Posts tagged with "women"

guitar, rock, strum, tabs, strings

How Women Can Overcome Music Industry Challenges

By Deborah Fairchild

If someone were to ask me how I managed to thrive in a male-dominated industry and rise to the position of president at VEVA Sound – and how other young women could similarly succeed – here would be my response:

For me, it has always been about focusing on the work and knowing that if you just do that, everything else will take care of itself. When something needs to happen, just get it done. 

Get it done even if it seems like a menial task. Get it done even if there’s no immediate reward being dangled in front of you. And get it done even if there is no clear indication that what you’re doing will result in a promotion, a raise, or other good things happening somewhere down the road.

Putting in the time and effort doesn’t necessarily guarantee success in the music industry (and likely not in any industry). But success can’t happen without that time and effort.

This approach to the working world goes all the way back to my first studio internship. Whatever task was placed before me and needed to be accomplished, I would do it – right down to the unfulfilling but necessary job of cleaning the toilets. (And yes, I actually cleaned toilets. The music industry isn’t always a glamorous world.)

I think that I knew, even at a young age, that if I just kept my attention on the work at hand, and concentrated on what I was doing versus what everyone else was doing, success would find me.

That proved to be true, and this approach continues to pay dividends for me to this day – and maybe could do the same for young women who are probably much like I was several years back, cultivating dreams and ambitions.

In my case, I always loved music and I also had a technical mind. It was a matter of taking those two things and mixing them together, which is why I got my degree in audio engineering. Once I finished college, working as an archival engineer gave me a steady income and allowed me to be around music all day. The rest is history.

Of course, all of this still leaves the question of whether it Is more difficult for a woman than a man to achieve success in the music industry. Certainly, women are underrepresented in our industry, as they are in many others. To give you an idea of that underrepresentation, a study released in 2019 by the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative looked at 700 popular songs. What that study found was that women accounted for only 21.7% of artists, 12.5% of songwriters, and 2.7% of producers. 

I also can report that over the years I have encountered situations where a man could do or say one thing, but I know it would be unacceptable for me to do or say the same thing.

So, yes, a young woman with ambitions to enter our industry will face challenges, but those challenges shouldn’t deter you. 

After all, the music business is hard for everyone – male or female. Breaking in is tough. Then navigating the business once you’re in is difficult. Finally, it can be extraordinarily challenging to continue to succeed in the business over time, even after you’ve had your initial success. 

The key is to set aside any negative thoughts about all those challenges and focus on what you can control. Be determined to do the work and strive to learn everything you can from everyone you can. 

People are fond of saying, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” That’s true only to a degree. Who you know may bring opportunities initially, but what you know gives you staying power in this business. 

Ultimately, knowledge and determination have been the two most important factors in my success. They can be for others as well.

About Deborah Fairchild

Deborah Fairchild, president of VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), started her career with the company as an archival engineer in 2004. In the past 16 years, she has risen to lead the company in all facets of the business. She has grown VEVA into a global entity servicing major labels in North America and Europe, establishing offices in New York, Los Angeles, and London in addition to the company’s headquarters in Nashville. Fairchild has kept VEVA at the forefront of technology and continues to evolve and adapt VEVA’s services and technology to assist the needs of their extensive client base. She advises many label executives, producers, engineers and artists seeking archival and asset management solutions. 

Rita Azar Illustrates an Entertainment Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Nielsen’s 2020 TV Inclusion Report

We’re excited to share with you Nielsen’s latest Diverse Intelligence Series report: Being Seen on Screen: Diverse Representation and Inclusion on TV.  In the current day and age, visibility on screen is more powerful than ever. Through Nielsen’s latest report, the clear facts about representation on television are laid out in a clear and coherent way for interested parties.

This is Nielsen’s first ever report that measures the television media landscape’s progress and gaps in on-screen inclusion. The report reviews a variety of underrepresented groups in TV, including women, people of color and LGBTQ+ folks.

