Posts tagged with "women"

Insuficiente by Sael and Beele cover art from Black Koi Entertainment via NV Marketing and Public Relations, LLC by Nini Veras for use by 360 Magazine

Sael and Beele – Insuficiente

Sael and Beele join their talents for the release of “Insuficiente”

Available on all digital platforms

Argentina and Colombia come together to give life to “Insuficiente.” The voices of Sael and Beele make the perfect match to this song that brings a positive message into today’s society and is now available on all digital platforms.

Inspired by female empowerment, Sael and Beele wrote this song for all women who, at some point in their lives, have felt “insufficient” next to their partners.

The song was born under the wings of the record label Black Koi Entertainment, with the production of Sael and Taiko and the co-production of Sky Rompiendo. “Insuficiente” begins as a sensual urban ballad that later becomes a powerful reggaeton, with a dynamic and commercial rhythm.

The song premieres with its official music video, shot in the beautiful city of Medellín, Colombia, under the lens of filmmakers Film by Dave and Lucas Emiliani.

Sael is part of the new generation of urban music interpreters. He is currently receiving great support from his fans, allowing him to make his born-country Argentina proud of his talents. So far, Sael has more than 45 thousand subscribers on his YouTube channel and his music videos collect millions of views.

Insuficiente by Sael and Beele cover art from Black Koi Entertainment via NV Marketing and Public Relations, LLC by Nini Veras for use by 360 Magazine

Art Exhibition illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

LA Art Show

The LA Art Show returns July 29th – August 1st. They’re not unaware that they aren’t considered the “cool kids” in the landscape of art fairs in LA, but they are the oldest (26 years) and frankly, the most popular with 60k visitors per year. Obviously this will be a different year but with their new director, Kassandra Voyagis and a primarily female team we have made a hard focus on what’s now.

The future is now.

Vellum LA, the first physical gallery for NFT-backed digital art in Los Angeles opens on Melrose Ave in September, and is presenting a world first major art fair NFT exhibition at the LA Art Show.

Titled Sea Change, the exhibit was created with top NFT marketplace SuperRare (also an official partner of the fair, their first), and curated by Nxt Museum curator Jesse Damiani with Vellum LA curator Sinziana Velicescu. It will also be the first public appearance of a brand new technology for displaying digital artworks in the real world, built by award-winning StandardVision.

Importantly, this first-of-its-kind show features only women and non-binary artists.

Artist List

Claudia HartAuriea HarveyKrista KimMarjan MoghaddamItzel Yard (Ix Shells)Blake KathrynNicole RuggieroSam Clover (PLANTTDADDII)Sabrina Ratté and more.

Each NFT at Vellum LA’s inaugural Sea Change Exhibition will be showcased on Luma Canvas displays, developed by Vellum LA’s technology partner Standard Vision to be the first ever collector digital art displays. Luma Canvas offers a museum-grade LED display ideal for digital art and NFTs, available in a variety of sizes for different viewing environments and artwork types. The Luma Canvas software allows owners to automatically upload their NFT collection directly onto Luma Canvas displays, which boast vivid, three dimensional qualities optimal for presenting digital works in a physical way.

LA Art Show will be one of the first major art fairs to hold live NFTs on the floor.

DIVERSEartLA

Curator Marisa Caichiolo returns with a focus on the presence, contributions, research and documentation of women and non-binary artists at the forefront of work at the intersection of art, science and technology represented by guests Museums and Institutions.

San Marcos Museum of Art (MASM) from Lima, Perú, which will bring a new media project by Peruvian artist Angie Bonino. “The Symphony Of Now,” consists of a video installation, and interactive sound installation focusing on the Andean techno de-colonial shamanism.

Museum La Neomudejar from Madrid is bringing DATA | ergo sum RELOADED by artist Ana Marcos, an interactive art installation that visualizes the capability of viewing machines using artificial intelligence to extract data by a simple observation of visitors.

Art Museum of the Americas (AMA) has joined with a special project curated by Fabian Goncálves, that will feature a compilation of material and an exhibition of the work of women artists who have played a central role in the development of new media practices throughout history and women and non-binary people whose forward-thinking practices are currently reshaping the field.

UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center is bringing a special project curated by Chon Noriega titled Immersive Distancing by LA-based artists Carmen Argote and Zeynep Abes, which will examine recent media art produced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Now Art LA and Building Bridges Art Exchange have joined forces as local non-profit organizations to exhibit the work Agua by Luciana Abait, a video projection created as part of LUMINEX Project by Now Art LA. This work is inspired by the flood-myth motif that occurs in many cultures, in which water acts a healing and rebirth tool, often referencing ideas of creation, purification, and sustaining life. The projected FLOOD will run down the main aisle of the LA Art Show.

The most unconventional and anticipated contribution to the section is Tiffany Trenda, a multidisciplinary performance artist, known for exploring the relationship of the female body to today’s ever-changing technologies.

Galleries

While we won’t have as many international galleries, we have managed to bring together a fantastic roster of galleries that celebrate the experimental vibe that is LA.

