Posts tagged with "news"

NFL, szemui ho, 360 MAGAZINE

DJ D-Nice and Dhani Jones × COVID-19 Relief

DJ D-Nice Joins Former NFL Linebacker Dhani Jones to Support COVID-19 Financial Relief through #GiveTogetherNow

Over 28,000 families and counting will receive financial support through #GiveTogetherNow, a rapid-response effort to get cash directly to people struggling as a result of the coronavirus.

NFL-athlete-turned social entrepreneur Dhani Jones will interview DJ D-Nice about how he’s using music to bring people together during this time of social distancing through his #ClubQuarantine DJ sessions on Instagram Live.

Derrick “D-Nice” Jones is a talented musician and photographer who uses his dual passions to share his love for music, art, and creative culture. His most recent project, #ClubQuarantine, an Instagram Live virtual dance party, has drawn celebrities like first lady Michelle Obama, Drake and Oprah Winfrey.

Dhani Jones is partnering  with Stand Together to connect people across the country with some of the world’s most interesting people who want to share their stories, experiences, and talent to inspire and contribute to others around the globe through a new Instagram Live series of conversations called “Stand Together Live.”

Stand Together LIVE will feature interviews, performances, and masterclasses designed to help people thrive during these challenging times. Proceeds go to #GiveTogetherNow – a COVID-19 rapid response effort for families struggling during this crisis. In just one week, #GiveTogetherNow has raised over $14.4 million, enough to reach more than 28,000 families. 100 percent of the donations go directly to families in need.

The COVID-19 global pandemic has forced the world to exercise social distancing and that has had severe economic consequences for families. With so much change and uncertainty, people are creating ways to connect with each other and meaningfully contribute to those around them by sharing advice, stories, inspiration, practical support and resources for those coping with the fallout of the coronavirus.

Stand Together believes that every single person has something unique to contribute and that when people come together, we all can rise. That’s why Stand Together launched #GiveTogetherNow, a rapid-response effort to get cash directly to individuals and families struggling as a result of the coronavirus and ensuing economic crisis.

About #GiveTogetherNow

Stand Together and the Family Independence Initiative partnered to create #GiveTogetherNow, which offers families access to a direct and immediate cash transfer to help offset financial burdens caused by the measures to stop the spread of COVID-19. The online platform allows anyone to make a contribution to families who will receive cash deposits to their bank accounts. #GiveTogetherNow has raised over $14.4 million providing more than 28,000 families each with a $500 emergency fund deposited directly into their bank accounts to help them with any financial burden caused by the global pandemic.

About Stand Together

Stand Together is a philanthropic community that empowers people dedicated to helping others improve their lives. We identify, vet, and create organizations that discover innovative ways to remove barriers in education, business, communities, and government so every person can rise. We partner with these groups by offering tools and resources to dramatically increase their effectiveness and scale. Learn more at StandTogether.org or Instagram @standtogether.

JOSEPH LOWERY, BARACK OBAMA, MEDAL OF FREEDOM, VAUGHN LOWERY, 360 MAGAZINE

REMEMBERING JOSEPH LOWERY

“When black will not be asked to get in back; when brown can stick around; when yellow will be mellow; when the red man can get ahead, man; and when white will embrace what is right.” – Joseph Lowery

Former Co-Founder/President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Rev. Dr. Joseph Echols Lowery, transitioned on Friday, March 27, 2020 at 10pm at the age of 98. He was one of the last remaining leaders of the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. Lowery has assumed and executed a broad and diverse series of roles over the span of his eight decades: leader, pastor/preacher, servant, father, husband, freedom fighter and advocate. FOX 5 Atlanta pays tribute to Lowery HERE.

In 1997,he was dubbed the ‘Dean of the Civil Rights Movement’ upon receipt of the NAACP’s Lifetime Achievement Award. On January 20, 2009, in his inimitable style; Dr. Lowery delivered the Benediction on the occasion of President Obama’s inauguration as the 44th President of the United States. On August 12, 2009 when President Barack Obama awarded him the nation’s highest civilian honor: The Presidential Medal of Freedom, in recognition of his lifelong commitment to the nonviolent struggle for the causes of justice, human rights, economic equality, voting rights, peace and human dignity.

Born in Huntsville, Alabama, on October 6th, 1921, Rev. Dr. Lowery’s legacy of service and struggle is long and rich. His genesis as a Civil Rights advocate dates to the early 1950s where, in Mobile, Alabama he headed the Alabama Civic Affairs Association; the organization which led the movement to desegregate buses and public accommodations. In 1957, with friend and colleague, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. he was a Co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), where served in an array of leadership positions, including: Vice President (1957-67); Chairman of the Board (1967-77); and as President and Chief Executive Officer from (1977-1998).

In 1961, he was one of four Alabama pastors whose property was seized by the Alabama Courts in an historic, precedent setting libel suit, Sullivan v. NY Times, Abernathy, Lowery, Shuttlesworth, & Seay, because of their civil rights work.The United States Supreme Court vindicated the ministers in a landmark ruling which remains an important element in the protections afforded the free speech rights of the press, and of citizens advocating and protesting for justice and societal change.

In March of 1965, he was chosen by Dr. King to chair the Delegation delivering the demands of the Selma-to-Montgomery March George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama.  As the world witnessed, Wallace ordered the marchers beaten in the incident that came to be known as “Bloody Sunday”, which ultimately led to enactment of the Voting Rights Act.

Throughout his career, Rev. Dr. Lowery’s commitment to human rights and social justice exists on a global scale. His work resulted in the desegregation of Nashville, Tennessee schools, presenting Nelson Mandela with the Martin Luther King Jr. Human Rights Award following his release from prison in 1990, leading a peace delegation to Lebanon and nations in Central America to seek justice by nonviolent means, and securing millions of dollars in contracts for minority businesses in the Southern region of the United States.

