Posts tagged with "Q&A"

Inhuman illustration by Heather Skovlund (Cover art for Inhuman provided by Smith Publicity) for 360 Magazine

Eric Leland × Inhuman

A Gripping Military Horror with Shocking Supernatural Twists

Q&A WITH ERIC LELAND:

AUTHOR OF Inhuman MILITARY THRILLER DEBUT

Question: What inspired you to write Inhuman?

Eric Leland: During a class for my MA I wrote a 25-page short story titled Recon Team: Mercury. That story was shortened to five pages and is now the prologue to Inhuman. For a NaNoWriMo idea I thought it would be interesting to see what happened when the rescuers came looking for the team that disappeared in my original short story. Inhuman is the result.

Q: What sets Inhuman apart from other military and horror books?

EL: The bravado one comes to expect when reading military fiction is quickly ripped away to expose and pick at the delicate flesh of fear and self-doubt we are ashamed to admit exists.

Q: What do you hope readers will take away from the book?

EL: It was never my intent for Inhuman to be didactic. Primarily I hope readers are entertained. I hope readers will remember the experience of Inhuman rather than any particular lesson.

Q: Inhuman features a diverse cast of characters. How did your military friendships, and experiences with “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” inform this inclusivity?

EL: A diverse cast adds verisimilitude to military fiction simply because any U.S. military unit features a diverse roster. In my first combat experience I found myself fighting shoulder to shoulder with Mexican Americans, an African American, and a gay woman. Unfortunately, DADT was still a thing for most of my military career and I would only find out after DADT was repealed that some of my greatest friends were gay. I think truth in fiction is important, and if I did not write a diverse cast I would by lying. Readers can spot a lie from a mile out.

Q: How did you develop your characters? And which of them do you have the strongest connection to?

EL: The character Jaran is heavily based on my wife’s experiences who was born in Vietnam. At an early age, she and her family fled to a refugee camp after the war. The chaos of displacement during war time seemed terrifying. I can’t really say which character I have the strongest connection to—John’s sense of duty; Chris’s refusal to take anything seriously; and Brandon’s severe depression and self-doubt—they’re all variations of me.

Eric Leland grew up in Massena, NY and entered Army basic training upon high school graduation. He was an MP in the Army for six years and reclassified to a Special Agent with the Army Criminal Investigation Division. Eric deployed to Honduras in 2002, and Iraq in 2003 and 2009 where he was awarded an Army Commendation Medal with “V” device for valor. He completed his MA in Creative Writing from Southern New Hampshire University and has happily traded in his gun for a pen. Eric lives in Seattle with his wife. Connect with Eric Leland on Facebook, Instagram, and Goodreads.

Inhuman is available on Amazon in both print and digital.

Audiobook forthcoming in Summer 2021.

Gigi Vega illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Rising Star Gigi Vega

360 Magazine had the opportunity to ask rising star, Gigi Vega, questions that her fans would want to know. Gigi Vega debuted her hit song “Mistletoe Kiss” taking the holiday music charts by storm. She went viral on TikTok with 10 million views and 15k videos. In addition to writing and producing, GiGi is a dancer and choreographer. Read on to learn more about Gigi!

GIGI VEGA INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: 

1. How has your family inspired you and your music?

GV: I would always do little shows and auditions. My father is a jazz musician. He would play the piano, so I was always surrounded by music, and theater as well. 

2. What or who inspired your song “Watchu Tryna Do?”

GV: It just happened. Actually, had it for a while, but was finally able to come back to it. Originally, the lyrics were supposed to be “in the club”, instead of “in the crib”. But I had to make adjustments due to COVID 19

3. Talk about your producer on this song? 

GV: Jack London. He has worked with the Chainsmokers.

4. Where do you get your ideas for songwriting? 

GV: Melodies just come to me. Melodies come first for me. Lyrics come from everyday life experiences. I’ve always been into dancing and singing. It’s something that just clicked for me, but I got more into it once I started composing my own songs.

5. What charities are you aligned with and why? 

GV: Anti-bullying programs.

6. What acting projects will you be involved with in the future?

GV: I will be in The Drone That Saved Christmas. Production begins in March. After that, I hope the COVID situation improves, so I can be touring.

7. Who are your biggest influences?

GV: Janet Jackson. Definitely into anyone who is super full out, and she is one of them.

8. What advice would you give to a singer starting out?

GV: Don’t let anyone steer you in the direction of what they want you to be – it is not worth it, ever.

9. Talk about your training as a triple threat, what do you do to stay on top? 

GV: Just take a look at my Music video, it is all there. Acting, dancing, singing. I have trained in all three disciplines since I was very young. My dance training was focused on modern dance, but I am schooled in all disciplines. I have always been on stage or behind the camera, so it is second nature.

10. How do you take care of your voice? 

GV: Regular training, like an athlete. Lots of lemon and pineapple juice, as well.

11. If you could collaborate with another artist, who would it be?

GV: Chris Brown or Jason Derulo. Dancer/singer like I am. Janet – anyone who is full out, as mentioned before.

12. What is on your playlist right now?

GV: Omarion, Michael Jackson, Ariana Grande, Billie Eilish, Pop Smoke, Jason Derulo.

13. Who are you currently watching on TikTok?

GV: Everything that comes across my feed.:)

14. When did you know you wanted to be an entertainer? 

GV: Never thought about anything else. I was on stage from an early age. I made the move from stage to commercial work in my teens. Once I learned how to write solid music, I knew I wanted to record music. It was a process. I spent hundreds of hours in the studio as a kid.

15. What artist did you admire as a child?

 GV: I loved watching Janet Jackson, Michael Jackson is my absolute favorite.

16. Do you play any instruments? 

GV: I pluck out notes on the piano and guitar to help my melodies. Had many lessons and music theory, but I won’t be accompanying myself just yet.

