Posts tagged with "Biggie"

Lil Kim hosts Biggie Gala his birthday via 360 Magazine

BIGGIE GALA

THE 2ND ANNUAL BIGGIE DINNER GALA PRESENTED BY LEXUS AND PEPSI, LIL KIM

Honoring The Notorious B.I.G’s 50th Birthday Celebration at Guastavino’s in New York City 

Presented by Lexus and Pepsi, Lil Kim honored the iconic rapper in New York City fashion with a star studded event paid homage to B.I.G. The biggest names in hip hop gathered last night, Friday May 20th, 2022 to celebrate what would be Biggie’s 50th birthday. The 2nd Annual Biggie Dinner Gala at Guastavino’s (409 E 59th St, New York, NY 10022) honored Biggie’s legacy with a star studded black tie gala and concert with performances of Biggie’s most insatiable hits.

Industry titans and family members including Lil’ Kim, Lil’ Cease, Junior M.A.F.I.A., CJ Wallace, T’yanna Wallace, Fat Joe, Havoc, Sway, Smif-N-Wessun, Tek and Steele, Prayah, Ceaser Emanuel of Black Ink Crew, and more gathered to celebrate B.I.G.   

Featuring performances of Biggie’s most prolific hits, the night recognized him as the greatest rapper of all time. His contribution reverberates through hip hop–inspiring countless generations. His prolific legacy is emblazed in pop culture history. Long live B.I.G! 

Fans can get a behind the scenes look at the explosive event tonight (May 21, 2022) at 7PM on Biggie Smalls and Lil’ Kim’s official Instagram pages and Lil Kim’s YouTube. The event was powered by Culture Creative, the Black-owned Emmy Award Winning agency established to connect brands with emerging cultural marketing places through new and innovative ways of authentic storytelling.

Credit: Jamel Martin of JMartinvisuals

Image via Press Here Publicity for 360 Magazine

The FunkLabb × Myah Marie – Pretty Please

The FunkLabb & Myah Marie Release Pretty Please Music Video ft. Ruba, Young Dinero Banks, & Sarina The Violin Diva, PRESS HERE to Watch

Brooklyn-based producers/songwriters The FunkLabb, Ed Lawson and Wes Davis, has once again teamed up with singer, songwriter, and background vocalist Myah Marie for their latest single Pretty Please. Propelled by a symphony of horns and thumping bass, the funk-infused 70s inspired track features TV personality Ruba and rapper Young Dinero Banks with an appearance by Sarina The Violin Diva. Today, The FunkLabb has released the accompanying music video for Pretty Please, a continuation to the intergalactic video for Mama Said No, where we find Myah after her alien abduction using her vocal abilities to lure her captors and, with the help of her talented friends, plan their means of escape. PRESS HERE to watch the video, directed by Deathcats, and PRESS HERE to check out the premiere on The Young Folks.

We developed this track specifically for Myah with a live feel in mind using horns, live strings, and bass, knowing she would definitely complete that vision, shares Wes. Myah killed it again! ‘Pretty Please’ also features Ruba, who brought a taste of his giant personality to the track, and Young Dinero Banks who puts the exclamation point on the joint with his dope verse! On the video, Ed adds, The video for ‘Pretty Please’ shows what happened to Myah following the video for ‘Mama Said No’ after her abduction to outer space. We’re giving you something different from the mainstream norm, get ready!

When The FunkLabb sent me the track for ‘Pretty Please’ I was so thrilled, the track was undeniably catchy and fun without any topline on it! I was inspired right away and wrote it pretty quickly, shares Myah who is a lyricist and background vocalist behind many top artists such as Britney Spears, Miley Cyrus, Selena Gomez, and Avicii, among others. This one is just about being super into someone and just coming out and saying it! As a woman (in my experience), sometimes it’s hard for us to admit we like someone or we have this fear of coming on ‘too strong’ or being perceived as ‘crazy’ and with this concept I kind of wanted to play with really just being up front and admitting my interest. (It’s hard to do in real life!!) I love this video because it’s so campy and crazy and the second follow up to ‘Mama Said No.’ I’m really looking forward to the release of this video and to share it with everyone. Tune in to see what happens next!!

Funk suggests more than a sound. It implies a whole lot of attitude, slick swagger, and serious soul and you feel it just as much as you hear it. The FunkLabb cooks up music in this spirit as they uncork a timeless groove ignited by fresh fire. Since meeting nearly three decades ago crafting music behind the scenes for everyone from legends such as The Notorious B.I.G. and Will Smith to R&B favorites Sharissa and Allure, The FunkLabb now step into the spotlight. Evolving their collaboration into an artist development hub with various artists leaning on their expertise, wisdom, guidance, and studio prowess, the group are gearing up to release a series of independent singles in 2021, beginning with Mama Said No and Pretty Please.

