Posts tagged with "advice"

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Karen Gershowitz – Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust

Yes, You CAN Fit Travel into a Busy Career. It Just Takes Planning.

By Karen Gershowitz

I know what you’re thinking: Travel is opening back up and I’m itching to go. But when I’m drowning in deadlines and work and want to spend time with family and friends, how can travel possibly fit in? The answer is, with planning.

My career as a marketing researcher and strategist is intense. Yet in 5 decades, I’ve managed to travel to 90 different countries. Travel is my passion. Reducing or giving it up, even for work, is out of the question. These competing priorities have taught me to plan ahead and be creative.  I talk about some of the many ways I’ve done this in my memoir Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust.

At the beginning of my career, two weeks of vacation was the maximum allowed. I planned those weeks around long weekends to get the most out of them. Four vacation days became nine-day trips.

Another possibility I discovered is to rollover vacation time, allowing for a longer trip.  You might take one week the first year, then plan for a three-week trip the next. That strategy allowed me to go to Tanzania for a photo safari and then climb Mt. Kilimanjaro.

If you can afford it, consider unpaid leave. I did that for a trip to Australia that took me across the globe when after the flight and recovering from jetlag, two weeks would have been whittled down to just over a week of satisfying travel. That extra vacation time is unlikely to change your career trajectory and will leave you with memories for a lifetime. Negotiating extra travel time when taking a new job is a great tactic, and in this post- COVID world where labor supply is short, now might be the perfect time. Two weeks is far too short to satisfy a travel itch. In negotiating for extra vacation time when changing jobs—four weeks in total—I only brought it up after we had settled on pay. The deal with my boss was that the month had to be split into three periods scattered across the year. That worked for the company; my absence didn’t stop any projects from proceeding. It also satisfied my desire for travel. 

You might also consider taking an extended break prior to starting with a new employer. time off between jobs. It’s a magical time with no stresses about what you’ve left behind. When I negotiated for four weeks of vacation time, I also negotiated my start date. I gave myself a full month, which allowed me to take three separate trips–Hawaii, Spain and Puerto Rico. I began my new position fully rested, with a clear head and excitement about the work. 

If you do find yourself with a quiet stretch take advantage of it. Rather than fretting about not having work or creating make work, scour the internet for last minute deals. Traveling to a lesser known place may lead to fabulous, unexpected finds. Years ago, I went to Venezuela at the last moment and discovered nearly empty pristine beaches and an Italian village in the Andes.

Here are some tips for making whatever time you have enjoyable, worry-free and non-jeopardizing to your career.

  • Give everyone lots of advance notice if you will be gone for more than a few days.  No one likes surprises, least of all clients and colleagues. This gives them time to discuss what should happen while you are away.
  • Try to anticipate any issues, problems, or questions and make sure you’ve dealt with them before you leave. 
  • Update your boss and co-workers on any current projects in detail and in writing so they have a reference document if they need information. 
  • Make it clear that you will be unreachable during your away time (you don’t want to be brought back to “reality” while traveling).  If necessary, tell them wi-fi is likely to be unreliable where you will be staying.

For much of my career I have also traveled for business, both domestically and internationally. This allowed me to see the world while my clients paid for my flights and other expenses. If you are also lucky enough to travel for business, here are some ideas for how to experience the location beyond meeting rooms. 

  • Try to plan the trip near a weekend, then stay a couple of extra days. Or even plan your whole vacation in some desirable destination. I traveled for two weeks in Asia, following a meeting in Singapore.
  • Once virtual conferences become an option instead of a necessity, if you attend them and can choose, find ones that meet your needs and are in a destination you’d like to see. 
  • Ask local business associates what to see and do. Because they live there, they may have some great tips for restaurants and sites off the usual tourist routes.
  • Before going, look for events taking place while you’re there—concerts, ball games, walking tours, cooking classes, art or antique shows. 

I hate clichés, but where there’s a will, there’s a way really applies to fitting travel into a career. If you want it enough, plan ahead, don’t keep it a secret and enjoy every moment.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Karen Gershowitz, author of Travel Mania: Stories of Wanderlust, has been traveling since age 17 when she boarded a plane to Europe and stayed there for three years. She has since traveled to more than 90 countries, experiencing countless bold, once-in-a-lifetime adventures: climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, trekking atop an elephant in Thailand, hiking in the blistering heat of the Moroccan desert—and much more. While studying ceramics as an undergraduate at the Kansas City Art Studio, Karen proposed and received a grant to photograph ceramics studios, potters and their work throughout Japan. She later built a career as a marketing strategist and researcher with companies who sent her around the globe to conduct focus groups, interviews and meetings. She lives in New York City, but is a citizen of the world.

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3 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

Sometimes despite your best efforts it can be hard to lose those extra pounds. Chemist, nutrition and exercise expert Christine Hronec shares three tips on why you may not be losing weight.

1. Because you are eating too much.

In order to drop weight, now we’re not talking about fat just yet we’re just talking about weight, you need to take your total daily energy expenditure. Which is your body’s basal metabolic rate plus all the energy and calories you burn in a day. Those two items added together is your total daily energy expenditure. In order to sustain your current body mass, you need to be eating that amount of calories.

Now if you are not in a caloric deficit, you will not lose any body mass. Here’s a problem. Some of you are losing body mass but you are not losing body fat. You’re thinking: “You know what, I need to eat less and to exercise more.” Yeah, to a point. But the thing is if you’re trying to lose body fat, I’m not talking about losing muscle, I’m not talking about losing water, I’m talking about just the parts of your body you don’t want, like the part that makes you look fat, the fat. If you want to lose that, that is something that you cannot just wing. You cannot just do more cardio and eat less and expect to lose body fat. So, you’re going to lose muscle and you’re going to lose water.

And the thing is your body is going to spare protein first and is going to want to hold on to your fat more. Why? Because fat is more energy dense, and if you are starving your body wants to keep the fat as a longer-term sustainable energy source to keep you alive. Your body is going to want to get rid of the protein first. So, that is why your body will get rid of muscle first. If you are eating too much and your macros are not dialed in, you will not lose any body mass whatsoever. So, don’t fool yourself and think that you can just wing it. Because if you want to go from point A to point B, you need to be more strategic.

2. Your body is not able to metabolize body fat.

Why? Because you’re drinking too much alcohol. If you are drinking alcohol, your body cannot store it anywhere. Alcohol is a poison and your body can’t hold it. The second it comes into your body, your body needs to break it down and turn it into something else. When that is happening, all other metabolic processes stop.