17. What’s your fashion style?

GV: I like more tropical vibes, or casual, put-together vibes, but I always like to switch it up. I can be glam or a Tomboy. Get a girl who can do both.

18. What do you do to relax?

GV: I love fashion, always putting fashion pieces together. I learned to sew as a child, went to classes and camps for years. I was one of those kids who got a new shirt, and then I would go to my room and change the shape and design. I love listening to music and writing. Honestly, writing is my happy space.

19. What other businesses do you plan on starting to promote your brand?

GV: I am very into sneakers and shoes. I have so many different designs in my head that need to come out.

20. What’s the one thing you think everyone could do to make the world a more positive place?

GV: Less judgment of others, especially strangers.

Image courtesy of Jodi Jackson
Digital Divide illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Digitally Disconnected

DIGITALLY DISCONNECTED

13 TIPS FOR HELPING BRIDGE THE DIGITAL DIVIDE FOR CHILDREN DURING COVID-19

While social, racial, and economic disparities have always existed within the educational system, the COVID-19 pandemic is exasperating these inequities and widening gaps between students at a drastic rate. For families who can’t afford home computers, laptops, or high-speed internet access, remote learning is nearly impossible, and for students who already found themselves struggling before the pandemic, the prospect of more than a year of lost classroom time is a devastating blow. However, there are steps parents can take to shrink this digital divide, and there are resources available via schools, non-profits, and government initiatives that can help children access the technological tools they need to succeed. Indeed, Dr. Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra, President and Founder of Children and Screens, notes that “the inclusion of 17.2 billion dollars for closing the ‘homework gap’ in the recently passed American Rescue Plan is a watershed moment for digital equity.”   
 
Several of the leading figures in the fields of public health, education, psychology, and parenting have weighed in with their suggestions on the best ways to combat the digital divide, and many will participate in an interdisciplinary conversation and Q&A hosted by Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development on Wednesday, March 24, at 12pm ET via Zoom. Moderated by the Director of Internet and Technology Research at the Pew Research Center Lee Rainie, the panel will engage in an in-depth discussion about the digital divide and actionable steps we can all take to bridge the gap. RSVP here.
 
1. DON’T WAIT, ADVOCATE 

While schools across the country are doing everything they can to make sure that children have access to the technology and connectivity they need for remote learning, the unfortunate reality is that many families still lack adequate resources. If your family is among them, says author and MIT Assistant Professor of Digital Media Justin Reich, know that you’re not alone and that there are steps you can take to advocate for what your children need. “Start with your school staff,” Reich recommends. “They’re often overwhelmed during this challenging time but be polite and persistent. If you run into a dead-end with your school system, consider reaching out to school libraries and youth organizations like The Boys and Girls Club or the YMCA to see what kind of support they might be able to offer.”
 
2. SCALE DOWN 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Professor Dr. Wayne Journell agrees, pointing out that sometimes, despite their best efforts, teachers and administrators may not always know which students are struggling with connectivity issues. “Let teachers know if you have slow internet at home,” says Journell. “Sometimes detailed graphics and animations that look cute but have little relevance to the actual lessons being delivered can cause problems for students with unreliable internet. If teachers are aware, then they can scale down the ‘frilly’ stuff and still get the important content across.”
 
3. STAND UP FOR YOURSELF  

While it’s important for parents to speak up on behalf of their children, RAND Senior Policy Researcher Julia Kaufman, Ph.D., highlights the importance of encouraging children to express their needs, as well. “If your child does not have access to technology at home and is falling behind, make sure your child’s teacher knows the obstacles they’re facing and ask what accommodations will make it easier for your child to do assignments offline,” says Rand. “At the same time, help your child feel comfortable expressing any technology concerns or confusion to their teachers, including cases where they have the technology but cannot use it well.”
 
4. CHECK YOUR ASSUMPTIONS 

One critical step that educators and policymakers can take in addressing the digital divide is to check their assumptions. They cannot – and should not – assume that students do or do not have access based solely on demographics such as family income level. “In addition, they cannot assume that providing access alone creates equity,” adds Dr. Beth Holland, a Partner at The Learning Accelerator (TLA) and Digital Equity Advisor to the Consortium of School Networking (CoSN). “This is a complex and nuanced challenge that needs both a technical and a human solution to ensure that students not only have access to sufficient high-speed internet and devices but also accessible systems and structures to support their learning.”

5. SURVEY AND MODIFY  

For teachers who are on the ground and in the classroom, checking your assumptions can be as simple as asking a few basic questions at the start of the term. “Survey students to determine the percentage of your population that doesn’t have home Internet access,” recommends former AAP President Dr. Colleen A. Kraft, MD, MBA, FAAP. “Once you know the divide, you can address it,” adding, “When planning 1:1 projects and choosing devices, for example, you can consider a device’s capacity for offline use. For those without Wi-Fi, a public library in the child’s neighborhood can also be an excellent resource.”

6. VOTE FOR CHANGE 

That parents and teachers need to worry about the digital divide at all is a failure on the part of our elected leaders, says Bates College Associate Professor of Education Mara Casey Tieken. “Contact your elected officials—local, state, and federal—and complain,” she suggests. “Write letters, call their offices, attend their legislative sessions, and make your voice heard. Join with other families whose children are impacted by this divide to amplify your message and use your vote to support lawmakers who understand the impacts of this divide, have a clear plan to address it and are willing to take action.”
 
7. MAKE BROADBAND A UTILITY  

Reich agrees, reminding those families who already have their needs met that they share in the responsibility to advocate for the less fortunate. “It’s our job as citizens to demand that we as a society give families and children the tools and resources that they need for remote learning now and in the future,” says Reich. “We need to advocate for a society where broadband is treated as a utility rather than a luxury good, and young people enrolled in schools and educational programs have access to computers for learning.”

