spring to life with their easy-to-maintain plants. It also proves just how popular the social media platform is for sharing insights into their interior design choices.”

Shin Thompson via NU Marketing for use by 360 MAGAZINE

CHEF SHIN THOMPSON

Listen to 360 MAG Vaughn Lowery and Chef Shin Podcast: HERE

Chef Shin Thompson was an underground Cookman turned Michelin star chef in Chicago for his Chicago Restaurant. Although he spends most of his career in Chicago. He now recently moved to LA to start a new Japanese BBQ restaurant.

The challenge he had to have to earn the star for the restaurant in Chicago is that you must be able to cook well for 365 days. Chef Shin Thompson felt accomplished that the people were able to realize the passion that he has for the food. He said, “It was a great feeling to be recognized for all the hard work that went over the years.”

At first, he got interested in being a chef because of his parents. He said, “My dad was really big into cooking at home and replicating recipes from his travels and so really where I got interested in it.”

As a child, he would spend most of his time traveling with his dad. He said, “I first got exposed to food from all the different travels, my dad used to take me out of school for weeks at a time…so take me out of school and we just learn about different cultures, and we traveled all over Europe and all over Asia.”

His family comes from a Japanese household; therefore, it played a huge role in introducing him to the food. “My mother is Japanese, so anybody who’s in a Japanese family will tell you that food is a big part of the culture in Japan and is a heritage to be a big cook if you’re Japanese. So, my mom was always cooking Japanese food and my dad was always cooking food from all of these different cultures, so I got exposed to a lot of different things at a young age.” He spoke.

While he works on a restaurant tour, he introduces us to his challenges and thoughts on what means to succeed in the restaurant business. He said, “The interesting part about the restaurant business that I find fascinating is it takes different skills sets, so you need to be an artist from the chef perspective you need a business person that can really understand the numbers and the food costs, labor costs, you need marketing and being able to or more like psychology getting into the mind of the people who coming into the restaurant.”

According to Chef Shin Thompson, the restaurant will have private rooms with “Asian-looking screens.” Along with the modern look and Japanese style. It will have the décor of “Japanese charred wood, which is called Shou Sugi Ban, which is a Japanese technique that is used in ancient times, where they actually charred the wood and they would use it for the siding in their homes” he said. It’s good for resisting fire. The reason is that there is nothing to burn since the wood is already charred.

For the menu, “The BBQ grill menu is about $148 dollars for domestic tasting, which includes full meal” he said. There will be an A5 version that is not domestic, however, it will more expensive. In Japan, having a restaurant being A5 means the best.

Some of the upgrades that are still in progress are the “wine cellar that we will have in the middle of the dining room, as well as several dry agers that will be built in the wall as a display.” Therefore, when a guest walks in, they will see the dry agers that will have meat.

One piece of advice that Chef Shin Thompson gives to young chefs is “there are a lot of sacrifices that you need to put in as a young chef and in order to make sure it is worthwhile, you need to be 100% passionate about what you do.”

Justin Osborne is a SCAD grad and design contributor for 360 MAGAZINE

JUSTIN OSBORNE

Born and bred in Atlanta, Justin Osborne had an immediate gift of fashion. After years of tinkering in his parents’ duds, he acquired an eye for style. He soon rearranged the furniture in the bedrooms of his two siblings. He clearly had a keen eye for symmetry and placement. His fascination with art won him admission and a SCAD diploma. His passion became a career upon being enlisted by his grandfather Dr. Joseph Lowery to renovate his outdated condominium. Justin’s use of tribal motifs and eclectic lighting caught the attention of several members of his family, including his mother, Cheryl Lowery. She tasked him with upgrading her suburban house. That’s when his cousin Vaughn Lowery (360 president) noticed his acute sense of design. They began to convert modest living spaces into immersive shrines.

Justin finds inspiration in his immediate surroundings, while Vaughn is driven by his adventurous international travels. With a unique blend of African mod and Hollywood glamor, they have begun to build a buzzworthy blueprint.

Specialties: Floating shelves, fixtures, backs plashes and floor installs.

Aspiring to be more carbon neutral, he has begun fabricating furniture out of salvageable materials like glass, maple and marbel.

Hire Justin.

