Posts tagged with "freelance"

Marta Klopf photo from Grace Topalian for use by 360 Magazine

Digital Artist/Designer Marta Klopf QXA

By: Ally Brewster

Marta Klopf is graphic designer that works in web and brand design. When talking about her artwork Klopf says, “My projects focus on clear communication while highlighting the values, thoughts and stories behind a brand and translating conceptual ideas into cohesive visual worlds.” Originally from Italy, Klopf graduated from Minneapolis College of Art & Design and soon moved to New York City, quickly falling in love with the city and finding inspiration in it. She loves being able to help with change through her art and design. Klopf looks forward to getting back to creating art for local community focused organizations in the future. We had the opportunity to ask Marta Klopf about her artistic journey and what’s next for the artist: 

How did you get into graphic design? Was graphic design always the direction you wanted to go?

I wasn’t one of those people who know as children what they are going to be when they grow up: for a long time I didn’t see a path that seemed right for me. I was always interested in a lot of things, and always wanted to follow new ideas and start new projects. What I did know was that I was interested in art, and that I was passionate about communicating. So I discovered design, which is at its very core visual communication. I moved to Minneapolis to pursue my BFA in graphic design and have worked in the field since. And I think it worked out, because design gives you the opportunity to be interested in a lot of things, to approach different projects with different ideas and interests.

Do you have a preference for working digitally or physically? Why?

I love working digitally: I feel like the digital world is where a lot of people today go to find information, learn things, discover brands, buy things, make connections, and therefore it is a dynamic place that is always evolving, which makes it exciting to be a part of it. I also think digital projects challenge you in a different way, because they need to make an impact while also remaining flexible and adaptable.

You stated: “New York is vibrant and makes you feel alive. You always feel like you are part of something big. It always pushes you creatively because there is always something new to inspire you.” What initially drew you to work in New York? Do you have a favorite thing in New York you always go back to for inspiration if you ever feel burnt out?

I think that, at first, what drew me to New York was the sheer quantity of creatives and creative endeavors, which gives you the opportunity to really find a path that works for you and matches your interests. But I didn’t expect to really fall for the city as much or as quickly as I did: I met a lot of inspiring designers and creatives who were pursuing their passions in so many different ways. I think the people are what always inspires me: it may be a bit cliché, but the energy that comes from surrounding yourself with other creative people can be very energizing. I also love to take long walks: you always end up somewhere new, and getting out of your usual environment and what is comfortable usually helps.

You’re a freelance graphic designer “with experience in web and brand design.” What is your favorite aspect of being a freelance artist? The most difficult?

I work for an agency and also do freelance projects, so I get the best and worst of both. I love the freedom of freelance work. You are in charge of what projects you take on, and the directness of working directly with the person who will use your work makes it empowering. The most difficult part would be that you are alone: you have to be the one who does all the organizing, the designing, the coordinating, the email writing, the zoom calls. Which I like, but can be quite a lot.

How do you begin your process of starting a new project with a brand?

The first thing I do is learn as much as I can about the project, first to determine whether it’s something I am able to take on, and then to find out what makes the project special. I would then typically meet with the client, talk about big picture things (their ideas and needs, their philosophy, and so on) as well as practical things (timeline, other people involved in the project, etc). Depending on the project I would then come up with a few ideas and see whether they will work and are well received. From there, it becomes a matter of getting more and more detailed and continuing to incorporate feedback from the client until the final product is ready.

Of the projects you’ve worked on, which is your favorite? What about it makes it so memorable/special for you? 

I recently finished a website called letstech.at. It is geared towards kids 10-18 in age and is meant to be a science/engineering portal for them: get them interested in more scientific or technical subjects, present ideas through videos and blog articles, as well as show role models (especially female ones) who work in the field and be a place where they can find information about careers in engineering. I loved working on it both because it was a design challenge (trying to speak to a relatively broad age range), and because it truly is a great resource for kids: it feels great to be part of something that empowers them through learning and through highlighting female role models.

As someone who loves being able to help change the world through your artwork, which causes are you passionate about that you would want to design for in the future?

