Posts tagged with "music industry"

Vertex Consulting Group – Examining an Innovator

Always reflecting on the up-and-coming leaders of the industry, 360 had a chance to connect with Vertex Consulting Group on their methodology, ethos, and results. After digging further into their company identity, their slogan, “innovative & quality solutions,” is by far an understatement of what they are capable of. With a 4.8/5 Trustpilot rating based on hundreds of reviews, Vertex Consulting Group is one of the most promising agencies, or ‘power houses’ as they call it, of the latest generation. Read on to learn more about Vertex. 

The History of Vertex 

Let’s backtrack a bit – Vertex Consulting Group was initially founded in 2020 in Denmark by a merger of several other agencies based out of Europe, the United Arab Emirates & The United States. This global context has allowed Vertex to retain its unique point of view 

When the previous firms merged & Vertex Consulting Group was created, the founders of the old firms covered each segment of their previous specialties in this new powerhouse. The secret behind their success could be their incredible resume, featuring consistency and clarity in their vast amount of previous project experience. For example, 360 learned every senior partner has at least six years of experience in their respective field which obviously creates a decent foundation for building an empire of success. With an experienced team, Vertex has been able to pivot their individual talents into a cohesive picture

Vertex Today

In particular, 360 found Vertex’s unique approach to their Spotify Management to stand out. What we are privy to witnessing here is the remodeling of music marketing as we know it. They reinvented the regular ads strategy by adding several elements from manual scraping. This is on top of the different aspect of targeting; the reach stays the same as in any other ad, but the specific targeting or the type of people that see their ads are much more likely to find it interesting. After looking further into Vertex’s behind the scenes, we are seeing an interest & a click rate with up to 500% higher than before they implemented their own strategies to the manual targeting. In an industry that is constantly shifting and where consultants can find it difficult to stay afloat, Vertex, with their singular strategy seems to ride the wave. 

All in all, what Vertex Consulting Group is accomplishing is revolutionary for the music industry. It eliminates the old school playlist marketing by outnumbering it by far, while making it far easier to navigate whether musical streams are real or botted – a main issue of discussion regarding marketing in the music industry the last few years. The results their Spotify Management has had on their clients are beyond incredible. Several have expressed the belief that “This is the best service for any artist! Shout out everyone at Vertex!” and “This is definitely THE best investment I’ve ever made for my music career” proving that the right investment for up-and-coming artists can make all the difference.

From record deal signing to world tours – Vertex navigates the industry with grace. It is safe to say that Vertex Consulting Group elevates their artists’ careers on an incredible level.

Tracy Sugarman’s Works Offered at Auction

“AND ALL THAT JAZZ”! WORKS BY TRACY SUGARMAN – ARTIST TO THE MUSIC INDUSTRY, TO BE OFFERED AT AUCTION

September 2021. Artworks by the American illustrator, Tracy Sugarman (1921-2013), who documented some of the most momentous events in American history, such as Mississippi’s Freedom Summer of 1964 (a milestone in the civil rights movement in America) and images of World War II, will be offered in Dreweatts Modern and Contemporary Art sale on October 12, 2021.

As well as encapsulating historical moments in a unique way, Sugarman illustrated hundreds of books and record covers in a career spanning 50 years. The group of works coming up for auction spotlights Sugarman’s work for the music industry. Between 1954 and 1959 he produced more than a hundred album covers for the record labels Grand Award and Waldorf Music Hall Records. These were later reissued on CDS.

His illustrations were published in hundreds of magazines and books, as well being shown as on TV (PBS, ABC TV, NBC TV, and CBS TV). He was in high demand as a multi-talented artist, scriptwriter, producer, and author and won numerous awards from the Society of Illustrators in New York and the Art Directors Club in Washington, D.C. He was also a civil rights activist, something he also captured in his artworks.

While carrying out his commissions for the music industry he was given complete artistic freedom to create the works as he wished. Commenting he said: “I had been able to explore every medium from scratch-board to oils, from pastels to watercolors and seen them reproduced. I had captured Mahalia Jackson singing gospel and Knuckles O’Toole playing ragtime piano.” A work in 2007 marked the beginning of a lifelong love affair with jazz and the works in this sale show how he creatively captures the spirit and energy of Jazz.