His efforts also emphasize the need to uplift and empower historically disenfranchised communities. Ranging from supporting the families affected by the Atlanta “Missing and Murdered Children Crisis” through setting up funds with Citizen Trust Bank, demanding election reform and economic justice as Convener of the Georgia Coalition for the People’s Agenda (GCPA), to advocating for the rights of Black farmers discriminated against by the Department of Agriculture – Rev. Dr. Joseph Lowery remains committed to cultivating the Beloved Community and reminds us to “turn TO each other not ON each other!” Ebony Magazine, in recognizing Rev. Dr. Lowery as one of the nation’s “15 Greatest Black Preachers,” described him as the “consummate voice of biblical social relevancy, a focused prophetic voice, speaking truth to power,” and his strong dedication to faith and inclusion is evident in all of his work.

Joseph Lowery had 5 children from 2 separate marriages.

•Most notable speech can be watched HERE.

Remarks at Coretta Scott King’s funeral.

•His legacy continues with the Lowery Institute.

•According to CNN Lowery was a founder of the SCLC.

BBC remembers Lowery.

Mentioned in The Guardian.

Civil Rights Icon Dies at 98 – NBC News.

•As seen on NPR.

Essence Magazine Instagram Post.

The Shade Room Instagram Post.

Tyler Perry Remembers.

Jamie Foxx Commemorates.

Barack Obama Pays Respect.

OWN Network Tribute

Lowery was laid to rest on Saturday, April 4th which is the same day MLK was assassinated.

Joe Biden Acknowledges.

Official Statement from The Family of Reverend Doctor Joseph E. Lowery

Our entire family is humbled and blessed by the overwhelming outpouring of love and support that has come from around the globe. We thank you for loving our father, Dr. Joseph E. Lowery, and for your continuous prayers during this time.

In lieu of flowers, cards or food, donations may be made to The Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute for Justice & Human Rights. Dr. Lowery’s life was driven by a sense of obligation to our global community and desire to champion love over hate; inclusion over exclusion. The Lowery Institute was founded in 2002 to further Dr. Lowery’s legacy of promoting non-violent advocacy among future generations.

Donations can be sent to The Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute, P.O. Box 92801, Atlanta, GA 30314, or made on-line by clicking here.

Aligning with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines on COVID-19 prevention and social distancing, plans are underway for a private family service. A public memorial will be held in late summer or early fall.

Thank you,

The Lowery Family

Rice University on COVID-19

Rice U. experts available to discuss COVID-19’s wide-ranging impact

As the COVID-19 pandemic grows and impacts the lives of people across the globe, Rice University experts are available to discuss various topics related to the disease.

Joyce Beebefellow in public finance at Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy, can discuss paid leave programs.

“COVID-19 highlights the importance of paid (sick) leave programs to workers,” she said. “The issue is not whether we should have a paid leave program; it is how to design a program that provides nationwide coverage to all American workers instead of waiting until the next pandemic.”

Robert Bruce, dean of Rice’s Glasscock School of Continuing Studies, is an expert in online and distance learning, community education and engagement and innovative models for personal and professional development programs.

“The field of continuing and professional studies is uniquely positioned to help the public during a crisis that requires social distancing,” he said. “Our core mission is to empower people to continue to learn and advance, regardless of location or age or learning style.”

Utpal Dholakia, a professor of marketing at Rice’s Jones Graduate School of Business, is available to discuss consumer behavior and panic-buying during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Everyone is panic-buying, not just all over the country, but basically all over the world,” Dholakia said. “That makes the sense of urgency even more. Are all these suppliers going to be able to keep up with the demand?”

John Diamond, the Edward A. and Hermena Hancock Kelly Fellow in Tax Policy at the Baker Institute and an adjunct assistant professor in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss the economic impact on Houston and Texas, particularly unemployment.

Elaine Howard Ecklund, the Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Social Sciences, professor in sociology and director of Rice’s Religion and Public Life Program, studies the intersection of science and religion. She can discuss how these two entities can work together to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and recently authored an editorial about this topic for Time magazine. It is available online HERE.

Christopher Fagundes, an associate professor in the department of psychological sciences, is available to discuss the link between mental and immune health.

“In my field, we have conducted a lot of work to look at what predicts who gets colds and different forms of respiratory illnesses, and who is more susceptible to getting sick,” Fagundes said. “We’ve found that stressloneliness and lack of sleep are three factors that can seriously compromise aspects of the immune system that make people more susceptible to viruses if exposed. Also, stress, loneliness and disrupted sleep promote other aspects of the immune system responsible for the production of proinflammatory cytokines to overrespond. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine production can generate sustained upper respiratory infection symptoms.”

And while this research has centered on different cold and upper respiratory viruses, he said “there is no doubt” that these effects would be the same for COVID-19.

Mark Finley is a fellow in energy and global oil at the Baker Institute.

“The U.S. and global oil market is simultaneously grappling with the biggest decline in demand ever seen (due to COVID-19) and a price war between two of the world’s largest producers, Russia and Saudi Arabia,” he said.

Bill Fulton, director of Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, an urban planner, an expert on local government and the former mayor of Ventura, California, can speak to both the short-term and long-term changes in city life and the way government works.

What will the effect be on transportation and transit? Retail and office space? Will people walk and bike more? How will they interact in public spaces in the future? How will government function and hold public meetings during the crisis, and will this fundamentally alter the way government interacts with the public in the long run? How will local governments deal with the inevitable revenue loss — and, in the long run, with the fact that they will probably have less sales tax?

Vivian Ho, the James A. Baker III Institute Chair in Health Economics, director for the Center of Health and Biosciences at the Baker Institute and a professor of economics, can discuss insurance coverage as families experience lost income and jobs during the crisis.

“Policymakers should temporarily expand subsidies for middle class workers who buy insurance through the Affordable Care Act marketplace,” Ho said. “Families experiencing lost income due to the pandemic shouldn’t have to worry about losing access to health care in the midst of a pandemic.”