2021 brings legendary LA galleries: Track-16 (first fair) and Coagula Curatorial. Plus 14 year-old wonder kid and LA native, Tex Hammond exhibits at his first fair under Acosta Arts.

Returning: Arcadia Contemporary, Caldwell Snyder Gallery, Simard Bilodeau Contemporary, and Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery from London for the lineup of Modern + Contemporary.

The show will once again have an international presence with the Pigment Gallery returning from Spain, In The Gallery returning from Denmark, Gallery KITAI from Japan, and exploring new territory, the Spaceless Gallery based in Paris and operating through a circuit of innovative pop-up locations all over the world, looks beyond the walls of a traditional white cube space to provide an ever-changing experience for both our artists and audience. The gallery’s nomadic nature ties in with its decentralized art programs that aim to establish fresh dialogues between the exhibition venue, the works and the viewer integrating all art forms, including music and performance art.

Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use of 360 Magazine

CITY GIRLS – TWERKULATOR

CITY GIRLS DROP MUSIC VIDEO FOR TWERKULATOR DIRECTED BY MISSY ELLIOTT

Miami’s own City Girls have dropped the long-awaited music video for their massive summer single Twerkulator, out now via Quality Control Music / Motown Records. After dropping the highly anticipated track in May, fans of Young Miami and JT have eagerly awaited the music video to accompany the club-ready track. Directed by hip-hop icon Missy Elliott, the video follows the chaos that ensues after Elliott delivers a city-wide warning that “The Twerkulators have already invaded Twerk-City and you don’t have much time.” The video is choreographed by Sean Bankhead with Creative Direction by Derek Blanks.

Alongside dropping their new video, City Girls have stayed busy as summer kicks off, blessing fans with an unforgettable and unapologetic performance of Twerkulator at the 2021 BET Awards, as well as gracing the cover of i-D Magazine in June. Watch for more to come soon from hip hop’s most notorious duo.

Watch the Twerkulator BET Awards performance here.

Zoe Wees press photo by Jeff Hahn for use by 360 Magazine

Zoe Wees

By: Kai Yeo

Powerful vocal range, unguarded vulnerability, and great songwriting skills. All of that combined is Zoe Wees, 19-year-old German singer-songwriter who is creating a global imprint with her unbelievable vocal range and soulful rhythms.

If you’re new here: Zoe Wees made her stellar debut with her single “Control” in March 2020, a song she opens up about her child epilepsy, a traumatic, isolating condition that can cause severe seizures. “Before I wrote ‘Control’ I looked back to the past every evening. Like I was just sitting in my room and was just there and was just sad and looked at the wall… After I wrote ‘Control’ it was another feeling. Like the situation wasn’t even that bad no more.” The emotional ballad became a worldwide hit and entered the top 20 at Pop radio in the U.S.

A year after her debut single, Wees continued to magnify her presence in the mainstream atmosphere with her emotional release “Girls Like Us” – an empowering anthem of solidarity shared among girls fighting against the stereotypes and expectations of society. Not just about struggling with looks, it is also a song that talks about emotions and pressures of social media. Now at 13 million streams on YouTube, it is praised as “a vulnerable pop anthem that pushed for togetherness” as Wees encourages her listeners to find confidence within themselves.

Now, with her debut EP “Golden Wings” out, Wees continues to relay her personal narratives in her music to create an inspiring and safe space for her fanbase – her wings. Last week, I got the chance to speak with Zoe about the five-track EP and potential live shows, as well as her struggles and autobiographical songwriting.

In your interview, you stated that this EP is your “strength and wings.” Can you share any special moments in the process of making this EP that reflects your strength and wings particularly?

“I feel like the last song for the EP that I wrote, I think it was ‘Girls Like Us.’ The one special moment I realized was that for the first time in a session, I thought about – not just about me – also the other people. About my wings and my community, which I didn’t really have before. I was always thinking about writing my own stuff down and thinking of myself for now, because it was what I was going through. But in the end, I know my music helps a lot of people. So [the one special moment] is taking extra care to also write about what people and my listeners can relate to, especially because I know what they’re going through.

Just in your lyrics and voice, the execution of your message “just want to make people feel less lonely, make them feel stronger” is shown so clearly. How do you feel about your fans’ reactions to your EP?

“I’m so happy. Cause you know actually; one thing is we wrote together. And they’re here from the beginning, and we’re gonna grow together when I go on tour and when I’m in their city. They’re gonna come visit me and I’m gonna see them. This is what makes me happy because anytime I go back to a city, I’m gonna see them again and again and again, so we grow together, which is so nice.”

Known for your “raspy low to unbelievably powerful and sky-high” singing style, is there a personal favorite style when making this EP or did you just go with the flow?

“I actually just go with the flow. Really, I just go with the flow. Whatever comes out of my mouth.”

You wrote your first song on anxiety and epilepsy; can you tell us why this was important for you to show your authentic and true self?

