Posts tagged with "series"

M.O.D.O.K. HEAD GAMES

Showrunners for the upcoming Hulu series about the popular Marvel villain M.O.D.O.K. will also spearhead a brand new comic series with the character as the lead.

M.O.D.O.K. HEAD GAMES comes from Patton Oswalt and Jordan Blum, who will showcase the leader of the terroristic organization AIM.

M.O.D.O.K. will be outsmarting the rest of the Marvel universe on his way to victory and domination, but this story is a bit more personal. He is haunted by memories of a family he doesn’t know, putting his power, and his brain, at risk.

You can see everything Oswalt and Blum had to say about the supervillain story in an exclusive interview from Marvel by clicking right here. You can also see brand new, never-before-seen pages of the interior of the books from Scott Hepburn, the artist of the upcoming run.

Oswalt said the writers of the show created such an amazing world for M.O.D.O.K. that they had to go further.

“We had so much creativity to burn that Jordan just said we should fill this in in a four-issue comic series as a background. I always love that, to be able to go even deeper into that world,” Oswalt said.

Blum added that he was excited to write the 616 version, or our world’s version, of M.O.D.O.K. specifically.

“We leapt at the chance to write the M.O.D.O.K. who had been there since Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and put our spin on him and pull from a lot of the other versions of M.O.D.O.K. in the past. The character is very flexible and I think you can do a lot with him,” Blum said.

The premiere issue of the series will hit shelves of comic book shops everywhere Dec. 2, and you can keep an eye out for the series starring the historic villain streaming on Hulu in 2021.

To find a comic book shop near you, you can click right here.

You can also follow Patton Oswalt on Twitter and Instagram, and you can follow Jordan Blum on Twitter.

Tyler Perry’s “Sistas” Season 2

360 MAGAZINE had the chance to sit down with the cast of BET’s hit show “Sistas,” which comes from mastermind Tyler Perry, to discuss the second season of the show.

The second season premiered Oct. 14 with a special two-episode event. You can see the third episode of the season on BET Wednesday, and you can catch up on the first season on BET.

Friendship and relationship drama are center stage in this show about four women in the middle of the Atlanta dating scene. Is Mr. Right out there in 2020?

360: What are you most excited about with your characters in season two?

Novi Brown (Sabrina): The drama. I’m just excited to see how far Tyler’s going to take these ladies, and one of my acting teachers says, “Crisis shows character.” We saw Andi in a crisis right when season one ended. Is she still on the road? What is she doing? What is Danni doing? Is Karen over there with Zac because people are dying around them? It’s getting really crazy. Then we have the whole situation with Calvin and Sabrina. Then there’s Olonzo and Maurice. I just feel like you guys should definitely expect every seed that was planted to start budding and cultivating on its own, but you can’t direct how it’s going to be. This is Tyler’s show. We just show up. That’s all we’re going to do. We just want to entertain you guys.

Crystal Hayslett (Fatima): I’m more excited because you actually get to learn who Fatima is. You get to learn more about her. You get to see a lot of different layers she has. Season one, you don’t really get to see that. All you see is that she’s a “ride-or-die” for Andi. This season she continues to do that, but it’s so much more to Fatima.

Trinity Whiteside (Preston): I’m just excited about Preston’s growth. I think with Preston being a mid-season reveal last season, we didn’t get to get into a lot of background as far as Preston individually. I think in this season you get to see a little bit more of him as an individual.

Kevin Walton (Aaron): I’m excited to see more of Aaron in a different kind of space. Season one was plenty of drama in things that were around him. I feel like he gets associated with that space as if he is that. With the opportunity in season two, you get to know him a little bit more beyond just that drama. I’m excited for people to get to see that and see how they respond. Right now everyone is like, “Red flag, Aaron! Questions! Questions! Red flag!” Soften it up for him, please. I’m excited to see that happen.

Devale Ellis (Zac): I’m excited for the evolution. Zac is not going to be the same person he was in season one. Typically that’s what happens in television. Season one to season two you see an evolution of the characters, but I’m excited for people to see where Zac goes in the season.

Anthony Dalton (Calvin): I’m excited to see the interaction with new characters coming in, especially with my character and some of the other characters on the show and the new dynamics that come with that.

Brian Jordan Jr. (Maurice): I’m most excited that people get to see more of Maurice this season and more into his personal life and not just him as an auxiliary to other people but really a deep delve into his life. I’m so excited about that.

360: How does the show’s balance of comedy and drama reflect real life relationships and real life itself?

Mignon (Danni): Life isn’t all anything. Things come to pass, right? Nothing is permanent, except for what you decide to hold dear, and I think comedy and drama being balanced is only necessary for authentic storytelling.

Crystal Hayslett: I think it hits spot on. In life, there’s a balance to everything, and Tyler, with his writing and the way he wrote everything, is the perfect balance and the perfect depiction of what real life is.

Trinity Whiteside: I think, in life, much like with the show, you take the good with the bad. You get the comedy with the drama, and those are two things that I believe drive the show and what has fans from different walks of life enjoying the show.

Kevin Walton: Funny is money. When people laugh, it kind of holds up that heart space, and we do that in general, and we do that in life. When you have comedy and drama dance like that, it is that space where you know where things hit home, and you can find ways to laugh about it and create more humor. Like Crystal said, TP does that beautifully in that space. I think it mirrors life in that way.

Anthony Dalton: I feel that it’s just the human condition. There’s pain. There’s sorrow. There’s laughter, especially amongst the black community. It resonates with the fans, and that’s why we got a season two, and that’s why our numbers are the way they are.