“Hospitals in states that did not expand Medicaid coverage to able-bodied adults under the Affordable Care Act are bearing tougher financial burdens, which may damage their ability to respond to the current health crisis,” she said.

Mark Jones, a professor of political science and fellow at the Baker Institute, is available to discuss how the spread of COVID-19 is impacting elections, including runoffs in Texas.

“COVID-19 has already resulted in the postponement of local elections originally scheduled for May 2, with the elections now to be held in November with current officeholders’ tenure extended until their successors are confirmed in November,” Jones said. “It is increasingly likely that COVID-19 will affect the Democratic and Republican primary runoff elections scheduled for May 26, with a growing possibility that the elections will be conducted entirely via mail ballots or at the minimum will involve the adoption of no-excuse absentee voting whereby any Texan, not just those 65 or older, hospitalized or out of the county, will be able to obtain an absentee ballot and vote by mail.

“The emergency adoption of no-excuse absentee voting would change the composition of the May primary runoff electorate by expanding turnout among many voters who otherwise would have been unlikely to participate, as well as increase pressure on the Texas Legislature to reform the state’s electoral legislation to allow for no-excuse absentee voting when it reconvenes in January of 2021 for the next regular session.”

Danielle King, an assistant professor of psychological sciences and principal investigator of Rice’s WorKing Resilience Lab, is an expert on the topic of resilience to adversity. Her research focuses on understanding the role individuals, groups and organizations play in fostering adaptive sustainability following adversity. She can discuss how individuals can remain resilient and motivated in difficult circumstances.

“Though we are still in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic, we can begin to enact adaptive practices that foster resilience such as remaining flexible to changing circumstances, practicing acceptance of the present realities, seeking social support in creative ways while practicing social distancing, and finding and engaging with experiences and thoughts that elicit positive emotions during trying times,” King said.

Tom Kolditz, founding director of Rice’s Doerr Institute for New Leaders, is a social psychologist and former brigadier general who has done extensive research on how best to lead people under perceived serious threat. His work is widely taught at military service and police academies globally, and he did extensive work with the banking industry during the 2008 financial crisis. His expertise is in articulating what people need from leaders in volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous times and what leaders must do to gain and maintain people’s trust. His book, “In Extremis Leadership: Leading As If Your Life Depended On It,” teaches people to lead in crisis, when people are anxious or afraid.

“Leadership when people are under threat hinges far less on managerial principles, and far more on trust,” Kolditz said. “Whether in a company or their own family, people who lead in the same way now as they did two months ago will experience a significant decline in their influence.”

Jim Krane, the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow for Energy Studies at the Baker Institute, is an expert on energy geopolitics and Middle East economies and societies. He can comment on the effect on OPEC and its production decisions, relations between Russia and Saudi Arabia, and how low oil prices will affect policy inside producer countries.

Ken Medlock, the James A. Baker III and Susan G. Baker Fellow in Energy and Resource Economics at the Baker Institute, senior director of institute’s Center for Energy Studies and an adjunct professor and lecturer in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss COVID-19’s impact on oil prices and the oil industry.

Kirsten Ostherr, the Gladys Louise Fox Professor of English and director of Rice’s Medical Futures Lab, can discuss the representation of outbreaks, contagion and disease in public discourse and the media. She is also an expert on digital health privacy. She is the founding director of the Medical Humanities program at Rice, and her first book, “Cinematic Prophylaxis: Globalization and Contagion in the Discourse of World Health,” is one of several titles made available for open-access download through June 1 by its publisher, Duke University Press.

Peter Rodriguez, dean of the Jones Graduate School of Business and a professor of strategic management, can discuss the economic impact of COVID-19 in Houston, the state of Texas and around the world.

Eduardo Salas, professor and chair of the Department of Psychological Sciences, is available to discuss collaboration, teamwork, team training and team dynamics as it relates to COVID-19.

“We often hear that ‘we are in this together’ and, indeed, we are,” Salas said. “Effective collaboration and teamwork can save lives. And there is a science of teamwork that can provide guidance on how to manage and promote effective collaboration.”

Kyle Shelton, deputy director of the Kinder Institute, can discuss how the economic impact of COVID-19 closures and job losses can amplify housing issues, and why governments at every level are opting for actions such as halting evictions and foreclosures and removing late fees. He can also speak to some of the challenges confronted by public transportation, why active transportation like biking and walking are so important now, and how long-term investments in these systems make cities and regions more adaptive and resilient.

Bob Stein, the Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and a fellow in urban politics at the Baker Institute, is an expert in emergency preparedness, especially related to hurricanes and flooding. He can also discuss why and when people comply with government directives regarding how to prepare for and respond to natural disasters, and the political consequences of natural disasters.

“Since God is not on the ballot, who do voters hold accountable before and in the aftermath of natural disasters?” he said.

Laurence Stuart, an adjunct professor in management at Rice Business, can discuss unemployment in Texas, how people qualify for it and what that means for employers and employees.

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,962 undergraduates and 3,027 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 4 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance.

Wine Enthusiast, 360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery, Alejandra Villagra

Lotus Chefs × COVID-19 Care

NEWS AND SUPPORT FROM LOTUS CHEFS AND RESTAURANTS

Andrew Wong and Kimberly Hernandez boxing up at home meals for elderly, vulnerable and in need hospitality workers in the community. 

In these difficult times, our clients are working tirelessly to offer educational and practical initiatives, but also to bring some excitement to many who are struggling with the boredom and loneliness of isolation. At Lotus, we cannot express enough our pride in representing them and we believe they can help make this whole process a little easier. We will continue to support our restaurants and chefs and the industry through this time of adversity.

Andrew Wong, London

Michelin starred chef Andrew Wong is working to create at-home meals for elderly and vulnerable members of the local community with the help of his protégé Kimberly Hernandez, Head Chef at Kym’s. Using restaurant quality produce, meals will be packaged and hand delivered free of charge, ready to be heated up at home. The boxes will be left on the doorstep of those who are self isolating to minimise human contact for those who are at high risk. For the time being the initiative is being organised through his local parish church – St Peters in Eaton Square. Andrew will continue to work tirelessly to find opportunities to keep his staff busy and motivated whilst also giving back as much as he can to his surrounding community in SW1.

