Posts tagged with "music industry"

Headshot of Lumane for 360 Magazine

Rising Star, Lumane

Switzerland native Lumane is not your typical pop artist. Much of her inspiration stems from her mother playing “Moonlight Sonata” by Beethoven on the piano when she was just a toddler. At four-years-old, Lumane put her foot forward to be like her mom learning to play different instruments throughout the years to come. In the mix of that was learning to use her vocal gift in hopes of expressing her creative side.

Lumane had the opportunity to audition her talents at the age of 13 in front of superstar judges in Germany on a show called “Das Supertalent”, which is similar to America’s Got Talent. She sang her heart out only to be left with no invitation back. Lumane was determined to grow. Years later with thousands of hours put into vocal lessons and practice, she auditioned for The Voice in Switzerland making her way through 3 rounds. This progress wasn’t enough for Lumane. 

Lumane did not give up. With the support of her family, she pushed further to achieve her dreams. She bought a plane ticket to New York to continue her studies in the city that never sleeps. While being in school 6 days a week to study Musical Theatre and Acting for Film & TV she continued writing and producing her own songs on the side. After finishing the two-year program she realized that songwriting and pop music was her true passion, not musical theatre. This lead her to audition for the Berklee College of Music in Boston and started her studies there only a couple of months later. Being surrounded by like-minded musicians was exactly the inspiration Lumane needed. After only two semesters at Berklee, an opportunity to finally take the first steps in using her talents to professionally create and record her first set of songs presented itself. 

She packed her bags, returned her apartment keys, bought a plane ticket to Nashville, TN to start actively working on her dream instead of just learning about it in class and books. Lumane finished her degree from Berklee online while writing songs with award-winning producers and writers. This first true experience in the music industry left her thirsty for more.

In her music, Lumane wants to tell her story and experiences – moving to a different continent at 18 years young by herself, being an immigrant in the US and meeting the love of her life, as well as empower people to stand up for themselves and for what they believe is right. All of this comes wrapped in powerful vocals and beautiful melodies, accompanied by explosive beats and heartbreaking piano parts.

Lumane worked with a Grammy-nominated producer on songs like “Taboo”, “Letters”, and “White Lies” which are three recent releases from this electro-pop artist. Her next song titled “Poison” is a story we all have – the feeling you get when you find the right person for you after only meeting toxic people and seeing right through them. Sounds like a good song, right? You can hear for yourself on all streaming platforms.

guitar, rock, strum, tabs, strings

How Women Can Overcome Music Industry Challenges

By Deborah Fairchild

If someone were to ask me how I managed to thrive in a male-dominated industry and rise to the position of president at VEVA Sound – and how other young women could similarly succeed – here would be my response:

For me, it has always been about focusing on the work and knowing that if you just do that, everything else will take care of itself. When something needs to happen, just get it done. 

Get it done even if it seems like a menial task. Get it done even if there’s no immediate reward being dangled in front of you. And get it done even if there is no clear indication that what you’re doing will result in a promotion, a raise, or other good things happening somewhere down the road.

Putting in the time and effort doesn’t necessarily guarantee success in the music industry (and likely not in any industry). But success can’t happen without that time and effort.

This approach to the working world goes all the way back to my first studio internship. Whatever task was placed before me and needed to be accomplished, I would do it – right down to the unfulfilling but necessary job of cleaning the toilets. (And yes, I actually cleaned toilets. The music industry isn’t always a glamorous world.)

I think that I knew, even at a young age, that if I just kept my attention on the work at hand, and concentrated on what I was doing versus what everyone else was doing, success would find me.

That proved to be true, and this approach continues to pay dividends for me to this day – and maybe could do the same for young women who are probably much like I was several years back, cultivating dreams and ambitions.

In my case, I always loved music and I also had a technical mind. It was a matter of taking those two things and mixing them together, which is why I got my degree in audio engineering. Once I finished college, working as an archival engineer gave me a steady income and allowed me to be around music all day. The rest is history.