In the Studio (lot 301) in its bright red hues, communicates the passion and vibrancy of Jazz and music in general. Dark lines contrast the colour, creating the shapes of the figures, resulting in a simple, but powerful piece. It carries an estimate of £400-£600. Portrait of a Trumpet Player (lot 299) by Tracy Sugarman captures a trumpet player in full flow. Created in wax crayon, the raw image brings the paper to life. It is estimated to fetch £400-£600. The Thinker (Lot 300) in wax crayon and watercolor shows the creative process and thinking behind the creation of music. In rough strokes Sugarman conveys all of this in a minimal way, creating the impact by its very simplicity.  The work is estimated to fetch £400-£600.

More works by Sugarman can be seen in the online catalogue, follow the link here

Ms Banks at GRM Gala presented by GRM Daily & Beats by Dr. Dre on 9th August at the V&A_photcredit_ Richie Shots from Kate Head, Stoked PR for use by 360 Magazine

GRM Gala Presented by GRM Daily × Beats by Dr. Dre

Artists, entrepreneurs and key industry figures came together at the GRM Gala in London to celebrate black excellence in the UK Entertainment and Music Industry.

Collaborating with Beats By Dr. Dre, GRM Daily co-hosted their annual Pre-Rated Awards Gala at the iconic V&A Museum. The illustrious event was attended by a number of GRM’s extended family of influential artists and industry friends including: Adeola Patronne, Akala, DJ Semtex, Eva Apio, Krept & Konan, Miss La Familia, Tim Westwood, Tion Wayne and Zeze Millz. Also in attendance were GRM Rated 2021 award nominees: AJ Tracey, Arrdee, Fredo, Ghetts, Ivorian Doll, Michael Dapaah, Ms Banks, Nella Rose and Stormzy.

The GRM Gala, whose official sponsors included Chivas Regal Whisky and AU Vodka, brought the best in style and opulence to the V&A, creating an ambience befitting of the celebration. The event was curated by GRM Daily CEO and founder, Post.

Post says: “I was honored to celebrate the outstanding success achieved by friends and peers at Monday’s event”.

The GRM Gala took place for the first time last year. It was held in partnership with Beats By Dr. Dre at One Marylebone in Westminster, ahead of the GRM Rated Awards 2020.

GRM Daily, is an award-winning platform at the epicenter of UK Rap & Grime music culture for over a decade. An outlet where the very best of UK music is whole heartedly celebrated, GRM is renowned as an influential launch pad for the country’s emerging and established talent and as the hosts of Britain’s premier award ceremony for UK Rap & Grime music, The Rated Awards. With over 4 billion YouTube views, 4 million subscribers and a social reach of over 3 million, GRM is the most viewed British music platform in the UK.

Beats is a leading audio brand founded in 2006 by Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine. Through its family of premium consumer headphones, earphones and speakers, Beats has introduced an entirely new generation to the possibilities of premium sound entertainment. The brand’s continued success helps bring the energy, emotion and excitement of playback in the recording studio back to the listening experience for music lovers worldwide. Beats was acquired by Apple Inc. in July 2014. Beats’ latest product the Beats Studio Buds are available now.

illustration bv Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

ANNOUNCING HVS CONSERVATORY

A New Post-Secondary School for Vocalists  

In DTLA’s Historic Garland Building   

A NEW KIND OF VOCAL EDUCATION  

PREPARES THE NEXT GENERATION OF ARTISTS  

FOR A CAREER IN LOS ANGELES’ COMPETITIVE MUSIC INDUSTRY http://hvsconservatory.com  

Auditions will be held this fall for February 2022 enrollment. 

HVS Conservatory: Where today’s students become tomorrow’s stars.   

Hollywood Vocal Studios and Adreana Gonzalez are proud to announce the founding of Hollywood Vocal Studios (HVS) Conservatory—a post-secondary school for aspiring professional vocalists—located in Los Angeles’ historic Garland Building.   

HVS Conservatory seeks to fill a major gap in modern music education. There are a number of music schools across the East Coast that cater to classical techniques and musical theater performance, but none are dedicated to the modern solo vocalist. Singers interested in honing their skills in the competitive recording industry currently have no blueprint to success, nor opportunities for group mentorship and instruction. HVS Conservatory aims to fill these gaps and has partnered with a number of esteemed recording industry professionals to bring world-class music education to the epicenter of the business—Los Angeles, CA.  