Brace, Copenhagen

The team at Brace have just launched an incredible take-away option at their Copenhagen restaurant with a huge selection of dishes that can be collected, heated and finished at home. The new take-away menu very much carries the soul of Brace and utilises all local, organic and wild produce with sustainability and seasonality at its core. Dishes can be ordered every day of the week, for both lunch and dinner online at www.restaurantbrace.dk.

WAGYUMAFIA, Japan & Hong Kong 

Kobe beef specialists Wagyumafia have started their first-ever premium meat home delivery service. Supporting his farmers is Wagyumafia founder Hisato Hamada’s top priority, saying ’As we promised them, despite the current crazy crazy situation, we will never stop, but keep thinking and be more creative than yesterday.’ For people living in Japan please message @wagyumafia_butcher and in Hong Kong message @wagyumafiahk for details on how to order.

Aqua Crua, Barbarano Vicentino (VI)

In the initial weeks of the COVID 19 contagion, before the total lockdown of the country, Giuliano Baldessari from 1* Michelin Aqua Crua in Vicenza was the first chef in the country to offer his guests a “Comfort the Souls” – a bespoke 4 course menu for €30 that could be collected from the restaurant and enjoyed at home. Aqua Crua has since closed and will reopen in April. Baldessari has joined many Italian chefs in the initiative #iocucinoacasa (I cook at home) by Gambero Rosso, by showing a short and easy recipe for home cooking: watch here. He is going live daily on instagram at 3:30pm GMT with recipes and cooking techniques.

TURK Fatih Tutak, Istanbul

Istanbul’s critically acclaimed TURK Fatih Tutak has closed its doors until further notice, however, stay tuned for home-style recipes and tutorials on chef Fatih Tutak’s Instagram. His video tutorials will showcase Turkish dishes with soul that will be easy to produce, nourishing and inventive.

Marsan and Joia, Paris

Hélène Darroze has closed the doors of her Parisian restaurants; Marsan and Joia until further notice. The 2* Michelin chef and her teams are respecting French isolation instructions, and plan to come back stronger when they reopen their doors. For updates please follow @helenedarroze,  @marsanparhelenedarroze,  and @joiaparhelenedarroze.

Hélène Darroze at The Connaught, London

Hélène’s two Michelin star restaurant at The Connaught has restricted it’s opening hours, and will now close on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.  It remains open Wednesday to Saturday, and the team looks forward to welcoming guests, with restricted reservations, spacing between tables and increased hygiene practices. For news please follow @helenedarrozeattheconnaught.

Ikoyi, London

Jeremy Chan and Iré Hassan-Okdukale have taken the sad decision to temporarily close Ikoyi in St James’s Market. They will continue to support the entire Ikoyi team, and once things have settled, start cooking again.  For updates please follow @jeremychanikoyi and @ikoyi_london.

Mirazur, Menton

Mirazur has temporarily closed in Menton, on the Cote D’Azur. Mauro, Julia and the whole Mirazur family look forward to welcoming guests again soon.  For news and recipe inspiration please follow @maurocolagreco and @restaurantmirazur.

Il Pagliaccio, Rome

Anthony Genovese and the team of 2* Michelin Il Pagliaccio in Rome have also joined the movement started in Italy earlier this month for a stronger and safer future, by closing the restaurant until the 4th April.

Lux Lucis, Forte dei Marmi

Lux Lucis in the Hotel Principe Forte dei Marmi in Tuscany, home to the Michelin starred cuisine of Valentino Cassanelli, has postponed its seasonal reopening from March until May this year.

Duomo & I Banchi, Ragusa 

A ‘see you soon’ has been sent from Sicily from Ciccio Sultano, as he closes I Banchi and 2*Michelin Duomo in Ragusa until the 6th April. Sultano, though, has joined many Italian chefs in the initiative #iocucinoacasa (I cook at home) by Gambero Rosso, by showing a short and easy recipe for home cooking: watch here.

Farzi Cafe, London
Modern Indian Restaurant Farzi Cafe have closed their doors until further notice, but look forward to receiving guests as soon as they can. For updates please follow @farzilondon.

Tennessee, 360 MAGAZINE

What’s New in TN

New & Trending

Bledsoe County Geocaching Tour, Pikeville – Discover fascinating stories, spectacular views and great food as your GPS guides you on an adventure. As part of this new geocaching tour, 44 geocaches are hidden at sites across Bledsoe County, the Sequatchie Valley and at Fall Creek Falls State Park.

Go West Young Man: Western Frontier Couture of Manuel Exhibit at Monthaven Arts & Cultural Center, Hendersonville – Known as the “Stylist to the Stars,” Manuel’s signature designs are known for their elaborate, rhinestone embellishments which have covered Salvador Dali, Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley, Marty Stuart, Dwight Yoakam and more. Manuel’s styles have awed audiences and fans around the world.

The Walls Art Park, Waverly – This art park is a one-of-a-kind park where artists can express themselves with their art by painting on the walls. Artists are invited to come out, pick a wall, and create whatever is in their soul.

New Restaurant, Attraction & Shop Openings

Portland Pizza and Pub, Portland – This restaurant serves delicious, creative pizzeria and local brews.

Back Dō/Mi Yard, Memphis – Inspired by many trips to Jamaica, local restauranteur Karen Carrier adds another concept to her brand. This restaurant is behind her other restaurant, The Beauty Shop, and highlights elevated takes on classic Caribbean food.

Coastal Fish Company, Memphis – This restaurant is making great seafood selections even more accessible to the Mid-South area. From the owners of local, fine-dining restaurants Flight and Southern Social, this venture’s menu features items like oysters with wasabi apple or passionfruit chili sorbets as opposed to the typical garnishes.