Of course, all of this still leaves the question of whether it Is more difficult for a woman than a man to achieve success in the music industry. Certainly, women are underrepresented in our industry, as they are in many others. To give you an idea of that underrepresentation, a study released in 2019 by the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative looked at 700 popular songs. What that study found was that women accounted for only 21.7% of artists, 12.5% of songwriters, and 2.7% of producers. 

I also can report that over the years I have encountered situations where a man could do or say one thing, but I know it would be unacceptable for me to do or say the same thing.

So, yes, a young woman with ambitions to enter our industry will face challenges, but those challenges shouldn’t deter you. 

After all, the music business is hard for everyone – male or female. Breaking in is tough. Then navigating the business once you’re in is difficult. Finally, it can be extraordinarily challenging to continue to succeed in the business over time, even after you’ve had your initial success. 

The key is to set aside any negative thoughts about all those challenges and focus on what you can control. Be determined to do the work and strive to learn everything you can from everyone you can. 

People are fond of saying, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” That’s true only to a degree. Who you know may bring opportunities initially, but what you know gives you staying power in this business. 

Ultimately, knowledge and determination have been the two most important factors in my success. They can be for others as well.

About Deborah Fairchild

Deborah Fairchild, president of VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), started her career with the company as an archival engineer in 2004. In the past 16 years, she has risen to lead the company in all facets of the business. She has grown VEVA into a global entity servicing major labels in North America and Europe, establishing offices in New York, Los Angeles, and London in addition to the company’s headquarters in Nashville. Fairchild has kept VEVA at the forefront of technology and continues to evolve and adapt VEVA’s services and technology to assist the needs of their extensive client base. She advises many label executives, producers, engineers and artists seeking archival and asset management solutions. 

Cash and wallet illustration for 360 Magazine

4 Tips For Ambitious Young Women’s Careers

The COVID-19 pandemic proved to be a double whammy for young women eager to launch their careers.

Young people in general have had their job searches stymied by the recession. Meanwhile, women of all ages have seen their careers impacted negatively more than men by the events of 2020.

But despite the challenges, there is hope for ambitious young women just starting out who want to make a mark, even in male-centric industries, says Deborah Fairchild, president of Nashville-based VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), which verifies and archives projects for clients in the music industry.

“That doesn’t mean it’s going to be easy,” she says. “But if you can avoid becoming discouraged, and can face the world with firm determination, the opportunities will be there.”

Fairchild, who started her career with VEVA Sound as an archival engineer in 2004 and rose to lead the company in all facets of the business, has succeeded in an industry in which women are still underrepresented.

Just as an example, a study released in 2019 by the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative looked at 700 popular songs and found that women accounted for only 21.7% of artists, 12.5% of songwriters, and 2.7% of producers.

Fairchild understands the challenges today’s young women face, and she offers a few tips for those who are just now launching their careers and hope to move up in their organizations:

  • Be prepared to clean toilets. This could be viewed metaphorically, but in Fairchild’s case it was also literal. “When I started as an intern at a studio, I did everything they asked – even clean toilets,” she says. “To pursue a professional career in the music industry, you have to be prepared to pay your dues, starting at the bottom and working your way up. I imagine that’s true for a lot of other industries as well.”
  • Learn from everyone. Formal education is great, and it’s wonderful to have a college degree, but once you’re on the job you will discover how much more there is to learn from watching and listening to other people, Fairchild says. Just about anyone in an organization – from the lowest-paid employee to the CEO – has skills or knowledge they can share with you that will prove useful in your career journey. “Whenever you meet someone,” she says, “always assume they have something to teach you until they prove they don’t.”
  • Networking is a key, but not the key. Who you know is important. So is what you know. “A strong network will give you opportunities,” Fairchild says, “but your knowledge and capabilities will be what give you a long-lasting career.”
  • Know when to pivot. At every stage of your career, stay sensitive to when it’s time to pivot, Fairchild says. “The interesting thing about the music industry is that some things take generations to change, while others change on a dime,” she says. “The ability to discern when to move on or when to double down will set you apart.”

