Posts tagged with "skits"

Page Kennedy illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q×A with Page Kennedy

ACTOR & RAPPER PAGE KENNEDY JOINS 360 MAGAZINE FOR SOME Q&A

By: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Page Kennedy is well known as a rapper and actor within our entertainment industry. Kennedy’s recent acting skills brought him to play “Duck” on Netflix’s “The Upshaws”, one of their newest series to hit streaming platforms starring alongside Kim Fields (Regina Upshaw), Mike Epps (Bennie Upshaw), and Wanda Skyes (Lucretia). He is also known for his roles in “Blue Mountain State”, “Weeds” and his comedic genius skits shared on Instagram and TikTok.

Kennedy’s self-titled album ‘Page’ was released in February 2021 featuring heavyweight rappers Xzibit and Method Man is available now on all streaming platforms – make sure you go check it out!

360 Magazine had the pleasure of interviewing Page Kennedy where we discussed “The Upshaws”, his character ‘Duck’, music, and his fitness journey. We had an amazing conversation about his media roles, the love for Eminem, and also found out that we both favor Cardi B because of the way she represents herself: “Cardi B makes me feel like I know her”, said Kennedy.

Read on to hear about our conversation with Page!

Your Netflix series, “The Upshaws”, came out today- how do you feel about working with it?

PK: I love it, you know I was a part of it, and I still watch the series multiple times. I can’t get tired of it. I can just go to any episode and watch it- it has so many great jokes and the characters are diverse, and they bring their own style, energy and creativity. I think it’s the funniest show on TV.

How is it working with the cast?

PK: Working with the cast is great. You know, you got legends there. You’ve got Kim Fields, the ultimate foremost legend, Mike Epps who is a comic genius, Wanda Skyes- comic genius. They are good people, and everybody is happy to be here, so it makes it fun.

Do you feel that you have any similar traits to your character Duck within yourself?

PK: I’ve been asked that question and, let me see, I look at Duck as a different character than what I typically play. The only similarity that I see between me and Duck is his loyalty. He is loyal to a fault. You know, he spent 7-10 years in jail where he could have gotten less time where he could have ratted out his friend who could have been his co-defendant, but he just took it. I think I have a loyalty like Duck. Other than that, he’s a little different than me.

Let’s talk about your latest album. How did you feel about the creative direction within the videos for “Fear” and “Safe”? How did you work through the process of such a real and raw album?

PK: I wanted to make use of all of my talents to create an art- that was my goal. My goal was to take the amalgamation of talents that I have to coalesce to create art that could be ubiquitous forever. You know, that’s what I feel I accomplished because things are great 20 years from now and it’s still going to be great. You can still listen to Biggie because it’s incredible, it’s timeless and that’s what I wanted to do. I feel like I accomplished that.

Can you tell us about the song “Shine”?

PK: I think that the album needed some respite because it’s very heavy and after you listen to Fear and Safe, it’s so cumbersome that you need some respite. And so that’s what Shine provides. It still takes a look at how difficult 2019 was personally for me and then 2020 was for everyone. The face of darkness, there is light after, and I wanted to show that the Devil will not take that light away. We will shine.

Can you tell us about your album cover?

PK: The cover of the album is confluence of tragic incident of black Americans who have had their lives taken from them at the hands of police brutality. That confluence is to show that they are me. You know, they all make up me; I am the same as them and so I wanted to, through me, show them. Wait until you get to the song “Flowers”, that is my favorite song on the album.

At the end of some of your videos, there is mention of voting- what are you trying to show viewers?

PK: So, creating Fear was so I could galvanize the troops to go vote because we can’t just yell from the rafters “We are being disrespected”, “We are being overlooked”. We have to actually get in the dirt and, you know, do things that cause change. Our biggest voice was our vote. The virality of those videos was to have the embolism of to vote throughout the video. To help people want to get out and vote after they see the deleterious effects of what fear can do on both sides so that’s why you see that throughout the videos.