I try not to set limits on what want to do, but generally I feel strongly about projects that are of value to people: in the case of the project above, kids who want to learn, but also, for example, design for community based organizations who help women, minorities, or in any way empower people by offering them resources that may be otherwise difficult to access. As another example, I also was part of a mentoring program, where professional designers helped create logos for groups of high schoolers who wanted to pitch ideas to help their community to investors. I love being able to use my skills that way: making an impact through design.

With your artwork, what direction do you feel like you want to go in next? Is there any new pattern, style, process, person, media, etc, that you feel has grabbed your attention and inspired your work? Is there anything you’ve done in the past you want to continue with? 

I feel that style changes constantly, and the more we focus on style the less longevity a project has. What matters to me the most are good ideas, and I think the time of the pandemic (having to stay home and mostly focus on work) really reinforced the idea of wanting to make work that has an impact. I always look at the work of Partner & Partners (where I used to work) and Hyperakt in New York as inspiration for beautiful work that is backed by great ideas and also makes an impact on the communities and the world we live in.

Marta Klopf is currently accepting freelance projects here.

Marta Klopf design for LetsTech from Grace Topalian for use by 360 Magazine

Marta Klopf design for LetsTech

Sara Sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, illustration

Top 5 nutrition tips when working from home

1. Look for nutritious alternatives

If you’re worried about not being able to continue to eat well as particular ingredients are no longer in stock, try exploring other foods that could offer similar health benefits. We have put together a shopping list of alternative food options to ensure you’re not missing out on your essential vitamins and minerals. The key advice here is nutrition should still come first, but you may have to switch up some of your routinely used ingredients.

2. Stick to your routine

Spending more time at home can also impact when you eat. Whether or not you’re working from home, try to create (and stick to) a routine. This will help you avoid snacking on unhealthy foods. Eat your typical set number of meals a day and around the same time each day. If you don’t cook much or have more time on your hands than previously, now is a great time to start.

3. Stay hydrated

Keeping well hydrated is important for overall well-being, particularly cognitive function. If you’re working from home, keep a glass of water by you and drink throughout the day. Drink several cups of fluid each day including water, tea & coffee (though not too much!), fruit teas and sugar-free drinks.

4. Don’t forget your fresh veg

Fresh fruits and vegetables may have taken a back seat for you. Fruit and vegetables provide loads of essential nutrients and there are ways to extend their shelf-life and make them more convenient. For example, soups and sauces can be made straight away and then frozen. You can make a concentrated stock which you can then freeze in ice cube trays and, voila, homemade, low salt stock cubes!

5. Keep your stress at bay

There are many ways to reduce stress. Try to minimize the amount of alcohol you drink, especially during the week, which will also help you stick to a routine. Keep an eye on the number of caffeinated drinks you’re having and try switching to decaf options during the afternoon. This can help you sleep and focus better.

ABOUT HUEL:

Launched in 2015, Huel’s mission is to make nutritionally complete, convenient and affordable food, with minimal impact on animals and the environment.

Offering consumers “complete nutrition” means that each Huel meal serves customers a good balance of protein, carbs, fibre, essential fats and phytonutrients, plus an optimum level of all essential vitamins and minerals required on a daily basis. Formulated by Registered Nutritionist, James Collier, Huel is vegan, lactose-free and soya-free.

Along with Huel powder (including a gluten-free and reduced carb option), Huel offers a number of nutritionally complete products, including the world’s first nutritionally complete granola and an on-the-go bar which makes for the perfect snack. Most recently, Huel launched their first Ready-to-drink meal, acting as an innovative solution for time-poor consumers.

Each Huel packet has a year-long shelf life and produces zero food waste with minimal packaging waste which makes less of an environmental impact on the planet than many other food products.

Visit Huel:

Instagram: @huel @huelusa @huel_de @huelglobal
Twitter: @gethuel @huelusa
Website: huel.com

iphone case, 360 MAGAZINE, tech, device, cell phone, Vaughn Lowery

Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus vs. iPhone 11

Let’s quickly undertake a full comparison between the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 plus vs. the new Apple iPhone 11. These phones are from two of the biggest rivals in the Smartphone industry.


If you have the intention of buying any of these phones, then this review will help you to decide which one you’ll go for. Both handsets share similarities in terms of physical size, durability, build quality and video quality, yet, these two phones are vastly different.

A lot of people have been asking questions such as “Is the Apple iPhone 11 a better Smartphone than the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 plus or vice versa?”