Canadian musician and Juno award-winning artist covers Elle via 360 MAGAZINE

ELLE – CHARLOTTE CARDIN

KO Média is excited to unveil the Summer issue of ELLE Canada featuring Canadian musician Charlotte Cardin. Fresh off the heels of four major wins at the 2022 Juno Awards, including Album of the Year for her debut, Phoenix, the rising pop star opens up about her identity as an artist and how much music has set her free. “Music is the most wholesome way I’ve found of letting go, of drowning out the noise and staying grounded in truth,” she shares in an intimate interview with her big sister and biggest fan. “Whenever I start overthinking what I should wear or how I should be, I go back to my music and focus on the stories I want to tell.” For Cardin, the creative experience of writing her debut album was empowering, allowing her to “access the truest and most vulnerable parts of myself.” Now, with her second album set to be released in 2023, she’s moving to London for the next stage of her career. “It feels right to go where the music speaks to me the most.”

Dive into this summer issue with a roundup of brands offering fun, fashionable swimwear and a look at the new crop of body-care products that are rethinking our face-first approach to skincare. For readers in need of a getaway, discover all that Tunisia has to offer (spoiler: everything from warm hospitality to a cosmopolitan capital), or escape to Merrill House, an ancestral home turned luxurious boutique hotel tucked away in a quiet corner of Picton, Ont.

In fashion, our editors look at the timeless trend of wearing all black — even in summertime — and delve into the history of the white T-shirt, which has deep roots in popular culture. Toronto artist Esmaa Mohamoud, whose exhibits combine sports, fashion and racial issues, reveals the inspiration behind a series of basketball jerseys she transformed into majestic Victorian-style dresses. Plus, we introduce three Canadian curators of vintage jewellery who are giving one-of-a-kind pieces a second life.

Inspirational women abound in this issue. Canadian author Sonya Singh explains what writing her first book taught her about dating and herself; director and producer Lucia Aniello talks about her award-winning show Hacks and championing stories that haven’t been told; multi-hyphenate Jessie Andrews speaks candidly about carving her own path and her recent role in Euphoria; and actor and L’Oréal Paris spokesmodel Andie MacDowell shares her thoughts on going grey and inspiring the next generation. We also chat with Violette Serrat, the new creative director of makeup at Guerlain, about using makeup to celebrate and learn to love ourselves.

This edition is filled with fascinating deep-dives on a wide range of topics. Acclaimed Bangladeshi artist and author Fariha Róisín talks about her latest book exploring how the West’s wellness trends have commodified global healing traditions. Actress and food writer Madhur Jaffrey talks about foodways rooted in tradition and why India’s cuisines are still widely misunderstood. Plus, our writers look at the shift away from binge-watching; the experiences of women affected by alopecia and hair loss; the unrealistic beauty standard of perfectly straight glowing-white teeth; and the ways that Canada’s health-care system forces people who experience chronic illnesses to become their own advocates.

Finally, three tarot readers reveal the secrets of their practice, which include initiating reflection, stimulating introspection and accessing the wants, needs and thoughts that lie dormant within us.

READ THE DIGITAL ISSUE

The Summer issue of ELLE Canada will hit stands and Apple News+ on June 20, 2022. 

KO Média also publishes ELLE Decoration, ELLE QuébecMagazine VÉROdi Stasio, and K pour Katrine magazines.

Jlf architecture legacy houses in Jackson Hole, Wyoming via 360 magazine.

JLF ARCHITECTS

JLF Architects Announces May 2022 Release of New Book “Foundations” Published by Rizzoli and Featuring 16 Stunning Legacy Houses

JLF Architects’ announces the publication of “Foundations: Houses by JLF Architects” (Rizzoli New York), debuting on May 3, 2022, and offering an in-depth look at 16 spectacular homes designed by the Bozeman, Montana-based firm in Wyoming, Montana, Utah, Idaho and New York. The 256-page coffee-table book, already receiving media acclaim, features 200 photographs of JLF-designed houses, thoughtfully sited amid breathtaking scenery and rooted in regional history, materials and methods.

JLF Architects announces the May 3, 2022, publication of the firm’s new book “Foundations: Houses by JLF Architects.” Published by Rizzoli New York, written by Seabring Davis with JLF Design Build and with some 200 photographs by Audrey Hall, “Foundations” highlights 16 stunning JLF-designed houses set amid remarkable scenery in the mountains, on the water, in the forest and the foothills of Wyoming, Montana, Utah, Idaho and New York.