8. CONCRETE INITIATIVES  

Angela Siefer, Executive Director of the National Digital Inclusion Alliance, advocates four concrete initiatives. “Establish a permanent broadband benefit, increase access to affordable computers, digital literacy and technical support, improve broadband mapping (including residential cost data), and support local and state digital inclusion planning.” By implementing these changes, Siefer says, policymakers can start to mitigate the digital divide. 

9. USE TECH FOR GOOD 

There are many reasons to consider equitable solutions along a “digital continuum” rather than the “digital divide;” a binary description leaves less room for nuanced and customized interventions. It may be imperative to fortify existing institutions, implement new governance structures and promulgate policies to confront disparities regarding working families. Antwuan Wallace, Managing Director at National Innovation Service, suggests that legislators consider a Safety and Thriving framework to increase family efficacy to support children with protective factors against the “homework gap” by utilizing technology to train critical skills for executive functioning, including planning, working memory, and prioritization. 
 
10. LEVEL THE FIELD 

Emma Garcia of the Economic Policy Institute emphasizes that guided technology education will be of great value after the pandemic. She says, “it will need be instituted as part of a very broad agenda that uses well-designed diagnostic tests to know where children are and what they need (in terms of knowledge, socioemotional development, and wellbeing), ensures the right number of highly credentialed professionals to teach and support students, and offers an array of targeted investments that will address the adverse impacts of COVID-19 on children’s learning and development, especially for those who were most hit by the pandemic.”
 
11. APPLY FOR LIFELINE 

Research also shows that the digital divide disproportionately affects Latino, Black, and Native American students, with the expensive price of internet access serving as one of the main obstacles to families in these communities. “Eligible parents can apply for the Lifeline Program, which is a federal program that can reduce their monthly phone and internet cost,” suggests Greenlining Institute fellow Gissela Moya. “Parents can also ask their child’s school to support them by providing hotspots and computer devices to ensure their child has the tools they need to succeed.”
 
12. GET INVOLVED 

Learning remotely can be difficult for kids, even if they have access to all the technological tools they need. Research shows that parental encouragement is also an important aspect of learning for children, notes London School of Economics professor and author Sonia Livingstone. “Perhaps sit with them, and gently explain what’s required or work it out together.” She adds that working together is a great way that parents with fewer economic or digital resources can support their children. “And if you don’t know much about computers, your child can probably teach you something too!”
 
13. NO ONE SIZE FITS ALL 

When it comes to encouraging your children, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach. “Reflect on the more nuanced ways your children learn and leverage accessible resources (digital and non-digital) to inspire their continued curiosity,” says University of Redlands Assistant Professor Nicol Howard. Leaning into your child’s strengths and interests will help them make the most of this challenging time.
 
While the move to remote learning may seem like an insurmountable obstacle for families that can’t afford reliable internet or dedicated devices for their kids, there are a variety of ways that parents can help connect their children with the tools they need. For those privileged enough to already have access to the necessary physical resources, it’s important to remember that emotional support is also an essential piece of the puzzle when it comes to children’s educational success, especially during days as challenging as these. Lastly, it falls on all of us to use our time, energy, and voices to work towards a more just world where the educational playing field is level and all children have the same opportunity to thrive and succeed, regardless of their social, racial, or financial background.
 
About Children and Screens
Since its inception in 2013, Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, has become one of the nation’s leading non-profit organizations dedicated to advancing and supporting interdisciplinary scientific research, enhancing human capital in the field, informing and educating the public, and advocating for sound public policy for child health and wellness. For more information, visit Children and Screens website or contact by email here.
 
The views and opinions that are expressed in this article belong to the experts to whom they are attributed, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, or its staff. 

Jamaine Ortiz Illustration for 360 Magazine by Kaelen Felix

Q×A with Jamaine Ortiz

Jamaine “The Technician” Ortiz, an up and coming, 23-year-old boxer, is making his name in the world of boxing. After growing up in Worcester, Massachusetts, the young boxer turned pro in 2016. His amateur record is 100-14 and he has already won many awards for his skill.

During the recent Mike Tyson vs. Roy Jones Jr. fight that was shown on pay-per-view, Ortiz was victorious over Sulaiman Segawa of Silver Spring, Maryland. After scoring a technical knockout in the last 10 seconds of the seventh round, Ortiz gained the WBC USNBC Silver lightweight title. This was his first fight outside of New England and he certainly made himself known in the fighting community. After winning this fight, Ortiz jumped from 76th to 44th in the world for the lightweight division. If he keeps winning, Ortiz is predicted to fight for a major world title by late 2021.

360 Magazine sat down with Ortiz to ask him questions about his professional career, personal life and future.

What was your upbringing like? Was there always a focus on athletics?

I started boxing at seven years old, and I was always an athletic kid, playing sports and outside.

Where did you learn to box?

I learned how to box at the Boys & Girls Club of Ionic Ave.

Why boxing?

I use to get into fights as a kid, I like that its a one on one sport I don’t have to rely on anyone. Over time, I noticed I was winning a lot and kept it going.

Who are your role models, boxing or otherwise?

My role model was my coach Carlos Garcia.

You’re currently the Undefeated World Boxing Youth World lightweight champion. What does this accomplishment mean to you?

I’m actually the former Youth World lightweight champion due to my age since I turned 24 last April, currently, I hold the WBC USNBC Silver lightweight title. The accomplishment is just a stepping stone, I have far more to go and I understand its a process and this is part of the process.

Your nickname is ‘The Technician’ where does this come from?

A technician is a person skilled in an art or craft by dictionary standards and when it comes to boxing, and me being a carpenter, I’m now an active trader. It was a perfect fit since everything I do, including things in my personal life, I’m technical about it. So it’s a name that reflects more than just boxing.