HVS Conservatory students will be taught, mentored, and critiqued by a who’s-who of prominent music industry professionals dedicated to helping develop and nurture young voices. Utilizing the preferred vocal technique of luminaries like Quincy Jones and Michael Jackson, the HVS Conservatory faculty will combine their cutting-edge technical knowledge with years of real-world experience in order to help young artists develop both strength and savvy. Jeffrey Skouson is one of the industry’s preeminent vocal coaches and founder of the Institute of Vocal Advancement and will be heading the vocal department. Skouson counts Imagine Dragons, The Killers, and Panic! At The Disco among his regular clientele. Director of Performance Ron Harris is a renowned producer, coach, and A&R rep, who has helped shape the careers of stars like Fergie, Christina Aguilera, and Grammy-winning producer Trevorious (Lizzo’s Cuz I Love You).  

“The modern music industry is a challenging business to navigate, HVS Conservatory will be the place to learn not only how to navigate it… but how to do so successfully.” Founder Adreana Gonzalez goes on, “It’s time Los Angeles gives as much in education to its rising leaders, as it does to the stage of entertainment and we’re so happy to lead the way.”   

HVS Conservatory was founded by Adreana Gonzalez—an esteemed and multitalented professional, who has spent the past two decades working with professional vocalists. She is a fixture of the Hollywood scene and counts a wide range of industry insiders as friends and colleagues. She has worked with celebrities like Will Ferrell, Jessie Reyez, Graham Patrick Martin, Lexi Ainsworth, and many more. Now, she hopes to take the knowledge and experience she gained both as a performer and teacher, and use it to help inform the futures of the world’s top vocal talents.  

Visit the HVS Conservatory website for more information.

Fritz Michel "Look Out (Botticelli Girl)" artwork via Jon Bleicher at Prospect PR for use by 360 Magazine

Fritz Michel Q×A

Originally from France and currently based in New York City, Fritz Michel is a sensational, international star and storyteller. Michel has previously worked in film, television, and the stage, but is currently taking the music industry by storm. He recently released the highly anticipated single and music video for “Look Out (Botticelli Girl),” which can be viewed HERE. 360 Magazine spoke with Michel about his creative song writing process, the true meaning behind “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)”’s lyrics, and his upcoming debut EP release.

What has the reaction to the release of “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” been like?

One really great thing to come out of the release of “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” has been the opportunity to reconnect with artists that I have not had the chance to work with. I just shot a music video for the song in Oregon with a longtime filmmaking colleague. We used analog special effects, like puppets and slide projections, to create a visual story. I feel fortunate that my music is helping me tap into a whole new creative language. The streaming platforms allow you much more global reach as an artist. I’ve made personal connections with listeners and music writers all over the world over the past year, and that’s been amazing.

You’ve described “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” as a meditation and contemplation of amazing works of art and human history. Have any artists or pieces of art, besides Botticelli’s ‘Birth of Venus,’ inspired your music?

I look for musical inspiration everywhere. I borrowed the image of Ulysses lashed to the mast in Homer’s “The Odyssey” in my song “Stardust”. I use some snaky guitar steel there to speak of my homeward journey across the sprawl of Los Angeles from Hollywood to the PCH and beyond, while pining for my New York roots. 

What was the song writing process for “Look out (Botticelli Girl)” like?

“Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” came to me very fast after a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art one afternoon last fall, right after the museum had reopened. I find that the galleries calm me emotionally and transport me creatively. I thought about that tension between permanence and impermanence that I experience [while] looking at a great painting and standing in awe of the flow of history. I also thought about capturing little human moments in music [in] the [same] way a painting does. You see that in the verses. I also thought “Botticelli Girl” had a catchy ring to it and would make a good lyric!

How has the pandemic affected your music creation process?

I really started exploring songwriting out of necessity when the pandemic exploded and put the brakes on performing live with my bands. My world changed on a dime, and that prompted a lot of introspection along with observation. I spent a great deal of time alone in my NYC apartment with my guitar. Fortunately, I discovered the space to learn the basics of music production and found the motivation to reach farther with the process. That’s the been a silver lining to the disruption and tragedy of the last year.

