Posts tagged with "empowerment"

ANUEL RELEASES BROTHER SONG INSIDE 360 MAGAZINE

Anuel AA – Brother

Anuel releases new single and music video Brother. The artist breaks down musical barriers and experiments with different sounds.

Anuel, one of the great leaders of Latin music, releases his new single Brother a song that promises to surprise the urban genre industry with its masterful fusion of Spanish, Trap, and alternative music. The song and its music video are now available on all digital platforms.

Anuel is an integral artist, composer, and successful businessman who is unquestionably one of the great references to Latin music. The singer, who has long been associated with the urban genre, now presents a new theme that combines Latin Trap, alternative music, and R&B sounds. This innovative rhythm fusion featured production from Hydemiyabi, Dim Cruz, and EQ, as well as lyrics about personal and emotional empowerment.

“Brother” debuts with its official music video, which was shot in the historic city of Madrid, Spain, by Conteni2 Media Group and directed by Anuel himself in collaboration with Tru Views.

“I am very happy with the outcome of this video; it is exciting to work as a director on my own music videos.” “I hope my fans enjoy this production and listen to this rhythm fusion that combines the best of two worlds,” Anuel said.

In addition to representing the lifestyle of a music star like Anuel, the audiovisual piece is full of bright colors, gold, European architecture, and a lot of “bling bling.”

Anuel AA – Brother (Video Oficial)

Anuel × Reebok Collaboration HERE

Marvel female black superhero via 360 magazine

Monica Rambeau

This December, universal powerhouse Monica Rambeau will star in first-ever solo comic series! A five-issue limited series, MONICA RAMBEAU: PHOTON will be written by award-winning author and scholar Eve L. Ewing and drawn by new Marvel talent, artist Michael Sta. Maria. The iconic Marvel super hero with four decades worth of amazing stories will at long last headline her own saga.

From the New Orleans Harbor Patrol to the Avengers to the Ultimates, Monica Rambeau has been a leader and team player her entire life but now she’ll face a reality-shattering crisis that she’ll have no choice but to take on single-handedly. In order to do so, Photon will need to reach new heights of her incredible abilities—and then surpass them! In a revelatory journey spanning time and space, fan will behold Photon’s true potential. The adventure begins when Photon is charged with making a very special, very cosmic delivery. What should be light work (get it?) for Monica becomes increasingly complex and dangerous due to a threat from beyond and family drama. 

“It’s such an honor to be taking on the story of a legacy character like Monica Rambeau,” Ewing said. “Monica’s character has a long history in the Marvel Universe, but she’s way overdue for getting her own story told. I’m picking the pen up from the legend himself, Dwayne McDuffie, who put out the last Monica Rambeau solo adventure almost three decades ago. It’s a privilege and I’m excited to tell the story in a way that both highlights her incredible cosmic abilities as well as her everyday, relatable struggles. I hope this will be a title that has something equal to offer to veteran readers and folks who may be brand new to comics.”

Explore the outer reaches and wildest vagaries of the Marvel Universe through the eyes of one of its most powerful heroes when MONICA RAMBEAU: PHOTON #1 arrives in December. For more information, visit Marvel.com.

Rita Ora Finish Line via Heather Davis for Disney for use by 360 Magazine

Rita Ora – Finish Line

“Finish Line,” performed by global superstar Rita Ora and written by award-winning songwriter Diane Warren, was released across all music streaming platforms and is the soundtrack for ESPN‘s upcoming four-part Title IX docuseries, 37 Words. A true passion project across the company, ABC Owned Television Stations’ race and culture team played a pivotal role in securing the song and was part of a majority-women-led team responsible for the creative vision of the “Finish Line” music video. An exclusive clip of the music video premiered Sunday, May 15, during ABC’s American Idol. Emmy Award-winning producer and host Ryan Seacrest interviewed both Ora and Warren live.