So, when you consume alcohol, your body passes its ability to burn body fat for 48 hours at least, sometimes even 72. I do not recommend consuming any alcohol if your goal is to lose body fat. This goes for fitness competitors, this goes for people who are getting ready for their wedding, people who have a photo shoot. Alcohol has to be the number one thing out the door if you are serious about those types of goals.

3. You are eating too little.

There are lots of circumstances where you need to eat more. And it’s going to vary on a case by case basis, but if you have been in a caloric deficit for so long and nothing is changing on your body. Meaning you are not seeing any changes in your measurements; you are not seeing any changes in the scale. You most likely have been in a caloric deficit for far too long. And as a result of that, you are not able to part with your stored body fat.

If your carbs are too low for too long what happens is your insulin levels drop. When your insulin levels drop, your Leptin levels will drop. Leptin is the hormone that tells your body it is starving. It tells your body you need to hold on to body fat as a means of survival. If those levels get too low, you’re not going to  release any sort of body fat. So, there are times when it makes strategic sense to increase your insulin having a refeed day, because that’s going to pull up your Leptin levels.

About Christine Hronec

Christine Hronec is an award-winning chemist and three-time champion fitness competitor, nutrition, and exercise expert. Since founding her company Gauge Life in 2013, Christine has helped approximately 40,000 women transform their bodies and switch to a body-positive self-image. Her YouTube channel has over 25 million views. Christine has received awards from the American Chemical Society and was published in the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Christine was part of the team that created Time magazine’s “Invention of the Year” for her work in the biotech field.

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Brain Tumor Infocon

By: Skyler Johnson

The Brain Tumor Infocon was an event that took place this past week, via Zoom because of the pandemic. The event was not for cancer patients themselves but for those that cared for them. They gave four talks on four separate days, each regarding a different topic. I attended the workshop focusing on children and young adults. All different types of people attended, from parents caring for children to friends caring for friends. But they came for the same reason, to try and gain advice towards dealing with cancer patients. And hopefully they left gaining more information then they had entered with. Here’s what I learned from the event:

Brain Cancer Changes Who a Person is

This must be terrifying to go through, but it does make sense. After all, the brain is where a person’s thoughts, feelings, and emotions are stored, and cancer destroys that. When a person has cancer you have to see them change. There’s not much anyone can do about it, there’s no way to prevent it, but it is something that happens nonetheless. 

Don’t Be Afraid to Say “Cancer”

For a person with cancer, it can be incredibly isolating when their caregiver doesn’t use the actual word. For children, it can be hard to understand what’s wrong with them if they don’t know what they’re going through if they don’t have the actual term to define it. It’s the same with emotions. Caregivers shouldn’t be afraid to show emotions just because they don’t want to upset those they’re caring for. It’s another thing that can make people feel very alone. 

The Question Jar

The presenter recommended a question jar for child patients who may be shy about asking questions regarding their cancer. The caregiver, a parent, would leave the jar in a heavily trafficked part of the house, like a kitchen or living room, and the child can put questions in the jar whenever they’d like. The caregiver would answer their questions periodically, not directly after the child put the concern in. You wouldn’t want them to know you’re keeping track. 

Feel Free to Take Time for Yourself

Having to take care of a cancer patient can be a daunting task, and one thing that was heavily encouraged was having caregivers taking time for themselves. They can’t be there for another person if they can’t be there for themselves. Exercise. Watch TV. Walk the dog. Anything that’ll help calm.

Everyone has a Different Definition of Caring

This is the first lesson I learned, and the most important. The presenter asked the group how they defined caring, which is not something I’d thought about previously. Several of the attendees answered, each in different ways. To some people, caring meant what caring means to most people: helping someone else through their day, making sure they’re content. If I answered the question I might’ve used an anecdote. But for one person it meant “loving and hurting,” which is, I can imagine, the most accurate. Caring can be painful. Caring can be suffering. Because you have to watch them fall apart, and get emotional in front of them, and despite all the advice people may give you, while caregiving will always be loving, it will also be hurting.

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How to Drive a Class A Motorhome

With so many Americans embracing the RV lifestyle, there’s bound to be a learning curve on how to drive and manage a large motorhome.

Holiday Rambler® has partnered with Spencer and Kristi Blu from the Adventurtunity Family to share their experiences as they travel the United States in a 2017 Vacationer® 36H from Holiday Rambler with their four-year-old son Kade and puppy Ruko Blu. The family purchased their 37-foot RV in July 2020 and started living on the road full time that September.

Since then, they’ve chronicled their adventures on Instagram and the Holiday Rambler blog.

Holiday Rambler is an award-winning brand within REV Recreation Group, Inc., which is a subsidiary of REV Group, Inc. The Holiday Rambler 2022 line includes four diesel and three gas motorhomes, including the Vacationer model that the Adventurtunity family owns.

Dad Spencer does the majority of the driving of the family’s Holiday Rambler and recently shared his tips and advice for handling a Class A motorhome in a blog post.

Learning to Drive a Class A Motorhome by Spencer Blu from Adventurtunity Family

There is something about learning to drive a Class A motorhome that gives some people pause when they are trying to decide what type of RV to buy for their family.  It was one of the most frequent questions I got when we brought home our Vacationer.  Friends and family alike would look at it and say, “That’s a beautiful motorhome…no way I could drive that!”  Or something like, “That’s gotta be so scary to drive. How did you learn?”  If I’m honest, Class A’s were not at the top of my list when we started looking for an RV because I had never driven anything nearly that big!  But, the reality is that it’s not all that daunting.  And, like anything else, the more you do it, the better you get!

So, to help put nerves at ease for those considering a motorhome purchase, I’m going to be talking about the aspects of driving a Class A motorhome to give you a better idea of what it’s like, how it differs from driving a passenger vehicle, and ideally give you the confidence to go take that test drive! 

To be clear, I am not an expert or an instructor.  The ideas and thoughts are based on my experience driving our Holiday Rambler Vacationer with a gas engine.  I have not driven a diesel pusher, and, while I understand there are some fundamental mechanical and operational differences, the concepts below should by and large apply to either platform.

The First Drive

“So, you want to take it for a drive?”  Those words hit me in the face like a right hook from Mike Tyson.  My family and I were standing in the living area of a beautiful Holiday Rambler motorhome.  It was the very first RV we went to look at when we started our search. We had been given the tour and were honestly a little giddy with the thought that it could possibly be our new home for an incredible journey to come!  And then the seller asked that question and I was snatched right out of my daydream.  “You mean right now?” I said, as if his question was poorly timed.  I mean I knew it was coming, we were there as potential buyers. I certainly wouldn’t buy a car without driving it, this shouldn’t be any different, right?  So, after about a 15 second internal pep talk, and the realization that, if I was going to drive this thing across the country, I had to start somewhere, I said, “Let’s go!”  And you know what?  It wasn’t nearly as big a deal as I had made it out to be in my head!  So now I can say with confidence that if you’re hesitant about getting a Class A because you lack the experience to drive it, don’t be.  You can do it, and you’ll be glad you did!