You’ve been boxing competitively for more than a decade. How have you evolved during that time, technique-wise and also personally?

Time is the mother of greatness, practicing repeatedly overtime is only natural; I’m going to get better.

How has your career been impacted by COVID-19 and 2020?

Luckily I was able to get a fight right before the impact of covid came I didn’t get to fight as much as I normally would. I probably would have had about 4 fights in a year but I had two with the last one being a great exposure bout.

Tell us about your interests outside of boxing.

I enjoy nature and I spend most of my time with family. Always working on self-development, a lot of stocks, and trying to find real estate deals.

Do you still have Olympic aspirations? What are your future boxing goals?

Olympics of boxing is an amateur sport but recently I think in 2016, they allowed pros to compete but it is heavily dominated by amateurs. In the next year, I see myself becoming World Champion at the lightweight Division and reaching for that pound for pound list.

What is your go-to move in a fight?

Not sure, probably switching from orthodox to southpaw.

What makes you unique as a boxer?

My ability to switch stances easily and my technique.

BoxRec

Tapology

RingTV

Behind The Ropes

Hunter Sansone Headshot by Leigh Keily

Q×A with Hunter Sansone

By Hannah DiPilato

360 Magazine has the opportunity to sit down with rising star, Hunter Sansone. Hunter is quickly making a name for himself in Hollywood with the characters he portrays on screen.

This winter, Hunter can be seen starring in Disney+’s highly anticipated sports film “Safety,” which was released to Disney+ on December 11. He also stars on CW’s hit series “Stargirl” as Cameron Mahkent also known as Icicle Jr. and is currently in the process of filming season two. We asked Sansone questions about his career, future and aspirations.

What has been your favorite role in your career so far?

Wow. That’s hard to say. Honestly, I don’t have a favorite. They have all been equally fulfilling. I learned different things from each project. I will say I am really into emotionally complex roles that involve a lot of raw emotional work.

What was your favorite part of working on the movie “Safety” for Disney+?

Being a part of an underdog sports film. I grew up watching these types of films, and they partially influenced my dream of becoming an actor one day. I played sports growing up, so to be able to utilize that childhood experience with my career was fun.

Do you have any exciting roles that are upcoming?

I am currently filming Stargirl Season 2, and that should be coming out sometime in 2021 on The CW. Few other things in the works that I can’t dive into at the moment.

I know you support the Stand Up for Pits Foundation, are there any other charities you would like to work with?

Rebecca Corry and the Stand Up For Pits foundation are incredible. They have done so much with ending discrimination towards pit bull type dogs. I have also recently partnered up with Stray Rescue of St. Louis. Their main focus being rescuing abandoned, abused, and neglected animals off the streets. Both incredible organizations that I plan to have my voice attached to for many years to come.

Since you grew up in Missouri, how did you get involved in acting? Did you have other future plans?

My mom has been a professional singer and vocal coach my whole life. She was my influence that led me down this path. She used to say to me that she thought I would be a good actor, but I didn’t think much of it for a few years. One day, I found myself curious and went to an acting class with her and I was hooked.

What is your favorite scene from “Safety” that you think viewers should be on the lookout for?

A combination of a few different scenes where Ray and I are sneaking Fay around the dorms. Definitely had some good laughs with those.

Do you have an idol you respect in Hollywood? What about them inspires you?

I’ve always respected Leonardo DiCaprio and how he attacks a role. He always gives 150%. He commits physically, mentally, and emotionally to every role. I try to approach every single one of my roles with that same tenacity and work ethic.

Tell us more about your character Daniel Morelli in the new movie.

Daniel is Ray’s roommate, teammate and best friend. He is the first person that Ray confides in about his situation with his little brother. You will see Daniel showing up for Ray in more ways than one throughout the film. He is all about family. Also, Daniel is an Italian kid from Long Island with a thick accent. I’m Italian myself so that was fun to be able to honor my Italian heritage on screen.

Tell us about the filming for Season 2 of Stargirl, can you give our readers an inside scoop?

We are working away on Season 2 as we speak. Having a blast while doing it. I can’t give you much, but what I can say is if you loved Season 1, you will definitely not want to miss Season 2. It should be coming out sometime in 2021 on The CW.

Where do you see your career going in the future, are there any goals you have for movies or TV?

I have big goals. I dream big. I recommend that to anyone with a dream. Don’t commit 50%. Set the biggest dreams for yourself as possible and go after them with every fiber in you. I think I’m going to keep them to myself for now and we can regroup down the road once a few of them have been accomplished.

Photo of Larry Namer curtesy of Nicole Goesseringer Muj

QxA With Larry Namer

An entertainment industry veteran with close to 50 years of professional experience in cable television, live events and new media, Larry Namer is a founding partner of Metan Global Entertainment Group (MGEG), a venture created to develop and distribute entertainment content and media specifically for Chinese speaking audiences in China and abroad. In 2018, the company launched the MGEG Film Fund I and serves as a managing partner.  He is also the executive producer of the recently announced feature film “EMPRESS,” a new travel series for the China audience titled “Explore The World,” and an executive producer of the new crime series “Nova Vita.”  He is a co-founder of the recently launched lifestyle platform BeautyKween. Most recently, he was appointed Chief Operating Officer of FanVestor.

Mr. Namer is the co-founder of E! Entertainment Television, a company now valued at over four billion USD, and the creator of several successful companies in the United States and overseas. Among those companies are Comspan Communications that pioneered Western forms of entertainment in the former Soviet Union and Steeplechase Media that served as the primary consultant to Microsoft’s MiTV for developing interactive TV applications.  