“Finish Line” is a women empowerment anthem that will support “37 Words,” a four-part ESPN docuseries from documentary filmmakers Dawn Porter and Nicole Newnham, as part of The Walt Disney Company‘s Fifty/50 initiative led by ESPN. The Fifty/50 initiative commemorates the 50th anniversary of the passing of Title IX, the federal civil rights law that prohibits sex-based discrimination in any educational institution receiving federal funding and gave women the equal opportunity to play. 

“I knew that I wanted to be a part of the Fifty/50 initiative because it celebrates the 50-year anniversary passing of Title IX,” said multi-award-winning songwriter Diane Warren. “This powerful initiative inspired me to write ‘Finish Line’ as an uplifting anthem that reminds us to never give up the fight. It may be 50 years since the law was passed, but we are still pushing for the fundamental human right of equality. Rita Ora understood the message of never giving up within this song. She sang it so movingly with the conviction it needed.”  

“I love working with Diane. She is such a brilliant songwriter and collaborating with her is always a joy,” said global superstar Rita Ora. “When she brought this song to me, I was so moved by the lyrics and the passion they evoked and knew instantly that I had to be involved with the project. The fight for women’s equality is a global issue. Every day, women around the world are fighting to be seen, heard and respected. We must continue to work to empower one another as we strive to make equality a reality for women in every part of the world.”

“As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Title IX across The Walt Disney Company, it is a true gift to have two such prolific, powerhouse artists as Rita Ora and Diane Warren contribute their talent and passion to a song that celebrates and encourages girls and women around the country,” said Debra O’Connell, president of Networks for Disney Media & Entertainment Distribution. “‘Finish Line’ is a fantastic and empowering anthem, brought to life by an extraordinary and inspiring group of women. I’m incredibly proud of this collaboration and thrilled to showcase it on our Networks as part of the Fifty/50 initiative.”

Car Cat is an NFT from 360 MAGAZINE’S OPENSEA collection

NFT | LA Roundup

At the crux of the crypto community are gatherings. During a four-day inaugural conference from March 28-31, the brilliant minds behind the Edge of NFT podcast–Joshua Kriger, Jeff Kelley, Eathan Janney and Zack Sekar brought the LA blockchain clique together.

L.A. LIVE, the entertainment complex perfectly set in DTLA and adjacent to the Arts District is where tons off-site events were held. Since parking is difficult to navigate, public transit is one’s ideal option. In fact, some arrived via e-bikes with helmet in tow.

Attendance included financial experts alongside web developers, to those eager to learn about digital market spaces, DeFi, Web 3 and minting NFTs. Thanks to the growing tech within the City of Angels, largely in part to lower startup costs in comparison to Silicon Valley, the event drew an international crowd. 

Notable speakers ranged from billionaire Mark Cuban, NBA legend and founder of Black Santa Baron Davis, famed DJ Steve Aoki and world-renowned CEOs Robby Yung and David Wachsman. Other highlights which grabbed our attention were the art installations, innovative activations and musical performances.

The venue’s outdoor courtyard provided us with a much needed recess in between talks. In fact, we caught performances by rappers Nelly and Rich the Kid, played Trivia at the Freckle and snacked on lite bites from a plethora of parked food trucks. 

Wednesday night included an exclusive party held by Magic Eden, the leading NFT market place on Solana. The beginning of the night included a panel discussion from the Magic Eden team members Jack Tanlu, Zhuoxun Yin, Sidney Zhang and Zhuojie Zhou. After the discourse, the night was led by sets from Flosstradamus, Waka Flocka Flame and Migos‘ very own Quavo.

However, like many industries in America, the tech arena is white male-dominated, threatening new generational wealth of both women and minorities. 

That said, there were few discussions which concentrated on marginalized people within the realm, including the web3 panel which featured Dapper Labs, Stephanie Smellie, Ridhima Khan, Jayne Peressini, Nicole Rochette with moderator Ros Gold-Onwude

Perhaps next season, the organizers will consider grants for POC, LGBTQ and artists alike, encouraging inclusivity.

In celebration of this metaverse, 360 MAGAZINE, a brand which was established within this emerging smart city, launched its NFT capsule.