Feeling like something was missing from music, The FunkLabb collectively incorporate elements from their past catalog and eclectic taste as they aim to bring back the excellence and musicality needed to remind listeners of how a song makes you feel. Ultimately, The FunkLabb represents the culmination of a lifetime dedicated to music and a bold new chapter.

ABOUT MYAH MARIE

Billboard & American Top 40 charting songwriter and vocalist Myah Marie has amassed over 20 million global Spotify plays as a featured artist on tracks such as RuPaul’s Adrenaline and viral Tik-Tok sensation LEGS by Lucian Piane. She is the lyricist and background vocalist behind many top artists such as Britney Spears (14+ songs), Lil Wayne, Miley Cyrus, and Selena Gomez, in addition to collaborating with a myriad of artists including Erika Jayne of The Real Housewives, Hailee Steinfeld, AJ Mitchell, and Digital Farm Animals. As the lead singer of the band My Crazy Girlfriend (Capitol Records), she has toured across the country performing alongside notable acts such as Charli XCX, Jason Derulo, and Icona Pop. Myah is presently working on the next phase of her career, which includes developing, coaching, collaborating and consulting for new artists with budding careers, while continuing to refine her own unique sound.

Follow The FunkLabb via their Instagram, Twitter, Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube and website.

Page Kennedy illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q×A with Page Kennedy

ACTOR & RAPPER PAGE KENNEDY JOINS 360 MAGAZINE FOR SOME Q&A

By: Heather Skovlund-Reibsamen

Page Kennedy is well known as a rapper and actor within our entertainment industry. Kennedy’s recent acting skills brought him to play “Duck” on Netflix’s “The Upshaws”, one of their newest series to hit streaming platforms starring alongside Kim Fields (Regina Upshaw), Mike Epps (Bennie Upshaw), and Wanda Skyes (Lucretia). He is also known for his roles in “Blue Mountain State”, “Weeds” and his comedic genius skits shared on Instagram and TikTok.

Kennedy’s self-titled album ‘Page’ was released in February 2021 featuring heavyweight rappers Xzibit and Method Man is available now on all streaming platforms – make sure you go check it out!

360 Magazine had the pleasure of interviewing Page Kennedy where we discussed “The Upshaws”, his character ‘Duck’, music, and his fitness journey. We had an amazing conversation about his media roles, the love for Eminem, and also found out that we both favor Cardi B because of the way she represents herself: “Cardi B makes me feel like I know her”, said Kennedy.

Read on to hear about our conversation with Page!

Your Netflix series, “The Upshaws”, came out today- how do you feel about working with it?

PK: I love it, you know I was a part of it, and I still watch the series multiple times. I can’t get tired of it. I can just go to any episode and watch it- it has so many great jokes and the characters are diverse, and they bring their own style, energy and creativity. I think it’s the funniest show on TV.

How is it working with the cast?

PK: Working with the cast is great. You know, you got legends there. You’ve got Kim Fields, the ultimate foremost legend, Mike Epps who is a comic genius, Wanda Skyes- comic genius. They are good people, and everybody is happy to be here, so it makes it fun.

Do you feel that you have any similar traits to your character Duck within yourself?

PK: I’ve been asked that question and, let me see, I look at Duck as a different character than what I typically play. The only similarity that I see between me and Duck is his loyalty. He is loyal to a fault. You know, he spent 7-10 years in jail where he could have gotten less time where he could have ratted out his friend who could have been his co-defendant, but he just took it. I think I have a loyalty like Duck. Other than that, he’s a little different than me.

Let’s talk about your latest album. How did you feel about the creative direction within the videos for “Fear” and “Safe”? How did you work through the process of such a real and raw album?

PK: I wanted to make use of all of my talents to create an art- that was my goal. My goal was to take the amalgamation of talents that I have to coalesce to create art that could be ubiquitous forever. You know, that’s what I feel I accomplished because things are great 20 years from now and it’s still going to be great. You can still listen to Biggie because it’s incredible, it’s timeless and that’s what I wanted to do. I feel like I accomplished that.

Can you tell us about the song “Shine”?

PK: I think that the album needed some respite because it’s very heavy and after you listen to Fear and Safe, it’s so cumbersome that you need some respite. And so that’s what Shine provides. It still takes a look at how difficult 2019 was personally for me and then 2020 was for everyone. The face of darkness, there is light after, and I wanted to show that the Devil will not take that light away. We will shine.

Can you tell us about your album cover?