In three words, how would you describe the sound of “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)?”

Atmospheric, reflective, acoustic.

You are multi-talented artist, having shared your skills through music, film, TV, and the stage. Looking ahead, which of these creative avenues are you looking to focus on the most?

I’m very fortunate to have worked in music, film, TV, and stage. Music is a lot like putting on a play in my experience. You have to find or write a script and bring your own colors, sounds, and perspectives to the story. Rehearsal is required and technical elements need to come together. Then, you hope that somewhere there’s an audience that’s interested in what you have to say. Looking ahead, I plan to focus my creative process wherever I find willing collaborators and a game audience that’s open to the story. I’m making videos to go with my other releases (“Darker Now,” “Stardust,” and “King of Corona”).

I’m also thinking about writing a musical set in a family [of] architects with a longtime theater colleague, Oren Safdie. We collaborated closely on the premieres his trilogy of plays about architecture. One of my first acting gigs was performing in Oren’s spoof of “Fiddler on the Roof,” set in modern-day Montreal at La Mama, ETC on East 4th Street. So, in that way, I think I’ll be exploring all those avenues in the year ahead. 

What is something about you or the release of “Look Out (Botticelli Girl)” that fans may not guess or suspect?

I doubt many people who listen to my music would guess that I was born and spent my childhood in France. We’ve also talked about Botticelli a lot in this interview, but much of “Look Out” comes from personal reflection on my own history. Termini’s is an old Italian pastry shop we used to frequent in South Philadelphia. I lived in Tribeca during 9/11 when the towers fell. When I refer to cherubs, I was really thinking of my own daughters there, less than the ones in “Birth of Venus”! Someone might pick up on those details on a closer listen to the song.

Do you have any more releases to come in 2021 that you can tell us about?

I’m finishing up a couple so I can put out my first EP this fall. I want to get back to performing, too. So much of what I know about music, I learned playing bass in a jazz quartet– so I hope we get that going again. For me, music is a good way to tap into our need for bliss, storytelling, and myth in life. I think it’s all about that conversation and listening to one another.

Emily Bunn image via emilyxbunn on Instagram for use by 360 Magazine "Emily" page

Emily

Emily Bunn is a writer and photographer, who has been published by the likes of 360 Magazine, County Lines Magazine, Cambridge Editors, Society19, Milkcrate, WhatsPop and Gauge Magazine, among others. Specializing in lifestyle writing and entertainment journalism, Emily is constantly on the pulse of pop culture.

A bonafide media mogul, Emily currently works at 360 Magazine. While Emily produces stories in a variety of topics, she concentrates on the topics of fashion and beauty, music and entertainment, current affairs coverage, and auto industry writing. The impressive roster of clientele she’s produced writing for via 360 Magazine includes celebrities such as Beyoncé, Markice Moore, and John Oates, and high-end brands like Rolls-Royce, Lamborghini, and TAG Heuer. While Emily began as a digital media intern with 360, she has been able to cement herself as a valuable asset to the magazine as the Executive Assistant.

Emily is arriving on the scene of the publishing industry with spunk and diligence. She recently graduated magna cum laude in May of 2021 from Emerson College. During her time at Emerson, Emily majored in Writing, Literature and Publishing, with a minor in Photography. She was involved with various on-campus publications, including writing for the music blog, Milkcrate, and providing photography for the design-oriented literary magazine, Gauge.

Emily’s photographic responsibilities progressed throughout her collegiate career, due to success in documentary, darkroom, and digital photography courses. Emily’s deep passion for image-making blossomed as she worked as a film and photo tech at Emerson College’s darkroom and photo lab. Able to produce images both through both analog and digital mediums, Emily enjoys documenting street photography and live music events. Her debut photography exhibition, “People Watching” was showcased at the Huret-Spector Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts in November of 2020.

A live music enthusiast, Emily has always been very involved in her local music scene. In Boston, she worked on the Live Events team at Emerson College’s radio station, WECB.fm. Representing the underground sound of Emerson, Emily worked with the team to produce open mic nights, campus events, and sold out concerts. Eventually, Emily’s participation with WECB.fm landed her the position of Live Events Manager. She produced large scale concerts for a variety of notable musicians, including Alex G, Japanese Breakfast, and Diet Cig. Emily also worked to highlight emerging, local artists in her community by photographing album covers and organizing band photoshoots.