Recap of NFT.NYC

360 MAGAZINE NFT ANIMAL SERIES ON OPENSEA

Article: Bee Davies, Yash Thadani, Vaughn Lowery

Amaal_Honey Single Artwork from Brittany Peterson for use by 360 Magazine

AMAAL TO RELEASE EP MILLY THIS FALL

“These songs are an unapologetic celebration of my womanhood,” says Amaal. “They’re the sound of me reclaiming my power, my pleasure, myself.”

Listening to Amaal’s extraordinary new EP Milly (releasing this fall) you’d have little idea that the breakout Canadian R&B star was born in Somalia, or that she was raised in a strict Muslim community in which expressions of female autonomy and sexuality were considered explicitly taboo. The songs on Milly transcend language and religion and culture, tapping into the kind fundamental humanity and search for self that binds us all. Amaal writes with a vivid sensuality here, reveling in the power of both physical and emotional touch, and her performances are visceral to match, delivered with a mesmerizing intimacy that hints at everything from FKA twigs and Kelela to SZA and Jhené Aiko. The result is a quietly revelatory work of self-actualization from an artist fully embracing her true identity in all its strength and beauty, a bold, intoxicating collection that, by its very existence, serves as a radical act of feminine liberation.

“My art is my way of confronting the misogynoir and the old, oppressive ideologies that have constrained me for so much of my life,” Amaal explains. “Without music, I’m not sure I would have been able to discover the woman I’m truly meant to be.”

The fourth of ten children, Amaal began her remarkable journey in war-torn Mogadishu, where she and her family lived until they were forced flee as refugees in the early 1990s. Starting over fresh in Toronto, she embraced the poetic nature of her cultural heritage but bristled at the conservative strictures and customs that came with it, particularly the repressive expectations placed upon women. Though it was forbidden at home, Amaal found escape in modern pop and R&B music, and as she began spending more and more time outside of her tight knit immigrant community, she adopted the nickname Milly as something of an alter ego.

“Milly was a version of myself that could be and do whatever she wanted without fear of shame or judgment,” says Amaal. “When I was Milly, I was anonymous, which ironically helped me find myself.”

By the time she hit 20, Amaal had grown bold enough to begin making her own music, but she still felt limited as to what she could sing about, so she focused her creative energy on politically and socially conscious material inspired by the civil unrest in Somalia and the struggles her people faced as a result. It was powerful stuff, to be sure, but there was more to Amaal than being a refugee, and she longed to express the fullness of herself and her story in her art. 

“It felt like I was absent in my own music,” she explains. “I was just trying to do things that felt safe and that would make my community proud because I knew that the moment I strayed beyond that, the backlash would come.”

In 2019, Amaal finally worked up the courage to step outside of her comfort zone with the release of Black Dove, a surprisingly vulnerable collection that found her reckoning with love and heartbreak and desire in her music for the very first time. Though it felt incredibly risky, the EP was a critical smash, garnering a Juno nomination for Soul/R&B Recording of the Year, racking up millions of streams online, and prompting rave reviews across the board. Complex hailed Amaal’s “airy and ethereal vocals,” while Exclaim! dubbed her “an artist that demands attention,” and Vibe proclaimed her a singer “like no other.” Perhaps more important than any reviews, though, were the messages Amaal began receiving from women around the world who saw themselves in her story and were learning to find their own voices through listening to her music.

“I called that EP Black Dove because I felt like this bird that was finally being uncaged,” says Amaal. “It was the beginning of me stepping out of the constraints that I’d grown up with.”

If Black Dove represented Amaal’s first steps towards self-expression, then Milly is more like a flying leap. Written and recorded with GRAMMY-nominated production duo Nicky Davey (Beyoncé, Zayn), the collection embraces the wild sense of freedom and discovery that came with Amaal’s alter ego growing up, tackling sexual liberation and female empowerment in no uncertain terms. The arrangements on the EP are spare and spacious, fueled by sultry beats and hypnotic synthesizers, and the minimalist approach only serves to intensify the spotlight on Amaal’s captivating vocals, which flow from a deeper, more full-bodied register here than ever before.