Some major takeaways from the report:

  • Hispanic/Latinx women are consistently and significantly less represented across all platforms
  • Across all TV, Native Americans’ share of screen is less that one quarter of their presence in population estimates
  • Of the top 300 programs across broadcast, cable and SVOD, only 2.3% have non-binary representation

From these takeaways, it is clear that although television has moved in a direction of representation, there is still plenty of progress to be made. If Nielsen continues to report this information yearly, it will be interesting to track these developments over time.

You can download the full report and learn more here: nielsen.com/inclusionanalytics

Breast Cancer Illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

UVA Breast Cancer Discovery

University of Virginia Cancer Center researchers have identified a gene responsible for the spread of triple-negative breast cancer to other parts of the body – a process called metastasis – and developed a potential way to stop it.

Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of breast cancer that accounts for 40,000 deaths in the United States annually. The majority of these deaths result from resistance to chemotherapy and subsequent aggressive metastases. So UVA researchers asked: What causes a primary tumor to become metastatic? This is an important question in cancer biology because patients with metastatic tumors have the highest death rate.

UVA’s Sanchita Bhatnagar, PhD, and her team found that the breast cancer oncogene TRIM37 not only causes the cancer to spread but also makes it resistant to chemotherapy. A new approach she and her colleagues have developed could possibly address both, the researchers hope.

“Despite metastasis being the key reason for failure of cancer therapies, it remains poorly understood. We do not clearly understand what drives the metastatic growth in patients,” said Bhatnagar, who was the first to identify TRIM37 as a breast cancer oncogene. “In general, several genes are altered during tumorigenesis. However, whether targeting the same genes will prevent metastatic transition remains to be addressed.”

Promising research from Bhatnagar’s team shows that targeting TRIM37 prevents metastatic lesions in mouse models. Those findings form the foundation of her lab’s current work exploring the role of TRIM37 in racial disparities in triple negative breast cancer. Incidence of the disease is disproportionately higher in African-American women compared with other races, with a 5-year survival rate in African-American patients of only 14% compared with 36% in non-African-American women.

Targeting Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Bhatnagar and UVA’s Jogender Tushir-Singh, PhD, have developed a new approach to stop the effects of TRIM37 and, hopefully, prevent or significantly delay the spread of triple-negative breast cancer. This could also lower the disease’s defenses against chemotherapy.

Blocking the gene could benefit approximately 80% of triple negative breast cancer patients, the researchers estimate.

Bhatnagar and Tushir-Singh’s approach uses nanoparticles – microscopic balls of fat – to deliver treatment to block TRIM37. These nanoparticles are paired with specially engineered antibodies that bind to the cancerous cells but not to healthy cells. “As soon as the antibody finds the triple negative breast cancer cell, it binds to the receptor and is taken up by the cell,” explained Tushir-Singh, of UVA’s Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics.

“It is a kiss of death,” Bhatnagar said, “that selectively reduces the expression of TRIM37 in cancer cells and prevents the spread.”

The approach could be used to deliver targeted treatments for many other cancers as well, the researchers report. “That would not only get the treatment where it needs to be but, hopefully, help prevent unwanted side effects. Besides preventing metastases, it adds selectivity,” Bhatnagar said.

“A problem in the field is, how will you give [a nanoparticle treatment] to the patients? Most of these nanoparticles are cleared by the liver, so they never have a chance to really do their job,” she said. “In this study, researchers bypassed this issue by delivering nanoparticles by nasal route, increasing the rate of uptake in the lungs – one of the most common metastatic target sites in TNBC patients.”

The development of the new approach is in its early stages, but tests with lab mice have offered encouraging indications. “The lungs showed dramatic reduction in metastatic lesions after the treatment in comparison to the mice that received no treatment,” Bhatnagar said.