The Basics of Driving a Class A Motorhome

Let’s get the obvious out of the way off the bat.  Regardless of what length the coach you decide to get is, it will be bigger and heavier than what you’re used to driving.  By a lot.  I had driven a few rental box trucks before. But none of them even came close to the size of our 37-foot-long Vacationer. Time and space will be your biggest allies as you pilot your coach!  So, as long as you keep these fundamental things in mind every time you turn the key, you’ll be in good shape.

  1. Know your height and weight (fully loaded). Write them down on a sticky note and place it on the dash where you can see it.  Better to know you won’t fit under an overpass before you get to it than to find out while you’re stuck under it.
  2. Take left turns wider than you think you need to, and right turns even wider.  As nicely as these machines can handle being on the road, they will not turn on a dime. 
  3. Allow yourself additional space to get up to speed with traffic.  More importantly, leave plenty of space between yourself and the vehicle in front of you to slow down. Acceleration and braking distances are greatly increased in a vehicle this size.

Road Signage

Another thing that you will realize is that there are a lot of road signs that now apply directly to you as the driver of a large vehicle. You will start to pay attention to all those signs you ignore when driving a passenger vehicle.  Those suggested speed signs for off-ramps and sharp curves you always thought were comically slow will all of a sudden make perfect sense when cruising in your rig.  You’ll also want to be aware of height and weight restriction signs that may now apply to you when approaching bridges and overpasses.  A quick glance at that aforementioned sticky note will be quite helpful! 

When travelling in mountainous or hilly regions you will want to keep an eye out for signs that tell you the grade percentage of an upcoming steep climb or descent.  You’ll definitely want to slow down when approaching a steep descent.  Manage your speed by gearing down and braking intermittently to save your brakes. The “Runaway Truck Ramp” signs you see on steep downhills are there for a reason and you do not want to have to use one of them!

What it boils down to is that you’ll now need to take note of all the signs that are there for truck drivers.  While you may not be driving an 80,000 lb. tractor trailer, you are closer to their level than you are to the Honda Civics buzzing around you on the road.  So being aware of those signs will go a long way in helping you arrive safely to your destination!

Conclusion

And there it is my friends!  I knew nothing and had zero experience the first time I drove our coach.  But I took my time and made sure to be very aware of my surroundings.  It really is enjoyable once you get comfortable and familiar with your coach.  Hopefully this information helps give you some confidence to go find that Class A you and your family have been dreaming about!  You’ll be rolling down the road to adventure in no time!  By the way, we ended up buying that Holiday Rambler Vacationer.  The very first one I drove is the one we own, and I couldn’t be happier!

CELEBRATE LABOR DAY VISITING MANUFACTURING SITES THROUGHOUT THE U.S.

Curated by the Holiday Rambler® Brand

The long Labor Day weekend is an ideal time to sneak in a warm weather road trip before temps begin to cool off. For RVers and travel lovers looking for something different, try visiting a few manufacturing sites suggested by Holiday Rambler.

While many traditional manufacturers haven’t reopened their factory tours, there are still plenty of interesting (and tasty) companies to visit for a behind-the-scenes look. Think potato chips, baseball bats, whisky, cars, hot sauce, and more. The ten sites on the Holiday Rambler travelogue start on the East Coast, dip into the South, wind through the Midwest, head into the Mountain states, and finish on the West Coast. Each stop is paired with a recommendation for a local establishment that’s a bit different from the norm, along with an RV park.

While Holiday Rambler has temporarily suspended its factory tours, the brand has released a series of four videos showcasing how its motorhomes are made at its manufacturing headquarters in Decatur, IN. The exclusive tours deliver a peek into a few of the steps involved in manufacturing a 16,000 to 30,000 lb. Class A motorhome. To watch the factory tour videos, visit Holiday Rambler’s website, select the About tab, click on Factory Tours, and provide an email address.

Holiday Rambler RVs are known for their superior functionality and luxury design amenities that allow travelers to explore far and wide with confidence and in comfort. The 2021 Nautica model from Holiday Rambler earned Best New Model from RV Pro and Top RV Debut from RVBusiness. Nautica is a Class A Diesel motorhome that is less than 40′ and built on a Freightliner Custom Chassis®. While the Nautica is shorter in length, it still boasts a roomy interior with lots of storage. Amenities include an electric fireplace, stainless steel appliances, pantry storage, master bedroom suite with a skylight shower, and an exterior entertainment center with a 50″ LED TV.

Holiday Rambler is a Class A RV brand within REV Recreation Group, Inc., which is a subsidiary of REV Group®, Inc. For more information, visit HERE.

Please note: each manufacturing stop has been researched but be sure to call ahead to confirm hours of operation, advance ticketing requirements, and other relevant details. Be sure to travel safely by following the CDC guidelines related to COIVD-19.

10 Manufacturing Stops from Holiday Rambler

Cranberry Bog Tour – Harwich, MA

The U.S. is the world’s leading cranberry producer and MA is one of the leading cranberry growing states. Take a scenic drive to the largest organic cranberry bog on Cape Cod. During a 90-minute tour, learn about the 12-month operation of a bog. Before or after the tour, visit the farm stand for all things cranberry – fresh and dried cranberries, cranberry sauces, cranberry bog honey, and cranberry cookbooks.

Daily tours are offered throughout the spring, summer, and fall, reservations are required, and tickets are $15 each.

To experience the local culture, grab a bite to eat at Mooncusser’s Tavern­­ or Brax Landing, which offers waterfront dining on the Saquatucket Harbor. RVers can stay overnight at Adventure Bound Camping Resorts.

UTZ Potato Chips – Hanover, PA

For snack lovers, the Utz Potato Chip Trip is a must. In 1921, William and Salie Utz began making potato chips in their summer kitchen. 100 years later, the company continues to be family managed and has expanded to make a number of other brands, including Bachman, Zapp’s, Dirty, TGI Fridays Snacks, and Good Health.

This free, 30-45-minute self-guided tour lets visitors see (and smell) the process that starts with farm-fresh potatoes and ends with crispy Utz chips. An observation gallery, closed-circuit monitors, and audio program deliver interesting details about the production process. And, of course, the tour ends with a bag of Utz potato chips and a coupon to the factory outlet store – the perfect place to stock up on road-trip snacks.

The tour is open Monday – Thursday but call ahead to confirm the hours since the daily production schedule is subject to change.

Staub’s Landing Restaurant and Pub is nearby and offers lunch and dinner options, including the area’s best burgers and a selection of more than 60 craft beers. RVers can stay overnight at Gettysburg Farm RV Campground.