“This project forced me to explore whole new ranges in my voice, which put me in touch with whole new parts of myself as a woman,” Amaal reflects. “I honestly didn’t know I could sing that low or feel that confident until we recorded these songs.”

That confidence is clear from the outset on Milly, which opens with the steamy “Heaven.” “Open up the gates of heaven / Holy water dripping blessings / My blessings on you,” Amaal sings on the track, elevating physical intimacy to the level of divine consecration. Like much of the EP, it’s a rapturous ode to power and pleasure, to flipping the script and centering the sexual experience on female satisfaction. The swaggering “Honey” minces no words when it comes to women knowing their worth in the bedroom, while the dreamy “Renegade” takes the reigns with dominance and authority, and the effervescent “Special” brushes off the dime-a-dozen men who don’t have what it takes to keep up. Even a sweetly romantic track like the understated “Lullaby,” which features Syd from The Internet, blurs the lines between love and lust in its portrayal of the kind of deep, committed relationship in which insecurities and inhibitions are a thing of the past. 

Watch the mesmerizing live performance of Amaal’s latest single “Honey” here.

“After a lifetime of being told how I could speak and act and present myself as a woman, it felt like some kind of spiritual experience to be able say and do whatever I wanted on this EP,” says Amaal. “Singing these songs felt so radical, but at the same time so natural.”

It’s that duality that lies at the heart of Amaal’s music. For much of her life, she’s lived between two worlds; with Milly, Amaal is creating her own.

Interview with Ooshma Garg

Meal delivery services have gained a lot of popularity over the recent years and there are now many different services to choose. I was able to sit down with Oosma Garg, founder of one of these delivery services: Gobble.

Given all of the meal delivery services on the market today, what do you think makes yours stand out?

Unlike other meal kit services, Gobble’s meals only take 15 minutes to prepare. Gobble’s army of sous chefs do the prep work; like simmering sauces, marinating meats, and chopping vegetables, so that members can prepare a gourmet meal at home easily and quickly. We prep complex ingredients for 18 unique dishes every week, which gives members variety and new flavors with every meal. 

With freshly prepped meal kit ingredients, Gobble simplifies the process of eating healthy, nutritious, and flavorful food, ensuring that members don’t sacrifice time for taste or vice versa. Convenience is at the core of every Gobble product and experience — The company even launched a text concierge service so that members can chat with a “sous chef” and get real-time, educated answers at any time, especially during their cooking experience.

What inspired you to create the 15 minute meal idea?

I have always been a tinkerer and grew up curious, constantly experimenting. Women have been wondering ‘what’s for dinner’ since the beginning of time. Other companies in this industry approached this question through diets or teaching women to cook. Gobble was encouraged to solve the real problem at hand and fit into the fabric of everyone’s daily life. Gobble’s already prepped and prepared meal kits do the invisible work of solving this timeless mealtime question, in just 15 minutes. Gobble’s 15 minutes philosophy was inspired by the importance of quality time with loved ones, and when dinner isn’t stressful or time consuming, this is made possible. 

Are there meal options to fit certain diets?

Yes there are. Gobble’s Lean and Clean meal options feature lean proteins, healthy fats, and are under 600 calories per serving. This meal plan also includes the same flexibility that Gobble’s other plans do, as members can easily add breakfast and lunch options, or skip deliveries with ease. 

Additionally, Gobble is a great option for picky eaters, as customers can choose their own proteins, grains, and quantities. And, Gobble gives the user full ingredient control. Gobble does most of the prep, but it leaves the final amounts of sauces and most other ingredients going into your dish up to you (unlike oven-ready, or fully prepped/cooked kits).

Tell us about Gobble’s ingredients.

All of Gobble’s ingredients and production are fresh, as if it was cooked in small batches at home, and the production is devoid of shelf stabilizing compounds or preservatives. This makes the supply chain evermore difficult as the company cannot store these complex and custom prepped ingredients from one week to the next. 

Tell us about being a female founder in this meal kit delivery space.