Next Steps

To verify that TRIM37 targeting might offer a potential treatment approach, Bhatnagar teamed up with Tushir-Singh, her husband, to test it in the lab. “And we find that our targeted nanoparticles significantly reduce metastatic lesions in the lungs of spontaneous metastatic murine [mouse] models – both immune compromised and immune sufficient,” she said. “This is an important proof-of-concept much needed for the bench-to-clinic transition of these important findings.”

Clinically, most women in the early stages of breast cancer are treated with surgery, followed by radiation or chemotherapy. However, metastasis remains a challenging medical problem. Bhatnagar’s research offers a potential way to target a driver of metastasis that she hopes will prevent or slow metastatic progression and improve overall survival.

Much more work needs to be done, but Bhatnagar’s research is being noticed by pharmaceutical companies interested in exploring the approach’s potential. “This is a delivery platform, not only for targeting our protein of interest but for many other chemotherapeutic drugs that can be packaged into the nanoparticles and selectively delivered,” Bhatnagar said.

Findings Published

The researchers have published their findings in the scientific journal Cancer Research. The research team consisted of Piotr Przanowski, Song Lou, Rachisan Djiake Tihagam, Tanmoy Mondal, Caroline Conlan, Gururaj Shivange, Ilyas Saltani, Chandrajeet Singh, Kun Xing, Benjamin B. Morris, Marty W. Mayo, Luis Teixeira, Jacqueline Lehmann-Che, Jogender Tushir-Singh and Sanchita Bhatnagar.

Bhatnagar, a Hartwell Investigator, is supported by the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Breakthrough Award (BC170197P1, BC190343P1) and Metavivor Translational Research Award. A provisional patent has been filed for the molecularly targeted nanoparticle design engineered by the Bhatnagar and Tushir-Singh laboratories.

To keep up with the latest medical research news from UVA, subscribe to the Making of Medicine blog.

All Good Just A Week Ago

If you’re feeling a little bit lonely as a single person during quarantine, there might be a perfect book for you.

For both men and women, “All Good Just A Week Ago: Funny Dating Stories to Help You Keep Your Head in the Game” is chock-full of funny, relatable dating stories put together from interviews.

With teachable moments and unimaginable scenarios, “All Good Just A Week Ago” helps single people keep their heads in the game.

Erika McCall and Niesha Forbes, two best friends, wanted to put their quarantine time to good use, so they set up 50 interviews to gather data and stories for the book.

These stories prove that relationships can make you laugh and roll your eyes instead of cry, all while showing us that we’re not alone.

In 1950, only 22% of Americans were without a romantic partner. In 2019, 124 million Americans were without a partner.

Though the percentage of people in relationships has gone down, the desire to find love and companionship has not.

McCall said, “It’s the year of 20/20 vision, and it’s time for a dating and love revolution.”

Both authors agreed that the revolution begins with this book. With a goal to understand romantic communication and expectations, “All Good Just A Week Ago” uses stories to heal relationships and foster close, loving, committed relationships in a generation obsesses with “hook up culture.”

McCall and Forbes even get into a few of their own stories. McCall herself is single and wants to clear the way for her future husband to enter her life while Forbes is on her way to her third wedding anniversary and hopes that sharing her experience can help bring about mutual respect, kindness and traditional courtship in relationships.

McCall said her story is every woman’s story while Forbes said, “It is critical to know that once you get to a certain age, things you did in your early twenties, all those toxic behavior patterns where you’re not putting your worth above your desire to be with someone, if you don’t do the work on yourself, you will find yourself in your thirties, forties and even fifties, having not learned the important lessons or found true love.”

Following the laughs in the beginning of the book, readers will reach a call to action that encourages men and women to think critically about how to move forward with healthier relationship dynamics.

For more information about the book or to order it, you can click right here.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Woman at Computer

What happens to the home and economy when women leave the workforce?

The pandemic-induced recession forced many women to drop out of the workforce, with research showing they were much more likely than men to give up jobs so they could take care of children when schools went online.