Maker’s Mark Distillery – Loretto, KY

Visit one of the most picturesque production sites in the country to learn about the history of Maker’s Mark bourbon whisky. Watch the fermentation process, see the charred oak barrels used to age whisky for five to seven years, and don’t miss the bottling area where workers hand-dip the top of each bottle in Maker’s Mark’s signature red wax.

The origin story of Marker’s Mark is relatively new, dating back to 1953. It began when Bill Samuels, Sr. purchased an existing distillery in Loretto, KY, and began making whisky based on his family’s 170-year-old recipe. Maker’s Mark is unusual because it uses red winter wheat in its mash bill instead of rye. And, instead of the American spelling of “whiskey,” Samuels chose “whisky” to pay homage to his Scottish-Irish heritage.

All tours must be booked online in advance and all guests must be 21 years of age or older.

Visit LaGwen Drive In that’s known for its home-made chili sauce, hamburgers, and hand-dipped cones. RVers can stay overnight at Elizabethtown Crossroads Camp.

Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory – Louisville, KY

Louisville Slugger got its start in 1844 when 17-year-old Bud Hillerich played hooky from work to take in a Louisville Eclipse baseball game. When the team’s superstar hitter broke his bat, Hillerich offered to make him a new one. 177 years later and Louisville Slugger remains family owned and proudly produces 1.8 million wood and aluminum bats a year.

The fun begins outside with the world’s largest baseball bat that stands 120 feet tall and is a replica of Babe Ruth’s 34-inch Louisville Slugger. During the factory tour, walk through the production line to see a few of the 22 steps that turn raw wood into a sleek bat. Each visitor walks off with a better understanding of this iconic brand, along with their very own souvenir mini-bat. After the tour, check out the baseball museum that’s dedicated to the game and some of its legends.

Tickets for the museum and factory tour range from $16 to free and reservations are required.

Afterwards, get a Southern fix of ribs, beef brisket or shrimp and grits at Hammerheads. RVers can stay overnight at Elizabethtown Crossroads Camp.

Ford Rouge Factory Tour – Dearborn, MI

The Ford Rouge Factory dates back to 1917 when Henry Ford first began developing the site. His vision was to achieve “a continuous, nonstop process from raw material to finished product.” At its peak in the 1930s, more than 100,000 people worked at the expansive industrial complex, and one new car rolled off the line every 49 seconds. Today, the Rouge Factory is an example of engineering and modern manufacturing coming together to create one of the country’s most popular trucks – the Ford F-150.

The self-guided tour includes two high-tech theater experiences. The Manufacturing Innovation Theater combines “floating” 3D laser projection mapping and exciting behind-the-wheel footage to take visitors from concept to highway. Top off the tour with a visit to the observation deck to see a remarkable display of industry in motion as Ford F-150s are assembled on the plant floor below.

Tickets to the Henry Ford Museum include the Rouge Factory Tour and are currently limited due to a reduced daily capacity. Tickets should be purchased in advance online.

To continue the “Ford experience,” grab lunch at Ford’s Garage that’s designed to look like a 1920s service station with vintage Ford vehicles, gas pumps, and fixtures. RVers can stay overnight at Haas Lake Park RV Campground.

Wisconsin Foamation Cheesehead Factory – Milwaukee, WI

For a “cheesy” factory tour, look no further than Wisconsin. The tour begins with everyone taking a “Wedge of Allegiance” and continues from there with plenty of groan-inducing jokes. From start to finish, see how cheeseheads are made in a small production facility in Milwaukee. On the deluxe tour, everyone can make their own cheesehead or other style of cheese-inspired hat. FYI – cheesehead was originally coined by Chicagoans as a derogatory term to describe Wisconsinites.

Ralph Bruno started the cheesehead craze in 1987. While reupholstering his mother’s couch, he took an extra piece of foam, cut it into a wedge, added holes, and made it the color of American cheese. He then wore it to a Milwaukee Brewers’ baseball game and, based on the attention and interest from fans around him, began making and selling cheeseheads. Today, cheeseheads are known around the world and can be found in various styles – top hats, visors, sombreros, and more!

The tour that includes a cheesehead hat is 45-60 minutes and starts at $25.

Visit Sobelman’s for a true Milwaukee bar/restaurant experience and be sure to take a look at their Bloody Mary offerings. RVers can stay overnight at Wisconsin State Fair RV Park or River Bend RV Resort.

Budweiser Brewery Tour – St. Louis, MO

Adolphus Busch was a German immigrant and U.S. Civil War veteran who joined his father-in-law, Eberhard Anheuser, in the brewery business after serving in the Union Army. In 1876, thanks to Busch and a friend, the brewery introduced a light-colored beer called Budweiser that Americans loved. Before Budweiser, many were drinking heavy, dark ales so a palatable, crisp lager was appreciated. In 1879, the company’s name was changed to Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association, and in 1880 Busch took over as president after Anheuser’s passing. Busch pioneered the use of refrigerated railcars and pasteurization in the brewing industry as part of his efforts to create the first nationally selling beer in the U.S.

Visitors can choose from a number of different tours. The Beermaster Tour lasts approximately 120 minutes and visits exclusive locations on the Anheuser-Busch campus. The Clydesdale VIP Experience lasts approximately 45 minutes and includes a visit to the stables and time with a Clydesdale handler who will share in-depth information about their lifestyle, training regimens, and mannerisms.

Tour tickets range in price, depending on the experience selected. When booking online, note that some tours are for guests 12 years and older while others are open to all ages.

After the tour, combine Blue’s music with a po boy or red beans and rice at Blue’s City Deli. RVers can stay overnight at Pin Oak Creek RV Park.

Hammond’s Candies – Denver, CO

10 million – that’s how many candy canes Hammond’s Candies in Denver hand makes each year. In addition to that signature cane-shaped candy, the company also produces chocolate bars, rainbow lollipops, and lemon drops. Take a free, 30-minute tour to see how this company that’s one of the oldest candy manufacturers in the U.S. makes its sweet treats.

Hammond’s Candies was founded by Carl T. Hammond, Sr. who quit high school in 1913 and got a job as a candy maker apprentice. After serving in World War I, Hammond returned to Denver and picked up where he left off in a candy factory. With several years of experience under his belt, he ventured out on his own. Early on, Hammond did everything. He developed the recipes, made the candy, sold it, and handled all the tasks required of a fledging business. Today, the company sells its handmade candies worldwide. In the U.S., its treats can be found in Whole Foods, Nordstrom’s, Dean & Deluca, Cracker Barrel and specialty shops.

Tours run every 30 minutes and online reservations are required to ensure availability.