Being one of the only female founders in this space, I was inspired to solve a fundamental aspect of society, mealtimes. I saw my mom working 12+ hours a day while balancing her professional role alongside her role as a mom, that there was a void of solutions that allowed working women to provide for their families without sacrificing time or nutrition. Gobble is designed to solve a real problem and fit into the fabric of everyone’s daily life. I’m proud to be a female founder in this space, and am excited to continue to bring even more solutions to the table. (Literally.) 

How did the pandemic affect Gobble?

Gobble has seen a 200% increase in basket size of non-dinner menu items, as people are home all day and demand increased deliveries for all mealtimes. Throughout this pandemic, many Americans found themselves facing COVID Burnout, which led them turning to other meal solutions. During Fall 2020, Gobble ran a survey to better understand how COVID was affecting its members. 78.5% of respondents reported that the pandemic affected how they shop for and prepare food with 48% of people sharing that they order groceries solely online. We offer members the ability to transform one’s kitchen into a new country and transport one’s tastebuds through unique flavors and ingredients by implementing adventure into everyday life at home.

Rodney Ramlochan image via Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine

Rodney

Rodney Ramlochan is an executive, entrepreneur, and global business generator who has dedicated his career to empowering others, identifying strategic relationships, and building world-class organizations. Driven by his passion for technology, fashion, lifestyle, and culture, he serves as 360 Magazine’s global business manager. Rodney builds market position for 360 by locating, developing, defining, and closing business relationships with leading brands.

Alongside his role at 360 Magazine, Rodney serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Dev-Byrne & Company, a national technology expense management firm serving premier clients ranging from global not-for-profits to Fortune 500 firms. He is a highly accomplished leader known for laser-like vision in formulating and executing cutting-edge strategies to achieve business goals.

Over the years, Rodney has held multiple roles within the business sector over the past two decades. As Vice-President and co-founder of an award-winning telecom auditing firm, he garnered an elite list of clients, taking the startup from obscurity to highly profitable in under three years. At Verizon, he oversaw large business units responsible for service delivery for enterprise clients.

Rodney completed both undergraduate and graduate degrees, with honors at New York University. He is a published contributing author who has written papers on service delivery and Total Quality Management. In addition, he has served on the Alumni Board Committee of New York University and the chairman of the board for St. Frances Cabrini Academy in Brooklyn, NY.

Willow Kayne from Derek Sherron, Epic Records for use by 360 Magazine

Willow Kayne shares high-energy single – I Don’t Wanna Know

Please meet UK pop provocateur Willow Kayne, who has shared her new single “I Don’t Wanna Know” today. Listen here at all DSPs.

After releasing a slew of independent singles, Willow signed with Sony this year and released her major label debut single “2 Seater” just a few months back to buzz and acclaim, even receiving early love from BBC Radio 1. Now, the 19 year old is throwing her hat in the ring as one of the most vivid, genre-blurring pop provocateurs in music today. A keen visual artist with influences as far-reaching as fashion design giant Nigo and production mastermind Pharrell, she pools together the most lucid touchpoints of all her inspirations to build a sound as diverse as her creative palette. Willow can trace this eclecticism directly back to her childhood, being raised by a hip-hop and house-obsessed father and a mother who produced videos for the likes of Erasure and the Prodigy. James Brown, Nas, and MF DOOM were all significant early influences, and soon she was making her own musical discoveries, falling hard for artists as diverse as Tyler The Creator, the Sex Pistols, Gorillaz, and Portishead.

Teaming up with UK hitmaker Oscar Scheller, “I Don’t Wanna Know” takes all of the attitude Willow has started to become synonymous with and ramps it up to 11 – taking cues from the old school rave culture that she is obsessed with by sticking a middle finger up to trolls over a drum & bass indebted production. It’s a high energy example of just how unpredictable a talent Willow is, and how easy she makes it look; the track is packed with hilarious one-liners that cut those who have bullied her online to size. An empowering anthem that deals with real life issues with a sense of confidence that feels refreshing in the landscape of pop today. The official video, along with a debut project and a HUGE announcement are all coming soon…

Watch previous music video “2 Seater” here.