Marcy Jo’s Muletown, Downtown Columbia – Open November 2019, Marcy Jo’s Muletown, sister restaurant of iconic Marcy Jo’s Mealhouse & Bakery, serves up home-cooked breakfast and lunch daily, and features monthly songwriters’ nights.

The Ice Cream Social, Gallatin – Unique ice cream parlor located inside Filly’s Game and Grill on the downtown Gallatin Square.

Cooking 101 Restaurant and Cooking Classes, Hendersonville – Enjoy a prepared meal or learn to make your own yummy dishes at this eatery.

Simpl, Knoxville – Owner and Executive Chef Kendall Ball serves up southern small plates made with locally-sourced ingredients, upscale takes on classic bar snacks and Instagram-worthy brunch fare.

Perk City, Knoxville – This coffee shop offers a bottomless cup and baked goods including lavender blackberry cornbread. Inside, there are historic pictures of the area and a space for local artists and other “makers” to display their work. Each month, the shop offers a specialty drink to benefit a local charity.

Mountain Monster, Pigeon Forge – A 200-foot-tall drop tower featuring three rides in one, anchors the Tower Shops at Mountain Mile. The Tower Lawns at Mountain Mile are also open.

Monster Mash Burgers, Sevierville – The themed restaurant inspired by classic horror movies, serves up house-ground burgers, hotdogs, and out-of-this-world milkshakes.

Ogle Brothers General Store, Sevierville – Step back in time and shop for Christmas gifts. Local honey, jams and more line the shelves at this “farmer’s market” concept store.

New Distilleries and Breweries

Gutter Bound Distillery, Hurricane Mills – American spirits crafted in the spirit of the American Craftsman. Each bottle produced at the first legal distillery in Hurricane Mills contains locally-produced, small-batch, handcrafted spirits.

Elst Brewing Company, Knoxville – Elst was created by four Knoxville neighbors that shared an appreciation for great tasting beer and the process of creating a recipe, sourcing the finest ingredients and combining them with precision and science.

Junction 35 Spirits, Pigeon Forge – Straight from the hills of The Smoky Mountains, Junction 35 Spirits is bringing a long-time family tradition to the public. The rich local history of making and running spirits diverging with the Master Distillery brings together a taste like no other.

New Hotels

Arrive Hotel (Nov. 2019), Memphis –This boutique hotel will sit in the middle of the South Main Arts District, across the street from the National Civil Rights Museum. With 62 rooms, an onsite bakery (Hustle and Dough), bar (Longshot), and cocktail spot, this new hotel will mesh right into the neighborhood’s eclectic, Memphis vibe.

Central Station, Memphis – One of the city’s newest hotels stands in the 105-year-old Amtrak station in the heart of the South Main Historic Arts District. With 123 rooms, this property, which is also part of Hilton’s Curio Collection, combines historic and artistic elements to create an experience that is uniquely Memphis.

The Harpeth Hotel, Franklin – Opening in winter 2019, The Harpeth Hotel, a Curio by Hilton property, will become downtown Franklin’s most luxurious hotel featuring 119 rooms. With a nod to the local flavor, 1799 Kitchen inside The Harpeth Hotel will feature mouthwatering dishes and distinct cocktails.

The Historic Central Hotel(Feb. 2020), Sevierville – The boutique hotel is slated to open in historic downtown Sevierville. The luxurious two-bedroom units feature full kitchens, a fireplace, a private balcony and more. On the ground floor, find The Honeybee Coffee Co. as well as Prawns, a new seafood restaurant.

The Ridge Outdoor Resort, Sevierville – With 50 RV campsites, tiny home glamping and luxury tent camping, this truly is a unique place to stay. Look for more additions coming soon to The Ridge including a dog park, pickleball court and gaga ball courts.

Winter Events Across Tennessee (November-February)

Gaylord Opryland’s “A Country Christmas”  (Nov. 8-Jan. 1), Nashville – Marvel and celebrate the season at Gaylord Opryland’s “A Country Christmas” featuring more than 3 million lights, nine acres of stunning décor, a Build-A-Bear Workshop, gingerbread decorating corner and ICE! featuring “A Christmas Story” in 2 million pounds of colorful, hand-carved ice sculptures and slides.

Zoolumination (Nov. 15-Jan. Dec. 30), Nashville – See the Nashville Zoo in a whole new light at the country’s largest Chinese lantern festival. Zoolumination features over 500 custom-made silk lanterns, elaborate displays with animals, holiday-themed scenes and even a 200-foot-long dragon.

Outdoor Ice Skating at Wilderness at the Smokies (Nov. 15, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020), Sevierville – Families can enjoy the tradition of ice skating during the holidays and enjoy a cup of hot cocoa at the 3,200 square-foot ice rink. Indoors, a variety of fun festivities take place, including visits with Santa, story time with Mrs. Claus, cookie decorating, crafts, games and shopping in specialty gift shops.

Shadrack’s Christmas Wonderland (Nov. 15, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020), Sevierville – Drive through LED lights, experience live music and fun activities for the kids, including crafts and photos with Santa at Smokies Stadium.

The Dancing Lights of Christmas(Nov 16, 2019-Jan. 4, 2020), Lebanon – Load up the car and see over 2 million lights dancing to the music on the radio at the Wilson County and the James E. Ward Agricultural Center.

Candy Christmas at Crave Golf Club (Nov. 20-Jan. 5, 2020) Pigeon Forge – The interactive mini-golf course transforms into a candy-themed winter wonderland with garland, wreaths, candy canes, Christmas trees and more lights than Willy Wonka would have ever approved.

Holidays Under the Peaks (Nov. 22-Dec. 24) Chattanooga – Nothing says “holidays” quite like wearing your PJs in public or seeing Santa Claus decked out in a wetsuit and fins. At the Tennessee Aquarium, underwater appearances by SCUBA Claus and the chance to sip hot cocoa and cuddle up in your coziest jammies while watching The Polar Express 3D are the most jingle-worthy of seasonal traditions.