The consequences of these decisions may go beyond each individual, though. 

“They could have large repercussions for the economy, the home, and society as a whole, says Andi Simon (www.andisimon.com), a corporate anthropologist, founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants, and author of the upcoming book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business.

Some ramifications of this 2020 exodus from the workforce for women could include:

  • A drop in consumer spending. When one spouse loses a job, whatever the reason might be, it means an immediate and sudden drop in income for that household. “The impact on household earnings will lead to reduced spending,” Simon says. “That will have ripple effects throughout the economy.”
  • An impact on women’s careers and advancement. Eventually, many of these women will no doubt go back to work, but how well they will be able to just pick up their careers where they left off could be another matter, Simon says. “Will they have lost ground in the line for promotions to men who didn’t take any time away from work?” she asks. “Also, depending on how slow the recovery is, rejoining the workforce might not be that quick and easy.”
  • A reduction in demand for family-related industries. When both spouses work outside the home, couples often need to make use of services that developed or grew because one adult – usually the woman – wasn’t around to take care of certain household duties. For households where a mother is now back in the home, that has changed. “They no longer need to pay someone for childcare services,” Simon says. “In addition, the need for house-cleaning services is likely to drop.”
  • Changes to retail markets. A woman who stays home with the kids has different needs than a woman who commutes to an office each day, and those differences could be reflected in the world of retail, Simon says. Just as an example, there could be a drop in demand for makeup. Sales of business attire for women may plummet – or at least take a hit as more casual, comfortable clothes become more important wardrobe necessities. Restaurants could continue to struggle as people eat out less and cook at home more.
  • Entrepreneurial urges could shift to home businesses. Some women could still keep their career mindsets and try to establish their own businesses run from their homes, Simons says. But she cautions that there are questions about just what those businesses might be since some potential areas – such as marketing, consulting, and business coaching – have seen a downshift in demand for their services. “That leaves you to wonder just how viable setting up a home business might be,” Simon says.

Despite all those concerns, some good can come out of this period as well for women who want a better life both personally and professionally, Simon says.

“If you’ve not been satisfied with your career and your life, this could be an opportunity to rethink and rewrite your personal story,” she says. “You need to imagine what you want to become, focus on how to make that possible, and then begin to take steps to make it happen.”

About Andi Simon

Andi Simon, Ph.D. (www.andisimon.com), author of the upcoming book Rethink: Smashing the Myths of Women in Business, is a corporate anthropologist and founder of Simon Associates Management Consultants (www.simonassociates.net). A trained practitioner in Blue Ocean Strategy®, Simon has conducted several hundred workshops and speeches on the topic as well as consulted with a wide range of clients across the globe. She also is the author of the award-winning book On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights. Simon has a successful podcast, On the Brink with Andi Simon, that has more than 125,000 monthly listeners, and is ranked among the top 20 Futurist podcasts and top 200 business podcasts. In addition, Global Advisory Experts named Simons’ firm the Corporate Anthropology Consultancy Firm of the Year in New York – 2020. She has been on Good Morning, America and Bloomberg, and is widely published in the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, Business Week, Becker’s, and American Banker, among others. She has been a guest blogger for Forbes.com, Huffington Post, and Fierce Health.

Nao New Single and Music Video

Two years following the release of her Grammy-nominated album “Saturn,” Nao is back with a new single and music video.

Her new song, entitled “Woman,” features Lianne La Havas. It is a song focusing on female empowerment, as Nao sings, “if God is a woman on Sunday ima worship us.”

“Woman” is produced by Loxe, who co-produced four songs on Nao’s previous album. It is mixed by Manon Grandjean, who worked with Dave on the album “Psychodrama” and Stormzy‘s album titled “Heavy is the Head.”

Listening to this song, it’s pretty easy to see Nao’s confidence and stranglehold on her own power. Nobody can take that away from her, and she said she considers this song her anthem to empowerment.