“…a future star…” – i-D Magazine

“…playful lyricism, smooth refrains, and ‘90s-indebted grooves.” – NME

“…the artists that stick out from the pack are always those who are willing to switch things up, and quite clearly, Kayne isn’t afraid to do so…” – Lyrical Lemonade

“The Gen Z talent links together huge opposing forces, creating her own potent brand of rebel-pop.” – Clash Magazine

“A sizzling rallying-call from the Bristol-based artist all about living your own life and doing your own thing, ‘Two Seater’ blends rap verses with 90s-tinged pop influences, resulting in an instantly catchy debut.” – DIY Magazine

Socials:

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1500 Sound Academy x ASU — Music Program for use by 360 Magazine

SZNS Launch Swimwear Brand

Los Angeles based pop-quartet SZNS are set to launch their own swimwear brand SZNS SWIM. This news follows the groups recent Times Square billboard and feature in People Magazine for their newest single “Build A Boy.” SZNS music gives a fresh take on the classic 90’s girl group music we all know and love with blending elements of EDM, Latin-synth, and House inspired beats, incorporating the styles and backgrounds of all its members. Similarly, to their song writing process Winter, Spring, Summer, and Autumn have brought together their unique styles in collaboration with Brazil’s top active wear workshop São Paolo to create the vibrant SZNS SWIM collection. Just as they have with their music SZNS want to make a product for all to enjoy no matter who they are.

When asked about their new swimwear line SZNS SWIM, SZNS said, “SZNS aims to inspire women and girls everywhere with their message of self-love and empowerment! SZNS SWIM is a natural extension of this message as SZNS SWIM embraces all body types, shapes, and sizes!”

In order to better understand SZNS, one must first understand the unique personalities of each member Winter, Spring, Summer, and Autumn and how their names uniquely play into seasons they represent.  Winter for instance is your shoulder to cry on, a listening ear and your biggest advocate, someone who is there for you during those tough times. All Spring wants in life is to connect and heal people through her music, using her talents to help others grow through her art similarly to how the showers of April bring help bring the beautiful flowers of May. Autumn on the other hand is troublemaker of the group, some might see her tough exterior but those closest to her in SZNS know she’s a real softie, you may find her out on town on Friday night but you have just a good a chance of finding her curled up on the couch watching Netflix. While Summer is known for being the bubbliest of the group, and can be found dancing everywhere she goes bringing her energy that turns even your darkest times to a bright sunny day. Together these four personalities come together to create the fresh high energy sound of SZNS. With this in mind SZNS are getting ready to release a series of four EP’s each specifically crafted for each member/season, emanating power, vulnerability, wit, and reality ranging from bass dropping dance beats to sultry ballads! Stay tuned to SZNS’s socials (below) for more information on the release of SZNS SWIM as well as upcoming tour dates and new music releases from SZNS.

Marta Klopf photo from Grace Topalian for use by 360 Magazine

Digital Artist/Designer Marta Klopf QXA

By: Ally Brewster

Marta Klopf is graphic designer that works in web and brand design. When talking about her artwork Klopf says, “My projects focus on clear communication while highlighting the values, thoughts and stories behind a brand and translating conceptual ideas into cohesive visual worlds.” Originally from Italy, Klopf graduated from Minneapolis College of Art & Design and soon moved to New York City, quickly falling in love with the city and finding inspiration in it. She loves being able to help with change through her art and design. Klopf looks forward to getting back to creating art for local community focused organizations in the future. We had the opportunity to ask Marta Klopf about her artistic journey and what’s next for the artist: 

How did you get into graphic design? Was graphic design always the direction you wanted to go?

I wasn’t one of those people who know as children what they are going to be when they grow up: for a long time I didn’t see a path that seemed right for me. I was always interested in a lot of things, and always wanted to follow new ideas and start new projects. What I did know was that I was interested in art, and that I was passionate about communicating. So I discovered design, which is at its very core visual communication. I moved to Minneapolis to pursue my BFA in graphic design and have worked in the field since. And I think it worked out, because design gives you the opportunity to be interested in a lot of things, to approach different projects with different ideas and interests.