Emily’s involvement with the radio station didn’t stop there, as she was also a live broadcast DJ personality on WECB.fm. Throughout her entire collegiate career, Emily performed as the personality for several radio shows, including “The Cry Guys” and “Suppy?” As a DJ, Emily worked to curate weekly radio show playlists and grow her listenership. Both of her shows highlighted recently released alternative music. A weekly album review accompanied each episode, in which Emily researched and reported on musicians and offered her opinion on stand-out album tracks. Both “Suppy?” and “The Cry Guys” premiered weekly on Sunday mornings, and Emily was sure to wake up, electrify, and excite listeners with her punk music curation.

Looking towards the future, Emily is working to continue expanding her music coverage repertoire, honing in her interviewing abilities, and creating engaging, politically conscious, intelligent digital content. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Instagram.

"People Watching" photography exhibit by Emily Bunn, photographed by Emily Bunn, for use by 360 Magazine "Emily" page

Emily Bunn at her “People Watching” photography exhibit at the Huret-Spector Gallery in Boston, MA.

Illustration By Alex Bogdan for use of 360 Magazine

The Unsung Heroes Behind Your Favorite Songs

By Deborah Fairchild

Maybe you commute to work listening to The Weeknd’s “Save Your Tears,” or you make chores around the house more palatable with a little assistance from the sounds of Drake or Billie Eilish.

If you follow popular music at all, you almost certainly are aware of those performers as well as many other big names in the business, such as Post Malone, Lizzo and Ariana Grande.

And when you think of their songs, you likely think of them.

But recorded music is not the work of just one person, no matter how talented and charismatic that person is on stage. Backup musicians, producers, songwriters, engineers and others also play significant if often unheralded roles in coaxing into existence those tunes that, as some have said, become the soundtracks for our lives.

To get an idea of the plethora of people whose efforts go into your cherished songs, take a journey through the credits for country singer Luke Combs’ album “What You See is What You Get.” Roughly 40 people earn a mention, from drummer Jerry Roe to engineer Alex Gilson to mastering assistant Megan Peterson. Luke may be the focus for country music fans who listen to the album’s songs, but it becomes clear pretty quickly that he is not doing it all by himself, as he likely would tell you.

That list of names connected to the album is more than just a formal acknowledgement to those who lend their talents to the final product. In the music industry, credits are part of the resume, so building an accurate record of who contributed to what is crucial for everyone involved. If, for example, you do digital editing, you want to be able to say you worked on Luke Combs’ album – or Drake’s or Taylor Swift’s – and you want to have the credit listed to prove it. That will help pave the way for more job opportunities down the line.

And, of course, there’s the not-so-small matter of the paycheck. Most people are drawn to the music industry because it’s something they enjoy, but they need to pay bills like anyone else. Yet, unless someone is keeping an accurate record of who contributed to the work, that pay might not make its way to the correct and deserving person’s bank account.

So, credits are important on many levels and they are something I take seriously, as you might imagine since my company, VEVA Sound, helps musicians store and organize their projects through our VEVA Collect digital platform.

But I’m also confident that the average music fan doesn’t spend as much time as I do contemplating the many, many people who deserve some credit for popular – or even obscure – songs. In fairness, the tendency to overlook behind-the-scenes people is probably true in a lot of other industries as well.

Books often include an acknowledgements page, or pages, where the author names editors, researchers, literary agents, librarians or anyone else who helped make the book a reality. Many readers, though, just skim the acknowledgments or skip them altogether. Movies end with not just a cast list, but an extensive cataloging of anyone who remotely had a hand in creating the movie, from key grips to gaffers. Unfortunately, moviegoers often mosey toward the exit as the credits begin to roll rather than stick around to check out all the names. That is, they leave unless they suspect the director included a bonus post-credits scene, as the Marvel movies tend to do, and even then they may pay little attention to the names.

Such realities may leave people thinking, “Who cares about credits anyway?”

Plenty of folks, that’s who.

But it was thinking along those lines that got those of us at VEVA Sound to begin wondering if there was something we might be able to do to create more awareness around music credits to make sure they – and the people behind them – don’t get overlooked.