“I want to send a message – to all women but especially to women of colour – that we can be in control, we can be leaders, we can have confidence in our minds and bodies,” Nao said. “There’s a lot of darkness in the world but also great things happening in response, many led by women and girls. For the first time in history there’s a global movement for equality, fairness and systematic change that seems to be delivering real results, both personally and politically. Me and Lianne really wanted to sing about that, support it and celebrate it.”

To listen to and see the video for Nao’s new song, you can click right here.

Orgasm Gap illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Pornhub Orgasm Gap

Pornhub, the premier online destination for adult entertainment, today announced the launch of its “Orgasm Gap” campaign in honor of International Female Orgasm Day, an initiative geared toward closing the orgasm gap in heterosexual relationships. As part of the campaign, Pornhub will interrupt videos most popular with straight men at the 40% timestamp to highlight the percentage of women in heterosexual relationships who do not reach orgasm during sex.

Additionally, to motivate straight men to take care of unfinished business, Pornhub is inviting women to visit the campaign’s landing page to reward the men who successfully made them climax with an official orgasm giver certification.

Studies have found that only 60% of heterosexual women reach orgasm during sex, while more than 85% of queer couples reach orgasm together. What’s more, research indicates that women experience orgasm much more frequently and quickly while masturbating than with a male partner. To raise awareness for the orgasm gap, Pornhub will interrupt videos most viewed by straight men at the 40% mark over the weekend so that they can share in this frustration as well.

“Researchers demystified the female orgasm decades ago by highlighting the importance of clitoral stimulation and foreplay for women to reach The Big O,” said Corey Price, VP, Pornhub. “Yet, in straight relationships, women are still getting the short end of the stick in nearly half of all of their sexual encounters. The party shouldn’t end as soon as the man reaches orgasm, which is why we’re encouraging straight men to do their research to ensure everyone gets over the finish line. For visual learners, you can check out one of the thousands of female orgasm instructional videos on our site.”

Creative agency Bar Ogilvy partnered with Pornhub on the creation and execution of this campaign. “In a time when women are working towards equality on many fronts, the orgasm gap struck us as a somewhat overlooked matter. This proved to be very motivating for our creative team”, said Nuno Riça & João Amaral, Bar Ogilvy Creative Directors.

“And with Pornhub’s reputation of tackling so many important issues, this was just as ‘on brand’ as it gets.”

To reward straight men who step up to the plate for their partner, women can insert the names of the men who made them come to high heaven on the campaign’s landing page to generate an official certificate for every guy who gets the job done.

For more information on the campaign, and to view the SFW animated video, please visit www.endtheorgasmgap.com.

Resources on how to prioritize female pleasure can also be found at Pornhub’s Sexual Wellness Center website at www.pornhub.com/sex.

Founded in 2007, Pornhub is the leading free, ad-supported adult video streaming website, offering viewers the opportunity to upload and share their own videos. With over 12 million videos and over 130 million visitors a day, Pornhub truly is the best adult site in the world. Pornhub has built the largest dedicated membership base in the adult community, averaging over 76 million monthly active members, offering viewers a fun and sophisticated social experience directly on site, complete with messaging, photos, achievement badges.

Misbehavior Trailer

Check out the official trailer for MISBEHAVIOUR, the charmingly provocative true story of how two very different groups of women made their voices heard in the fight for equality, starring Gugu Mbatha-Raw (“The Morning Show”) and Keira Knightley (Pride and Prejudice).

In 1970, the Miss World competition took place in London, hosted by US comedy legend, Bob Hope. At the time, Miss World was the most-watched TV show on the planet with over 100 million viewers. Claiming that beauty competitions demeaned women, the newly formed Women’s Liberation Movement achieved overnight fame by invading the stage and disrupting the live broadcast of the competition. Not only that, when the show resumed, the result caused uproar: the winner was not the Swedish favourite but Miss Grenada, the first black woman to be crowned Miss World. In a matter of hours, a global audience had witnessed the patriarchy driven from the stage and the Western ideal of beauty turned on its head.