Let It Glow Christmas Light Show (Nov. 22-Dec. 30), Union City – Drive through 50 acres of thousands of twinkling lights synced to classic songs at Discovery Park of America. The cost is $10 per car. Be sure to purchase a pair of 3D glasses to see dazzling displays.

GLOW Nashville(Nov. 22-Dec. 31) – Witness one of the country’s tallest Christmas trees, millions of lights, and a life-size Santa’s Workshop, ice skating, tubing experiences and plenty of holiday activities at First Tennessee Park.

Enchanted Garden of Lights (Nov. 22-Jan. 4, 2020), Rock City in Chattanooga – Immerse in this award-winning holiday lighting spectacular with live music, holiday treats like gingerbread cookies and hot cocoa, and delight in magical decorations.

Smoky Mountain Winterfest(Nov. 22, 2019-Feb. 17, 2020), in Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg and Sevierville – Smoky Mountain Winterfest offers a spectacular display of lights and events to celebrate the season with light displays, shopping, award-winning shows and attractions — all while showcasing the winter beauty of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

“Night of Light,” Christmas Tree Lighting on the Town Square(Nov. 23), Columbia – The much-anticipated tree-lighting ceremony features a majestic, 40-foot Christmas tree on the Courthouse Square. It’s a magical night of holiday music and entertainment sure to usher in the joy and splendor of the holidays. The special guest emcee is nationally-syndicated country radio personality Blair Garner who has captivated the airwaves for 30 years. Admission is free.

A Very Maury Christmas Holiday Market(Nov. 23), Columbia – This regional holiday market features over 30 quality vendors in downtown Columbia. A $5 donation is accepted at the door.

Colonial Coffee: A Revolutionary Drink(Nov. 23), Elizabethton – Roast up beans, use a hand mill to grind coffee, brew a pot over the open hearth, and enjoy a hot cup of history 11 a.m. at Sycamore Shoals State Historic Park.

Holiday Lights at Cheekwood Estate & Gardens (Nov. 23-Jan. 5), Nashville – Celebrate the season with 1 million lights, holiday concerts, cookie decorating, gingerbread workshops, s’mores stations, art and live reindeer.

 “A Christmas Carol” at the Roxy Regional Theatre (Nov. 28-Dec. 21), Clarksville –  Ebenezer and his ghostly encounters come to life in this lavish and thrilling musical adaptation of Charles Dickens’ most well-known story.

Drive-Thru Christmas Lights at the Clarksville Speedway (Nov. 28-Dec. 31), Clarksville – Enjoy over one mile, and over 1 million lights from the comfort of your car.

Holiday Tea and Thanksgiving Marketplace(Nov. 29-30), Rugby – Relax from the hustle and bustle of the season 1-3 p.m. at Uffington House in Historic Rugby.  Tickets are $22 and $16 for children under age 12.

Downtown Peppermint Trail(Nov. 29, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020), Knoxville – Stroll downtown to see trees, windows, doors, and patios dripping in lights and dipped in peppermint. More than 100,000 lights and garlands throughout downtown create a winter wonderland; and restaurants, bakeries, coffee shops, bars and boutiques offer peppermint specials.

Elf on the Shelf(Nov. 29, 2019-Jan. 5, 2020), Knoxville – Scout elves will land in Knoxville to begin the scavenger hunt. Children of all ages are invited to pick up a North Pole Pass at any of the participating businesses to help guide them through the adventure. There will be treats and prizes along the way until adopted scout elves return to the North Pole.

Christmas with the Annie Moses Band (Nov. 30), The Caverns in Pelham – On the Saturday after Thanksgiving, escape to the Cumberland Mountains to hear the Annie Moses Band, a classical-crossover string and vocal band made up of six virtuosic siblings. 

Festival of Lights at Drakes Creek Park (Dec. 1-15), Hendersonville – For the first time, the City of Hendersonville will host a drive-thru of Christmas light displays through Drakes Creek Park.

Christmas on the Cumberland (Nov. 26-Jan. 1, 2020), Clarksville – One million lights illuminate the half-mile Cumberland Riverwalk with captivating displays. Special crafts, dances, choirs and other activities will take plan on select Saturdays. This free event is a treasured tradition open 5-10 p.m. Sunday-Thursday and 5-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

Christmas in Olde Jonesborough (Nov. 30-Dec. 21), Jonesborough – Tennessee’s oldest town features a month-long series of events and activities for the holiday season along with music, storytelling, visits from Santa and a Christmas Market. The series kicks off with Whoville and Small Business Saturday Nov. 30.

Christmas Carriage & Wagon Rides (Dec. 6-8, 13-15, 20), Cookeville – Enjoy a horse-drawn carriage or wagon ride in Dogwood Park down the grand sidewalk around the Christmas Tree while the music and light show plays.

Christmas Candlelight Tour of Homes (Dec. 7), Murfreesboro – Usher in the holiday season with an enchanting tour of historic homes, distinctive churches the Oaklands Mansion while listening to the music of carolers from local schools and churches.

Candlelight Christmas (Dec. 14), Collinsville – Docents will take guests on guided tours of the pioneer settlement 4-8 p.m. See 16 structures from mid-19th Century adorned with primitive period holiday décor along with music, hot chocolate, food vendors and crafts for the kids.

Dickens of a Christmas(Dec. 14-15), Franklin – Middle Tennessee’s largest outdoor Christmas festival returns for its 35th year of filling Main Street with over 200 musicians, dancers and characters from Charles Dickens’ famed stories along with southern artisans and makers from across the South.

Elvis Presley Birthday (Jan. 8- 11, 2020), Memphis – Graceland gears up to celebrate what would have been Elvis Presley’s 85th birthday. With four event-filled days and appearances by Priscilla Presley, there’s no better way to celebrate The King!