What came out of that was a Credits Are Cool™ campaign that raises money for charity while at the same time emphasizing just how important those people behind the scenes are to the songs that keep music lovers humming, dancing and smiling.

To pull off the Credits Are Cool effort, we collaborated with a number of musical artists to create hoodies, t-shirts and sweatshirts with the name and image of a song on the front. On the back is a list of people who contributed to the song. In a sense, we are trying to create a movement, proclaiming that we should celebrate everyone who was involved in making music – not just the performers whose names are on a marquee.

Artists whose songs appear on the Credits Are Cool clothing include Sam Tinnesz, Wendy Moten, Sonia Leigh, Hailey Steele, Right Said Fred, Ty Herndon, Jamie O’Neal, Shelly Fairchild, Teke Teke, Whiskey Wolves of the West, and Tayla Lynn, granddaughter of Loretta Lynn.

Maybe through this initiative, in some small way, those who listen to music will take a moment to think about the fact that recorded music is a much more collaborative effort than they might ever have imagined. It could even open up career ideas for young people who love music and would like to work in the industry, but didn’t realize that there’s room for people other than the talented vocalist and the guitar hero.

Yes, credits really are cool because they are not just about seeing your name in lights. They are about how you get work in the ever-competitive music industry.

About Deborah Fairchild

Deborah Fairchild, president of VEVA Sound, started her career with the company as an archival engineer in 2004. In the past 16 years she has risen to lead the company in all facets of the business. She has grown VEVA into a global entity servicing major labels in North America and Europe, establishing offices in New York, Los Angeles, and London in addition to the company’s headquarters in Nashville. Fairchild has kept VEVA at the forefront of technology and continues to evolve and adapt VEVA’s services and technology to assist the needs of their extensive client base. She advises many label executives, producers, engineers and artists seeking archival and asset management solutions.

FF Rarri illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Q × A with Rarri Dream

Q&A WITH RARRI DREAM

Rarri Dream’s album, Foreign the Speed, is getting a lot of traffic after he dropped it in August of 2020. He has artist’s Lil Jah and Hoodrich Pablo Juan featured on Foreign the Speed. The production on the album is amazing with the likes of Black Mayo, Chiveer, and Solo Cam. Songs like Televise, Get Paid and Keep it Going put you in a joyful mood with its melodic sounds. Rarri has just now gained recognition but he has been rapping ever since he was 14 in his home studio. 2021 he is planning to take over the rap game and make music with other mainstream artists. He shot the music video for the song Get Paid on the album last year in October. Everyone should be on the lookout for Rarri to do some big things soon.

Q- Can you tell us about your upbringing and how it influenced your sound? Siblings?

RD -My upbringing was cool growing up in Lithonia 
In the early part of my life, I was influenced by Mike Jones T.I and Lil Wayne. My sibling is just my lil sister she’s the only one.

Q -What inspired your latest song? 

FR -My latest single is called “Show it” featuring Yung Bino what inspired it was when he sent the hook back and I see he was talking about strippers and money so, I just thought to go crazy on it cause that’s my vibe.

Q- If you had an opportunity to work with a major label, would you ink the deal? Why?

RD -I would take the deal because if you think about it major labels give you so many opportunities that being independent doesn’t and, people don’t understand that

Q- How would you best describe your style? Favorite designers? 

RD- Very colorful but sometimes dark because I like wearing leather jeans on some rockstar shit, but really, I just like any designer brands with quality.

Q- Do you consider yourself a sneakerhead? If so, what’s your go to pair?

RD- Kinda I mostly wear designer shoes though my go to is the balenciaga track shoes. I also sometimes wear Air Force 1’s.

Q- Can you describe your writing process?

RD- I don’t write I just freestyle I been recording so long that I’m just used to it coming off the top of my head.

Q- What’s the number one thing people notice about you when you enter a room?

RD- My style people often ask what’s that you’re wearing? Or damn bro, you dripping lol.

Q- If you were on a deserted island, what would you bring?

RD- I would bring like 3 of my favorite outfits a bunch of food I like, a weapon to protect myself and a bad ass girl.

Q- Are you involved in your community? Can you elaborate on your last philanthropic endeavor?

RD- Not at the moment, I’m still fairly young so I’m not really into that yet, but I will soon though.