For a self-described “square meal, stiff drink and a fair price,” visit Work & Class. RVers can spend the night at Dakota Ridge RV Park.

TABASCO Factory Tour & Museum – Avery Island, LA

Avery Island, the location where world-famous TABASCO is made, is unique just like the sauce. The island actually rises above the marshes found along coastal Louisiana and sits atop a deposit of solid rock salt that is believed to be deeper than Mount Everest is high.

The TABASCO tour is self-guided and features nine stops including the TABASCO Museum, Pepper Greenhouse, Barrel Warehouse, and TABASCO Country Store (the bottling line stop is currently closed). The Country Store shouldn’t be missed since visitors can taste a variety of TABASCO products, including Tabasco-flavored ice cream and “Original Red” that’s sold in more than 195 countries and territories. The original recipe was created by Edmund McIlhenny in 1868 and has been used by the McIlhenny family for more than 150 years. Most visitors are surprised to learn that only three ingredients are used in the sauce – aged red peppers, salt, and distilled vinegar. Once the three ingredients are combined, the pepper mash is placed into oak barrels, topped with a layer of salt, stored in the Barrel Warehouse, and aged for three years.

Tickets range from $12.50 to free and the tour is open daily.

Check out the Tabasco Restaurant on Avery Island or venture to Landry’s Cajun Seafood & Steakhouse 15 minutes away. RVers can spend the night at Frog City RV Park.

Tillamook Creamery – Tillamook, OR

Tillamook Creamery is the largest tourist attraction on the coast of Oregon and one of the most popular in the state. The creamery offers a free, self-guided tour that shares details about life on a dairy farm, allows visitors to watch milk being made into cheese, and, most importantly, provides complimentary samples. For those who would like to learn the secrets behind Tillamook’s extra creamy ice cream, make a reservation for the small group Exclusive Ice Cream Experience. Get a hands-on look, and taste, of how extra creamy Tillamook Ice Cream goes from milk to market.

Tillamook County Creamery Association (TCCA) was founded in 1909 when several small creameries each contributed $10 to start the cooperative to ensure all cheeses made in the Tillamook Valley would be produced with the same high level of quality. Today, the TCCA is owned by almost 80 farming families, and is proud to make award-winning cheese, yogurt, sour cream, ice cream, and butter.

The creamery recommends visiting during the week to see employees working in the facility. Tickets to the Ice Cream Experience range from $15 – 20 for children and adults.

Just a few minutes away, visit Dutch Mill Café, a ’50s diner with checkerboard flooring, old time booths, and the front clip of a 1957 Chevy. RVers can spend the night at Pleasant Valley RV Park.

About REV Group, Inc.

REV Group® companies are leading designers and manufacturers of specialty vehicles and related aftermarket parts and services. Our companies serve a diversified customer base, primarily in the United States, through three segments: Fire & Emergency, Commercial, and Recreation. They provide customized vehicle solutions for applications, including essential needs for public services (ambulances, fire apparatus, school buses, and transit buses), commercial infrastructure (terminal trucks and industrial sweepers) and consumer leisure (recreational vehicles). REV’s diverse portfolio is made up of well-established principal vehicle brands, including many of the most recognizable names within their industry. Several of our brands pioneered their specialty vehicle product categories and date back more than 50 years. REV Group trades on the NYSE under the symbol REVG. Investors-REVG

Page Kennedy illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q×A with Page Kennedy

ACTOR & RAPPER PAGE KENNEDY JOINS 360 MAGAZINE FOR SOME Q&A

By: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Page Kennedy is well known as a rapper and actor within our entertainment industry. Kennedy’s recent acting skills brought him to play “Duck” on Netflix’s “The Upshaws”, one of their newest series to hit streaming platforms starring alongside Kim Fields (Regina Upshaw), Mike Epps (Bennie Upshaw), and Wanda Skyes (Lucretia). He is also known for his roles in “Blue Mountain State”, “Weeds” and his comedic genius skits shared on Instagram and TikTok.

Kennedy’s self-titled album ‘Page’ was released in February 2021 featuring heavyweight rappers Xzibit and Method Man is available now on all streaming platforms – make sure you go check it out!

360 Magazine had the pleasure of interviewing Page Kennedy where we discussed “The Upshaws”, his character ‘Duck’, music, and his fitness journey. We had an amazing conversation about his media roles, the love for Eminem, and also found out that we both favor Cardi B because of the way she represents herself: “Cardi B makes me feel like I know her”, said Kennedy.

Read on to hear about our conversation with Page!

Your Netflix series, “The Upshaws”, came out today- how do you feel about working with it?

PK: I love it, you know I was a part of it, and I still watch the series multiple times. I can’t get tired of it. I can just go to any episode and watch it- it has so many great jokes and the characters are diverse, and they bring their own style, energy and creativity. I think it’s the funniest show on TV.

How is it working with the cast?

PK: Working with the cast is great. You know, you got legends there. You’ve got Kim Fields, the ultimate foremost legend, Mike Epps who is a comic genius, Wanda Skyes- comic genius. They are good people, and everybody is happy to be here, so it makes it fun.

Do you feel that you have any similar traits to your character Duck within yourself?

PK: I’ve been asked that question and, let me see, I look at Duck as a different character than what I typically play. The only similarity that I see between me and Duck is his loyalty. He is loyal to a fault. You know, he spent 7-10 years in jail where he could have gotten less time where he could have ratted out his friend who could have been his co-defendant, but he just took it. I think I have a loyalty like Duck. Other than that, he’s a little different than me.

Let’s talk about your latest album. How did you feel about the creative direction within the videos for “Fear” and “Safe”? How did you work through the process of such a real and raw album?

PK: I wanted to make use of all of my talents to create an art- that was my goal. My goal was to take the amalgamation of talents that I have to coalesce to create art that could be ubiquitous forever. You know, that’s what I feel I accomplished because things are great 20 years from now and it’s still going to be great. You can still listen to Biggie because it’s incredible, it’s timeless and that’s what I wanted to do. I feel like I accomplished that.

Can you tell us about the song “Shine”?

PK: I think that the album needed some respite because it’s very heavy and after you listen to Fear and Safe, it’s so cumbersome that you need some respite. And so that’s what Shine provides. It still takes a look at how difficult 2019 was personally for me and then 2020 was for everyone. The face of darkness, there is light after, and I wanted to show that the Devil will not take that light away. We will shine.

Can you tell us about your album cover?

PK: The cover of the album is confluence of tragic incident of black Americans who have had their lives taken from them at the hands of police brutality. That confluence is to show that they are me. You know, they all make up me; I am the same as them and so I wanted to, through me, show them. Wait until you get to the song “Flowers”, that is my favorite song on the album.

