Posts tagged with "babies"

Teen Pregnancy

By Cassandra Yany

Teen Pregnancy in the United States

In 2018, the birth rate among women aged 15 to 19 years in the United States was less than half of what it was in 2008, which was 41.5 births per 1,000 girls, as stated by the Pew Research Center.

In 2017, 194,377 babies were born to women in the U.S. between the ages of 15 and 19 years old, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The birth rate dropped seven percent from 2016, with 18.8 babies born per 1,000 women in this age group. This was a record low for the nation.

The teen birth rate has been declining since the early 1990s, and this decline accelerated after the Great Recession. A 2011 Pew Research Center study connected the decrease in teen births to the economic downturn of the recession. The rate has continued to fall even after the economy’s recovery.

Evidence suggests that the declining birth rate is also partly due to more teens abstaining from sexual activity, and more who are sexually active using birth control than in previous years. Still, the CDC reports that U.S. teen pregnancy rate is substantially higher than other “western industrialized” nations.

DoSomething.org states that three out of 10 American girls will become pregnant at least once before the age of 20. About 25 percent of teen moms will have a second child within two years of their first baby.

Data shows that there are racial, ethnic and geographic disparities among teen pregnancies in the U.S. From 2016 to 2017, birth rates among 15 to 19-year-olds decreased 15 percent for non-Hispanic Asian teens, nine percent for Hispanic teens, eight percent for non-Hispanic white teens, six percent for non-Hispanic Black teens, and six percent for Native American teens. In 2017, the birth rate of Hispanic teens was 28.9 percent and of non-Hispanic black teens was 27.5 percent for non-Hispanic Black teens. These were both two times higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white teens, which was 13.2 percent. Among the different racial and ehtnic groups, Native American teens had the highest rate of 32.9 percent.

From 2007 to 2015, the teen birth rate was lowest in urban communities with 18.9 percent, and highest in rural communities with 30.9 percent— as reported by the CDC. During the same years, the rate among teens in rural communities had only declined 37 percent in rural counties, while large urban counties saw a 50 percent decrease and medium and small counties saw a 44 percent decrease. State-specific birth rates from 2017 were lowest in Massachusetts (8.1 percent) and highest in Arkansas (32.8 percent).

Socioeconomic disparities also exist among teen pregnancy rates. Teens in child welfare systems are at higher risk of teen pregnancy and birth than other groups of teens. Those living in foster care are more than twice as likely to become pregnant than those not in foster care. This then leads to financial difficulties for these young families. More than half of all mothers on welfare had their first child as a teenager, and two-thirds of families started by a young mother are considered poor.  

Teen pregnancy and motherhood can have significant effects on a young woman’s education. According to DoSomething.org, parenthood is the leading reason for teen girls dropping out of school. Only about 50% of teen mothers receive a high school diploma by the age of 22, while 90% of women who do not give birth during their teen years graduate from high school. Less than 2% of teen moms earn a college degree by age 30. 

Being a child of a teen mother can also have lasting effects on an individual. The children are more likely to have lower school achievement and drop out of high school. They are more likely to be incarcerated at some point in their lives and face unemployment as a young adult. They could also have more health problems and are more likely to become a parent as a teenager themselves. 

According to the CDC, teen fatherhood occurred at a rate of 10.4 births per 1,000 ranging from 15 to 19-years-old in 2015. Data indicates that these young men attend fewer years of school and are less likely to earn their high school diploma. 

A decline in teen pregnancy means an increase in U.S. public savings. According to the CDC, between 1991 and 2015, the teen birth rate dropped 64%, which led to $4.4 billion dollars in public savings for 2015 alone.

Global Teen Pregnancy

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 12 million girls 15 to 19-years-old and 777,000 girls under 15 give birth in “developing” regions each year. About 21 million girls aged 15 to 19 in these areas become pregnant.

Complications during pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death for girls age 15 to 19 years globally. An estimated 5.6 million abortions occur each year among 15 to 19-year-old girls, with 3.9 million of them being unsafe. This can lead to death or lasting health problems.

Additionally, teen moms face higher risk of eclampsia, puerperal endometriosis and systemic infections than 20 to 24-year-old women. Babies of these mothers face higher risk of lower birth weight, preterm delivery and severe neonatal conditions.