Q- If you could offer someone advice trying to break into music industry, what would say?

RD- I would say invest in yourself because the more you put in, the more you’re going to get back from it.

Q- Dream collaboration? Hobbies?

RD- Some of my dream collaborations would be with Lil Wayne, Young Thug, and Drake to name a few. My hobbies are when I’m not recording, I like to play video games or go shopping.

Heather Skovlund Music illustration 360 Magazine

The Don Was Motor City Playlist

Music Icon Don Was to Launch Weekly Show, “The Don Was Motor City Playlist,” on Detroit’s NPR Station, 101.9 WDET-FM and streaming worldwide beginning 10 pm, April 16, 2021.

“The Don Was Motor City Playlist,” hosted by Don Was and WDET Music Host Ann Delisi will feature playlists curated by Was and tales from his more than 30-year career as a musician and producer.

Blue Note Records President, six-time Grammy Award Winner and music industry powerhouse Don Was is launching a weekly broadcast program Friday, April 16 in his hometown of Detroit. On the new two-hour show, The Don Was Motor City Playlist, Was will dig deep into his music archives to curate playlists and share personal stories about the artists whose songs he features. The show will pay homage to the Motor City and artists with whom he works and loves. It will be broadcast on Detroit’s NPR station, WDET 101.9 FM and available to stream on WDET’s website, the WDET mobile app, and on smart speakers.

The show will air every Friday from 10 pm–midnight and will be hosted by Was along with producer and co-host, Detroit radio personality Ann Delisi.

“This show is really different in that it is completely freeform,” says Was. “The format will be an old school stream of consciousness; diverse with songs that I love and want to share with listeners. It’s been really fun to make the playlists. I get to do this show from my birthplace of Detroit with the great Ann Delisi. You will hear stories about The Stones. Stories about Dylan. Stories about Bonnie Raitt and Iggy Pop. Stories about Detroit.”

The name of every playlist will be inspired by Don Was’ history in Detroit. As listeners tune in from around the world, they will hear commentary about the Motor City and its rich musical and cultural histories. Dubbed, “the most exciting city in America” by the New York Times, Detroit is the birthplace of Was, Jack White, Big Sean, Alice Cooper, Eminem, Elvin Jones, Pepper Adams, Marcus Belgrave, James Carter, Carl Craig, Alberta Adams and many others.

“Don Was is a genuine and fascinating storyteller who will give listeners intimate insight into music makers. Don is a Detroit treasure and so is Ann Delisi. We are thrilled that Don and Ann will be teaming up to create The Don Was Motor City Playlist on WDET,” says Mary Zatina, General Manager of WDET. It’s a perfect trio — “Don’s energy and talent in the music industry is in a league of its own. Ann, whose ear is to the ground in music of every genre, both share the ability to deeply engage listeners as they narrate stories and anecdotes about music making. The third leg of the formula is WDET — a one-of-a-kind radio station known for innovation and eclectic offerings that inform and delight audiences in metro Detroit and around the globe.” WDET, which has been on the air for 73 years, is Detroit’s flagship National Public Radio Station.

Delisi has been a Detroit broadcaster and producer for more than 35 years. Her show Essential Music is a treasured go-to for listeners to discover new music as well as look back at landmark albums, musical moments and the musicians who created them. She has interviewed everyone from David Bowie to Adele to White House Photographer Pete Souza. Dedicated to exploring the creative spirit that drives artists, Delisi said the idea to partner with Was came up in one of their many conversations over dinner.

Ann recounts the story of how the Don Was Motor City Playlist came about–“We were having dinner in Detroit when he was in town for the Concert of Colors global music festival. He talked about listening to WDET and the late night show “Jazz Today” hosted by Bud Spangler. He said that his dream was to do a show like that and play songs that were his personal favorites – from any genre and from era. Months later, I suggested to my WDET colleagues that Don should host a show on WDET and everyone loved the idea.”

WDET Program Director Joan Isabella says, “Don and Ann have a deep love of music and reverence for the artists who create it. Ann is a savvy interviewer and as his co-host, she will ask questions about his work that listeners will relish. The Don Was Motor City Playlist provides a platform for Don to share his life experiences as a musician, producer and record label president. Having heard many of Don’s stories throughout the years, I know it’s going to be a blast for the listeners.”