“Breathtaking houses that are built lovingly with noble materials and heritage methods, always presented in profound conversation with nature,” writes Rizzoli about the book, which has already received accolades from “BigLife” magazine in a feature on the “Modern Artifact” Park City house from the book in its recent Spring 2022 issue. And “Big Sky Journal HOME” applauds JLF Architects as the “esteemed firm [that] brings decades of experience to bear on rustic and modern design solutions” in its review of the book.

From their first project some 40 years ago, challenged with creating a Montana cabin to match existing log structures on a century-old homestead property, JLF pioneered the idea of reusing old materials. “Reclaiming the wood and rebuilding it into a new form kindled a movement in American architecture,” they write in the introduction to “Foundations.” “The early work stirred a revival of craft that launched JLF’s time-honored design-build philosophy … The authenticity of materials with their natural blemishes worn by axes, adzes, boot heels, horse hooves, and the elements seemed to belong to the Montana landscape. The buildings appeared as if they had always been there, enduring and timeless.”

JLF has taken its history-rich designs in increasingly contemporary directions in recent years, continually pushing its own limits to lead the way in what has become known as Rustic Modern or Mountain Modern design. Bringing a fresh contemporary approach to Old-World materials and methods, these JLF legacy houses retain the connections to regional history and the land that resonate deeply with homeowners, combining the highest level of artisanal craftsmanship with up-to-the-minute sustainable technology. As “Foundations” states, “Building a legacy house – large or small – with purpose is the definitive reward … we build houses that weather time, traditions, trends, and generations with practical grace.”

“BigLife” spotlights a spectacular Park City, Utah, project by JLF in “Building Dreams.” Appropriately featured in the magazine’s PLACE section, it recognizes the firm’s commitment to designing in concert with specific history and landscape since that first cabin design in 1979, which it calls “an origin story of resourcefulness and a pitch-perfect sense of place.” “BigLife” writes, “JLF has become renowned for the way that their projects are at home in their environs,” adding that the Park City house “perfectly marries the authenticity of place with a modern sensibility” and that the new book “Foundations” “offers insight into the intentionality that goes into each JLF project.”

“Big Sky Journal” reviews “Foundations” in its just-out popular annual HOME issue, writing of JLF Architects “working to build in partnership with the land through environmentally responsible, artful design” and sharing a quote from the new book to summarize the philosophy of the firm that has become known for creating “brand-new 100-year-old houses”: “The most sustainable thing we can do is design a house that will still be here in a hundred years, a place where people can gather for generations to come.”

“Foundations: Houses by JLF Architects” includes a foreword by writer, filmmaker and conservationist John Heminway, who similarly captures the mystique of a JLF house: “A home should be right in every way. It should impress, not through grandeur but through simplicity, authority, and grace. Ideally, it is located, designed, and crafted so thoughtfully that it appears the only imaginable structure for the landscape. Let others erect castles, as long as JLF can build you a home where, inside and out, you will feel better, be better … the home of the heart.”

About JLF Architects:

With over 40 years of experience, JLF Architects, pioneers in building houses with reclaimed antique timber and indigenous stone, continue as leaders in creating sustainable legacy houses that contrast rustic materials with the best of contemporary design. The award-winning Bozeman, Montana-based firm with offices in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and Park City, Utah, applies distinctive solutions and Old-World techniques to create place-based houses closely aligned with the natural world and honoring history, from the Rocky Mountains to the Eastern Seaboard. Winners of “Mountain Living” Home of the Year, the JLF Architects and Big-D Signature design-build team unites passionate architects with dedicated builders to enable the collective imagination of visionary artisans working with visionary clients. For more information go HERE and follow JLF on Instagram and Pinterest.

Discover Puerto Rico × Pantone

Boriqua Interior Designer Cristina Villalón curates tips on how to best incorporate the color Puerto Rico Sunshine into a space. This fiery red-orange color created by Pantone is a combination of the sunbeams that grace the island throughout the day, refined by a physicist and professor at the University of Puerto Rico. Villalón, a leading designer in Puerto Rico with projects all over the Americas is the ideal eye to recommend how to integrate Puerto Rico Sunshine into any room or décor.

According to Villalón, orange is a dynamic color. It should be used to add energy to a room and make a space come alive. Thus, if you reside in a cold place, adding an orange wall will automatically add warmth and ebullience to the space.