Early on, he was named the youngest general manager of a major cable system at Valley Cable TV (VCTV) in Los Angeles. His vision and direction garnered VCTV several Emmy and Cable ACE award nominations, as well as recognition by Forbes magazine as the national model for local cable television programming. In 1989, he was awarded the prestigious President’s Award from the National Cable Television Association. He was honored with the “Outstanding Contribution to Asian Television Award” at the 19th Asian Television Awards in Singapore and received the International Media Legacy Award at the 2017 Elite Awards Foundation Gala. He was the recipient of Lifetime Achievement Awards at the 2018 Hollywood Tribute Awards and the 2019 Hollywood China Night, presented by the American-Chinese CEO Society, both in celebration of the Academy Awards®.  In July 2019, he was awarded The Tribeca Disruptor Award at the Novus Summit, held at the United Nations, and in September 2020, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the French Riviera Film Festival. 

We sat down with Mr. Namer to ask him a few questions about the recent collaboration between the companies FanVestor and Cre8or Global. The companies are working together to connect celebrities with their fans. The companies want to deliver future investment opportunities, exclusive perks and experiences, as well as fan-focused sweepstakes, eCommerce exclusives and charity offerings to fans. 

What made FanVestor interested in partnering with Cre8or Global? 

We felt that Cre8or had a unique business model as well as all the resources to execute that plan. They already had some major celebrities and sports figures working with them on beauty, make-up, and wellness products which would fit perfectly into the FanVestor systems. We already had certain celebrities who were looking for strong partners who could take them into those spheres and develop and distribute the products. So, it was a clear and good match for both companies.

What are some things the public can look forward to as a result of this collaboration? 

Very quickly you will see a few major celebrities launch their new product lines directly to their fans via FanVestor. These will be special editions that come with some nice perks which can be collectibles or even unique dream experiences. After first exposing these to hardcore fans, then the products will be made available to the general public. Then a little further down the road, you will see that fans will have the opportunity not only to acquire products, but they will be able to invest in those very same companies

What lead you to become the chief operating officer for FanVestor? 

Well, I was on the advisory board at first because I was intrigued with the concept, but as time went on I learned a lot more and felt that with what FanVestor had accomplished so far coupled with my skills and connections, there was a great opportunity to make FanVestor a market leader and game-changer.

Are there any celebrities that FanVestor and Cre8or Global want to work with that you haven’t yet?

Yes, I would say there are hundreds of celebs that this makes sense for. FanVestor’s targets are sports, esports, fashion, art, film, TV and music stars, and influencers. Just take a dozen from each group and you are over 100. Then there are so many areas that are of interest to us and to celebrities, beyond unique products. There are securities, bonds, experiences and perks, charity fundraising, auctions, sweepstakes, and so on. Over the career of a celebrity, he or she might want to engage in projects within several of those activities.

Does FanVestor have any ideas for the future for other companies you would like to partner with? 

I think the concept of fans wanting to engage with their heroes and celebrities wanting to have a closer, more intimate relationship with their fans is universal. I can see us doing localized versions of FanVestor in other countries and other languages (other than English). I’m a strong believer in finding good, experienced, local partners whenever I engage in business outside the United States.

What advice would you give fans that want to invest in celebrities through FanVestor? 

While return on investment is certainly something to consider, think beyond just the monetary measures and of the intangibles that come with it. For example, the Green Bay Packers are owned by fans and they have special shareholder days and even a merchandise catalog of things only available to shareholders. Besides the monetary reward, they relish in having that stock certificate framed and hanging on the wall for all their friends to see. There is a pleasure to be had in supporting your team that way. So, it’s not just money that is part of the ROI. Choose the things you feel passionate about, whether it be a sports team or a celebrity doing great charity work.

How can the public get involved in this partnership between FanVestor and Cre8or Global? 

Starting next month, you will begin to see the Website and mobile apps populated with the first of a wave of fan opportunities. You can go on right now and register to be kept apprised of all the news

Since you are using the celebrities’ own fanbases, do you see any major problems occurring with promoting the product line?

Not at all. There will be some very clear communication between the celeb and the fans, so everyone knows what is being offered. When it comes to securities, everything is regulated on a federal level, so there is consistency in what and how opportunities are offered to fans.

Where do you see this partnership going in the future? Will the companies continue to work together to connect celebrities and their fans?

Yes, FanVestor and Cre8or are perfectly aligned. Crea8or knows how to develop and market new products with celebrity tie-ins. FanVestor knows how to monetize fandom. Today with the world-changing the way it has, celebrities and their managers, are looking for new ways, to connect to their fanbases and monetize those connections. FanVestor and Cre8or provide a one-stop shop for them.

Conison, Blake Holmes and Connor Morton article inside 360 MAGAZINE

CONISON: OUR CHAT WITH HIGH-END STREETWEAR LABEL FOUNDER, CONNOR MORTON 

By Blake Holmes

A celebration of the LA dream, Conison is an up-and-coming, high-end streetwear brand from Melbourne, Australia. 
Recently, we caught up with Founder and Creative Director, Connor Morton, to chat vision, inspiration and what’s in store for the year ahead. 

TELL US ABOUT CONISON..

Conison is a high-end streetwear and design brand. 

At the heart of Conison is a message of inspiration. I want to encourage people to express themselves, providing an avenue for them to explore their own sense of style and creative potential through fashion and design. 

WHAT’S YOUR WHY? 

I’ve always endeavoured to express my creativity through outlets available to me, from DJing and music, to clothing customisation and art. I think everyone deserves this opportunity and my dream is that Conison will provide that for others; an inspiration source that spreads positivity and reinforces the idea that everyone has the power to shape their reality. 

WHAT’S IN STORE FOR YOUR UPCOMING COLLECTION? 

Collection 2 Rise & Fall is a two-part capsule. This collection celebrates an ascension to your highest self and the fall of negative energy. These ideas are expressed in my messaging and I’ve catered to both the NZ/Aus and US/Euro markets, with different materials and designs. 