A pivotal moment in developing the show’s potential occurred years ago when Was visited WDET to be interviewed by Delisi, only for the show to be preempted due to a national emergency press conference.

“Back in 2012, our live interview was preempted, so we ended up recording a lengthy interview in a small studio sharing stories and talking about music. In the years that followed, I began working with Don on the Concert of Colors and we would always talk about music. Little did we know that all of those conversations were preparing us for this show,” says Delisi.

“I’ve been going through my record collection, music from Detroit and beyond, on and off Blue Note,” says Was. “Maybe some music that hasn’t been released from Was (Not Was), but I’m modest with this show, I haven’t decided that part yet.”

Fans can hope.

For more than 70 years, from our Midtown Detroit location on the campus of Wayne State University, WDET-FM 101.9, Detroit’s NPR station, has delivered a unique mix of news, conversation, special programs and music programming. Our 48,000-watt broadcast signal reaches a 70-mile radius across all of southeast Michigan, northwest Ohio and southwest Ontario. It expands nationally through our live stream, website, mobile app and podcasts. WDET-FM 101.9 is a community service of Wayne State University. Support for WDET comes from Wayne State, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, local foundations, and through private donors and corporate underwriting.

Ariana Grande illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Ariana Grande × The Voice

Multi-platinum global recording artist, Grammy Award winner, and talented actress Ariana Grande will join the upcoming Fall 2021 cycle of NBC’s “The Voice” as a coach.

Grande, a powerhouse vocalist whose international fan base of “Arianators” has enabled her to rapidly become one of the biggest pop superstars of our generation, will be joined by returning iconic coaches Kelly Clarkson, John Legend, and Blake Shelton, along with host Carson Daly, on the four-time Emmy Award-winning musical competition series.

With her most recent album, “Positions,” recently breaking the record for most songs to debut at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and cementing her as Spotify’s most-streamed female artist of the past decade, Grande, a self-proclaimed fan of “The Voice,” claims a red chair at a pivotal point in her career.

“As an undeniable force in pop music, Ariana’s inimitable success in the music industry is extraordinary,” said Jenny Groom, Executive Vice President of Unscripted Content for NBCUniversal Television and Streaming. “We were thrilled to learn that she is a true fan of ‘The Voice’ and know that this enthusiasm will add to her impact as a dynamic coach. Ariana is a visionary with over a decade of experience in the music industry. Her unmatched vocal skills, creativity, and unique expertise on all facets of the industry will make her an invaluable coach to the next generation of artists.”

Said Grande, “I’m so honored and excited to join ‘The Voice’ family! I have been a huge fan of the show for such a long time. I can’t wait to go head-to-head with the incredible coaches, get to know these new artists, and help to take their craft to the next level.”

A Grammy-winning, multi-platinum recording artist and international superstar, Ariana Grande was the first artist to hold the top three Billboard Hot 100 spots since the Beatles in 1964 with “7 Rings,” “Break Up with Your Girlfriend, I’m Bored,” and “Thank U, Next.” In 2020, she became the first and only artist to have five singles debuts at #1 in the chart’s history. At age 27, she has delivered five platinum-selling albums and surpassed 35 billion streams – she’s Spotify’s most-streamed female artist of the past decade – while rapidly becoming one of the biggest pop stars of our generation with her powerhouse vocals and unmatched presence both on stage and with her fans. She recently won a Grammy for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance for “Rain on Me” with Lady Gaga.

The Battle Rounds for Season 20 of “The Voice,” with current coaches Kelly Clarkson, Nick Jonas, John Legend, and Blake Shelton, continue Monday, April 5 and April 12 at 8 p.m. ET/PT on NBC.

For the 2020-21 season-to-date, “The Voice” is the #1 alternative series among total viewers. The show has ranked among the top 5 most-watched alternative series for each of its 11 broadcast seasons on the air.

Season 20 marks the 10-year anniversary of “The Voice.”

“The Voice” is a presentation of MGM Television, Warner Bros. Unscripted Television in association with Warner Horizon, and ITV Studios The Voice USA, Inc. The series was created by John de Mol, who serves as an executive producer along with Mark Burnett, Audrey Morrissey, Amanda Zucker, Kyra Thompson, and Adam H. Sher.