“The pandemic has made things tough for those just trying to launch a career, which means it’s more important than ever to stay positive and persevere,” Fairchild says. “Grab the opportunities that are there, and then make the most of them.”

About Deborah Fairchild

Deborah Fairchild, president of VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), started her career with the company as an archival engineer in 2004. In the past 16 years she has risen to lead the company in all facets of the business. She has grown VEVA into a global entity servicing major labels in North America and Europe, establishing offices in New York, Los Angeles, and London in addition to the company’s headquarters in Nashville.

Fairchild has kept VEVA at the forefront of technology and continues to evolve and adapt VEVA’s services and technology to assist the needs of their extensive client base. She advises many label executives, producers, engineers and artists seeking archival and asset management solutions.

Tokyo's Revenge Press Image by Kevin Maya Used By 360 Magazine

Tokyo’s Revenge Q&A

By Sabrina Weiss

Under the alias Tokyo’s Revenge, this youthful rapper’s prestige supersedes his TikTok fame. The anonymous musician’s track “GOODMORNINGTOKYO” blew up on TikTok and topped music charts, but his raw talent and earnest personality translate beyond the app. With his new song and music video “GOTHAM” and new album 7VEN, Tokyo continues to maintain his unique style with anime and comic-book inspiration. 

With humility and honesty, Tokyo navigates his quick rise to fame with his friends, who double as his musical team, by his side. The young talent spoke equally as transparently about his previous struggles with homelessness, personal approach to mental health, and favorite flavor of Starbursts (pink). All the while, Tokyo giggled and challenged us to video game battles. Even beyond his musical talent, Tokyo’s personality gravitates listeners and a loyal following.

When did you begin your music career?

Well, I did some free-style rapping in high school a bit, but that was mostly to fit into different friend groups. Then, for awhile after high school, I was homeless and ended up couch hopping at different friends’ houses. At one point I stayed with some friends who were constantly making music but didn’t know how to engineer it. It was from these friends that I got the inspiration to learn how to engineer the music. At first, I just engineered their music. But, I only started posting my stuff on Soundcloud about two months into me learning how to mix music. I’m not sure why it took that amount of time, something just clicked at that point.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, you were on your As Good as Dead Tour. We saw all the love you give your fans, particularly when you surf the crowd and jump in the mosh pit with your listeners. What was your most memorable moment of the tour? 

Oh man there were a lot of good moments. One of the most memorable times would be when I had to lie to security about whether I was going to get in the crowd. If I were to say yes then they would chase me in there. They go in and grab me as quickly as they can when I tell them I’m going to crowd surf. But, lowkey, I hate when they do that. The crowd is where I get my energy from. So I lied so I could be in there with my fans for longer.

There is a Discord ping in your new song “Gotham.” Do you actually use the chat app?

Well, it’s funny you ask that because I have my Discord open right now. I am constantly in my Discord with thousands and thousands of my supporters. I’ll hop in there and play video games with everyone and chat with all of you. I was actually just in one right before this interview and my buddy knocked on my door and said, “Hey man, you’ve got that interview right now, hop off real quick.”

After you blew up on TikTok, we are all wondering what you will do next. How do you plan on maintaining long-term relevance?

By doing whatever I feel like. I learned early on that I am not striving to have fans and followers based on trends. I want fans, followers, and family who support me through any medium I choose because I feel like I am connected to them more than just musically. Whether it be through YouTube videos or making music, I just want to continue to be connected to my fans. My fans are one of my major support systems.

What made you decide to be anonymous?

The idea of no one really knowing about me and trying to figure me and my personality out through clues in my music, rather than social media, is really appealing to me. I am not super attached to social media because if you try to over present yourself through social media, then people won’t be into your art. I want my music to get my face out, not my social media. Some artists are more focused on being social media influencers rather than their art and I’m just the opposite. I don’t talk much about me, I just talk through my music and let my listeners figure me out.