WHO/WHAT INSPIRES YOU? 

There are countless brands and creators that fuel my fire. Designers like Reese Cooper and Heron Preston, brands like Riot Hill and photographers like Kyle Caulfield to name just a few. 

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED? 

I believe motivation is something you have to seek constantly. This can be challenging at times and the interruptions of this year have been a prime example. 

Regularly contacting my mentors, listening to podcasts, and painting have kept me in the zone this year. There’s always motivation to be found if you look hard enough. 

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY LOOK LIKE FOR YOU? 

Every day is different but I start and end them in the same way. I usually wake up with a warm/cold soak to get focused, then have breakfast while watching motivational content on YouTube. From then I work ‘til i’ve felt i’ve done enough, which means late nights a lot of the time. I also work other jobs and fit in time at the gym or some form of exercise each day. I end the day with business content on YouTube to get inspired for the day ahead.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST FINANCIAL STRAIN WHEN RUNNING YOUR OWN BRAND? 

Being a one-man band with no backing at 22 has been a struggle. There are definitely financial challenges and they’ve taken a lot of practice, help from mentors and learning to overcome. In saying that, I’m feeling confident in the belief that now is the time to be bold, take risks and bet on myself. When you believe in your brand and the message you’re trying to share, anything is possible. 

WHAT’S THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED? 

My mentor sent me a message a few weeks back. I think it’s spot on and something I struggle with at times. “Your art is not about how many people like your work, your art is about if your heart likes your work, if your soul likes your work, it’s how honest you are with yourself”. I try to follow this ethos daily and remind myself of this at times I’m questioning my vision and creative direction. I’ve implemented this into my work daily and it’s become more authentic as a result. 

WHAT’S NEXT FOR CONISON? 

The sky’s the limit. I want to push creative boundaries, not just with Conison but in the global fashion and lifestyle brand space. This means everything from painting collections and exclusive pieces to furniture. 
Most importantly, I want to continue telling the Conison story in an authentic way. Giving people a story to truly connect with is what drives me and the best way to keep people engaged and on-board for the journey. 

I’m learning and growing every day and Conison will continue to evolve with me. I can’t wait to share it with everyone.

LEAVE US WITH A FAVOURITE QUOTE..

I’ve got a few. ‘Ignore the boos, they usually come from the cheap seats’. This one has been really important to me. As a young person, you often face a lot of negativity and doubt from others about your ability to step outside the norm and succeed. I’ve learnt not to take this to heart and stay true to myself, which is something I think we should all strive to do. 

Another favourite is, ‘an arrow can only be shot forward by pulling it backward’. This one’s all about resilience to me, and the idea that on the other side of struggle and hardship is success, fortune and prosperity. I try to remember this with every minor setback and keep a positive mindset no matter the circumstances. When you do, nothing can discourage you from achieving your dreams. This is what Conison is all about. 

Rise & Fall Part 1 drops 7th December, 7:00pm EST
at www.conisondesigns.com 

Promotional Photos for Noorullah Line for 360 Magazine

Noorullah

By Hannah DiPilato


With a line that unites sustainability and style, Noorullah is a brand to watch. The timeless collection features unique and versatile pieces that appeal to everyone. 

Recently, we caught up with designer Noorullah Amiri who explained what makes the line different from the rest of current-day high fashion. 


Where did you pull inspiration from for this line?


I pulled inspiration from the Ancient Egyptian wardrobe, which is a white linen fabric that has drape. Linen fibers create a very functional fabric that is breathable and good for temperatures all year round. For the pajama styles, I took inspiration from Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s stained glass window in the St. Peter’s Basilica from 1660. It was fitting to use that print for the pajamas, which you can lounge and meditate in.


The tracksuit is inspired by Ancient Greek Olympians, who would participate in the Olympic events. The idea was to create a comfortable and functional tracksuit also for lounging or exercising in cold weather. I also made use of genuine snake leather for small leather goods in relation to Ancient Greek biblical artworks: “Adam and Eve” and “Laocoon and His Sons”.  And also, lamb leather in relation to “The Sacrifice of Issac”.


What made you want to create sustainable fashion?

In the fashion industry, 85% of textiles go to the dumb each year and bits of fibers from the washing machine pollute the ocean. Producing new clothes causes pollution and there is post-consumption pollution as well. The best way to be sustainable is to close the loop in the fashion cycle and use only recycled textiles for making new fibers and materials.


It is our duty to take care of the planet for a better quality of life. And the fashion industry needs to be more sustainable to preserve the ecosystem. Our approach currently, is to focus on style and quality to create sustainable products. Style determines how long products will remain relevant and desirable, while quality determines how long the design will hold up during its use. We fully commit to our highly detailed designs with confidence so that they can be everlasting in terms of style and durability.


Have you had any community involvement relating to your company’s purpose?

Last year in San Francisco, on Earth Day, I went to a fair to gain and spread knowledge about sustainability, and also planted redwood tree sprouts that can grow up to 300 feet.


Where do you hope to see your designs in the future?

I hope to keep the designs exclusive and desirable so they can be enjoyed for a long time. We would like to have a strong global online presence with boutiques in strategic locations.

It is a dream to be able to provide people an experience from our world when shopping inside a brick-and-mortar location. I have a passion for storytelling through visual merchandising. In addition, I hope to have a limited wholesale partnership with a luxury department store.


What is your personal favorite piece from the collection and what makes this your favorite?

If I have one pick, I am going with the Wool Overcoat because it is comfortable and warm. I can wear almost anything underneath and still maintain a modern look. Also, similar to all of the garments from the collection, I created each pattern piece custom for your body. And I like that it has 4 deep pockets for holding valuables.


What would you say is the one thing that makes you stand out against other designers?