At the end of some of your videos, there is mention of voting- what are you trying to show viewers?

PK: So, creating Fear was so I could galvanize the troops to go vote because we can’t just yell from the rafters “We are being disrespected”, “We are being overlooked”. We have to actually get in the dirt and, you know, do things that cause change. Our biggest voice was our vote. The virality of those videos was to have the embolism of to vote throughout the video. To help people want to get out and vote after they see the deleterious effects of what fear can do on both sides so that’s why you see that throughout the videos.

Let’s talk about your fitness journey. What motivated you to get started?

PK: I got tired of looking at myself in movies and TV fat as hell and I was more attractive in my head than I was externally, so I wanted to match that.

So, there’s a lot of excuses that I think many people use such as “I can’t afford to go to the gym” or “I hurt too much to do this”. How did you push past your own excuses?

PK: I have an additive personality so once I get into something, I’m locked in and I got my mind right and ready. I had help, a tool to help me out with the point of why I was overweight which was my addiction to food. And so, I got gastro sleeve surgery which made my stomach smaller so that I couldn’t overeat. That helped. That was like the catalyst to help me and the working out thing- I already had that down. I had challenges where I would workout 100 straight days and another challenge where I went a straight year of working out without missing any days. My mind was already set to go to the gym, I just needed to get the food stuff right.

Do you still workout consistently?

PK: Yep, I’m still in it. Even when the gyms were closed, I found a way to get the workout in.

What advice would you offer somebody as far as starting out on their journey? If they were with you and undecided about their journey because of lack of motivation.

PK: I would say to make it something that is a part of your daily life that you don’t have a choice of. You don’t have a choice if you need to go to the bathroom or not, you don’t have a choice whether you like eating or not. These are things that must happen regardless of what you want or not. So, if you make the gym or workout a part of that, you take the lack of motivation away. We can have things taken away for us and see how resilient we could be. If you’re in jail or in a weight loss camp or anywhere that caused your free will to be taken away and you are forced to do something, you can do it because you have to. So why have to be in a situation where some other exterior force forces you to when you have a mind and brain that is going to be the thing to make you do it anyway.

Do you have a specific meal plan?

PK: Sometimes, yes. I go in spurts. Some weeks I have no carbs and no sugar. Then some weeks I am a little looser. I just try to be moderate because I could easily go really far one way or really far the other way. It’s not until I’m actually preparing for something that I go super crazy. Other than that, I just try and stay in striking range.

Do you allow yourself to have treats?

PK: Yep, probably more than I should.

What kind of workouts do you do?

PK: Well, when I get off the phone with you, I have a trainer, so I am going to the gym. Wednesday is leg day, which sucks. I work out with a trainer 3-4 days a week and then two other days I have an Oculus virtual reality thing that I do a supernatural workout on or I ride my bike for 20 miles to the beach on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Is there anything else that you’d like to talk about or anything that you’d like to share with our readers?

PK: I just want them to the importance of the album “Page” and how it’s important to everyone in the world right to be aware of everything that happening right now and everything that’s going on. And that if this album was released by a bigger artist, it would be a Grammy-nominated type of album – that’s how important this album is. I just implore everyone to continue to listen to it and check it out because I think it’s necessary. That’s the main thing that I want- and watch “The Upshaws” on Netflix streaming now.

Katie Sandler illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Motivation with Katie Sandler

How to Get Off Autopilot to Move Your Career (and Life) Forward

Katie Sandler, career development and impact coach, offers tips on how people can get things moving again

Millions of people feel like they are living their life on autopilot. This is the word to describe when day in and day out, it’s the same thing, to the point that many feel they are sleepwalking through life. Polling by Strada Education Network finds that many people feel stuck in their career and don’t know what will help them improve their circumstances. In fact, 32% of those people say they don’t even know where to begin in order to make things better and become unstuck. The good news is there are things that can be done to get off of autopilot and move your career and life along in a better direction.

“Oftentimes, people simply suggest training or educational programs in order to move your career along, but there are plenty of other things you can do,” explains Katie Sandler, personal development and career coach. “We need to get off autopilot in life as a whole, not just in our careers. Once you do this, you will become more successful and ultimately enjoy life a lot more.”

Those who feel stuck, both in their careers and in life in general, can take action to change those feelings. It all comes down to knowing what to do and how to get started. Sandler has helped many people to move past such a place and says some of the things that people can do include:

  • Get help. First and foremost, people need to start recognizing that you cannot do it alone and you need to hire someone to be a coach, a sounding board, and a catalyst.
  • Set the intention. You must set the intention and energy around creating new shifts in order to move in a different direction or at a different pace. AKA you have to decide to get off of autopilot in the first place.
  • Discover yourself. Recognize that you need to become familiar with yourself and your patterns of being – again, something you cannot do alone – in order to be able to make adjustments. This takes time, and it takes working with someone to help you see your patterns, to draw connections, to build understanding, and then to support you in reprogramming for desired outcomes.
  • Answer to yourself.  You also have to stop meeting society’s ideals, your family’s ideals, etc. and be open-minded and willing to do you, to be your authentic self and to honor what that means so that your career and life is filled with purpose and impact.
  • Making a decision. Oftentimes, people feel stuck because they are not sure what to choose. They consider various options and can’t decide what to do, so they don’t make any decision at all. That will keep you stuck, so make a decision so you can move forward with something.
  • Try new things. One of the most common reasons that people get stuck in life is that they don’t try anything new. They do the same things over and over, which ends up being autopilot. Make a point to try something new every month, whether it be for fun or for your career. This will help get you energized and so you can engage in life in a different way.
  • Start small. If you don’t like being stuck but fear making big changes, start small. Making small changes in various areas can add up to big results. Commit to the first small change, and then go from there as you get more empowered along the way.

“Nobody enjoys feeling like their life or career is stuck in one place,” added Sandler. “If that’s where you are, then it’s time to do yourself a favor and make shake things up. Working on honoring yourself will bring joy and peace to your life. Think of it as a gift to yourself, which ripples and benefits those around you as well.”

Sandler has provided professional support to many people to help them achieve their personal and professional goals. She routinely works with people to help them identify areas to focus on, paths for personal achievement, how to reach their life goals, and more. She also works with companies, providing impact trainings and workshops and developing and promoting purposeful and inclusive organizational cultures.

In addition to one-on-one coaching and corporate services, Sandler also offers low-key luxury impact retreats. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology, a master’s degree in mental health counseling, has a strong foundation in mindfulness-based stress reduction, and has worked in hospitals and private practice. She previously spent time as a research assistant while at Johns Hopkins focusing on purpose in life. To learn more about Katie Sandler and her services, or to see the retreat schedule, visit Katie Sandler’s website.