Brian Jordan Jr.: I feel like there are so many situations on this show that are just crazy, and I have been written in with comedic things that happen right in the middle of them. Personally, I’m a person who deals with sorrow, deals with trauma, with comedy. It’s something I’ve done my entire life. People look for joy in those types of situations, and laughter is the way we heal. Especially black people, I feel, we heal from laughter. Laughter is healing for us. I feel that it would not be an adequate depiction of the black experience if you didn’t have humor, so I think it’s perfect.

Devale Ellis: I would have to agree with Brian. I feel like we laugh sometimes to hide our pain, and Zac, in particular, was not supposed to be a super comedic character, but in order to bring some humanity to who Zac is and what he’s been dealing with, dealing with recidivism and some of the choices he made, I decided to make him a little bit funny because I wanted people to root for Zac. If you look at Zac in season one, it was hard to root for him because he made some really poor decisions, and I felt like if he was funny, it would allow Zac to be likable. He’s a charming guy. Even though he’s a little bit doltish and he makes some poor decisions, he’s not an evil guy, so for me, the comedy brings a humanity to my character.

360: The cast has made a point to say they want viewers to see themselves and people they know in this show. What has the fan reception been like, and what work is still left to do in season two and going forward?

KJ Smith (Andi): I think that, from the feedback I see, they do see themselves. They see themselves in each of our characters. We are multi-faceted, diverse human beings, and we all have different layers. I even see myself in all of us, so I think that what we’re doing is translating what it looks like to be a single, black female in this time and space, and I think people can really relate to that.

Crystal Hayseltt: People love that Fatima rides so hard for Andi, but in season one, they didn’t like the way that Andi treated Fatima. They were like, “She’s going for you. Why are you so mean to her?” Going into this season, you see more of a friendship and a bond built, which is beautiful. The fans are in for a treat for sure.

Trinity Whiteside: With Preston, I think it shows that a man can love a woman for who she is, despite how she feels or the insecurities she may have. There are people out there who love you just the way you are, and they don’t need you to change or be something other than simply who you are.

Kevin Whiteside: I feel like the fan receptivity drives the show in that space and in the relatability of those situations. As crazy as these things can be, it isn’t far-fetched from things that happen on a daily basis and in every day life. That’s where TP draws his inspiration from for these stories. That relatability is one of the successes of the show. It lands for people. When we get to, as people and the character, see, like the Twitter feeds and people’s responses, you’re seeing the things that land and people’s struggles and connectedness. They’re like, “Why would you do that? Don’t do that!” Then people go, “Damn, I’ve done that.” You see that, and I feel like that space is so important for the show because that’s what keeps people engaged. You see the drama, you want it to change, you know where you’ve done that and you’re just hoping someone makes a different decision. I think that’s huge, and I see the way that strikes a chord with our fans and is what makes them so awesome. It’s like they’re right there with you and emotionally engaged and calling us out.

Devale Ellis: I think this room here is a perfect example. We’re three of the six men on the show who represent the black men on the show, and we’re all different versions of black manhood, which I think is so important because now you have different versions of black men being represented on television for the first time. Everybody’s not a criminal. Everyone’s not gay. Everyone’s not toxic a masculine man. Everyone’s not super heterosexual. There are so many different versions of black masculinity, and I think it’s good for TV, and it’s good for us as a culture.

Brian Jordan Jr.: I think that we just continue to live and learn and be open to learning. For anybody who is creating content, anybody who is acting, there are so many different types of people in the world and so many different types of black people. There’s a quote they use on Boomerang that’s also on BET, and they say, “There’s not only one way to be black.” I think that when you continue to explore the different types of black men, different types of black women, different sexualities, different socioeconomic backgrounds and things people feel and breathe and experience, you continue to open your mind to learn, and you can always display them on television and make sure everyone is seen. The growth continues when you continue to learn.

Anthony Dalton: There’s not one way to be anything. I think that this show shows that there’s not one way to be a man. There’s not one way to be a woman. We all deal with certain things, and if we have conversations about them and try to get a dialogue and have an understanding, I feel like we’ll progress.

360: How has Tyler Perry helped get the show off the ground and get it rolling the way it is now?

Novi Brown: Besides the fact that he is Tyler Perry, he became who is is because he built it on his faith. There are so many years that he got so many noes, and I’m sure even until now some people still doubt what he’s capable of. Mignon says it all the time. He’s a maverick. He’s a leader. He’s a pioneer. He’s a person who really just shows us you can do whatever you want to do. That’s what I really, really love about our boss. It’s the best class in the world.

Mignon: We told him he should do a MasterClass. It doesn’t even have to be about filmmaking. It could just be “How to direct the course of your own life.”

Crystal Hayslett: It’s amazing. Working with him is fun. We really get to play. I love when he throws lines at me. He’s like, “Ooh, say this. Say that.” It’s a lot of fun, and there are moments where I’m laughing so hard. Then I’m trying to hold it all together because he’s so funny. At the same time, he’s so supportive. As soon as you finish he’s like, “Yes, you killed it!” He’s so supportive and makes you feel really good about your work.

Trinity Whiteside: People don’t realize how much fun we have in between takes. Tyler Perry isn’t “on-screen funny.” Tyler Perry is funny all the time. Just to have that kind of feeling around you all the time, the looseness, the comfort, it makes it easier for everyone, especially as an actor, to be able to be loose and to be free.