I would say it is my confidence because my design process is functional yet artistic, producing something with its own identity. I can pull inspiration from nature, for example, to create something that is unique in design having function and playing with silhouettes or other design elements.


When did you begin designing and how did you get started?

I began designing vector artwork using Adobe illustrator in 2011. I was working on a streetwear brand with t-shirts and fleece before designing window displays and private label brands for assignments in college.

I got started with the Noorullah brand by gathering inspiration and having an end-use in mind for the products. The end-use is when the garments will be worn, where, and by who. Getting an understanding of end-use is what enabled me to get started with bringing the inspirations to life.


Why do some pieces have only limited numbers available? Is this something you plan to change or continue doing in the future?

Everything from the collection is very limited because there are so many ideas to play with for new designs. The collection is truly exclusive and there will be a fresh collection to build from the previous one. In the future, as we expand our business, we will continue to keep the merchandise exclusive in proportion to consumer demands.


What is your process of designing sustainable products to ensure they’re functional and stylish?

To have a sustainable design we begin with the yarns that make up the fabric. To have durable fabrics we select the ones made from long filament yarns which are more durable, produce less fiber waste in the washing machine, and even have a better hand. We pay attention to construction details to make products functional, comfortable, and permanent. This way the products fulfill their intended uses while providing comfort and not becoming damaged. Along with durable materials and construction, we produce designs everlasting in terms of style.


How would you summarize the goal of the line in one sentence?

To give the wearer a high sense of confidence with luxury only for them to know.


Do you believe other brands should move away from fast fashion and create more sustainable clothing?

Yes, absolutely. The biggest way to impact the planet through sustainability in the fashion industry is to not produce any more clothes, but even that will not undo the existing pollution that has already been set in motion many years ago. And since we must continue producing products, it is best to be as ethical as possible.


Although the demand for fast fashion is high because some styles are trendy and affordable, the price that the planet pays is too great. Because fast fashion produces fads, where clothing goes out of style rapidly and they are made poorly to save pennies in productions.


What advice would you give to other designers about becoming more sustainable?

To source only recycled materials, and produce clothing that is classic and high quality.

*Receive 30% off + free shipping with promo code: 360MAG at checkout available through Dec. 31st.

SHOP NOW

Noorullah Wool Jacket Photograph 360 Magazine
Photo by @earthquakemgmt

Q&A With Devault & BabyJake

Devault & BabyJake Release Double-Sided Singles ‘Tell Me’ & ‘Blue’.
Electronic deejay & producer Devault and rising star BabyJake have teamed together for double-sided dance singles titled ‘Blue’ & ‘Tell Me’ that are set to be released at midnight. The singles come fresh off a powerful year for both artists, as each released EP’s and collaborative singles in their respective fields. While Devault released a string of audio/visual experiences, most notably RUBY, and collaborations with Manila Killa and Griff Clawson, BabyJake teamed up with Dillon Francis for a small dance EP and debuted his first solo EP project ‘Don’t Give Me Problems, Give Me Wine.’
360 Magazine asked DEVAULT and BABY JAKE, who are also good friends, some questions about their collaboration.

Q&A WITH DEEJAY & PRODUCER DEVAULT AND MUSIC ARTIST BABY JAKE

How did you both get started in music? And when did you first meet?
Devault: I initially started DJ’ing around 12 years old when my older brother randomly brought home a small turntable set and I immediately fell in love. As the years went on and when I was around 18 years old, I decided to start producing, essentially with the mentality of making music that I couldn’t find in my library of current music. Making something exciting; and now we’re here. I first met Jake a few years ago through a mutual friend when he was visiting LA for one of the first times. He ended up crashing at my house for a period of time and we immediately connected.
BabyJake: I first started taking music seriously after I dropped out of college in 2016, but I’ve been flirting with it since I was 8 years old when I picked up a guitar for the first time. Sage (Devault) & I originally met through a mutual friend, Austin Tompkins, when I first arrived in LA. I ended up sleeping on Sage’s couch for 3 weeks, maybe longer, and we’ve been friends ever since.

How would you describe your friendship and the dynamic between you two, did you always had the plan to one day work together and make a song?
Devault: I think we have mutual respect for each other, as when we met we were both figuring out our own paths in the music scene. I think we’ve both evolved greatly as musicians and as people. We always had the desire to make music together, but couldn’t find the right timing. Luckily, covid was almost a blessing in disguise as it allowed us to jam together for a few days with no pressure and these songs came out of it.
BabyJake: Yeah for sure. We always wanted to do something together, we just needed to wait for a good time to do it. I’m sure we’ll make much more music together as well, I practically see Sage every other day.

Which music artists inspired you? Where did you find inspiration for the two songs ‘Tell Me’ and ‘Blue’?
Devault: Depeche Mode, Daft Punk, and Jamie XX are some of my biggest inspirations. Music that is immediately recognizable to them and them only and that has become a mantra of mine. For our songs, we wanted to just have fun really, get out of our comfort zone and just make genuine dance records, while still retaining our styles.
BabyJake: Honestly there are too many artists to count that inspire me. That being said, I think the inspiration for these songs was less about who we wanted it to sound like & more about what feeling we wanted to establish to the audience. Whatever that feeling is, I’d say we captured it.

What three words would you use to describe your sound?
Devault: Moody, Emotive, & Ethereal
BabyJake: Not sure what 3 words I’d use to describe the records… I’d say everything that comes from Devault is somewhat emotional & deep.

A lot has happened in the last two years for both of you. Baby Jake, you released your first EP and Devault, you did remixes for Rihanna & Maroon 5. What was your personal highlight?
Devault: My personal highlight was releasing my first EP ‘Stay’ in 2018. This felt like it was finally a moment to identify me as not just an electronic artist, but as a genuine musician who can paint an entire world.
BabyJake: My personal highlight was a deep album cut named “Anywhere.” Even though it didn’t do crazy numbers, the production & experience of recording a completely live song with a choir, organ, drums… you name it… was incredible. That was definitely a high I hadn’t experienced before.