Directed by: Philippa Lowthorpe

Cast: Keira Knightley, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Jessie Buckley, Keeley Hawes, Phyllis Logan, Lesley Manville, Rhys Ifans, Greg Kinnear

Women Suing Fox News for Rape, Misconduct

By Eamonn Burke

Ed Henry, long time Fox News anchor who was fired under accusations of sexual assault this month, is now being sued by two women named Jennifer Eckhart and Cathy Areu. Eckhart, a former associate producer for Fox, alleges that Mr. Henry offered promotions in exchange for a sexual relationship with her. Co-plantiff Areu also accuses him of harassment in the form of inappropriate messages and also mentions Sean Hannity, Tucker Carlson, and Howard Kirtz in other “sexual charged” instances.

Fox News responded by acknowledging Eckhart’s claims and assuring that they fired Henry as soon as they heard of them. As for Areu’s allegations, they dismissed them as “false, patently frivolous and utterly devoid of any merit” as determined by a law firm they hired. Mr. Henry’s lawyer, Catherine Foti, does not accept the allegations from either party: “The evidence in this case will demonstrate that Ms. Eckhart initiated and completely encouraged a consensual relationship” she asserted.

Ms. Eckhart’s account of her interactions with Mr. Henry do not suggest something consensual, instead something far from it. The suit, filed on Monday, says that Henry “sexually assaulted her on office property, and raped her at a hotel where Fox News frequently lodged its visiting employees.” Additional information says that Eckhart was handcuffed, and Henry took photos of her afterwards.

The suit also claims that Fox News knew that Henry was engaging in this behavior as far back as 2017, and only did something about it now in order to “get ahead of this suit.” This accusation has major implications, and suggests perpetuation of the misogynistic culture that is rumored to exist at Fox News, which came to the forefront when news tycoon Roger Ailes faced multiple allegations of sexual harassment.

The women are suing for sexual harassment, creating a hostile work environment, retaliation, and violation of sex trafficking laws, and are seeking damages.

Women Suing Fox News for Rape, Misconduct

By Eamonn Burke

Ed Henry, long time Fox News anchor who was fired under accusations of sexual assault this month, is now being sued by two women named Jennifer Eckhart and Cathy Areu. Eckhart, a former associate producer for Fox, alleges that Mr. Henry offered promotions in exchange for a sexual relationship with her. Co-plantiff Areu also accuses him of harassment in the form of inappropriate messages and also mentions Sean Hannity, Tucker Carlson, and Howard Kirtz in other “sexual charged” instances.

Fox News responded by acknowledging Eckhart’s claims and assuring that they fired Henry as soon as they heard of them. As for Areu’s allegations, they dismissed them as “false, patently frivolous and utterly devoid of any merit” as determined by a law firm they hired. Mr. Henry’s lawyer, Catherine Foti, does not accept the allegations from either party: “The evidence in this case will demonstrate that Ms. Eckhart initiated and completely encouraged a consensual relationship” she asserted.

Ms. Eckhart’s account of her interactions with Mr. Henry do not suggest something consensual, instead something far from it. The suit, filed on Monday, says that Henry “sexually assaulted her on office property, and raped her at a hotel where Fox News frequently lodged its visiting employees.” Additional information says that Eckhart was handcuffed, and Henry took photos of her afterwards.

The suit also claims that Fox News knew that Henry was engaging in this behavior as far back as 2017, and only did something about it now in order to “get ahead of this suit.” This accusation has major implications, and suggests perpetuation of the misogynistic culture that is rumored to exist at Fox News, which came to the forefront when news tycoon Roger Ailes faced multiple allegations of sexual harassment.

The women are suing for sexual harassment, creating a hostile work environment, retaliation, and violation of sex trafficking laws, and are seeking damages.