Across the globe, adolescent pregnancies are more likely to take place in marginalized communities that are driven by poverty, and lack of education and employment opportunities. In many societies and cultures, girls get married and have children while they are teenagers. In some locations, girls choose to become pregnant due to limited educational and employment prospects. These societies either value motherhood and marriage, or union and childbearing may be the best option available to these young women. 

Teenage girls in some areas may not be able to avoid pregnancy because they do not have the knowledge of how to obtain contraceptive methods or how to use them. There are restrictive laws and policies regarding provision of contraception based on age or marital status that prevent these women from access to forms of pregnancy prevention. 

Health worker bias also exists in these areas, as well as an unwillingness to acknowledge adolescents’ sexual health needs. These individuals also may not be able to access contraception due to transportation and financial constraints. 

Another cause for unintended pregnancy around the work is sexual violence, with more than one-third of girls in some countries reporting that their first sexual experience was forced. After pregnancy, young women who became mothers before the age of 18 are more likely to experience violence in their marriage or partnership.

The University of Queensland in Australia conducted a study that found children who experience some type of neglect are seven times more likely than other victims of abuse to experience teen pregnancy. They drew these conclusions by looking at data from 8,000 women and children beginning in pregnancy and moving into early adulthood.

According to News Medical, researchers found that neglect was one of the most severe types of maltreatment when compared to emotional, sexual and physical abuse. The study defined child neglect as “not providing the child with necessary physical requirements (food, clothing or a safe place to sleep) and emotional requirements (comfort and emotional support) a child should receive, as determined by the Queensland Govt. Department of Child Safety.”

CBS reported that an increase in calls to Japan’s pregnancy hotline since March indicates that COVID-19 has caused an uptick in teenage pregnancies there. Jikei Hospital in Kumamoto, Japan said that calls from junior and senior high school students hit a 10-year high back in April. Pilcon, a Tokyo-based non-profit that runs school sex-ed programs, said that it was flooded with calls from concerned teens after they used home pregnancy tests or they missed periods.

Global Citizen stated that 152,000 Kenyan teen girls became pregnant during the country’s three-month lockdown, which was a 40 percent increase in their monthly average. Data from the International Rescue Committee shows that girls living in refugee camps were particularly affected, with 62 pregnancies reported at Kakuma Refugee Camp this past June compared to only eight in June 2019.

In an online press conference, Dr. Manisha Kumar, head of the Médecins Sans Frontières task force on safe abortion care, said, “During the pandemic, a lot of resurces got pulled away from a lot of routine services and care, and those services were redirected to coronavirus response.” The growing economic, hunger and health crises worldwide due to the pandemic makes this an especially challenging time for pregnant teens. 

Both Marie Stopes International and the United Nations Fund warned that the new focus on the coronavirus in the medical field would negatively affect reproductive health. This included disruptions to family planning services and restricted access to contraception, leading to more unintended pregnancies.

Preventing Teen Pregnancy

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Evidence Review has identified a variety of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs. These include sexuality education programs, youth development programs, abstinence education programs, clinic-based programs and programs specifically designed for diverse populations and locations. 

Resources that focus on social health determinants in teen pregnancy prevention, specifically at the community level, play a crucial role in addressing the racial, ethnic and geographical disparities that exist in teen births. The CDC also supports several projects that educate, engage and involve young men in reproductive health. 

According to the CDC, research shows that teens who have conversations with their parents about sex, relationships, birth control and pregnancy tend to begin to have sex at a later age. When or if they do have sex, these teenagers are more likely to do so less often, use contraception, and have better communication with romantic partners.

A 2014 report by the Brooking Insitution’s Senior Fellow Melissa S. Kearney and Phillip B. Levine of Wellesley College found that the MTV reality programs like “16 and Pregnant” and “Teen Mom” led to a 5.7 percent in teen births in the 18 months after the shows first aired. This number accounts for approximately one-third of the overall decline in teen births during that time period.

In locations where more teenagers watched MTV, they saw a larger decline in teen pregnancy after the introduction of the show. The show also led young adults to educate themselves more on birth control. Research showed that when an episode aired, there were large spikes the following day in the rate that people were conducting online searches for how to obtain contraceptives.