Along the topic of the modern musician, what do you think the industry is missing right now?

Actually, I don’t think the music industry is missing anything right now. If anything, I think there is too much of everything. A little while ago, I had an epiphany and thought to myself, “The biggest problem we have right now is that we are overexposed to everything.” And I feel the same way about the music industry. 

Only two years ago, you were couch-hopping at friends’ houses and now you have quickly risen to fame. How have the struggles of homelessness made you successful in your career?

It taught me not to get comfortable, ever. Being homeless gave me this huge hunger to never stop doing something, because back then I wasn’t focused on music immediately. I was focused on finding a place to work and to sleep. But, if I was comfortable just living like that, then I would probably still be doing just that.

I always wanted to do something bigger and better than couch-crashing, bigger and better than finding a shitty apartment to stay in and just making enough money to survive. I wanted to level-up to a point that my friends and I can be comfortable forever, and that’s how I got here.

You’ve spoken honestly about your mental health in the past. What do you do to get your head right?

I wake up and take a super long, burning hot shower. And then I think of everything but music. I don’t try to force myself into the music. I wake up and remind myself that I am a regular person who came from one place to this place with my best friends. 

We all focus on each others’ mental health more than anything else, and the music is tied into that. I try not to think of music as a job, because it wasn’t a job to us prior it was an outlet for all of our feelings. We play Smash Bros, go out and do something, and then if we are in the zone to make music, then we make music. If not, then maybe tomorrow! There’s no pressure.

Michael Brun illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Michael Brun – Bayo Tour

Michael Brun has been touring his critically acclaimed BAYO performances since the show’s inception on the streets of Haiti in 2016. Inspired by Haitian block parties, BAYO brought the energy and soul of these parties, as well as performances from numerous Haitian artists to sold-out venues across the US and Canada.

2020 would have been Bayo’s biggest year to date, but Coronavirus has halted touring around the world. Undeterred, Brun has sought out a pioneering new approach and model to touring during the Covid 19 crisis. This August, Brun will play three city specific Bayo shows which will give fans the unique sense of connection, intimacy and experience that we have all been missing in the absence of live touring. Brun will bring his BAYO Showcase to Chicago, Miami and Los Angeles August 14-15.

These Bayo concerts will be limited to ticket buyers located within 100 miles of each city. Brun will perform each show fully live with audiovisual technology creating a unique look and feel for each event, while also allowing fans to join in and be featured in the stream. Each show will feature exclusive footage from its respective cityscape, as well as past Bayo events and personal footage Michael shot in Haiti.  

These digital performances grew out of Brun’s recent experimentations with his IG streams, which have featured guests like J Perry, Paul Beaubrun and international stars like J Balvin and Jojo. In keeping with the Bayo tradition and Michael’s IG streams, fans can expect surprise guests during the upcoming tour.

Brun has always sought to push boundaries in the music industry. He has served as YouTube Foundry artist, consultant to Spotify, and Beats1 Guest DJ with Apple Music as well performing non-profit work with APJ and The Audio Institute in Haiti. A collaboration with BACARDÍ has been in discussion since last year, and their contribution enabled Michael to create a show that he felt was strong enough to push forward this new model and allow him to continue championing music and artists from the Afro-Caribbean diaspora despite the limitations of social distancing. 

Michael will perform each show from a fully built out production space, featuring state of the art audio visual technology, a full front of house lighting set-up and a multi-camera team. Tickets for each show will be available for sale on Tixr on August 1st at 10am PT starting at $4.99 and each event is 21+. Tixr innovated Bayo’s ticketing plus live-streaming solution, Tixr Play, powering a seamless purchase and viewing experience for fans. Limited edition merch offerings will be available in each city.