“Because I never write about happy things. You know, I hate writing about happy things, cause it makes me sad. That’s funny, I know. But I really like… never thought this was something I was ever gonna release. But I was just in the studio, and it was the first session, and I was so nervous. And then I thought about because I struggled so much with my epilepsy, and I still do even though it wasn’t as intense at that time, I really wanted to write a song about it. For me, it was the most natural way to be honest to my wings and everyone around me. And a way for me to be real. And that’s just me.”

Thank you for showing us such personal aspects of your life and empowering us (especially women) to be comfortable in our own bodies. Can you tell us what inspires you to write music?”

“Jessie J and Billie Eilish… and especially just what I’m going through.”

Follow Zoe Wees musical journey

Instagram | TikTok | Spotify | YouTube | Twitter | Facebook

Author’s Notes

P.S.: If you can’t tell from her answers… Zoe was every bit as wonderful and charismatic with her words as she is with her musical talent. Zoe, I can’t wait to see what’s next for you and to listen to more of what you create! Your music is so inspiring and when we finally meet in real life (hopefully at one of your tour stops), please remember we promised to trade my skin for your brows. Cheering for you always, stay beautiful x

Gaming illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 Magazine

The*gameHERs Launch Interactive Mobile App

Women-Led Gaming Platform Launches Social Networking App for Women Gamers

The*gameHERs, a women-led online platform that supports and empowers women in the gaming industry, today announced the launch of the*gameHERs app, an interactive mobile and web-based application created to connect women in the gaming community. The new app will act as a social networking platform where gamers can interact through online groups geared toward gaming topics and general interests and will also feature a “Play Now” section where gamers can request players to join a game in real-time. Additionally, the app will include an “Events” section that will keep users up to date on the latest virtual events hosted by the*gameHERs.

The app is scheduled to launch its 8-week exclusive BETA in August. Users who sign up in advance will receive invitation-only access to experience and use the*gameHers app and all its custom features before it is available in the app store starting October 2021.

We are thrilled to launch our first-ever app and create an even more accessible space where women, femme-identifying gamers and non-binary gamers who are comfortable in spaces that center women can feel safe and welcome,” said Laura Deutsch, Co-Founder of the*gameHERs. “It’s important for us to continue empowering women who game and with our new app, we are able to connect and support a wider community of women in the gaming world.

This is a groundbreaking day in the world of gaming,” said Todd Zander, Product Consultant at the*gameHERs. “Finally, there is an exciting and innovative way to connect women who game in a safe and supportive environment. The*gameHERs app is setting the bar in gaming for women seeking both community and entertainment.

The opportunity to partner with the*gameHERs team in building an app that both empowers and connects women around the world has been a unique and gratifying experience,” said Sara Melo, Chief Architect at Oxit. “The Oxit team is privileged to play a role in the development of a tool that will provide a safe and welcoming environment for those individuals who have often felt alienated and underrepresented historically. We believe the*gameHERs app will have a very successful road ahead and we look forward to being along for the ride.

When creating a new account in the*gameHERs app, users have the ability to choose their interests, join groups, as well as mark their favorite games to build out their profile. The “Play Now” feature, which is the first of its kind, allows users to request players to join a game in real time. If accepted, the two players are automatically put into a chat thread where they can interact and connect before heading over to their game of choice, seamlessly combining the social networking and gaming experience for the users.

The*gameHERs app also has an “Events” section where virtual events will be held regularly on a wide range of topics hosted by exceptional women in gaming and experts in the gaming industry.

Users must be 17 years of age or older to join the app and must verify their age before creating a profile. For more information and to sign up to receive exclusive first access to the*gamehers app please visit the official site.

About the*gameHERs

The*gameHERs is one of the first and largest media platforms, social networking communities, and lifestyle brands for women who game and work in the gaming industry. With its women-led social networking and game matchmaking web and mobile app, coupled with their community generated content, the*gameHERs aim to provide a safe and easy way to connect, socialize and game with other women.

Of the 2.7 billion gamers worldwide, 46% of them are women, with most of them experiencing hate and toxicity while gaming. The*gameHERs provide a sexist-free space for all kinds of gamers – from the casual players to the hardcore gamers to the techies, the streamers, the designers, the cosplayers, the developers, and programmers. The gameHERs also host the*gameHERs Awards, professional development boot camps, charity gaming streams, collegiate esports tournaments/chapters and other live and virtual events.

Tanya Snyder illustration via Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Tanya Snyder

By: Hannah Beck

The Washington Football Team announced on Tuesday morning that Tanya Snyder, wife of Dan Snyder (the current owner and CEO of the team), would be joining Dan Snyder as co-CEO. She is already a co-owner of the professional football team with her husband, and has been heavily involved with the team since Snyder bought it in 1999. Tanya has been a huge component of the team’s charitable work since 1999, and has also been involved in many league actions. Additionally, Tanya helped establish the NFL’s Think Pink campaign after she fought breast cancer. With the team currently rebranding themselves, appointing Tanya as co-CEO will be a great help.