Chocolatefest – (Jan. 25, 2020), Knoxville – Enjoy chocolate from area chocolatiers, restaurants & bakeries at World’s Fair Exhibition Hall.

“Home, Heart, Heritage: Black History Month Historical Art Workshops & Quilt Program” (Feb.2-23, 2020), Hendersonville – Celebrate and honor Black History Month at Monthaven Arts & Cultural Center and help create a quilt that tells the story of momentous African American figures and moments in history.

Rose Glen Literary Festival (Feb. 22, 2020), Sevierville – This festival at Sevierville Convention Center features premier southeastern authors, speakers and a book fair. The Keynote Speaker is Therese Anne Fowler (ZThe Well-Behaved Woman, A Good Neighborhood). Additional speakers include:Walter Ziffer (Confronting the Silence), Dr. Bill Bass (The Body Farm novels), Michael Knight (The Briarwood School for Girls), S.J. Dalhman (A Familiar Wilderness: Searching for home on Daniel Boone’s Road), and Paul Brown (Rufus: James Agee in Tennessee).

For a complete list of what’s happening in Tennessee, visit tnvacation.com/calendar.  

Silverado, Chevy, general motors, 360 MAGAZINE, auto

Chevrolet Silverado 2WD RST DBL

By Anthony Sovinsky x Vaughn Lowery

The truck buyer is a unique individual looking to satisfy a variety of needs that match the demands of their lifestyle. Like the American dream, where there is a will there is a way. The all new 2019 Chevy Silverado 2WD RST DBL has created the perfect means to wherever their journey ends.

The Silverado has undergone some plastic surgery for this year; and we must say, for a full-size utility truck, it looks good. Let’s start at the front. The grille is just down right colossal which gives it with a very dominant presence. It’s design features are evocative of its athletic brother, the Camaro, with a near identical LED headlight ensemble. Below the headlamps are two more sets of functional lighting components that include daytime reflectors and fog lights. Tasteful cuts and lines give it a very modern look while preserving its rugged nature. Aside from looking like it belongs in a transformer movie, the Silverado is also equipped like one. It possesses the following: a tailgate with lift assist; power back and release; a corner step rear bumper for ease of access to the truck bed; 12 fixed durabed tie downs with each corner rated at 500lb and LED durabed lighting.

The double cab was undoubtably spacious and the convenience package afforded enhanced comfortability as well as style. We encountered a number of useful additions which were of great use. First off, the bucket seats were ergonomically designed to allow for cozy travel no matter how far the destination. Next, the ultra crisp sound of the Bose audio system immediately heightened the driving experience and instantly became a key highlight of the vehicle. For music, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto come standard so prompt connectivity was a must. Furthermore, we had access to 4 USB ports to charge our phones. This comes in handy when there is a cabin full of avid cell phone users who are all on 10%. Lastly, the 8” HD color infotainment system with touchscreen and voice recognition makes it easy to navigate the city while allowing for handsfree texting and phone calls.

When powering a truck there is usually a sacrifice of efficiency for power. Well Chevrolet has solved that problem in 2019 with a 2.7 liter V4. Yes, that’s right, a 4-cylinder. Now, how does it power a full size truck? Easy, they turbocharge it, resulting in 310 hp and 348 ft-lb of torque (20 mpg street and 23 mpg highway). Because it’s boosted, torque is readily available at the tap of the throttle, providing the truck with additional pep to pass slow vehicles and getting up to highway speed faster.

While the tank-like structure and ride height provide a secure feel and safe ride, it does inhibit maneuverability in city traffic. The safety package ($890) increases the driver’s awareness. Front and rear park assist made it much less painful to park In confined spaces, which appeared quite often during our commutes in Los Angeles. Rush hour can become even more of a nuisance if you can’t switch lanes fast enough to keep with the flow of traffic. Lane change along with side blind zone alert allowed us to safely merge into different lanes.

In short, the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 2WD RST DBL possesses a bold futuristic styling. It’s agility is in tandem with other truck manufacturers and is well worth its value being priced well-equipped for just under $50,000.

For additional information go HERE.

Jason Lee, Wendy Williams, Cardi B., 360 MAGAZINE

JASON LEE BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION

By Armon Hayes

As of late, Jason Lee held a birthday celebration in NYC at the Bryant Park Hotel. His second stop along his birthday tour set to wrap in Miami at LIV. He’s the Founder/CEO of Hollywood Unlocked and its podcast “Uncensored” which is a joint venture with Premiere Network, launching the outlet into syndication within 50 markets. Also, this is in conjunction with iHeart radio and urban contemporary radio stations worldwide. 

360 Magazine had access to the exclusive event. The dimly lit venue set the tone for Lee to take center stage for his birthday speech. Making it clear, he has no plans on playing it safe and “looking forward to getting punched in the face.” Lee was surrounded by love from supporters and close friends like Cardi B. and Wendy Williams. 

2020 Range Rover Evoque AWD

By Camila Isopo × Vaughn Lowery

City-dwellers rejoice! You have another compact vehicle to choose from for all of your summer events. Seating five people, the new 2020 range rover evoque AWD is here to fulfill your driverly needs. Right before this compact SUV hits dealers 360 Magazine had the opportunity to test out its functionality in one of the most dense urban areas in America – Los Angeles, California. With its curb appeal, sexy design edits on the new 2020 model – this car will be one of the top contenders within its market segment.


Price: $56,850

Design: 

The new 2020 Range Rover Evoque comes in nolita grey, seoul pearl silver or yulong metallic paint with a black contrast. There’s a massive pillarless and non-retractable moonroof that adds an element of spaciousness in the interior.  The steering wheel is duotone leather. As for the seats, they are 14-way adjustable and also made of leather. The seats come in ebony or cloud. This model stores up to three preferred seating positions in its memory. Branded tread plates and a trim finish are extra details included in this model. Some signature features that drivers can expect are 20 inch “5079” style wheels with dynamic 5 split spoke and a diamond turned finish that includes the land Rover logo in heart.