What is the thing you missed most during lockdown?
Devault: Missing live shows dearly.
BabyJake: Live shows. I was supposed to be on tour so that’s a real bummer.

What other artists do you want to collaborate with in the future?
Devault: A dream would be working with Toro y Moi or Blood Orange.
BabyJake: Definitely want to keep working with Sage, also wouldn’t mind doing some more electronic features with some other talented producers. This is a hard question for me because I feel like collaborations just kind of happen with friends and/or artists you are close with. I never really force it or think about it, it just happens.

Finally, what’s next?
Devault: Next is my second vocal EP, it’s nearly done and looking to get it out at the beginning of next year. Very excited about it.
BabyJake: An album. Finally.
Their double-sided single ‘Tell Me’ and ‘Blue’ will be released tonight at midnight!!! You can download on all digital platforms and follow them on Instagram,@itsbabjake and @devaultmusic.

Photo of Devault and BabyJake by earthquakemgmt

Tokyo's Revenge Press Image by Kevin Maya Used By 360 Magazine

Tokyo’s Revenge Q&A

By Sabrina Weiss

Under the alias Tokyo’s Revenge, this youthful rapper’s prestige supersedes his TikTok fame. The anonymous musician’s track “GOODMORNINGTOKYO” blew up on TikTok and topped music charts, but his raw talent and earnest personality translate beyond the app. With his new song and music video “GOTHAM” and new album 7VEN, Tokyo continues to maintain his unique style with anime and comic-book inspiration. 

With humility and honesty, Tokyo navigates his quick rise to fame with his friends, who double as his musical team, by his side. The young talent spoke equally as transparently about his previous struggles with homelessness, personal approach to mental health, and favorite flavor of Starbursts (pink). All the while, Tokyo giggled and challenged us to video game battles. Even beyond his musical talent, Tokyo’s personality gravitates listeners and a loyal following.

When did you begin your music career?

Well, I did some free-style rapping in high school a bit, but that was mostly to fit into different friend groups. Then, for awhile after high school, I was homeless and ended up couch hopping at different friends’ houses. At one point I stayed with some friends who were constantly making music but didn’t know how to engineer it. It was from these friends that I got the inspiration to learn how to engineer the music. At first, I just engineered their music. But, I only started posting my stuff on Soundcloud about two months into me learning how to mix music. I’m not sure why it took that amount of time, something just clicked at that point.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, you were on your As Good as Dead Tour. We saw all the love you give your fans, particularly when you surf the crowd and jump in the mosh pit with your listeners. What was your most memorable moment of the tour? 

Oh man there were a lot of good moments. One of the most memorable times would be when I had to lie to security about whether I was going to get in the crowd. If I were to say yes then they would chase me in there. They go in and grab me as quickly as they can when I tell them I’m going to crowd surf. But, lowkey, I hate when they do that. The crowd is where I get my energy from. So I lied so I could be in there with my fans for longer.

There is a Discord ping in your new song “Gotham.” Do you actually use the chat app?

Well, it’s funny you ask that because I have my Discord open right now. I am constantly in my Discord with thousands and thousands of my supporters. I’ll hop in there and play video games with everyone and chat with all of you. I was actually just in one right before this interview and my buddy knocked on my door and said, “Hey man, you’ve got that interview right now, hop off real quick.”

After you blew up on TikTok, we are all wondering what you will do next. How do you plan on maintaining long-term relevance?

By doing whatever I feel like. I learned early on that I am not striving to have fans and followers based on trends. I want fans, followers, and family who support me through any medium I choose because I feel like I am connected to them more than just musically. Whether it be through YouTube videos or making music, I just want to continue to be connected to my fans. My fans are one of my major support systems.

What made you decide to be anonymous?

The idea of no one really knowing about me and trying to figure me and my personality out through clues in my music, rather than social media, is really appealing to me. I am not super attached to social media because if you try to over present yourself through social media, then people won’t be into your art. I want my music to get my face out, not my social media. Some artists are more focused on being social media influencers rather than their art and I’m just the opposite. I don’t talk much about me, I just talk through my music and let my listeners figure me out.

Along the topic of the modern musician, what do you think the industry is missing right now?

Actually, I don’t think the music industry is missing anything right now. If anything, I think there is too much of everything. A little while ago, I had an epiphany and thought to myself, “The biggest problem we have right now is that we are overexposed to everything.” And I feel the same way about the music industry. 

Only two years ago, you were couch-hopping at friends’ houses and now you have quickly risen to fame. How have the struggles of homelessness made you successful in your career?

It taught me not to get comfortable, ever. Being homeless gave me this huge hunger to never stop doing something, because back then I wasn’t focused on music immediately. I was focused on finding a place to work and to sleep. But, if I was comfortable just living like that, then I would probably still be doing just that.

I always wanted to do something bigger and better than couch-crashing, bigger and better than finding a shitty apartment to stay in and just making enough money to survive. I wanted to level-up to a point that my friends and I can be comfortable forever, and that’s how I got here.

You’ve spoken honestly about your mental health in the past. What do you do to get your head right?

I wake up and take a super long, burning hot shower. And then I think of everything but music. I don’t try to force myself into the music. I wake up and remind myself that I am a regular person who came from one place to this place with my best friends. 

We all focus on each others’ mental health more than anything else, and the music is tied into that. I try not to think of music as a job, because it wasn’t a job to us prior it was an outlet for all of our feelings. We play Smash Bros, go out and do something, and then if we are in the zone to make music, then we make music. If not, then maybe tomorrow! There’s no pressure.