The team has been somewhat nameless for a year or so, but plans to have an official team name for the 2022 season. Currently, the team is going by the title “the Washington Football Team,” after deciding to change their name due to their previous title’s racially insensitive roots. The team is also working to move on from sexual misconduct allegations brought forth from team cheerleaders. Both of these incidents have given the team a chance to re-establish themselves in the league, and Tanya is determined to help. Coming up with more charitable opportunities and new team values and standards, The Washington Football Team has a positive, new face with Tanya Snyder.

The announcement was met with mixed reviews, as the public is well aware of the scandals the team has faced in the past. Some fans feel that the team appointing Tanya is just a publicity stunt. Many think that the team is using Tanya’s positive reputation within the league, and the fact that she is a female, as a way to bounce back from the team’s negative press. Regardless, this is still a fantastic feat for women in sports. Tanya Snyder joins only two other women who have held positions of this caliber in the NFLAmy Trask of the Los Angeles Raiders and Kim Pegula of the Buffalo Bills.

While finding women involved in professional football, and in the sports world at large, is now more common than it once was, women holding this much power in a sports setting is still a rarity. There are thirty two NFL teams, some with more than one owner. This means that these three women only make up roughly 9% of league owners. This low number–coupled with the fact that many believe Tanya’s promotion to co-CEO was for positive press, rather than due to her extensive knowledge of football and long standing involvement in the league–demonstrate how much room for growth there is in the football community for women’s involvement.

While I think that the promotion is based on Tanya’s long-standing action and work within the community, many believe otherwise. Despite the reason she was appointed co-CEO, it’s fantastic to see a woman hold such power in a male-dominated field. Breaking into the sports world is incredibly hard for anyone–player, team owner, or manager– and it is 10 times harder to do so as a woman. The public constantly questions if women know enough to be qualified to hold their position in the sports industry. Tanya Snyder’s promotion to co-CEO is a great step forward for women in sports, and especially women in football.

The involvement of women in football–from 49ers coach Katie Sowers, who was the first woman to appear in a Super Bowl, to Tanya Synder–these women are showing young girls who have an interest in sports that it is possible to break through barriers. These women prove that it is possible to become a powerful woman within the league. Hopefully, Tonya Snyder can help the Washington Football Team combat their negative press and rebrand themself as a winning, socially forward, and gender inclusive team.

Photo by Hannah Beck for use by 360 Magazine

RE-INC × BODEGA

By: Andrew Shibuya × Hannah Beck

This past weekend, 360 Magazine attended the release of re-inc’s collaborative collection with Los Angeles clothing store Bodega and interviewed one of re-inc’s founders and CEO, Christen Press. You can find our coverage of the event as well as the interview below.

re-inc was founded by four members of the United States Women’s National team, Megan Rapinoe, Tobin Heath, Meghan Klingenberg, along with Press in 2019. The company’s mission revolves around sustainability, equality, and the creating of a global community, citing the reimagining and reinvention of the future as their primary tenets.

Their collaborator on this collection, Bodega LA, hosted the release of their “REUNITE” collection. Nestled between loading docks and former warehouses in the recently reopened ROW DTLA, Bodega is sequestered on the far end of the historic commercial complex turned upscale shopping mall. The store itself follows suit with its surrounding industrial environment, with many elements of the former factory preserved and combined with the namesake New York staple.

The event itself was based around the opportunity to shop the new collection in the Bodega store, as well as the opportunity to meet re-inc founders Heath and Press. Outside the store was a separate outdoors area where the festivities mainly took place, comprised of a DJ booth, a fruit stand, and a shaved iced stand. In addition, there was a small tent set up under which founders Heath and Press autographed posters and took pictures with fans.

The founders of re-inc will be playing at the 2021 Olympics in Tokyo this summer, something many of the fans present at the event were excited about. The US Women’s National Team is once more expected to be one of the dominant teams in the tournament. In 2016 in Brazil, Team USA was narrowly defeated in the quarterfinals round in a match against Sweden, though in 2019, the women won the FIFA World Cup in France.

For Heath, Press, Klingenberg, and Rapinoe, their identities as global athletes seem to be inextricable from re-inc’s mission and this latest Reunite Capsule. This collection is centered around not only a reopening of the world as vaccination numbers rise and coronavirus cases fall, but also, of course, their global competition this summer.

And so, in correspondence with this vast crowd of eager soccer fans and the desire to build a community around re-inc, one of the centerpieces of the event was a board where fans were encouraged to respond to the prompt “How will you boldly re-imagine the status quo?”. This feature of the event gestures to re-inc’s mission and core belief of “relentless and continuous reinvention”.

It seems as though re-inc likewise have intended to honor their mission through various production and charitable ventures. The clothes themselves are all said to have been made in woman-owned factories of recycled and organic materials. In addition, 1% of sales from the Reunited Capsule are to be given to the Partners in Health charity, who are striving for a more equitable distribution of the coronavirus vaccine. It is also worth noting that the collection was manufactured in factories on the East Coast of the United States.

The collection, which will be available at 9pm EST June 29th on their website, is comprised of a variety of colorful clothing with various accompanying graphics, seemingly paying homage to the trending resurgence of psychedelia. The garments range from sweats to hats and are in primarily earth tones. This event and the collaboration were similarly re-inc’s first foray into in-store retail. You can find the new collection HERE.