Let’s talk about your fitness journey. What motivated you to get started?

PK: I got tired of looking at myself in movies and TV fat as hell and I was more attractive in my head than I was externally, so I wanted to match that.

So, there’s a lot of excuses that I think many people use such as “I can’t afford to go to the gym” or “I hurt too much to do this”. How did you push past your own excuses?

PK: I have an additive personality so once I get into something, I’m locked in and I got my mind right and ready. I had help, a tool to help me out with the point of why I was overweight which was my addiction to food. And so, I got gastro sleeve surgery which made my stomach smaller so that I couldn’t overeat. That helped. That was like the catalyst to help me and the working out thing- I already had that down. I had challenges where I would workout 100 straight days and another challenge where I went a straight year of working out without missing any days. My mind was already set to go to the gym, I just needed to get the food stuff right.

Do you still workout consistently?

PK: Yep, I’m still in it. Even when the gyms were closed, I found a way to get the workout in.

What advice would you offer somebody as far as starting out on their journey? If they were with you and undecided about their journey because of lack of motivation.

PK: I would say to make it something that is a part of your daily life that you don’t have a choice of. You don’t have a choice if you need to go to the bathroom or not, you don’t have a choice whether you like eating or not. These are things that must happen regardless of what you want or not. So, if you make the gym or workout a part of that, you take the lack of motivation away. We can have things taken away for us and see how resilient we could be. If you’re in jail or in a weight loss camp or anywhere that caused your free will to be taken away and you are forced to do something, you can do it because you have to. So why have to be in a situation where some other exterior force forces you to when you have a mind and brain that is going to be the thing to make you do it anyway.

Do you have a specific meal plan?

PK: Sometimes, yes. I go in spurts. Some weeks I have no carbs and no sugar. Then some weeks I am a little looser. I just try to be moderate because I could easily go really far one way or really far the other way. It’s not until I’m actually preparing for something that I go super crazy. Other than that, I just try and stay in striking range.

Do you allow yourself to have treats?

PK: Yep, probably more than I should.

What kind of workouts do you do?

PK: Well, when I get off the phone with you, I have a trainer, so I am going to the gym. Wednesday is leg day, which sucks. I work out with a trainer 3-4 days a week and then two other days I have an Oculus virtual reality thing that I do a supernatural workout on or I ride my bike for 20 miles to the beach on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Is there anything else that you’d like to talk about or anything that you’d like to share with our readers?

PK: I just want them to the importance of the album “Page” and how it’s important to everyone in the world right to be aware of everything that happening right now and everything that’s going on. And that if this album was released by a bigger artist, it would be a Grammy-nominated type of album – that’s how important this album is. I just implore everyone to continue to listen to it and check it out because I think it’s necessary. That’s the main thing that I want- and watch “The Upshaws” on Netflix streaming now.

Naz “ItsNastyNaz” Saleh

TikTok, a phone app allowing users to share fun videos of singing, dancing and skits, has taken the world by storm, and Naz “Itsnastynaz” Saleh is its megastar.

Saleh, or “Itsnastynaz” on TikTok, was a completely ordinary fast food worker yet a complete anomaly. He was born on April 27, 1997, in Bronx, New York, and raised by his Yemeni-descendant parents looking for a better life for their kids. When he turned 12, he started working 12 hours per day, seven days per week. Saleh hit rock bottom when excessive bullying made him drop out of high school, but things changed.

Saleh went from working in fast food to being a man who enjoys all luxuries of life, but what made Naz Saleh who he is today?

It all started when Saleh was watching a YouTube video and a Musical.ly ad popped up. He saw the famous Baby Ariel. The video made him laugh and think he could do it even better than she could if he gave it a try. That was the turning point in his life. He started performing more skits with his brother in his workplace. He became an overnight success when the third video he uploaded was viewed 5 million times, and it didn’t stop there. The video spread like wildfire and was featured on news channels internationally.