Contraception and Reproductive Rights

According to Power to Decide, contraception is a key factor in recent declines in teen pregnancy. Yet, over 19 million women eligible for publicly funded contraception don’t have access to the full range of birth control methods where they live.

Between 2011 and 2015, 81 percent of females and 84 percent of males between the ages of 15 and 19 who had sex reported using a contraceptive the first time. This number increased for females since 2002, when 74.5 percent used contraception. 

A sexually active teen who doesn’t use contraceptives has a 90 percent chance of becoming pregnant within a year. 

NPR reported that a challenge to the Affordable Care Act could reach the Supreme Court in the near future, which would significantly affect reproductive healthcare. This could make contraceptives unaffordable and unobtainable for some Americans, which would in turn affect the number of teenagers having unprotected sex.

Some also fear that the recent death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg will jeopardize women’s reproductive rights. If her replacement is opposed to abortion, it will most likely turn the court in favor of increasing restrictions on abortion, and could even go as far as to overturn Roe v. Wade. This would have the potential to increase the number of unsafe abortions among pregnant teens, or increase the number of teen births.

According to Kaiser Health News, there is a case waiting in the lower court that involves federal funding of Planned Parenthood in both the Medicaid and federal family programs. Ginsburg always sided with women on issues such as these, so her absence could mean a lack of access to education, family planning and contraceptives for teens.

Allison Christensen Illustrates a Skin Care Article for 360 MAGAZINE

COCOOIL

While on a trip to Fafa Island in 2011, the creators of COCOOIL had an idea. They wanted to create a a luxury skincare product made with certified fair trade cold-pressed organic coconut oil. Here in 2020, they have it in COCOOIL, which only uses sustainably produced coconut oil from the Pacific Islands.

COCOOIL can guard against UV rays using their protective products like COCOOIL Tanning Oil SPF6COCOOIL Beach’n’Body Oil SPF15 and COCOOIL Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF30.

COCOOIL Tanning Oil SPF6 protects from harmful UV rays and delivers a beautiful tan while laying on the beach or next to the pool. COCOOIL Beach’n’Body Oil SPF15 and COCOOIL Broad Spectrum Sunscreen SPF30 offer even more protection against UV rays and come in packages that fit just right in your purse or travel pack.

They also have the COCOOIL SPF50 Broad Spectrum, which is made with natural botanical oils to hydrate and nourish skin.

The protective products are complimented by COCOOIL Face Oil with RosehipCOCOOIL Body OilCOCOOIL Baby Oil with Lavender and COCOOIL Ocean Spray.

COCOOIL Face Oil with Roseship leaves your face feeling luxurious and non-greasy. COCOOIL Body Oil is the perfect daily moisturizer while COCOOIL Baby Oil with Lavender will nourish your little one’s skin and provide a calming scent. COCOOIL Ocean Spray gives your hair waves, volume and texture.

Products come in regular size 200 mL bottles or in mini 100 mL bottles. They even have bundles that come with a COCOOIL tote, perfect for your next trip to the beach.

COCOOIL also has a cruelty free policy, meaning that they don’t buy any products or ingredients that have been tested on animals. In place of animal testing, they test all of their products on human volunteers in Australia.

They say they will not use any sources who are not just as committed as they are to their code of ethics, morals and standards.

To see all COCOOIL products, you can click right here. You can also read their story and learn more about their mission by clicking right here.

hvd, gift guide, champion, apparel, la, nyc, philly, Chicago, 360 MAGAZINE, unisex, couples, valentine's day

HVD GIFT GUIDE

Champion’s new offerings show ❤ with exclusive Reverse Weave hoodies as well as a limited-edition Oversized Wrap Logo perfect for couples and/or BFFs who like to match! #TWINNING

 

Reverse weave hoodie is comfortable, durable and extremely stylish. Definitely for the grown and sexy. (model: Armon Hayes)

Amtrak wants to show customers how much they love them by offering a Valentine’s Day Buy One Get One Free Sale. Thursday, February 13, through Monday, February 17, customers can buy one coach ticket and get the second free for nationwide travel between March 9 and August 30, 2020, with no blackout dates. Customers can receive discounted tickets by using the code V214 at checkout or at amtrack.com/valentines-day-sale.