360 Magazine was able to speak briefly to Press about the inspiration behind the newest collection as well as plans for re-inc’s future. Read the interview below:

What were some of the main sources of inspiration for re-inc’s newest collection?

It was the Olympics, of course, and there’s a little psychedelia in it, alluding to our next collection, the Field of Flowers collection, coming out this summer. And it’s really inspired by that happy high and about reimagining what your health and prosperity is, and of course, coming together in a new reimagined way. 

What was most important to you in the designing of this collection?

I think with every collection we design we want to get past just the surface and go really into emotions and humanity. I think that there is a tension in that because it is hard to convey something deep down, and I think we’ve done a really great job with that.

ABOUT re—inc

re—inc is a purpose-driven clothing company that was founded by world champions Christen Press, Tobin Heath, Megan Rapinoe, and Meghan Klingenberg in 2019. The company features gender-fluid designs that are ethically sourced and produced. re—inc’s founders encourage their fans to boldly reimagine the status quo and become change makers. Over the last two years, re—inc has partnered with over fifteen grassroots organizations to amplify their work and have donated over $90,000 to their causes.

ABOUT Bodega

Founded in 2006, Bodega has been a refuge and tool for a clandestine group of artists through the ideation and execution of creative endeavors examining the intersection of fashion, counterculture, community, and the arts.

Joel Peterson photo via Deseret News for use by 360 Magazine

Joel Peterson x My Road to Cancellation

Joel Peterson, Stanford Professor and former JetBlue Chairman, writes about his experience navigating the minefield of woke hostility in his piece My Road to Cancellation:

“Wokeism,” America’s new civil religion, draws on elements of neo-Marxism, critical race theory, social justice and identity politics. Its adherents believe it will lead to a more just society. Its detractors, on the other hand, believe its “cancel culture” will push civil society to the brink. And, for the “woke,” either will do.

The roots of my own unlikely cancelation go as far back as 1987, when Jesse Jackson marched Stanford students up Palm Drive to a rhythmic chant of “Hey, hey, ho, ho! Western Civ has got to go!” The next year, I joined the advisory council of its Graduate School of Business where I was soon invited to fill a one-year faculty vacancy. To everyone’s surprise (including my own), I returned every fall for the next three decades to teach four courses to a generation of exceptional MBA candidates.

Then, last year, before a student-politician boldly posted that “White people need to be eradicated,” I was summoned to respond to an equally disturbing complaint over having “triggered” woke students. Because I didn’t think I’d done anything worthy of the summons and because I had received the distinguished teaching award from students, a “Silver Apple Award” from alumni and been appointed to a faculty chair, I wasn’t worried. Alas, I’d misjudged my peril.

Years after Jackson’s campaign to eliminate Stanford’s requirement to study Western civilization, an Iowa-born, New York Times reporter, Nikole Hannah-Jones, developed what she titled “The 1619 Project.” In it, she presented America as founded on slavery and stained by perpetual bigotry.

With boosts from the Pulitzer Foundation and from George Floyd’s tragic death, her social justice message struck a nerve. However, when a number of historians debunked the pseudo-history, Hannah-Jones repositioned her essay as “a work of journalism that explicitly seeks to challenge the national narrative.” She followed up with a New York Times Magazine article headlined “What is Owed” making a case for reparations, consistent with her 1995 letter to the editor in Notre Dame’s “The Observer,” in which she likened Christopher Columbus to Hitler.

With police departments defunded, monuments vandalized and cities torched, Dr. Seuss was soon condemned as racist, Mr. Potato Head scheduled for gender reassignment, and free speech restricted by social media oligarchs. So, it wasn’t a surprise to see social justice warriors on the previously welcoming Graduate School of Business campus.

Content of character vs. color of skin

In a class I teach, students objected when guest CEOs claimed to have been “color blind.” When I volunteered that I, too, had resisted hiring based on skin color, gender or quotas, and had relied, instead, on character, competence and commitment, some students were offended. To understand why those “triggered” would object to standards of character and competence being added to the emergent holy grail of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), I turned to one of my own daughters.

Sensing my bafflement at the outrage, she immediately wrote back:

“I have known you my entire life, and I know by your words and deeds that you value all people of all races, ethnicities, and genders. I know you are constantly impressed and inspired by immigrants and their amazing stories of courage and perseverance. I’m proud of the work you’ve done. If this younger, ‘triggered’ generation pushes out of their lives all who seek to improve their understanding, teach them, and open their minds to broader ways of thinking, it will be to their detriment.”

I’d taught my kids – and, until now, my students — that talent, character, and competence are evenly distributed across every demographic. In response to my determination to be on the lookout for leaders without regard to identity, an offended gender-studies major wrote that she’d not known “whether to scream or throw up.” After all, it had been nearly 60 years since Martin Luther King had dreamt of the day when the content of one’s character mattered more than the color of one’s skin. But, by the time that day happily arrived, “wokeism” had hijacked his dream, re-elevating skin color over character.