Kevin Walton: There’s this air of dedication in him because you see what he’s amassed and the work that he does, and there’s that space of working with him where you want to contribute to that dedication, work ethic and him pouring his heart in. Then there’s the lightness. He’s just funny, and there’s all these moments that happen outside of shooting where you’ll laugh, and you’ll play with it, then you have to get yourself together an go, “Alright. Let’s get the scene.” He’s personable, so it’s a really dope atmosphere to play with, then it also demands that you bring more, especially at the rate he shoots. It’s a really comprehensive experience when we reflect on it. Working with him is really cool. There’s that demand, discipline and his dedication, then the fun and lightness of it because he likes to crack jokes and mess around, and we get to have that fun, too.

Anthony Dalton: It’s monumental, putting that Tyler Perry stamp on this show. Him doing the Viacom deal and everything gets us into a bigger market, and it allows everyone to see themselves on this show. Tyler Perry is an icon, and to be in same presence as him, and to be a part of a successful show that he’s the head of is monumental, and it just means that the sky is the limit for, not only Tyler Perry, but for us and anybody else who walks through those doors.

Devale Ellis: For me I think it’s, one, being an example. He completely obliterated this idea of the gatekeeper mentality. Tyler Perry bulldozed his way into Hollywood his own way. He didn’t follow anyone’s rules. He didn’t go along with anyone’s ideas of who he should be in order to make it, and now he owns the largest studio in all of Hollywood. He’s one of the most paid and most celebrated producers and directors in all of Hollywood, and people continue to support his projects, so he’s an example. Also, he’s smart enough to understand that he has to change with the times. This show is a different type of Tyler Perry. We saw a lot of his Bible Belt content where he was speaking to the older generations, but now this is more of a millennial or Gen Z type of show. You have younger people getting introduced, which is crazy to me, to Tyler Perry for the first time. When you have teenagers saying, “Oh, I didn’t realize that he also did these types of TV shows,” it shows that you can have longevity if you stay with your people, you continue to research what’s going on and you keep your feet ten toes down to what’s going on in the world. Him being an example and using his following to help us push our numbers means a lot, and I’m proud to be a part of it.

Brian Jordan Jr.: Tyler Perry did something that no one else was able to do. He created a genre of media as a playwright first. People never really call him that, but he’s a playwright first. He created a style of television and film that included and showed a people who had been forgotten in Hollywood. In this time where we are observing the disparities in African-American people, I think that Tyler Perry is revolutionary with the things that he has created to serve the people who had been forgotten since the beginning of time, purposely. I think that is something that should be praised an always observed. Nobody else can do it. Nobody else has done it. He has created, and also cornered, this genre, and it’s something people will always be loyal to because he is the author of it, and that is revolutionary to me.

360: What does it mean when he is actually on set, laughing at the jokes and tying in emotionally with the show?

Mignon: He’s there every day. He directs every episode. It’s him.

KJ Smith: He’s hands-on creatively in all facets. It’s at his studio. He’s the writer, the producer and the director, so he’s on-set with us every moment of every day. If Andi doesn’t have any scenes, I can go back to my trailer. I can go back to my space. He’s there regardless. He’s there most times before people get there and after people leave, so he’s extremely hands-on, and I think his dedication and work ethic is shown in the things that he’s been able to do for so many people and employing so many people. Changing the film industry, changing the city of Atlanta as a whole. He’s an incredible human being. I love Tyler. He’s just great.

To learn more about BET’s “Sistas,” you can click right here.

Vijay Mallya illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE Netflix article.

King of Good Times

By Hannah DiPilato

Last month Netflix released a new documentary that gives an inside look at the corruption and greed of some of India’s most prominent billionaires. The first episode tells the store of Vijay Mallya’s extravagant life that takes a drastic turn. 

Vijay Mallya was born to Vittal Mallya, an entrepreneur who founded the United Breweries Group. When Vijay Mallya was only 28 years old his father died suddenly and Mallya had to follow in his father’s footsteps and run a business empire. 

When Mallya took over his father’s business he shook everyone up with his lifestyle. In an interview, he was compared to Donald Trump to which he responded he was “nowhere near bankruptcy,” an ironic foreshadowing to his future. He also talked about having many enemies. 

Alcohol is not viewed in India as it is in America and in some states of India alcohol is banned. Due to this negative stigma, Mallya needed a different way to advertise his brand. He became a pioneer for different kinds of advertising. He used surrogate advertising to promote his company while keeping the sale of alcohol disguised, instead he advertised soda. The brand was still high profile even if the beer wasn’t what was being advertised. In 1996 the World Cup was hosted in India and Kingfisher launched a campaign with a catchy jingle that was a memorable success. 

Vijay Mallya’s genius was making his lifestyle the centerpiece of the brand. He became known as “the king of good times” and this became Kingfisher’s tagline. He knew how to build his image off of this to make everyone desire the lifestyle he was living. According to Sid Mallya, Kingfisher became “more than just a beer, it became a lifestyle” and everyone aspired to live like the king of good times. Vijay Mallya was one of the first people in India that wasn’t afraid to live lavishly and use his money unapologetically. 

In 2003 Mallya survived a devastating helicopter crash. The ride was only supposed to be a short 45 minutes and Mallya’s executive assistant, Tushita Patel, recounted the terrifying crash in the documentary. It was her first helicopter ride and she thought she was going to die. Mallya survived the crash and said, “Miracles do happen, there’s obviously a message from above.” He believed he would use his “second life” to the fullest.  

Mallya became one of the world’s largest liquor producers, but that wasn’t enough for him; he wanted to be recognized all over the world as more. In one recording he explained he wanted to be “a catalyst for change.” He had an urge to be number one, the boldest and brightest and he would do whatever he could to get there. 