Tech:

The new interface and infotainment system is more sleek and dynamic than before. Other technological features included in this model design are: premium LED headlights. A touch pro duo feature allows drivers to view something on one screen while using other media as well.

Performance:

This Range Rover model has a 2.0L turbocharged 4-Cylinder Gas Engine. It also has a 9 speed automatic transmission with black gearshift paddles. Drivers have electric assisted steering as well as terrain response and terrain progress control. Hill descent is another available control feature. The mpg is 20 city/27 highway. This model also has 246 horsepower. The torque is 269 lb-ft. When you drive, this rover leaps forward. 

Safety: 

For the safety of the driver and their passengers, perimetric alarm and incontrol protect are included in this model. Of course, airbags are included both in the front and sides of the car. The tires have a  pressure monitoring system. ISOFIX system is included for child seat safety. Some control features are: traction control, dynamic stability control, and roll stability control. The breaking features are: emergency braking, anti-locking braking, and emergency brake assist. When driving, you have a rearview camera as well as lane keep assist and a driver condition monitoring system. 

With off road capabilities, this will become one of the fastest selling SUVs in its segment. Technology meets luxury with this model. Millenials and empty-nesters would do well to purchase this vehicle.

Build your own.

Range Rover, 360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery
Range Rover, 360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery
Range Rover, 360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery
Range Rover, 360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery

Tech’s Impact on Journalism

In the epicenter of big tech, Representative Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11) joined Audrey Cooper, the Executive Editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, CEO of CalMatters and the former Executive Editor of Bay Area News Group Neil Chase, and Save Journalism Project co-founders Laura Bassett, a laid-off HuffPost reporter, and John Stanton, laid-off former D.C. bureau chief of BuzzFeed, to shine a light on the plight of local news and a key culprit: big tech.   

n the first quarter of 2019, the media has shed more than 2,400 jobs – including East Bay Express staffers – and, over the past 10 years, newsrooms have declined in size by 45%. The plight of the journalism industry has generated bipartisan congressional action, a rather unique occurrence in this polarized political climate. And while the journalism industry faces many challenges, the focus of Congress’ current action is to halt big tech’s negative impact on the economic sustainability of the free press. Wednesday’s speakers will address this unusual bipartisan action and the widespread consequences of the loss of local news.

According to Representative Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11), “Not that long ago, the Bay Area was home to over 1,500 journalists, but now there are less than 300 serving roughly 7 million people. This problem is not unique to our community—it is happening in every corner of the country, and we need to act. During a time when fact and accountability are under constant attack, today’s conversation about ways to preserve and protect local news and high-quality journalism is critical to the health of our democracy.”

According to Neil Chase, CEO of CalMatters and the former Executive Editor of Bay Area News Group, “I’m glad we had such a deep, meaningful conversation about the challenges facing journalism today, right here in downtown San Francisco. If we can’t solve it here, we can’t hope to help the places across America that don’t have the technology and financial resources that are available in a place like this.”

According to Laura Bassett, laid-off HuffPost senior politics reporter and co-founder of the Save Journalism Project, “As our country grapples with natural disasters, political turmoil, violence, and everyday life, Americans rely on journalists and the news industry to explain and break through the chaos. But, for that process to survive, we need well-staffed newsrooms and a blossoming industry. Instead, big tech is decimating journalism. Facebook, Google, and big tech have consumed the digital landscape and continue to threaten local and national journalism. We need our elected officials to weigh in, to reign in big tech, and to save the journalism industry, before this goes any further.”

And, according to John Stanton, laid-off former D.C. bureau chief of BuzzFeed and co-founder of the Save Journalism Project, “The irony of all ironies, we live streamed today’s event on Facebook to ensure it reached the largest audience. The mere fact that we had to rely on the conglomerate proves our point: Facebook and Google have too much power. Together, they control the landscape, the audience, and the content. I saw this first hand at BuzzFeed, when Facebook, without notice, changed its algorithm, resulting in huge viewership and financial losses for the company. As more and more local and national news outlets feel the death grip of big tech, we need Congress to step in and save journalism.”

 

Journalism in America is facing an existential threat from the monopolistic control of tech giants like Google, Facebook, and Apple. Big tech’s dominance over the digital advertising market and their unrivaled capacity to monetize its platforms are having drastic effects on journalism as a whole.

Custom Land Rover Defender 130 in Midnight Blue

E.C.D. Automotive Design, known for their prestigious, high-end luxury vehicles, recently completed another stunning custom Defender 130. Design inspiration for this beautiful custom Defender 130 came from a 2017 Aston Martin DB11.

E.C.D. is one of the top automotive companies in the world for custom bespoke luxury Defenders. Through their Luxury Design Experience, clients are given full control of the design of their custom Defenders. With design control of that capacity, it’s no wonder one client chose to design and color elements from a favorite supercar – a 2017 Aston Martin DB11.

Project Deep Blue is finished in Midnight Blue, an original Aston Martin paint color available for the DB11. The exterior design elements of this custom Defender 130 are more reminiscent of a luxury vehicle, a contrasting look from previous Defender 130s built by E.C.D., whose designs were centered around being off-road warriors. Project Deep Blue is subtle, yet absolutely stunning.

Under the hood, you won’t find any inspiration from Aston Martin or Land Rover. Rather, the brute power of a naturally-aspirated, 565-horsepower LS3 V8 Corvette engine. The LS3 was chosen by the client for its known reliability, loads of power, plenty of available upgrades, and a GM powertrain warranty.

The interior features duotone upholstery with premium leathers from Spinneybeck — a classic Light Beige and a darker Botany Bay Beige throughout. The duotone colors were also chosen with inspiration from the Aston Martin DB11. Luxury Corbeau Trailcat seats in the front and rear are heated and ventilated for riding comfort. With plenty of modern features on the interior such as wireless charging pads for mobile devices, you quickly forget that you’re riding in a classic British off-road icon.