As demands for skin-color diversity were broadened to include gender and sexual orientation, a student notified me that I’d called on more men than women in two (of four) classes. Knowing that I was no respecter of persons — whether by gender, race, sexual orientation, or anything else — I moved ahead with the course, suddenly aware that my interactions with students were being catalogued by identity.

Soon, a Black Lives Matter advocate asked, of all things, whether I would stand for the American flag. To provide context for my decision, I shared a story. As a toddler, I’d seen my mother take a call from the Department of Defense announcing that her fighter-pilot brother had been killed. Honoring her grief, I’d chosen to stand for the flag under which my only uncle had offered the ultimate sacrifice. The student’s response was presented as an irrefutable argument; my choice was “racist.”

Furthermore, in this woke new world, my professional experience was no longer relevant because of the race and gender I’d been assigned at birth. Despite having created tens of thousands of jobs, promoted women and minorities, and coached scores of entrepreneurs, I was deemed an “oppressor” in the catechism of “wokeism.” Furthermore, the penance for being raised in a “systemically racist” society — founded on millennia of Greek, Roman and Judeo-Christian antecedents, no less — was submission, and, if resisted, cancelation.

The reason behind such tyranny came into focus for me when Condolezza Rice, former secretary of state and current director of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, told me she’d shared with her students that the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (9/11’s architect) had felt like “having Erwin Rommel under lock and key.” The blank looks on the faces of her very bright students revealed that they had never heard of WWII’s famous Desert Fox.

Until then, I’d traced the enmity to activists like Jackson and Hannah-Jones. Now, I could see that it also stemmed from students having swapped an education for indoctrination. Those enlisted as social justice warriors had avoided the lessons of history, missed out on refining skills that might have allowed them to judge assertions, and denied themselves the insights required to make wise trade-offs.

Because such uninformed activism brought with it a minefield of woke hostility, I kept to myself any reservations I harbored about critical race theory, gender fluidity, and climate alarm. And, when Stanford’s math department proposed achieving “racial equity” by eliminating AP math (as racist, no less), I also kept quiet. Instead, I hoped my hardscrabble climb to CEO might inspire those who saw themselves as victims of inequity. Ironically, those who strained to label my uphill journey a product of “white supremacy” were often the very beneficiaries of woke preferences.

Oppressor-victim

To understand this recipe for canceling predecessor generations, I spoke next with Stanford military historian Victor Davis Hanson. Because Hanson had written the following, I wanted his help in gracefully handling the oppressor-victim theme:

“We should not… allow a current affluent, leisure, and pampered generation to hijack the past, and damn it to perdition. (They have) not earned the right to… cancel… those of the past who won Gettysburg, or built the Hoover Dam, or produced a Liberty ship every week.”

While Stanford had long nurtured a remarkably diverse and admirably inclusive community, it nonetheless rejected Hanson’s counsel in favor of a now fashionable “institutional racism.”

When Graduate School of Business faculty were further instructed to avoid “racist and xenophobic rhetoric and actions against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community,” I found myself wondering if the addendum were a virtue-signaling accusation, or if it were based on something I’d simply never encountered in all my years at Stanford. And, when the facts behind subsequent murders (of a Capitol police officer and 10 Colorado shoppers) contradicted de rigueur narratives, I wondered if the time had come to move beyond racial memes.

Apparently not. With free markets also labeled “racist,” those of us with responsibilities outside the ivory tower began to feel our “diversity of optic” (based on long experience) had been dismissed in favor of a “diversity of identity” (rooted in ideology). So, while I care deeply about Stanford University, and like and admire its president, provost, and business school dean, I was beginning to feel isolated.

Their deference to selective diversity led me to reflect upon a meeting I’d conducted in Berlin as chairman of JetBlue Airways. After the meeting, I’d taken a stroll down Unter den Linden to the Bebelplatz, 500 yards to the east of Berlin’s famous Brandenburg Gate. It was at that plaza, on May 10, 1933, that newly empowered Nazi officials had orchestrated the burning of “objectionable” books. Later dubbed “The Night of Shame,” the conflagration eventually contributed to Germany’s liberal democracy turning a blind eye to Kristallnacht, the Holocaust and an appalling rationale for war.

While loath to compare such a long-ago shame with how I was currently feeling in Palo Alto, of all places, I remembered being impressed that, in Berlin, the survivors of that era’s cancelation had later inserted “stumbling stones” between pavers to ensure that all who followed neither forget, nor repeat, that calamity.

As I traversed the once-riven capital city, the ground-level reminders had provoked in me a surge of optimism. Surely, the world would avoid the sort of conflict for which my own father had gone to war. Surely, everyone realized by now that banning books, restricting free speech and stoking fear would lead to tragedy. And, just as surely, America would eventually reject totalitarianism, even in its “wokest” form.

Yet, here I was, only three years later, 6,000 miles to the west of Berlin, sensing I was perilously connected to a prior generation’s intolerance. Adding to my anxiety was a discovery that my grandchildren’s generation were being scheduled to view an honorable heritage through a lens cleverly manufactured to provoke shame.