Do you have a preference for working digitally or physically? Why?

I love working digitally: I feel like the digital world is where a lot of people today go to find information, learn things, discover brands, buy things, make connections, and therefore it is a dynamic place that is always evolving, which makes it exciting to be a part of it. I also think digital projects challenge you in a different way, because they need to make an impact while also remaining flexible and adaptable.

You stated: “New York is vibrant and makes you feel alive. You always feel like you are part of something big. It always pushes you creatively because there is always something new to inspire you.” What initially drew you to work in New York? Do you have a favorite thing in New York you always go back to for inspiration if you ever feel burnt out?

I think that, at first, what drew me to New York was the sheer quantity of creatives and creative endeavors, which gives you the opportunity to really find a path that works for you and matches your interests. But I didn’t expect to really fall for the city as much or as quickly as I did: I met a lot of inspiring designers and creatives who were pursuing their passions in so many different ways. I think the people are what always inspires me: it may be a bit cliché, but the energy that comes from surrounding yourself with other creative people can be very energizing. I also love to take long walks: you always end up somewhere new, and getting out of your usual environment and what is comfortable usually helps.

You’re a freelance graphic designer “with experience in web and brand design.” What is your favorite aspect of being a freelance artist? The most difficult?

I work for an agency and also do freelance projects, so I get the best and worst of both. I love the freedom of freelance work. You are in charge of what projects you take on, and the directness of working directly with the person who will use your work makes it empowering. The most difficult part would be that you are alone: you have to be the one who does all the organizing, the designing, the coordinating, the email writing, the zoom calls. Which I like, but can be quite a lot.

How do you begin your process of starting a new project with a brand?

The first thing I do is learn as much as I can about the project, first to determine whether it’s something I am able to take on, and then to find out what makes the project special. I would then typically meet with the client, talk about big picture things (their ideas and needs, their philosophy, and so on) as well as practical things (timeline, other people involved in the project, etc). Depending on the project I would then come up with a few ideas and see whether they will work and are well received. From there, it becomes a matter of getting more and more detailed and continuing to incorporate feedback from the client until the final product is ready.

Of the projects you’ve worked on, which is your favorite? What about it makes it so memorable/special for you? 

I recently finished a website called letstech.at. It is geared towards kids 10-18 in age and is meant to be a science/engineering portal for them: get them interested in more scientific or technical subjects, present ideas through videos and blog articles, as well as show role models (especially female ones) who work in the field and be a place where they can find information about careers in engineering. I loved working on it both because it was a design challenge (trying to speak to a relatively broad age range), and because it truly is a great resource for kids: it feels great to be part of something that empowers them through learning and through highlighting female role models.

As someone who loves being able to help change the world through your artwork, which causes are you passionate about that you would want to design for in the future?

I try not to set limits on what want to do, but generally I feel strongly about projects that are of value to people: in the case of the project above, kids who want to learn, but also, for example, design for community based organizations who help women, minorities, or in any way empower people by offering them resources that may be otherwise difficult to access. As another example, I also was part of a mentoring program, where professional designers helped create logos for groups of high schoolers who wanted to pitch ideas to help their community to investors. I love being able to use my skills that way: making an impact through design.

With your artwork, what direction do you feel like you want to go in next? Is there any new pattern, style, process, person, media, etc, that you feel has grabbed your attention and inspired your work? Is there anything you’ve done in the past you want to continue with? 

I feel that style changes constantly, and the more we focus on style the less longevity a project has. What matters to me the most are good ideas, and I think the time of the pandemic (having to stay home and mostly focus on work) really reinforced the idea of wanting to make work that has an impact. I always look at the work of Partner & Partners (where I used to work) and Hyperakt in New York as inspiration for beautiful work that is backed by great ideas and also makes an impact on the communities and the world we live in.

Marta Klopf is currently accepting freelance projects here.

Marta Klopf design for LetsTech from Grace Topalian for use by 360 Magazine

Marta Klopf design for LetsTech