Produced in partnership with AWAL, EventCRU, New Epoch Software, Tixr, ToneDen

Follow Michael Brun: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

DaBaby illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

DaBaby – No Dribble

DaBaby releases new song and music video “NO DRIBBLE” With Stunna 4 Vegas. After ruling the Billboard Hot 100 with three top ten appearances last week, DaBaby’s commanding lead on the music industry continues. For a seventh week, the Charlotte juggernaut holds captive the No. 1 spot on the Hot 100 with his bruising single “ROCKSTAR” featuring Roddy Ricch.

With a staggering 11 billion global streams across his three Interscope albums, DaBaby’s sizzling success first dates back to his 2018 effort Baby On Baby, which spent 72 consecutive weeks on the Billboard 200, including 43 weeks in the top 50. He immediately torpedoed back to prominence in 2019 with his Billboard 200 No. 1 album KIRK. His sophomore attempt spent 42 consecutive weeks on the Billboard 200, including 38 weeks in the top 50. His most recent album, 2020’s Blame it On Baby, remains a fierce contender on the Billboard 200 as well, residing on the chart for 13 consecutive weeks, having yet to exit from the top ten.

Follow DaBaby: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Logic illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Logic – Dad Bod Music Video

Logic drops the official music video for “Dad Bod” from his latest album “No Pressure”. “Logic’s contribution to hip-hop is deep-rooted in inclusivity and compassion, and ‘No Pressure’ continues the trend even as he bids farewell to the art form that raised him and gave him a platform to speak his truth.”

“The 15 tracks that comprise No Pressure is a reminder of the Maryland native’s pure skill and dedication to the craft. His passion and talent are evident in all the sonic aspects of the album, from his double-timed flows to his melodic offerings and engaging lyricism.”

“…Logic at his finest, raging with righteous indignation and heightened melodic skills.”

“Logic’s No Pressure does what all retirement albums should aspire to accomplish: conclude a rapper’s career on a high note. The music is on par, lyrically, with the best material Logic has released throughout the past six years, and the Maryland rapper is keenly aware this is it.”

Multi-platinum, Grammy Nominated artist Logic (aka Sir Robert Bryson Hall II, aka Bobby Hall) – among the top streaming artists in the world with billions of streams to date – burst onto the music scene through a series of mixtapes that led to a significant, rabid underground fan base. Those tapes – Young, Broke, and Infamous (2010); Young Sinatra (2011); Young Sinatra: Undeniable (2012); and Young Sinatra: Welcome to Forever (2013) – garnered millions of downloads and streams. They jump started a worldwide tour that led up to his record deal with Def Jam Recordings in 2014, and the release of his debut album Under Pressure that year.  Logic kept up the pace with his second album, The Incredible True Story (2015, with the RIAA gold “Fade Away”), followed by Everybody (2017), containing the landmark 5x-platinum “1-800-273-8255” (National Suicide Prevention Lifeline) featuring Alessia Cara and Khalid.  

Overlapping Logic’s albums were new mixtapes Bobby Tarantino (2016, with the RIAA gold single “Flexicution”), and Bobby Tarantino II (2018, with the RIAA platinum “44 More” and “Everyday”). YSIV (September 2018), the fourth chapter of his Young Sinatra saga, contained “One Day” which Logic performed with Ryan Tedder and over 200 immigrant children, their siblings and parents at the MTV VMAs. 2019 kicked off with the publication in March of Supermarket (Simon & Schuster), the debut novel written by Bobby Hall, which entered the New York Times Paperback Fiction bestseller list at #1 – first-ever for a hip-hop artist. It was accompanied by the Supermarket “soundtrack” album, which debuted inside the Top 10 on the Billboard Alternative Album chart, an ‘Alt’ chart first for Logic. The prolific artist dropped his fifth studio album in May 2019, Confessions Of A Dangerous Mind.  It was preceded by the title tune single and video, “Confessions Of A Dangerous Mind,” and RIAA platinum “Homicide” featuring Eminem.