PK: The cover of the album is confluence of tragic incident of black Americans who have had their lives taken from them at the hands of police brutality. That confluence is to show that they are me. You know, they all make up me; I am the same as them and so I wanted to, through me, show them. Wait until you get to the song “Flowers”, that is my favorite song on the album.

At the end of some of your videos, there is mention of voting- what are you trying to show viewers?

PK: So, creating Fear was so I could galvanize the troops to go vote because we can’t just yell from the rafters “We are being disrespected”, “We are being overlooked”. We have to actually get in the dirt and, you know, do things that cause change. Our biggest voice was our vote. The virality of those videos was to have the embolism of to vote throughout the video. To help people want to get out and vote after they see the deleterious effects of what fear can do on both sides so that’s why you see that throughout the videos.

Let’s talk about your fitness journey. What motivated you to get started?

PK: I got tired of looking at myself in movies and TV fat as hell and I was more attractive in my head than I was externally, so I wanted to match that.

So, there’s a lot of excuses that I think many people use such as “I can’t afford to go to the gym” or “I hurt too much to do this”. How did you push past your own excuses?

PK: I have an additive personality so once I get into something, I’m locked in and I got my mind right and ready. I had help, a tool to help me out with the point of why I was overweight which was my addiction to food. And so, I got gastro sleeve surgery which made my stomach smaller so that I couldn’t overeat. That helped. That was like the catalyst to help me and the working out thing- I already had that down. I had challenges where I would workout 100 straight days and another challenge where I went a straight year of working out without missing any days. My mind was already set to go to the gym, I just needed to get the food stuff right.

Do you still workout consistently?

PK: Yep, I’m still in it. Even when the gyms were closed, I found a way to get the workout in.

What advice would you offer somebody as far as starting out on their journey? If they were with you and undecided about their journey because of lack of motivation.

PK: I would say to make it something that is a part of your daily life that you don’t have a choice of. You don’t have a choice if you need to go to the bathroom or not, you don’t have a choice whether you like eating or not. These are things that must happen regardless of what you want or not. So, if you make the gym or workout a part of that, you take the lack of motivation away. We can have things taken away for us and see how resilient we could be. If you’re in jail or in a weight loss camp or anywhere that caused your free will to be taken away and you are forced to do something, you can do it because you have to. So why have to be in a situation where some other exterior force forces you to when you have a mind and brain that is going to be the thing to make you do it anyway.

Do you have a specific meal plan?

PK: Sometimes, yes. I go in spurts. Some weeks I have no carbs and no sugar. Then some weeks I am a little looser. I just try to be moderate because I could easily go really far one way or really far the other way. It’s not until I’m actually preparing for something that I go super crazy. Other than that, I just try and stay in striking range.

Do you allow yourself to have treats?

PK: Yep, probably more than I should.

What kind of workouts do you do?

PK: Well, when I get off the phone with you, I have a trainer, so I am going to the gym. Wednesday is leg day, which sucks. I work out with a trainer 3-4 days a week and then two other days I have an Oculus virtual reality thing that I do a supernatural workout on or I ride my bike for 20 miles to the beach on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Is there anything else that you’d like to talk about or anything that you’d like to share with our readers?

PK: I just want them to the importance of the album “Page” and how it’s important to everyone in the world right to be aware of everything that happening right now and everything that’s going on. And that if this album was released by a bigger artist, it would be a Grammy-nominated type of album – that’s how important this album is. I just implore everyone to continue to listen to it and check it out because I think it’s necessary. That’s the main thing that I want- and watch “The Upshaws” on Netflix streaming now.

Dreamville’s Lute

DREAMVILLE’S LUTE RELEASES VISUAL FOR HIS NEW SINGLE “JUGGIN”


Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdUgSxNS8VM

VEVO: http://vevo.ly/bWDWrb

Lute “Juggin’” eSingle

Retail: http://smarturl.it/JugginLute

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About Lute

Born in West Charlotte, North Carolina, Luther “Lute” Nicholson’s hip-hop awakening happened at 7 years old. His older brother was heading off to basic training in the Army and entrusted him to look after his prized CD collection. A budding visual artist who spent all his free time drawing and doodling, young Lute had no interest in his big bro’s stash, but one day, curiosity got the best of him.

​“There was a treasure trove of stuff that I had never heard,” he recalls excitedly. “Outkast, Goodie Mob, Tupac, Biggie, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Pastor Troy, 3-6 Mafia… It wasn’t until I scavenged through all of it that I realized I had been missing out on a lot.”

​The year was 1996, and things were rapidly changing in the historically Black Beatties Ford neighborhood where Lute grew up. From the drugs being sold on the corners to the escalating police violence, the reality of his surroundings was becoming too much to bear. Hip-hop somehow helped the youngster make sense of it all.  