To support the campaign, Oakley released a new eyewear collection, Origins, capturing the brand’s iconic heritage and progressive approach to innovative design reimagined in present day style. Led by Sutro Eyeshade, a sport performance piece inspired by the iconic Eyeshade originally introduced in 1984, this new collection pays homage to Oakley’s journey rooted in a love of sport and passion for optics.

In addition, Oakley will be launching City of Origins, a branded, immersive retail space in Los Angeles on Fairfax Avenue that celebrates the new collection and Love of Sport. Opening February 21st, the pop-up retail space will feature intimate conversations, workshops, exhibitions and more, including the first ever photography exhibition by Evan Mock, surfer, skateboarder and model, a one-on-one talk with Team Oakley athlete and pro-surfer, Sage Erickson, and more. 

The Sky Dreamer, available on PUMA.com and at Foot Locker in the U.S., is equipped with PUMA Hoops technology, including the brand’s signature ProFoam cushioning and high-abrasion grip for peak stability. It also features forefoot webbing for stabilization and lockdown. The Sky Dreamer will retail for $130.


The pack also features a robust and playful collection of unisex apparel for kids and adults, including a Reebok x Tom & Jerry padded woven jacket ($140), short-sleeve t-shirts ($28), a hooded dress ($60), crew neck sweaters ($55), and hoodies ($60). Each piece is inspired by Tom & Jerry cartoon colorways and the collection’s matching footwear styles.
 
The Reebok x Tom & Jerry collection is available at Reebok.com and in-store at select retailers worldwide beginning February 15th.

This Valentine’s Day, Sapphire Gentlemen’s Club in New York City (NYC) is offering an exclusive deal for single guys. Anyone who is single this Friday, February 14th can stop by Primal Cut – the upscale restaurant inside Sapphire Gentlemen’s Club on 60th Street in NYC – and enjoy a romantic dinner with a Sapphire girl. The meal for the female entertainer will be paid for by Sapphire.

Szemui Ho, 360 MAGAZINE, baby clothes

How to Choose Clothes for Little Princesses

Children try to imitate adults in everything. At an early age, girls like to try on different outfits, and they want to look fashionable. The current range of products allows you choosing items that are perfect for each particular child, emphasize her personality, and form a sense of style. Every girl’s mother wants her daughter to look like a real princess. Parents need to know a lot of nuances and details in order to choose the most beautiful and convenient children’s items.

What Clothes for Girls is Considered Fashionable

The children’s fashion industry has recently been gaining tremendous momentum. In many ways, it is similar to an adult one, although, of course, dresses and skirts invariably remain favorite items of cute baby girl clothes. So, here are some modern fashion trends for girls:

  • Elegant dresses in retro style. The emphasis is on simple cut and beautiful prints.
  • Pastel and neutral colors. Such shades as khaki, burgundy are considered very fashionable this season. They not only look very stylish but also do not get too dirty.
  • Interesting prints. Drawings on clothes are very common today. Cartoon characters, flowers, unusual abstractions. It looks really very beautiful, especially if the color scheme is selected correctly.

Of course, it is important for the baby to feel comfortable in her outfit. The child’s skin is very sensitive, that’s why a kid can sometimes feel uncomfortable. Therefore, the choice of clothing for children must be approached very responsibly.

How to Choose Qualitative Clothes for a Girl

In order to buy qualitative, comfortable clothes, pay attention to the following aspects:

  • Fabric structure. Synthetics often don’t absorb sweat and cause a rash, so cotton or linen items should be bought. Synthetic materials are bad for your baby’s sensitive skin. Especially when it comes to underwear. As practice shows, clothes made from natural fabrics are much more useful for a little kid. All bodysuits, vests, romper suits and other items made from natural fabrics cause no allergies.
  • Label. A label sewn into the seam can cause allergies even on adults’ skin, so there’s nothing to say about the delicate child’s skin. Therefore, you need to buy only those items where all the information about the product is painted on fabric.
  • Comfort. Firstly, comfortable clothing fits the child, does not twist, does not constrict movements and lets your child both enjoy playing at the playground and sleep well in her bed. Secondly, comfortable clothing lets the skin breathe, as well as absorbs moisture well. You should not buy items with a bunch of buttons or laces — the simpler the clothes you can put on and take off, the better. In general, buttons and Velcro are the best fasteners to choose from.