Forced to consider moving to a less hostile teaching environment, I heard from former students. One female “of color” offered that, of all her professors, I’d been the most supportive of women and minorities. Another confirmed that the majority of his classmates felt silenced by the threats of a racist label. One student even scolded me for having allowed “the slings and arrows” of the woke to achieve their hoped-for effect.

I smiled wanly to see that Prince Hamlet had somehow survived Jesse Jackson. I, on the other hand, had failed utterly to anticipate the distorting polemics of identity politics. The script advanced during America’s annus horribilis had pitted race against race, gender against gender, and generation against generation, all risking a degradation of spirit worse than any virus.

As a former CEO, it seemed to me that the narrative had gone well beyond gaining political or market advantage. It had even exceeded antifa’s hope for French-Revolution-style anarchy. In fact, by 2021, it looked like a bold attempt at a hostile takeover of mankind’s best hope for peace and prosperity.

This conclusion led me to contrast two Americans best known for their connections to societal breakdown — a mid-19th-century Abraham Lincoln and a mid-20th-century Saul Alinsky. I selected Lincoln because he’d guided America through a civil war, and Alinsky because his dream had been to provoke civil unrest by inciting those he called the “have-nots” against those whom he called the “haves.”

President Lincoln’s observation of America’s vulnerability mirrored community organizer Alinsky’s precondition for a successful revolution. Thus, the warning attributed to Lincoln that “America will never be destroyed from the outside; if we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves” was the basis for the race and class warfare Alinsky welcomed by rewriting history, inciting envy and “canceling” a large portion of the population.

Whereas Martin Luther King had called upon our “better angels” to subordinate our differences to shared values and, thus, to overcome what Condi Rice called our nation’s “birth defect,” Alinsky chose to repudiate King’s redemptive dream. If he could get people to ignore e pluribus unum (America’s motto since 1782), he might be able to overcome the spirit under which the nation had thrived.

By 2020, the pandemic had offered activists a unique opportunity to cleave the nation along identity and tribal lines, skirting the 238-year-old aspiration that had been Alinsky’s steepest obstacle. Using a fear of cancellation to silence half the population, SJWs dismissed the steady social progress that was the trademark of the world’s most successful multicultural society. Instead of celebrating the progress flowing from our commonalities, they fomented division by pointing to historical injustices.

Between a pandemic, racial tensions and the absence of a Lincolnesque figure to bind up our wounds and bring us together, America was, indeed, vulnerable. As its citizens awakened to the soft tyranny promoted during the pandemic, many felt betrayed by institutions they’d once admired and leaders they’d once trusted. And, for my part, I discovered that the experience I’d had with cancellation in the academy was being repeated all across the nation.

While I may well survive, America will not survive the rewriting of its history, the violation of its Constitution and the abandonment of the freedoms it has promised to citizens of all political persuasions, ethnicities, genders and orientations. No matter our differences, unless we preserve free speech, secure our Constitution and re-enthrone individual responsibility over victimhood, all the king’s horses and all the king’s men will be unable to put Humpty Dumpty back together again.

And Alinsky’s vision will have canceled Lincoln’s.

Joel Peterson Bio

Joel Peterson is the Robert L. Joss Professor of Management at Stanford University, the former managing partner of the Trammell Crow Company, the former chairman of the board of Overseers of the Hoover Institution, the former chairman of JetBlue Airways and the founder and chairman of Peterson Partners, a sponsor for a quarter century of more than a dozen funds covering private equity, venture and real estate investments in hundreds of companies and real estate projects across the nation and throughout the world.

Image courtesy of Adore Me for use by 360 Magazine

Adore Me × Bebe Rexha Capsule Collection

Adore Me has never been a celebrity-driven brand but when the opportunity to work with Bebe Rexha was presented, they knew they couldn’t pass it up. Bebe has always been a powerful voice on body positivity and inclusivity – the themes most near and dear to Adore Me’s heart.

But the timing really matters to us, too, says Assiya Assanbayeva who is a content strategist for Adore Me. As we head into a summer where America’s re-opening, we’re excited that we have someone like Bebe Rexha to spread the message that it’s okay to celebrate and have fun. As a lingerie brand, making our customers feel happy, confident, and sexy is at the core of what we do – and after everything we’ve collectively been through, we truly hope we can spread some joy to our customers with this collection.

The collaboration was built around products that are unafraid to be sexy and playful, like both Bebe Rexha and Adore Me. Just like Bebe Rexha crosses genres from pop to country to rap to rock, Adore Me has always been driven to serve all styles of lingerie to all types of customers of all sizes. We hope the collection reflects this. Who better than a lingerie brand and an inspiring musician to help us through a hot vax summer. 

You can read more about the partnership and see the launch video here.

Onika Unlined

Pretty in pink! Made of recycled nylon lace, Onika has the best of both worlds: sexy and cute. This sheer plunging bodysuit features statement cut-outs with gold-ring hardware, a G-string back, and also has adjustable straps and removable cups. 