The next year in 2004, Mallay got in touch with Alex Wilcox to help begin the next Kingfisher adventure. Here is where Kingfisher airlines began. Mallya created a promotional video that showed how luxurious and unique flying on Kingfisher airlines would be. Mallay appealed to the rising middle class of India, larger than the population of The United States, and knew this would be the perfect consumer for this new flying experience. This was beneficial to Kingfisher as another way to advertise and promote the flamboyant lifestyle. 

On Sid Mallya’s 18 birthday the airline was officially launched. At first, the airline was a rapid success. The brand focused on high-frequency and low-cost eliminating serving meals and first-class like many other airlines. The airline sent the message “everyone is welcome here.” 

Although the company was thriving, in 2005 Mallya went behind the back of Alex Wilcox and spent billions of dollars on new planes. The airline was no longer going to be the same low-cost service it once was, this was not what the market wanted. The desire to expand the airline began to put Mallya in debt as he borrowed money from the bank. Mallya continued to expand and eventually, Wilcox could no longer help Kingfisher airlines; the two men had different expectations for the future of the company. 

Mallya’s debt continued to grow as he continued to buy into more companies. In 2008, the global economic downturn stopped people from traveling, Kingfisher airlines was not making what it needed to, daily, to survive. The company continued to fall into a pit of large debt through 2009 and 2010. The reports of the business numbers were published and scrutiny of the company was heightened. The flights were even running out of food and the crew was giving away their meals to customers. Although things were bad, Mallya thought he could save his airline. 

By 2011 Mallya was doing everything to save the airline. The workers of Kingfisher were severely underpaid. Many went on strike and the wife of an airline worker committed suicide because of the financial stress. Mallya begged his employees not to turn to the press, but eventually, his true character was revealed. He could have paid off some of his debt out of pocket but refused. Eventually, the license of Kingfisher Airline was suspended, the money had run out and the airline closed. 

When Mallya’s 60 birthday came around in 2015, he did not shy away from another profligate party. This party created a negative view towards Mallya and he was seen as a theft that did not care about the lives of his employees. This tipping point led to an investigation into his finances and prosecutors believed he was hiding his finances. Allegations against him included money laundering and fraud. 

Mallya fled to London with no plan to return against the orders of the government. He said, “I disprove the narrative that I stole money.” He was charged by the UK court for money laundering, conspiracy and cheating. Some argued there are worse criminals that need to be caught, while others declare he is a thief and needs to be prosecuted. His son Sid concluded because this was a “lifestyle brand, he was easier to target.”

Mallya has sold most of his business and as of summer 2020, he remains in London where he continues to fight all charges against him. You can watch the documentary on Netflix along with the next two episodes of Bad Boy Billionaires: India.

Labrinth Performs Songs From ‘Euphoria’

For the first time since his Emmy nominations, Labrinth performed songs from the score and soundtrack of the hit HBO series “Euphoria.”

Presented by HBO themselves, fans of the show were treated to “forever,” “still don’t know my name,” “when I r.i.p.” and “all for us.”

Including Labrinth’s for Outstanding Music Composition for a Series and Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics, “Euphoria” racked up six nominations. In her most adult-friendly role to date, Zendaya picked up a nomination for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series, and we can probably all guess which scene we’ll see when her name is announced as a nominee.

This video is proof that “Euphoria” isn’t leaving gorgeous colors and cinematography behind after the first season. It comes complete with everything but Labrinth wearing “Euphoria” makeup. Rich blues, purples and pinks set us up to be completely lost in the performance the way we were lost in the show.

HBO renewed “Euphoria” for a second season before the first season even ended, but because of production delays, we don’t have a release date yet.

Lovers of the show can still tune in to the 72nd Primetime Emmys on Sept. 20 to cheer for Zendaya, Labrinth and all of the other talented artists and creators responsible for “Euphoria.”

To see the entire performance, you can click right here. You can find “Euphoria” streaming now on HBO Max, and you can listen to the score right here.

Today City Girls release the fifth and final episode of a 5-part docu-series, CITY GIRLS: THE SERIES.

City Girls: The Series

Today City Girls release the fifth and final episode of a 5-part docu-series, CITY GIRLS: THE SERIES. Watch today’s episode; CITY ON LOCK IN THE MAKING, HERE.

Watch the full 5-part series HERE.

Produced by Quality Films, episodes feature honest footage captured throughout JT and Yung Miamiߣs turbulent lives and careers and will air in weekly installments. Watch the trailer for the whole series HERE.

The road to City Girls’ second LP, City on Lock, came with struggles and the girls’ strength and support to overcome those struggles. Yung Miami shows you can be a woman and do anything, Periodt.

In this vein, yesterday City Girls participated on a panel to de-stigmatize and aid minorities struggling with mental health issues. Hosted by Dr. Jessica Clemons MD and included G. Herbo, City Girls, Saweetie, Wale, NLE Choppa, and NAMI CEO Dan Gillison. Watch HERE.

Being a City Girl or City Boy means to keep honest, keep moving and never fold, be it prison or pregnancy, losses or leaks. And with the triumphant reunion and release of City On Lock, the City Girls quickly trended on twitter, went to #1 on the Apple Music album chart and #1 most added at the Rhythm Radio station format.

City on Lock speaks to individuals to do what they need to do to keep themselves moving and thriving in an unstable environment. The City Girls relay a consistent theme of Girl-Power, independence, and trying to have fun when the world feels like it can be working against you. Best friends since middle school, JT and Miami have made their way to the top with an in-your-face unapologetic swagger, demanding respect with a self-empowering message. As Billboard noted in their cover story, the ride-or-die sisterhood between the two is inspirational and exemplary in the way the City Girls wish to empower everyone.