Guided by these simple rules, it will be easy to buy good and beautiful clothes for a little girl. Don’t think that high-quality children’s clothing is expensive — it can be found at a low price. To save money without sacrificing quality, it’s suggested to shop at Trendy Toddlers. Here you can find clothes for girls for all occasions: clothing for sleeping, relaxing at home, playing sports, walking on the playground and much more.

Infant Loss Retreat

The Ramsey Keller Memorial, a non-profit organization that pays for infant funerals in Montana, is launching its first-ever national retreat for moms who are living without a child. “The Retreat” is designed to connect moms in person and is slated for the weekend of October 26, 27 and 28 at Fairmont Hot Springs Resort near Butte, Montana. The registration fee is $325/person and moms, nationwide, who have experienced the loss of a child are invited to attend. Topics are primarily focused on infant loss (children 1 year of age or younger and stillborn babies). Nationally known keynote speaker and founder of Still Standing Magazine Franchesca Cox is donating her time in an effort to offer “The Retreat” at the lowest cost available. Registration includes all scheduled events, the resort room, all meals Saturday and Sunday and additional goodies for attendees.

“Franchesca Cox is known for helping moms grieve and fight for the privilege to love life again,” says Ramsey Keller Memorial Founder Kori Keller. “She has experienced the loss of her firstborn daughter and while she has spearheaded many local and worldwide projects in her daughter’s name, she found the most healing came from living life to the fullest. The Retreat is about celebrating our babies lives and finding joy in life, even through the grief. I’m grateful and humbled that Franchesca is coming to Montana to share her message with moms like myself who have lost a child.”

Franchesca Cox is the author of Facets of Grief: a creative workbook for grieving mothers, and Celebrating Pregnancy Again. She is scheduled to speak twice during the weekend retreat. Her topics are “The Space Between Love and Loss” and “Broken and Brave.” Cox is also opening up discussion on baby loss to attendees and inviting the audience to participate in a Q & A session.

“Surviving the aftermath of infant loss is something we, as mothers who have lost a child, think about often. Whether the loss was last month or last decade, this retreat has excellent programming with key takeaways for everyone, as well as a format designed to build lasting relationships,” says Founder of Still Standing Magazine Franchesca Cox.

“Women who attend The Retreat will walk away with a lifelong network of people who belong to the same club, one that no one wants to be part of, but who understand something that very few people do. We’re a network, an incredibly strong support system. We will bond together and grow together and we’re there for each other,” says Keller.

Check in for The Retreat opens Friday October 26 at 4:00 p.m. with opening remarks from Ramsey Keller Memorial Founder Kori Keller starting at 6:00 p.m. Saturday’s agenda kicks off at 8:00 a.m. with breakfast, followed by the keynote address from Franchesca Cox, break out topical discussions, a message from Kori Keller about unnecessary baggage, a creative outlet activity presented and donated by Held Your Whole Life, a second impactful message from Franchesca Cox followed by dinner at 6:00 p.m.. Sunday includes breakfast starting at 8:00 a.m. followed by a panel discussion. The Retreat wraps up at 11:00 a.m. Sunday.

For more information or to register, visit The Retreat Website. Moms are encouraged to seek sponsors if they choose to do so, as payment for the retreat is considered a non-profit donation to the Ramsey Keller Memorial. While the topics are tailored for moms who have experienced baby loss, moms are welcome to invite the women who support them to attend so that they may be joined by sisters, mothers and close friends.

360 magazine, 360, vaughn lowery, Boppy, Boppy Pillows

Boppy

 

It all began when a mom-inventor received a request from her daughter’s daycare. The daycare asked parents to make pillows that could support babies when they were not being held. After a few prototypes, the Original Boppy® Pillow was born! Nearly three decades later, the Boppy® Feeding and Infant Support Pillow is still supporting moms, dads, grandparents and babies. The Boppy Pillow has become the essential must-have item for every mom because of its comfort and versatility. Encouraged by happy moms, dads and babies, we have expanded our family to include prenatal and postnatal support and travel accessories. Stay tuned as we continue to support mom in her new stage of life.

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info@the360mag.com
po box 361566
los angeles, ca 90036
213.841.1841

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