Well, right off the bat, here is our detailed review of notable differences and similarities between Samsung Galaxy Note 10 and Apple iPhone 11.
Key Differences and Similarities in Body & Design Between Apple iPhone 11 Vs. Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus
The Apple iPhone 11 boasts a moderate 6.1 inch OLED display, while the Samsung galaxy note 10 plus has a much bigger 6.8-inch dynamic AMOLED display.


They are both pretty thin, although the note 10 plus is thinner at 7.9mm, while the iPhone is 8.9mm thin. In terms of weight, the Samsung galaxy note 10 is a lot heavier at 196g, while the weight of the iPhone 11 stands at 194g.


The Note 10 plus has super slim bezels around the edges with the display covering almost the entire front screen.


Both Smartphones have improved water resistance ratings. They can both deal with a rainy day or an accidental drop in water.


Pros for Galaxy Note 10+
● Up to 1TB of internal storage
● Up to 1TB of microSD expandable storage
● Three powerful cameras
● Multipurpose S Pen tool
● Great edge-to-edge display
● Battery life is awesome with fast charging
● Amazing 6.8-inch display
● Beautiful design
● Live Focus effects for video


Cons for Galaxy Note 10+
● No headphone jack
● Quite expensive
● Low-light camera quality is poor.


Pros for Apple iPhone 11
● Amazing ultra-wide camera
● New Night mode is great
● Long battery life
● Superfast A13 Bionic processor
● Affordable price
● Tougher glass located at both front and back
● Durable design
● Available in six beautiful colour options.


Cons for Apple iPhone 11
● Fast charging not included
● Low 64GB storage
● LTE is slightly slow

Now you know what to expect from the Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ and the Apple iPhone 11. Whichever one you decide would ultimately depend on your budget.


Overall, both the Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ and the Apple iPhone 11 ranks among the top Smartphones you can buy. So, if you feel that anyone of them is right for you, simply go for it.

About the author
Mary Hunter is a well-known American freelance blogger with advanced writing skills. Currently, she works as a translator at TheWordPoint translation service. Mary has experience in editing, marketing, and her works have appeared in numerous publications and website articles. From 2015 til the present, she has been studying at William Paterson University as a philosophy major.

K. ROOSEVELT

K. ROOSEVELT RELEASES SELF-TITLED EP ON DEF JAM RECORDINGS

LISTEN HERE:
http://KRoosevelt.lnk.to/KRoosevelt

“Roosevelt seamlessly captures the exhilaration of budding summer flings.” – FLAUNT MAGAZINE

WATCH VIDEO FOR “ADRENALINE” HERE: http://youtu.be/q37XKPgX7g8

WATCH VIDEO FOR “BLINDING MY VISION” HERE: http://youtu.be/RhV2b_MTveM

ABOUT K. ROOSEVELT:

Born Kevin Roosevelt Moore II and raised in Los Angeles, his evolution as an artist is best articulated by the advice of his father, renowned blues musician Keb’ Mo’, who told his son, “Follow your dharma.” As a child often on tour with his dad, K. Roosevelt frequently found himself in the mist of some of the world’s great musicians and singers.

His formal music education began in middle school and continued at Hamilton Performing Arts High School. He soon began a career as a freelance drummer, gigging for local artists as well as going on tours. After high school, K. Roosevelt attended the Los Angeles Musician’s Institute. His training and influences, and the practical skills he’d picked up from a lifetime around the music industry eventually led him to writing and producing full-time.

In the studio, K. Roosevelt has worked with Jhené Aiko, The Game, OverDoz, Dom Kennedy, Jay 305, Hit-Boy, Casey Veggies, SuperDuper Kyle, and Travis Scott, to name a few.

Hannah Audrey Lowe 

Hannah is a digital coordinator here at 360 magazine, a hairstylist at Ulta Beauty and a freelance wardrobe stylist. She aspires to impact the fashion industry by empowering men and women through clothing to reach their fullest potential. Coco Chanel once said, “The best color in the whole world is the one that looks good on you.” 

Having grown up in Europe, Hannah had the privilege of being emersed in many different cultures. It also has aided the ability to speak three languages and have a multicultural world view. This opens doors for a broader vision in how fashion and cultures integrate to create a more beautiful society.