​Lute was 13 when he decided to try his hand at writing some raps. Coaxed into it by his friends Jimmy Kelso and Allan whose older brother was already a popular rapper in high school, the entering freshmen created a crew of their own. “Early on, I was terrible,” he admits, “But the more I did it, the more I really liked this second outlet I had to express myself in ways that I couldn’t through art.”

​The trio practiced religiously; rhyming over instrumentals they downloaded from the J. Armz How To Be An MC series. They eventually recorded their first mixtape, burned a bunch of CDs and distributed them to their friends. “Everybody was feeling it,” says Lute. “We liked the recognition we were getting at school but at the time we weren’t thinking anything bigger than that.”

​It wasn’t until near the end of 12th grade that he began to take things more seriously. Kicked out of school for insubordination and struggling to complete his GED at a local community college, the misunderstood 17-year-old had no choice but to grow up quick. He opted to put his faith in his expanding skills and instead of hitting the books, focused on elevating his lyrical content and flow.

​In 2010, he met up with fellow microphone fiend, SchylerChaise, and discussed forming a Voltron-like collective of likeminded MCs who would support one another on the come up. Lute brought in his old pal Jimmy Kelso and SchylerChaise invited his buddy High I’m Ry. Together they became Forever FC.

​“It was a brotherhood,” Lute explains. “We were all independent artists working on our own projects but we had each other’s backs.” The four-man squad made enough noise during their five-year tenure to grace the cover of Creative Loafing Charlotte and garner national coverage from The Fader, Complex and The Source magazines.

In the midst, Lute dropped his first solo mixtape, West 1996, in early 2012. Recorded in a basement over beats he found on YouTube, the critically acclaimed project swiftly caught the attention of legendary hip-hop producer, Pete Rock, who retweeted it to his followers, and North Carolina rap star J. Cole, who tracked him down after discovering the tape on 2DopeBoyz.com.

“I named the project West 1996 because I’m from the west and I fell in love with hip-hop in 1996,” Lute reveals. “I recreated the Nas cover because I felt like this was gonna be my ’hood’s Illmatic. My perspective was just talking about growing up and the music I loved. I didn’t expect anything from it, but all of a sudden, out of nowhere, it blew up.”

Retweets and likes weren’t paying the bills, though. And with a baby on the way, Lute went underground, taking a menial job at the airport fueling planes to make ends meet. Almost three years went by before fans heard from the promising young rapper again. But when he finally resurfaced, he had the long-awaited follow-up to his debut in hand and ready to go.

“Everybody was asking where the music was so I decided to give people an idea of what I’d been going through the last few years,” he says. “I had a lot of things to write about and started creating songs on the job. I had also decided that this was gonna be my last project ever, so I went all out and poured my heart into it.”

Lute sent raw copies of West 1996 Pt. II to a few of his closest peeps and associates, including Dreamville filmmaker Scott Lazer, who passed it along to the boss. The night before the release date, Lute got a text from J. Cole saying he’d heard and loved the album and wanted to help take it to another level. The two spoke, and much to the dismay of his fans, Lute ended up holding the project.

That summer, J. Cole invited the talented wordsmith to join the Forest Hills Drive Tour for a couple of weeks “to see how things work” behind the scenes. His Dilla-produced head nodder, “Still Slummin’,” was included on the Revenge Of The Dreamers II Dreamville compilation, and by the end of 2015, it was announced that Lute was officially on Dreamville Records.

Although West 1996 Pt. II was already finished when Lute got signed, it was riddled with delays due to sample clearance issues. So the artist went back to the drawing board, tweaking song structures, swapping out instrumentals and redoing hooks to make it feel fresh. “It’s come a long way,” he remarks.

The contemporary throwback album features soulful production contributions from GRAMMY-winner Cam O’bi (“Ford’s Prayer” and “Premonition” feat. Earthgang), alongside Shiggy (“Home” feat. Elevator Jay and “Git Up’ feat. GQ), Elite (“Ambitions”) and Save Allen (“Morning Shift“, “Crabs In A Barrel“ and “Livin’ Life” feat. High I’m Ry). The single “Juggin’,” also produced by Save Allen, serves as a metaphor for how the artist has approached his 28 years on the planet.

“It’s about finessing your way through life,” explains Lute. “My mom was always the one always telling me to watch my circle, don’t get involved with the wrong crowd, and do things the right way,” he recounts. “Meanwhile my dad was like, ‘forget that, you gotta get out there to figure out how life works.’ I’ve always just tried to find that balance.”