Levin Kali New Video Series

Leven Kali releases the first of 11 videos to illustrate his recently released project, HIGHTIDE. Each week will bring a new video for a song off the project tied with a charitable component important to Leven. The video will be followed by a “HIGHTEA” episode on Leven’s Instagram channel where he breaks down the video and directs his fans to more information on the charity connected and where to donate.

Passionately committed to the art of storytelling through his music, Leven’s video this week for song “Get By” is a powerful and moving visual centering around the Black Lives Matter movement juxtaposing today’s events with that of history. Follow the series on Leven’s YouTube and Instagram pages below.

“We wanted to find a way to bring life to HIGHTIDE and highlight some causes/organizations that we care about along the way. Each video is dedicated to one. With everything going on it felt right to start with GET BY to remind everyone that we need to keep moving forward together and keep using our power as a collective to make change” – Leven Kali on the conception of the video series.

ABOUT LEVEN KALI:

Born in the Netherlands and raised in Santa Monica, it doesn’t take more than one song to feel the soul and love deeply embedded in Leven Kali’s inspirational sound. His soothing voice and signature background harmonies have been making waves since his first independent single release “Joy” in 2017. Leven introduced himself to the music industry through a string of incredible collaborations and solo singles that year. Not bound by genre or style, he contributed to and was featured on projects such as Snoh Aalegra (Feels 2017), Playboi Carti (Self-Titled), Skrillex (HOWSLA), and Drake (More Life). Staying true to his roots, he remains surrounded by his hometown friends and family, crafting his unique and heartfelt sound with the people that he loves.

Leven signed with Interscope in the winter of 2017. In January 2018 he released his first single “Do U Wrong (feat. Syd)”. Critically acclaimed and culturally adored, the track amassed over 38 million global streams and served as the leading single for his debut project “LOWTIDE” in 2019. “LOWTIDE”, in conjunction with “HIGHTIDE” serves as a two-part project which reflects on Leven’s life in the past two to three years, precisely on the time period immediately after his signing. The project is nearly 30-minutes—that’s a typical car ride in LA (without traffic), and intentionally so. From Santa Monica to Hollywood or the Valley to DTLA, if you’re listening in the car, you’ll understand the musical culture Leven aims to create. A sensory, funk-filled, pass-the-aux-cord experience for you and your people to enjoy together.

360 Magazine, Chadwick Journals

“The Chadwick Journals” QxA

“The Chadwick Journals” is a 3-season series featured on Amazon Prime that deals with psychological and sexual journeys of men of color while they lead double lives and explore their identities. Deondray Gossett, a Los Angeles native, has been writing and producing this series since 2011. Married to Deondray, Quincy Le Near is also a producer and director of this series. Below, both masterminds share their experiences and insights related to creating the series:

1. How did your past directing experiences prepare you for directing “The Chadwick Journals?”

DEONDRAY:

Our whole franchise The DL Chronicles and The Chadwick Journals has always been produced the same: no money, guerilla-style, last-minute shooting. Chadwick Journals was just business as usual for us: no money and last-minute. We greenlit it 1 week before shooting and was still casting the project all the way up until 17 hours before call time on the first day. 

QUINCY: 

If I think about it, from the scope of my earliest experiences, this is literally how I began as a child. I created short films as a child, casting my younger cousins and friends in roles, and shooting in and about our homes. It’s pretty comical to recognize that directing the Chadwick Journals is basically the same process, albeit with real SAG actors and much more expensive equipment but with the same Indie spirit and approach.

2. What have been some of the biggest challenges with directing this series?

DEONDRAY:

Money… (laughs). With our limited budget, we often don’t have a lot of money to finesse our scenes. We get a max of three takes from each very limited angle on our very short shot list. It’s very intense and fast-paced. We shoot 10 pages a day on average, so casting is crucial; we have to get actors who are well-trained, come to set extremely prepared, and can nail the material in the limited amount of takes we give them. The cast and crew are completely exhausted after our typical 12-hour workdays and 5 consecutive days of shooting, so as I directed, I have to find creative ways to help them keep up with the pace. We keep a very Zen and fun atmosphere so that the exhaustion never compromises their performances, but instead enhances them.

QUINCY: 

In the beginning, season I, it was basically a two-man operation; cinematography, lighting, wardrobe, sound, direction, editing, etc. Not having money means you have to juggle all of the plates and it’s much more difficult to give 100% focus on perfecting one aspect of production. Luckily, we both have very versatile skill sets and experiences so we can perform those roles, but a director should only have one important job to focus on. A cinematographer has one job to focus on. A sound engineer, gaff, grip, etc. all only have to do their jobs when there is a full paid crew and you create a better-quality project because of it. 

Trying to do it all yourself, out of necessity, leaves a lot to be desired in the end. We managed to spend a little more and afford more crew each season, but it’s been an uphill battle. Luckily the fans are captivated by the great story and the strong performances but the perfectionist in me wishes we could remake the first season the way it deserves to be seen. Who knows? Maybe if we strike a deal to bring this show to cable or streaming networks like Amazon, Hulu, or Netflix, we can remake and expand upon them. That would be amazing.   

3. What have been some of the most rewarding experiences of working with the actors?

DEONDRAY:

Watching them have breakthroughs as artists. Particularly from the latest season of The Chadwick Journals, Damian Toofeek Raven, Jemar Michael, and Skyh Black all had breakthroughs right before my eyes on set. There was no time for a pre-table read, so a lot of my direction was on-the-fly. I was amazed at how quickly they adjusted to the slightest nudge from me. They would go from zero to a hundred with emotion with just a simple, “Dig deeper.” It was at these moments, even in the midst of all the exhaustion and all of the fires that were burning that I thought to myself, “I made some damn good casting choices.” They made my job so much easier, and Damian’s breakthrough garnered him a 2020 Daytime Emmy® nomination for “Outstanding Principal Performance in a Daytime Program” for his leading role in this season of The Chadwick Journals.