Follow Logic: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Jay Wheeler and Myke Towers illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Jay Wheeler × Myke Towers

A month after the release of the album “Platonicos“, the song “La Curiosidad“, original of the new urban-music sensation Jay Wheeler and Myke Towers, “exploded” on all digital platforms reaching top positions on Spotify and Apple Music charts. The growth and success of Jay Wheeler’s artistic career can be translated into perseverance, effort, innate talent, and the power of his romantic soul. Just a month ago, the Puerto Rican singer presented his second studio album named “Platonicos”, a 12-track album that includes amazing musical collaborations with Casper Magico, Dalex, Miky Woodz, Brytiago, and others.

However, there is one song that has managed to steal millions of hearts and the attention of thousands on all digital platforms. “La Curiosidad”, produced by Hitmen and Los Vegaton and performed by Jay Wheeler and his urban-star colleague Myke Towers, has revolutionized the music industry with more than 30 million reproductions, only in the audio of the song on YouTube. The single managed its own way up to the #48 position on Spotify´s Global Top 50 chart and is already trending on Apple Music. The great and organic success that the song has generated “forced” both artists to record an unforgettable music video. The clip was shot in San Juan, Puerto Rico and was directed by Abez Media. The filmmaker presents a love story and a new and sensational side of these two music stars. 

Follow Jay Wheeler: Facebook | Instagram | YouTube

Follow Myke Towers: Instagram | YouTube

360 Magazine, Hotboii

Hotboii – “Anonymous”

Hotboii PREMIERES new single & video “ANONYMOUS” with LPB Poody

Today, 19-year-old Orlando rapper Hotboii releases “Anonymous,” a high-powered collaboration with LPB Poody. Accompanied by a masterfully shot video, “Anonymous” is available now through all digital retailers HERE.

With its piano-driven beat, “Anonymous” is a triumphant showcase for Hotboii’s dynamic flow and high-impact delivery. Made by DrewFilmedIt, the “Anonymous” video gives an up-close look into Hotboii’s world, revealing his undeniable charisma as well as the raw emotion behind his music.

Check out the video for “Anonymous” by Hotboii with LPB Poody HERE.

Hailing from West Orlando, Hotboii is one of the most exciting new rappers to emerge from his hometown’s scene. After getting his start at age 15, he discovered a natural talent and soon began using music as an emotional outlet. As one of 17 siblings, Hotboii felt an incredible drive to establish himself as an industry heavyweight and lay the groundwork for a long-lasting career.

Earlier this year, he achieved breakout success with his full-length debut Kut da Fan On — a powerhouse 17-track album that accumulated millions of streams within the first month of its release. Arriving in May, Kut da Fan on features hit tracks like “Goat Talk” (now at over 4.2 million streams in the U.S.) and “Don’t Need Time” (now at over 6 million streams in the U.S.).

For more information on Hotboii, visit HERE.

 

Brutini illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Brutini – Ghetto Town

Rapper/songwriter Brutini releases his new video “Ghetto Town” feat. kahGEE today. The song will appear on his upcoming project.

“Brooklyn is deemed as one of the roughest cities to come from. There are so many bright lights that are covered up by dark clouds, making it hard to get out of ‘Ghetto Town.’ It’s really a blessing being born and raised in Brooklyn,” says Brutini on the video.

Brooklyn bred rapper and songwriter Brutini has been taking the music industry by storm. The rapper has been brewing new music in the studio to follow up his previously released buzz-worthy tracks “Taler” and “Cartier.” Late last year, Brutini released his single “Groovey Lit” with Young Paris and he followed up this release with “Ghetto Town.” His musical inspirations stem from from rappers like Jay Z, Cam’ron, Andre 3000, Lil Wayne, and Kanye West and R&B influences from artists like Musiq Soul Child and 112. Brutini’s music brings a view into his world, heritage and emotions, creating a soundscape that will leave listeners intrigued. Stay tuned for more announcements.

Follow Brutini: Instagram | YouTube | SoundCloud