Fun fact: for her first lingerie photoshoot, Bebe Rexha wore this bodysuit before the photoshoot to get her feeling more comfortable, and as Bebe told WWD, Bebe Rexha is discussing her lingerie. Her current favorite is the Onika bodysuit.

Margaritte Unlined

Feel like a rockstar! This push-up balconette bra is all about lace and attention to detail. Margaritte features sexy cleavage with intricate details, gold-ring hardware, and removable pads. Plus, it is made from recycled nylon lace and comes with a matching bikini and cheeky panty. 

Fun bra-fit fact: With Margaritte bra on, you won’t have to worry about a wardrobe malfunction. The wings of this longline bra are wide enough to help secure the bra around the body and avoid it flipping up. The trick here is the support coming from the top back elastic, while the bottom elastic is made a little softer to not dig into the skin.

Ambrey

Ambrey is perfect for layering or wearing on its own. Made of custom lace in a botanical motif, this dark green bodysuit features a high-cut leg line and a thong back for a smooth and seamless feel.  

Spotted: a little triple dart detail on the sides of the lace cups makes sure the bodysuit fits comfortably around the bust. Plus, it’s sewn with soft threads, so it doesn’t rub against the most sensitive area.

Avara Unlined

Bustiers are a big trend of 2021, and Avara is the first cropped bustier we’ve ever made. While this underwire black lace bustier’s floral details evoke a sense of boudoir chic, the pleated-side mesh panels add it some extra edge. Avara comes with a matching high-leg cheeky panty for a full jaw-dropping look.

Fun bustier-fit fact: front and side boning add extra support to the bustier, while mesh panels allow a bit of stretch for more comfortable wear.

Art by Maria Solomon for use by 360 Magazine

AdventureWomen Partners with African Wildlife Foundation

AdventureWomen, a by-women, for-women adventure travel company, has announced that they are partnering with the African Wildlife Foundation, an organization that supports the conservation of Africa’s wildlife and environment through community development, sustainability projects, education initiatives and more. As part of the collaboration, leaders from the two organizations will be hosting a special women’s safari to Zimbabwe in May of 2022.

Joining the trip will be AdventureWomen’s owner Judi Wineland, a longtime conservationist and adventure travel pioneer; and Carter Smith, AWF safari program manager and author of the children’s book African Tea. Joining Judi and Carter will be several other visionary women including Olivia Mufute, the first female Chief Ecologist at the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority and the current Zimbabwe country director for AWF; and Sharon Stead, founder of the Mother Africa Trust, which supports female-focused projects throughout Zimbabwe.

Both AdventureWomen and the African Wildlife Foundation believe in empowering girls and women throughout the continent, and this shared mission will be weaved into many aspects of the trip. A highlight of the journey will be a dinner hosted by Aunt Flatter, a Zimbabwe local with decades of wisdom about the country.

“At African Wildlife Foundation, we believe that women in Africa have a critical role to play in conservation on the continent,” says Carter Smith. “That’s why I’m so excited about AWF’s budding partnership with AdventureWomen, and honored to participate in this beautifully crafted safari with Judi Wineland. The Zimbabwe safari will feature women ambassadors, travelers, and conservation heroes. We can’t wait for this inspiring adventure.”

The trip will include once-in-a-lifetime experiences, including a visit to the majestic Victoria Falls, a walking safari to try to spot incredibly rare white rhinos, and a sunset cruise along the Zambezi River. Participants will also have the opportunity to visit the Lupani Primary School in Kazungula, Zambia (across the country border, nearby Victoria Falls). The school was rebuilt as an initiative of the African Wildlife Foundation’s Classroom Africa program, providing a safe learning environment for children across seven grades.

“We are thrilled to partner with AWF,” says Judi Wineland, whose philanthropic work in Africa began with her founding a Tanzania-based non-profit 25 years ago. “By inviting participants to foster female-to-female connections, we hope this trip will continue to bolster AWF and bring awareness to their incredible work.”

For more information, please visit here.

ABOUT ADVENTUREWOMEN
AdventureWomen® has been a pioneer and a leader in adventure travel for women since 1982, custom-designing and leading some of the most unique adventure travel tours for active women, worldwide. Owners Judi Wineland, President of Wineland-Thomson Adventures Inc., and her daughters Erica Landerson and Nicole Wineland-Thomson, describe AdventureWomen as a “relationship company” where women create connections with other women while exploring new frontiers and active outdoor adventure. Offering adventure tours to over 20 countries each year, AdventureWomen invites women to physically and mentally challenge themselves while exploring the world at their own pace and on their own terms.


ABOUT AFRICAN WILDLIFE FOUNDATION
The African Wildlife Foundation (http://www.awf.org) is the primary advocate for the protection of wildlife and wild lands as an essential part of a modern and prosperous Africa. Founded in 1961 to focus on Africa’s conservation needs, we articulate a uniquely African vision, bridge science and public policy, and demonstrate the benefits of conservation to ensure the survival of the continent’s wildlife and wild lands.