About Katie Sandler

Katie Sandler is the popular Impact Coach and provides health & wealth coaching and personal and professional development. She offers retreats around the world, as well as private coaching and corporate impact coaching opportunities. She focuses on helping people become more successful so they can live with purpose and make an impact in our world. To learn more about Katie or her services, visit the site: her website.

Gigi Vega illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rising Star Gigi Vega

360 Magazine had the opportunity to ask rising star, Gigi Vega, questions that her fans would want to know. Gigi Vega debuted her hit song “Mistletoe Kiss” taking the holiday music charts by storm. She went viral on TikTok with 10 million views and 15k videos. In addition to writing and producing, GiGi is a dancer and choreographer. Read on to learn more about Gigi!

GIGI VEGA INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: 

1. How has your family inspired you and your music?

GV: I would always do little shows and auditions. My father is a jazz musician. He would play the piano, so I was always surrounded by music, and theater as well. 

2. What or who inspired your song “Watchu Tryna Do?”

GV: It just happened. Actually, had it for a while, but was finally able to come back to it. Originally, the lyrics were supposed to be “in the club”, instead of “in the crib”. But I had to make adjustments due to COVID 19

3. Talk about your producer on this song? 

GV: Jack London. He has worked with the Chainsmokers.

4. Where do you get your ideas for songwriting? 

GV: Melodies just come to me. Melodies come first for me. Lyrics come from everyday life experiences. I’ve always been into dancing and singing. It’s something that just clicked for me, but I got more into it once I started composing my own songs.

5. What charities are you aligned with and why? 

GV: Anti-bullying programs.

6. What acting projects will you be involved with in the future?

GV: I will be in The Drone That Saved Christmas. Production begins in March. After that, I hope the COVID situation improves, so I can be touring.

7. Who are your biggest influences?

GV: Janet Jackson. Definitely into anyone who is super full out, and she is one of them.

8. What advice would you give to a singer starting out?

GV: Don’t let anyone steer you in the direction of what they want you to be – it is not worth it, ever.

9. Talk about your training as a triple threat, what do you do to stay on top? 

GV: Just take a look at my Music video, it is all there. Acting, dancing, singing. I have trained in all three disciplines since I was very young. My dance training was focused on modern dance, but I am schooled in all disciplines. I have always been on stage or behind the camera, so it is second nature.

10. How do you take care of your voice? 

GV: Regular training, like an athlete. Lots of lemon and pineapple juice, as well.

11. If you could collaborate with another artist, who would it be?

GV: Chris Brown or Jason Derulo. Dancer/singer like I am. Janet – anyone who is full out, as mentioned before.

12. What is on your playlist right now?

GV: Omarion, Michael Jackson, Ariana Grande, Billie Eilish, Pop Smoke, Jason Derulo.

13. Who are you currently watching on TikTok?

GV: Everything that comes across my feed.:)

14. When did you know you wanted to be an entertainer? 

GV: Never thought about anything else. I was on stage from an early age. I made the move from stage to commercial work in my teens. Once I learned how to write solid music, I knew I wanted to record music. It was a process. I spent hundreds of hours in the studio as a kid.

15. What artist did you admire as a child?

 GV: I loved watching Janet Jackson, Michael Jackson is my absolute favorite.

16. Do you play any instruments? 

GV: I pluck out notes on the piano and guitar to help my melodies. Had many lessons and music theory, but I won’t be accompanying myself just yet.

17. What’s your fashion style?

GV: I like more tropical vibes, or casual, put-together vibes, but I always like to switch it up. I can be glam or a Tomboy. Get a girl who can do both.

18. What do you do to relax?

GV: I love fashion, always putting fashion pieces together. I learned to sew as a child, went to classes and camps for years. I was one of those kids who got a new shirt, and then I would go to my room and change the shape and design. I love listening to music and writing. Honestly, writing is my happy space.

19. What other businesses do you plan on starting to promote your brand?

GV: I am very into sneakers and shoes. I have so many different designs in my head that need to come out.

20. What’s the one thing you think everyone could do to make the world a more positive place?

GV: Less judgment of others, especially strangers.

Image courtesy of Jodi Jackson
Empowering women by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Lauren Rottet Pays Tribute

Architect and Interior Designer Lauren Rottet pays tribute
to Women’s History Month

Rottet’s ongoing commitment to her profession is female-forward

Lauren Rottet, FAIA, FIIDA, internationally celebrated architect, designer, and founding principal/president and owner of Rottet Studio, acknowledges Women’s History Month, and her continuing commitment to the design industry and to women who create public and private spaces.

A WBE-certified business, Rottet Studio occupies a unique place in the industry – over 60% of their full-time staff are female. Rottet is also the first woman in history to be elevated to Fellow status, the highest membership honor, by both the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and International Interior Design Association (IIDA).  In the past two decades, Rottet has broken new ground with award-winning furniture, office, workplace, and hospitality design.  Her firm’s output totals more than 65 million sq. ft. of built design.

“I was raised by a father who told me that there wouldn’t be a difference between men and women in my generation, and I needed a career so that I wouldn’t need to rely on anybody else.” This is how Rottet described her decision to study architecture, after forgoing a career in medicine. “Fewer than 10 percent of women graduated in my class, but I didn’t really think consciously about being a woman in architecture. I never really thought about it as a male field,” she adds.

“I think probably the best career advice I ever received, was just to listen. You want to immediately come up with a solution or an idea, and instantly respond, but I think if you sit back and listen to the parameters,
to what the client wants, what the surroundings tell you about a project, I think that’s probably the most helpful professional advice one can give.” 

“They always say, ‘Hire your replacement, because then you can do bigger and better things,’” she says about the hiring and mentoring process. “The key to being a good mentor is recognizing when you can’t do it all by yourself, and that you have to teach someone else how to do it. The education of our staff, and of our clients is absolutely key.”

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hits High Point During Winter

Carbon monoxide is winter’s “silent killer.” Unintentional carbon monoxide deaths kill more than 400 Americans each year and sicken many others. It’s a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas undetectable to the human senses, so people don’t realize that they are being poisoned. Tragically in 2020, California lost a number of residents from carbon monoxide poison related to faulty wall heaters and other sources of carbon monoxide. Watch the video https://youtu.be/3BT_hDb4uqE.

Products that are typically involved in poisonings include malfunctioning fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, ranges, water heaters and room heaters; engine-powered equipment such as portable generators; fireplaces; and charcoal that is burned in homes and other enclosed areas.