QUINCY:

Damian Toofeek Raven who plays Chadwick has been with us for 15 years since the DL Chronicles series was created in 2005. He is our brother and working with him is like playtime for us. He’s always very concerned about connecting to the backstory and inner world of Chadwick. He cares about how Chadwick is portrayed as much as we do. Just to be able to create with someone we’ve grown to love is a plus and with someone who cares for your creation the same or even more than you do is priceless.   

4. How have the LGBTQ+ and African-American communities responded to the series?

DEONDRAY:

Honestly, though we’re critically acclaimed in the larger LGBTQ+ community, we’re really only known by the film connoisseurs and the gay Hollywood Elite. To the average white viewing audience, we still remain largely unknown even after 15 years of making this show. Conversely, gay and lesbian African-American, LatinX, Asian, and other people of color hang our posters on the wall. Two very different worlds that still remain separated by cultural and racial lines. We also surprisingly have a large straight African-American female audience who watches the show. They are some of our most vocal viewers who astonishingly aren’t always harping on the DL phenomenon, but actually are engaged in the characters and the plots. To have them as part of our fanbase is SUPER flattering for us. 

QUINCY:

I second that. 

5. What kind of audience(s) would you advise or want to watch the series, and why?

DEONDRAY:

Though we obviously are a series that’s trying to give a voice to the gay black community, we feel like our stories are universal. I think most people can identify with identity and self-love issues, which is ultimately the theme of both of our shows. Love is the undercurrent of every single episode, and I feel like you possess any amount of empathy, you will resonate with the characters whether you’re straight, gay, black, or white.

QUINCY:

Anyone who has ever felt like they had to pretend to be someone they weren’t to be accepted. Anyone who has felt forced to make decisions that were not in their best interest or desires out of fear. Anyone who has felt they would be unloved for being their authentic selves or voicing their dissent. That’s who these stories are about. Regardless of gender, race, or sexuality, we hope that anyone watching who might share those experiences can identify with these characters. 

6. How has the series evolved over the 3 seasons and why are the seasons spread out in the way they are over the past decade?

DEONDRAY:

The Chadwick Journals literally began as a fundraiser for the, then upcoming, re-launch of the The DL Chronicles back in 2011. It was meant to be a hybrid prequel/sequel that was going to energize the fanbase and raise funds. Fans always wanted to know who Chadwick Williams (the narrator of the The DL Chronicles) was and how he was tied to the characters, so this spinoff web series idea done much like HBO’s In Treatment seemed like a perfect vehicle. The first season, “Donovan” (co-starring Nic Few) took the festival circuit by storm and added more than 10,000 subscribers to our YouTube channel in just a month. We knew we had something, and we knew we needed to make more episodes, but just didn’t have the funding. We still self-finance the series to this day. Our second season, “Niquarterli” (co-starring Thomas Hobson) didn’t happen until 2016, and the current season, “Oren” (co-starring Jemar Michael) in 2019. The gaps are simply due to financing. We’re making moves now to up our content volume so that our &SEEN Network streaming platforms can provide more programming to our viewers, which will create a stable and consistent subscriber population.  

7. What does it feel like to be nominated for an Emmy and how will you use this accomplishment to move forward with your careers?

DEONDRAY:

This honestly feels like a dream. We’ve been creating this content for the past 15 years. We’ve gone from being independent, to being on the air, then back to independent again. We’ve sat on the front seats at award shows and won, and then years later not even able to get into the afterparty. Hollywood can be very mean and two-faced. We kept our chins up and continued to believe in the work we were doing thanks to our very loyal and loving fanbase. This current season of The Chadwick Journals almost died after having been passed around to several would-be investors who ultimately weren’t interested. Something told me not to let this die, so I took out a personal business loan and once again financed it ourselves. Looks like it was the best decision I could have ever made.

QUINCY:

I’m honored and still pretty flabbergasted. We’ve had a good campfire once before and when that died down there was no more heat. We managed to keep the ember smoldering, waiting for that gust of wind that will ignite it again. This industry is all about the heat, whose bringing it, whose flame is brighter, whose sending up the visible smoke signals this week. Who can I make s’mores with? LOL. One minute you’re hot, the next minute you’re not, so you have to be ready to jump on the opportunity when the opportunity comes back around. This nomination feels like that gust of wind. If we win, it will open the doors again to “be in the room where happens.” 

So, I feel just like Alexander Hamilton, “I’m not gonna miss my shot.”   

8. What is the overall message that you both want to convey through the series?

DEONDRAY:

It sounds cliché now, but the message simply is, it gets better. DL and closeted men are often seeking approval from the folks that ultimately don’t matter.  Everybody you want to love you, won’t, but you can find your own tribe. Stop seeking out the things and people that can’t see your beauty. Pay attention to the ones that can. 

QUINCY:

To find a way to heal yourself and be authentic. I want people to feel free and unafraid. I want people to know that they may only have this one life to live and to not waste it on conformity. Live in your truth and not in a lie that someone else, society, culture, or religion, coercers you to accept. There is joy to be had if you let it lead you.  