His audience skyrocketed to over 6 million followers. He was awarded the “Popular Creator” badge by TikTok after his videos broke the internet and were viewed between 100 million and 350 million times.

That’s when he quit his 84-hour-per-week job to focus full time on his TikTok career. He now sits at 13 million followers.

Saleh is now known as “The Most Generous Man in New York” after filming himself giving food and money to homeless people. His videos also caught the attention of the government, giving some of those homeless people the option to go to rehab. Many said goodbye to their previous lives and moved toward a path of happiness.

Following his quick ascent, Saleh signed deals with iconic brands such as What Do You Meme? and Fashion Nova. He even received sponsorship deals from apps on the Apple App Store. He went from working in fast food to making seven figures and driving luxury cars all in a day’s work.

Though he has found success on TikTok, life isn’t always easy for Saleh. He receives many hateful comments online.

When asked how he deals with hateful comments, Saleh said, “Receiving so much hate can be heart-breaking and really demotivating. It used to have really bad effects on my mindset and my happiness until I realized making skits, helping people and making others happy is my safe place, and no one can make me feel bad about that.”

He admits sudden fame can be a bit overwhelming, but Saleh tries to remain positive, using his power to spread as much love and happiness as he can.

Bodega Picture

Circle V Ranch Camp

David Fields, Executive Director of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul Los Angeles, operators of the Circle V Ranch Camp announced, “We are continuing to rebuild after the Whittier wildfire that burned through our camp and surrounding areas on July 8, 2017. We regret that we will not be offering 2018 summer camp sessions for more than 1.000 children from throughout Southern California. Our strong goal is to reopen in 2019.”

Circle V Ranch Camp Director Ray Lopez shared, “Our staff and volunteers are sad that Circle V is not quite ready yet to welcome back campers for our summer 2018 sessions. We are continuing to work with our rebuilding crews and look forward to opening as soon as we can in 2019. We thank everyone for their continued patience and support!”

The Whittier wildfire began on July 8, 2017, burning throughout Circle V Ranch Camp and surrounding areas. All 88 campers and 36 staff members in residence at the time were safely evacuated by heroic first responders, staff and volunteers. Circle V’s Craft Lodge and Health Lodge cabins burned to the ground, and the water treatment facility and pipes were seriously damaged. With no water, all remaining 2017 summer camp sessions were cancelled for 1,000 campers ages 7-17; and group retreat rentals were canceled until further notice. Circle V is in the process of rebuilding with a goal of reopening in 2019; donations are needed and welcomed at http://svdpla.org/donate/rebuild-camp/

More About St. Vincent de Paul Circle V Ranch Camp

Circle V Ranch Camp & Retreat Center was founded in 1945 by St. Vincent de Paul Los Angeles and has been located on its current site on 30 acres in the Los Padres National Forest in Santa Barbara County across from Cachuma Lake since 1990. Each Circle V Ranch Camp summer session offers six days and five nights of traditional supervised fun for boys and girls ages 7 to 13 and campers in leadership training from ages 14-17. Campers enjoy activities including archery, arts & crafts, hiking, swimming in the pool, learning about nature, reading skills, painting, photography, playing baseball, basketball, ping pong, foosball, soccer, miniature golf and of course, campfires, skits and singing. There is no TV, radio or internet access to affect the experience. Campers stay in wood cabins or traditional canvas tents. Three nutritious daily meals served family-style in the Dining Lodge are not only for food but also for camaraderie and fellowship. In summer 2016, the camp hosted more than 1,000 children for this time-honored experience. During autumn, winter and spring, Circle V is available for rental to other non-profit groups and organizations. Closed since July 8, 2017, due to damage sustained during the Whittier wildfire, Circle V is in the process of rebuilding with a goal of reopening in 2019; donations are needed and welcomed at http://svdpla.org/donate/rebuild-camp/