Symptoms can be variable, ranging from headache, fatigue, shortness of breath and dizziness to loss of consciousness and chest pain. Carbon monoxide poisoning can happen slowly or swiftly depending on circumstances. In an effort to raise public awareness, California Poison Control offers 10 tips to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning:

1. Have all heating equipment installed properly, and have a home or rental’s heating system inspected by a professional prior to turning the heat on when cold weather begins.

2. Carbon monoxide detectors should be installed in all homes, apartments, mobile homes and workplaces. When a detector goes off, assume that a real danger is present, and get all people and pets out of the structure immediately. Do not re-enter until a heating professional, the gas company or the fire department has declared the area safe.

3. During home renovations, ensure that appliance vents and chimneys are not blocked by tarps or debris. Make sure appliances are in proper working order when renovations are complete.

4. Do not cover the bottom of natural gas or propane ovens with aluminum foil.

5. Never use fuel-burning camping equipment inside a home, garage, vehicle or tent unless it is specifically designed for use in an enclosed space and provides instructions for safe use in such an area.

6. In climates with snow, make sure that chimneys and vents do not become blocked with snowfall.

7. Never operate a portable generator or any other gasoline engine-powered tool either in or near an enclosed space such as a garage, house or other building, or outside of an open window.  Keep the generator as far from the house as possible.

8. Do not use charcoal or hibachi grills indoors to cook with or for heat under any circumstances.

9. Do not attempt to heat your home by turning on the oven or clothes dryer and leaving the door open.

10. Never let a car engine run inside a closed space such as a garage. Drive out promptly after starting the car, and turn the car engine off as soon as you drive into an enclosed space. Never have a garage door closed with a running vehicle inside, even for a few seconds.  

About California Poison Control

CPCS is dedicated to providing the most up-to-date information regarding poison prevention. In case of an accidental poisoning, consumers should immediately call the nationwide number from any state1-800-222-1222. Pharmacists, nurses, physician-toxicologists and poison information providers are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to help.

Weekly tips about safety are available by texting TIPS to 20121 for information in English or text PUNTOS to 20121 for Spanish. Follow CPCS on Facebook and on Twitter @poisoninfo. CPCS is part of the University of California San Francisco School of Pharmacy and is responsible to the California Emergency Medical Services Authority.

Illustration for 360 Magazine art story

Ways to Achieve a Positive Mindset To Help You Succeed

A positive mindset helps people make the best choices and decisions for themselves, their jobs, and those around them. Learning to practice having a positive mindset also fosters a strong relationship with yourself and others as it relies on engaging in and maturing your internal dialogue. It helps in building resilience, creating a positive and optimistic attitude and ultimately leads to greater success and well-being.  The good news is that there are things people can do to have a more positive mindset.

“There are so many benefits of cultivating a positive mindset,” explains Katie Sandler, personal development and career coach. “The goal is to learn how to do it and then continue practicing it until utilizing a positive mindset becomes a way of life. It can be done, and when it is, you will be far more successful and content as a result.”

A positive mindset is a mental and emotional attitude – it’s about making the choice to think positively. If we think positively then typically beneficial behaviors and actions follow. Sandler has helped many people to shift their mindset and use the power of it to achieve goals and become more successful in multiple areas of their life. Some of the ways she has helped her clients to achieve a positive mindset include:

  • Practice mindfulness. When you are living in the moment and are aware of what is going on in the present moment with a kind and open attitude, you are being mindful. Many people worry about the past or the future, which tends to lead to symptoms of stress, depression or anxiety. But, when you attune to the here and now without judgement, you are better able to remain positive and achieve your goals. As your mind wanders, which it’s trained to do, simply acknowledge it and gently bring it back to the present moment by focusing on your breath.
  • Have an attitude of gratitude. Being grateful means noticing even the small things in your life that you appreciate. It’s a way to savor the moment, be positive and look for the possibilities in whatever life throws your way. When you do this on a regular basis, it helps to flex your mindset muscles – train yourself to be grateful and express gratitude and notice the good things that happen all around you.
  • Keep it real. Life is not easy or peachy keen. As a matter of fact, it is actually more difficult than it is easy, but no one wants to admit this. So let’s face the facts – we have to work at having a positive mindset, period, and anything worth having doesn’t come easy because life is hard.
  • Engage your internal dialogue. You know that voice you hear in your head? Well you’re not alone, because we all have an inner voice we hear. The thing is, a lot of people don’t realize that you can in fact engage with that part of yourself, and with a loving and kind attitude, you can work with yourself to mature your mindset.
  • Commit to it and keep practicing. People tend to think that knowing what to do is half the battle, but that’s not true. If you don’t put it into practice then it doesn’t do you much good to know it. You have to learn new habits and ways of being, implement them, test them out, and continually work at getting better at them.
  • Define what success means to you. At the end of the day, how we define success varies for us all, but this definition is for sure: To achieve well-being, a state of fulfillment and contentment, and a positive mindset is the type of success we should all hope for – the type of success we all need and deserve.

“One of the most important things you can do in life is to shift your mindset so that you can truly enjoy the life you’re living,” added Sandler. “It will be beneficial in nearly all areas of your life, helping you to become healthier, happier, and more successful. Make this the year that you put positivity front and center.”

A positive mindset can help people experience greater levels of happiness, and being happier helps people to become more positive – it’s a cycle. In an issue of the journal called Canadian Family Physician, a doctor wrote what he called a prescription for happiness. The three things he prescribed to help people be happier are spending time outdoors in a natural environment daily, starting every morning by thinking of three things to be grateful for, and surrounding yourself with supportive people.

Sandler has provided professional support to many people to help them achieve their personal and professional goals. She routinely works with people to help them identify areas to focus on, paths for personal achievement, how to reach their life goals, and more. She also works with companies providing impact trainings and workshops, developing and promoting purposeful and inclusive organizational cultures. Through her efforts, companies have been able to reduce absenteeism rates, motivate their team, reduce stress levels, engage their employees, and create a workplace in which to thrive.

In addition to one-on-one coaching services, Sandler offers impact retreats and corporate impact events. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in mental health counseling, has a strong foundation in mindfulness-based stress reduction, and has worked in hospitals and private practices. She has also spent time as a research assistant at Johns Hopkins. Upcoming retreats include Rest and Renew in Asheville, NC, Mindfulness in Mykonos, Rewire and Renew in The French Alps, and Mindfulness & Mindset in The Hamptons. To learn more about Katie Sandler and her services, or to see the retreat schedule, visit the site: https://katiesandler.com/.

About Katie Sandler

Katie Sandler is a popular impact and private wellness coach. She offers retreats around the world, as well as private coaching and corporate impact coaching opportunities. She focuses on helping people become more successful, overcome adversity, and reach new career goals. To learn more about Katie or her services, visit the site: https://katiesandler.com/.