9. How has the past decade’s pop culture and history informed the series’s direction over the course of the 3 seasons?

DEONDRAY:

Pop culture has had very little impact on the show really, as we are still dealing with an age-old and unfortunately timeless issue. This question has been posed to us before: “How does The DL Chronicles and The Chadwick Journals fit in with the current state and condition of LGBTQ+ people? Is it still relevant? Is it dated?” And my answer to those questions is always yes, it still has a place, yes, it’s still relevant, and no, it’s not dated. While the larger white LGBTQ+ community is becoming more and more emancipated, the subsets (LGBTQ+ African Americans and people of color) have largely been stagnant. I’m not talking about life for the Black Gay Elite (myself included), which is drastically different in terms of acceptance and access than it was 10 years ago; I’m talking about the average gay, lesbian, trans-Black and LatinX folks who still live in the hoods and barrios of America. It’s still unsafe for them to walk the streets in their truth and to be out and open in their churches. This series is speaking to and for them.

QUINCY:

I’m not sure that Pop Culture itself has had a direct influence, but I can say that some modern social issues have had an influence, specifically with episode Oren which deals with an HIV serodiscordant relationship and the use of PrEP for prevention. Even season 2 Niiquartelai touched on sex-positive sex work and polyamorous relationships which were once pretty taboo subject matters. Those weren’t topics of conversation that were openly discussed 10 years ago or even existed. If I think about season II it did include a sex tape that was found on a smartphone. Does that count as Pop Culture since everyone seems to have them? 

10. Are you both planning on directing more seasons, and in any case, how do you both want “The Chadwick Journals” legacy to live on?

DEONDRAY:

TV and Film directing is our passion, so yes, we will definitely continue to direct on the shows; however, we don’t have to do all of them. It has always been our plan to nurture new talent to be able to pass the torch and allow them to add their creative spin on our shows and possibly help them to produce their own original ideas.

We hope that the Emmy® nomination will help get the much-needed eyes on the show to enable us to not only continue to make this two needle-moving and groundbreaking series to be there as moral support for the community, but to also be able to create new original content that graduates our community from a place of self-acceptance to a place of full unapologetic existence and expression.

QUINCY: We have created a franchise and this character, and these stories can live in so many ways; TV, film, podcasts, novels, interactive books, chapter books, graphic novels, web shorts, etc. So, the sky’s the limit and I look forward to exploring it.

 

“Gold Mouf Chronicles” – Episode 2

DREAMVILLE’S LUTE RELEASES SECOND EPISODE OF “GOLD MOUF CHRONICLES”

Artist Discusses His Childhood and Love for Cars While Building a Model ‘87 Buick

Rapper Lute (Dreamville/Interscope Records) has just released the second episode of his mini-series, Gold Mouf Chronicles. Directed and edited by Alexander Hall, the eight-episode online series offers a vivid look into the rapper’s passions and talents, which extend far beyond music. The second episode, highlights Lute’s love of cars, as he prepares to build a model version of the ‘87 Buick Grand National. Lute opens up about his childhood, touching on the relationship with his brother and their humble beginnings in Charlotte, NC. “For me, music, art and cars are one in the same. It’s all about expressing yourself and what you love,” Lute says. Loyal fans will appreciate the introspective narrative and insight offered during the 4-minute video, released today. You can watch the second episode HERE.

Last month, the Gold Mouf Chronicles series debuted with the lead episode, “The Joy of Painting with Gold Mouf.” Styled after Bob Ross’ classic PBS program The Joy of Painting, Lute showed off his artistic skills while painting a Keith Haring-inspired spaceship. Watch HERE.

The series’ theme song comes by way of Lute’s latest single “GED (Gettin Every Dolla),” whose Neal Farmer-directed video,  has now amassed over 1MM views on YouTube. In 2019, Lute teamed up with label head J. Cole, and hip hop phenom DaBaby for the fan favorite, “Under the Sun,” which was featured on the Grammy-nominated RIAA certified Gold Dreamville album Revenge of the Dreamers III. Last month, Lute stunned fans when he performed an exciting halftime set during the Hornets vs. Rockets showdown at the Spectrum Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. Fans are encouraged to keep up with Gold Mouf Chronicles by visiting gettineverydolla.com

Lute’s “Gold Mouf Chronicles” Mini-Series Video:

Lute’s “GED (Gettin Every Dolla)” eSingle Retail:

Video:

Lute, Gold Mouf Chronicles, Dreamville,

Grammy winner, superstar, Justin Bieber, yummy song, def jam recordings, 360 MAGAZINE, celebrity, entertainment, music, Hailey Rhode Bieber, Selena Gomez

Justin Bieber: “SEASONS” Premier

JUSTIN BIEBER RELEASES FIRST EPISODE OF NEW YOUTUBE ORIGINAL SERIES “JUSTIN BIEBER: SEASONS”
“LEAVING THE SPOTLIGHT” LOOKS BACK AT JUSTIN’S LIFE AFTER CANCELLING THE LAST LEG OF HIS PURPOSE TOUR.
Global Superstar’s First-Ever 10-Part Documentary Event Premieres Today
WATCH “JUSTIN BIEBER: SEASONS” HERE
About Justin Bieber:

Grammy-winning global superstar Justin Bieber has amassed more than 50 billion streams and more than 60 million album equivalents worldwide over the course of his career. Justin’s Grammy-winning 2015 album PURPOSE sold over 21 million copies worldwide. As he looks ahead to the 2020 arrival of his 5th studio album, Bieber is once again ruling the airwaves and dominating the charts, as his recent collaboration with Ed Sheeran “I Don’t Care” hit #1 in 26 countries worldwide, Billie Eilish’s “Bad Guy” – pushed over the top by a Bieber remix – reached #1 in the US, and “10,000 Hours” with Dan + Shay became the highest charting debut for a country song in the history of the Billboard Hot 100. In 2017, the Justin-led global smash “Despacito Remix” broke streaming records and became the most-viewed video of all time. Justin made chart history with “Despacito” and the DJ Khaled-collaboration “I’m The One” as the first artist ever to tally new No. 1s on the Hot 100 in consecutive weeks, Bieber’s fourth and fifth No. 1 singles. IN 2015, PURPOSE debuted at #1 in over 100 countries around the world, and garnered a Grammy nomination for Album Of The Year. PURPOSE shattered global streaming records and yielded three consecutive #1 singles in the US – “What Do You Mean,” “Sorry,” and “Love Yourself,” which received a Grammy nomination for Record Of The Year. In late 2015, all three tracks landed at #1, #2 and #3 on the UK singles chart, surpassing a record previously held by the Beatles and making Justin the first artist ever to accomplish such a feat. In February 2016, Justin won his first Grammy: Best Dance Song for the PURPOSE track “Where Are You Now.” Justin Bieber, whose career launched in 2009, with the RIAA 5x-platinum worldwide hit “One Time,” is the first artist to reach over 10 billion views on VEVO. In 2014, he was ranked by Twitter as the #1 most tweeted about musical artist of the year. He has released five #1 albums to-date, and has starred in two films: Never Say Never (2011) and Believe (2013). In 2011, he was nominated for the Best New Artist Grammy. In 2013, Justin received the RIAA Diamond award in recognition of his 2010 single “Baby” (12x-platinum in the U.S. alone) as the best-selling digital single of all-time.
About YouTube Originals:
YouTube Originals are award-winning, creative and engaging scripted and unscripted series and films across music, personalities and learning for fans all over the world. Spotlighting both YouTube creators alongside Hollywood’s biggest stars, YouTube Originals provide an experience that only YouTube can offer. By tapping into the platform’s growing global community, fan engagement capabilities, and innovative content mixed with pioneering live streamed specials, there is truly something for everybody. Fans experience YouTube Original content through ad-supported YouTube as well as YouTube Premium, a subscription service that offers access to YouTube Original series and movies, a streaming music platform, and an uninterrupted, ad-free experience across all of YouTube. YouTube Originals are available in nearly 80 countries worldwide.
About OBB Pictures:
Founded in 2016 by Michael D. Ratner, OBB Pictures is the TV, digital, and film arm of OBB Media. Ratner, alongside co-founder Scott Ratner and a team of talented storytellers, create scripted and unscripted projects for many distributors, with a portfolio of work spanning comedy, drama, sports, and music. The company’s most recent hits in 2019 alone include Netflix’s “Historical Roasts”; Kevin Hart’s “Cold As
>Balls”; ESPN+’s “The Harder Way” and many others. The Emmy award winning full-service production company has its offices and post-production facilities headquartered in West Hollywood, California. OBB Media is also the parent company to OBB Sound, OBB Branded and OBB Cares.
About SB Projects:
Founded by Scooter Braun, SB Projects is a diversified entertainment and media company with ventures at the intersection of music, film, technology, brands, culture, and social good. In addition to managing roster of some of the biggest names in entertainment, including Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, J. Balvin, Idina Minzel, Demi Lovato, Karlie Kloss and Tori Kelly, SB Projects has grown their film and television division to include a robust slate of projects including the forthcoming comedy series “Dave” for FXX/Hulu, CBS’ “Scorpion,” “The Giver,” and “Never Say Never,” which remains one of the highest grossing music documentaries in domestic box-office history. The company also has several projects in active development including “Anna K” for HBOMax, an untitled K-Pop film for Fox, and the film “A Taste of Power” with award-winning filmmaker Chinonye Chukwu, among many others. In addition, SB Projects recently signed a multi-year, first-look television deal with Amazon Studios to develop scripted and unscripted projects.

OXYGEN PRESENTS “MANSON: THE WOMEN” PREMIERING SATURDAY, AUGUST 10 AT 7PM ET/PT

Oxygen, the destination for high-quality crime programming, debuts “Manson: The Women”on Saturday, August 10 at 7pm ET/PT. To understand exactly how one of the most daunting madmen in history charmed his way into the lives of the women who formed his family, this compelling two-hour special takes a deep dive into their psyche through the lens of the counterculture movement that swept the 1960s. Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, Sandra “Blue” Good, Catherine “Gypsy” Share, and Dianne “Snake” Lake recount their experiences with Manson, life on Spahn Ranch and their leader’s eventual decent into madness. Their candid, in-depth interviews provide a unique perspective on what it meant to be a part of the infamous Manson family and vividly depict the collapse of a freewheeling family whose leader groomed a few of its own to commit murder. For a sneak peek,

Nearly 50 years since one of the most notorious killing sprees in America rocked the nation, questions surrounding the illusive Manson Family remain. Perhaps most daunting was the notion that Manson could incite such bloodshed without physically executing his own plan. In an era where free love fueled the proliferation of counterculture communes, most of Manson’s loyal followers were young women from middle-class backgrounds whose own home lives did not bring them solace and, instead, pushed them to find acceptance elsewhere. This, coupled with Manson’s inflammatory us-vs-the world teachings, ignited a sense of belonging within the women and inadvertently paved the way for their leader’s stronghold. Input from former legal analyst and federal prosecutor Lis Wiehl, as well as additional researchers and experts on the family, breaks down the level of control and manipulation – psychological, physical, emotional – that took over the lives of these vibrant young women.

“Manson: The Women” is produced by Glass Entertainment Group with Nancy Glass, J.C. Mills, Jon Hirsch and Eric Neuhaus serving as executive producers, and Pyramid Productions with James Buddy Day serving as executive producer.