Puerto Rico Sunshine alongside neutral tones such as gray have a neutralizing effect to tone down the brightness. For full island-vibes, blues also complement orange beautifully and make the perfect combination in a vibrant beach house or beachy themed room. It is recommended to use only one vivid color, like Puerto Rico Sunshine, in any given space. Using a neutral palette and natural textures, then adding pops of this bold orange in accessories makes for a soothing yet cheerful space. Painting an entire room a strong, overwhelming color can be a bit too much for most interior design tastes. Villalón recommends painting one wall in a room the brighter, statement-making color, and the rest a more neutral tone. Not only will the accent wall stand out and become a focal point, but it won’t overpower the rest of the décor elements and make you want to run out of the room! Other trends include incorporating accent colors in a wall mural. A wall mural permits you to incorporate as much or as little of an accent color as you would like, and you can also add texture and visual interest with the pattern or design you choose.

A great way to offer cohesion to the room is to paint only one wall an orange, like Puerto Rico Sunshine, and then repeat the color via furniture pieces or accessories. Some of these ways include adding color to the entryway of your home, updating older furniture, framing a mirror, or even making your own artwork. The eye-catching possibilities are as endless as the sun’s rays. Color is an extremely powerful force and too much of anyone can leave a room or space unbalanced. Yet the right amount can invigorate a home and its visitors!

Cristina Villalón is the Co-founder, Principal Interior Designer and the Director of Álvarez-Díaz & Villalón® | Architecture & Interior Design. Recognized for her attractive, welcoming, and functional interior designs, Villalón was awarded in 2015 with the Star on the Rise Award from the Design Center of the Americas (DCOTA). In 2016, Cristina was named among the Top 40 Under 40 by the magazine Design: Retail and that same year, Caribbean Business awarded her the same distinction. Villalón is a proud mother of three beautiful daughters, a recycling activist and gender equality, an insatiable reader and a lifelong learner.

Discover Puerto Rico and Pantone featured in 360 MAGAZINE.

*Special thanks to Discover Puerto Rico for providing images and access to Cristina Villalón.

What to do with your old kitchenware

Over the years it is easy to pick up lots of kitchenware and utensils. However, what is not so easy is keeping them all in good condition. Many people find themselves looking around their kitchen and thinking that the only solution would be to rip it all out and start again. Whilst everyone would like to be able to afford a brand-new kitchen, sometimes it is not financially affordable. This does not mean that you are stuck though. There are plenty of options out there for you to breathe life into your kitchen and this article will give you some ideas on how to do it.

Old Knives

Whether you have invested in a really premium set, or they are just favorites that you have held onto, knives will inevitably lose their sharpness and shine. The simple thing to do is to replace them with a newer set. However, this is not the cheapest thing to do. One way in which you can avoid this is to use a wet stone sharpener. This will bring back the blade to your knife and allow you to keep your favorites without them becoming useless. 

Revitalize your woods

One way to breathe some life back into your kitchen and its wares is to give the cupboards, worktops, and tables a good clean and sand. Sanding them down will take off any surface damages like scratches and marks and smooth it all down. If you are looking to change the color scheme of your kitchen then sanding down all of these features is essential. It can be done by getting the right tools or even the handy DIY sanding pads. 

Removing the blemishes from your wood will make your kitchen look brand new again. This can be especially helpful if you have had children who have taken their toll on the surfaces. It is cheap and easy to do even for a DIY novice.

Kitchen art

If you have found yourself with an abundance of kitchen equipment that is either rubbish or too old to be of any good to anyone, then why don’t you think about repurposing it. You can be surprised at how creative you can get with old pots and pans. They can make quirky art deco pieces that people won’t believe you whipped up in an afternoon. It is all about knowing what you want to do. 

For example, old Teflon frying pans make great chalkboards. This is a great way to get the kids involved. If you have an old skillet pan lying around, you could add art to the back of it and hang it up. You can glue pieces of tile and glass to completely change its look. Or you can repurpose a cake tin as a decorative cake stand for your coffee table. You are only limited by your creativity.

Old Kitchenware

There is so much more that you can do to your old kitchen that does not involve throwing it away. If you don’t have the money or just want to be a little bit greener, then you can investigate how to repurpose all your old kitchenware. Some things like knives can be rejuvenated whilst others can be transformed.

 

Rottet Studio Wins Awards

Hall of Fame architect and interior designer Lauren Rottet, FAIA, FIIDA, has been honored for the Artis Chair from the Rottet Collection by the Chicago Athenaeum 2021 GOOD DESIGN® and the New York Product Design Awards.

The GOOD DESIGN® awards recognize the top new products bestowed annually by The Chicago Athenaeum in cooperation with the European Centre for Architecture, Art, Design, and Urban Studies. Founded in Chicago in 1950, GOOD DESIGN® is the oldest and most respected program awarding design excellence worldwide. This year, the museum received a record number of submissions from an international roster of top manufacturers and industrial and graphic design firms representing 50 countries.

“We are honored to receive these accolades for our work–a real measure of excellence–and we thank the distinguished judges and the design community as a whole,” said Lauren Rottet when referencing the Artis Chair, a sculptural swivel chair that exemplifies function and relaxation. 

The Dichroic Table, Powerful Table Collection, Montauk Upholstered Guest, and Wood Float Chair and Sofa were also celebrated by the New York Product Design Awards. Rottet’s continued exploration of light, color, and reflection is highlighted with her Dichroic Table while her Powerful Table Collection elegantly promotes both beauty and function. The Montauk Upholstered Guest Chair embodies stability and comfort with a lively twist while the Wood Float Chair and Sofa explore the amalgam of solid walnut and clear acrylic.

About Lauren Rottet

Lauren Rottet is the Founding Principal and President of Rottet Studio, an international architecture and interior design firm, which has been recognized as one of the Top 3 Most Admired Design Firms in the World. The firm has an extensive portfolio of corporate, hospitality, residential, and maritime projects for the worlds leading companies and brands, including Goldman Sachs, Disney, BGC3, New York Stock Exchange, Target, Four Seasons, Langham, Dorchester Collection, Marriott, Ritz-Carlton, Hyatt, Hilton, Belmond, Naftali Group, Extell Developments Central Park Tower, Viking Ocean Cruises, and more.  I am not sure I have seen someone who is as skilled in such a wide vernacular of design styles from contemporary minimal to elegantly traditional in such an authentic manner,” said critic Paul Goldberger. Rottet’s product designs have earned many accolades, including Interior Designs Best of Year, four gold medals for Best of NeoCon, and seven Chicago Athenaeum GOOD DESIGN Awards.

Image by Ivory Nguyen for use by 360 Magazine

KO Média – ELLE DECORATION CANADA

KO Média is excited to unveil the fall issue of ELLE Decoration Canada featuring a new way of imagining your dream home by designer Nicholas Ancerl. Crestwood, described as “a dramatic home among the treetops” of Barrie, Ontario, has yet to be built. Instead, it has been brought to life with 23 photo-realistic renders. “The contemporary interiors will have a rustic touch and a neutral colour palette,” Ancerl explains. “We want the colours of nature, seen through the expansive windows, to dominate the interiors.” When asked about setting expectations too high for homeowners with such stunning renders, the designer assures: “Nothing can take away from the experience of actually stepping into a real space.”

This edition is imbued with a desire to create bright, airy living spaces that are both functional and serene. Included are Toronto-based architect Anya Moryoussef’s transformation of a single-car garage into a modern workspace inspired by traditional Italian studiolos; a prefabricated house reimagined by architect Alain Carle to capture the natural play of light and shade throughout the day; an architectural firm’s ingenious use of every nook and cranny in a tiny Vancouver home brimming with joie de vivre; and wood-and-glass containers fashioned by a Montreal couple to give their Old Port loft structure without sacrificing any natural light.

In the spirit of the season, Athena Calderone, author of Cook Beautiful, shares recipes that capture the tones, textures and tastes of fall and tips for creating the ultimate autumn table settings. Readers will also find a curated list of outdoor armchairs, loungers and swings from which to soak up the sun, and patio heaters in all shapes and sizes for the chilly months to come.

We caught up with Quebec native Philippe Malouin, creator of the Hanger chair, to find out how he continues to keep things simple after being listed among the world’s 100 top designers by Architectural Digest. Designer Montana Labelle offers advice for combining elegance and simplicity from her newly opened Lifestyle Studio in Toronto; and Quebecer Danielle Carignan, a pioneer in the personal organizer profession, shares tips to declutter your space and your life.

And for those seeking an escape, this issue has everything from top coffee makers for a meditative morning routine; to a seaside hospitality complex in Iran that blends seamlessly into the blazing red, yellow and orange rock formations of Hormuz Island.

The fall issue of ELLE Decoration Canada will hit stands and Apple News+ today.