Posts tagged with "global citizen"

Teen Pregnancy

By Cassandra Yany

Teen Pregnancy in the United States

In 2018, the birth rate among women aged 15 to 19 years in the United States was less than half of what it was in 2008, which was 41.5 births per 1,000 girls, as stated by the Pew Research Center.

In 2017, 194,377 babies were born to women in the U.S. between the ages of 15 and 19 years old, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The birth rate dropped seven percent from 2016, with 18.8 babies born per 1,000 women in this age group. This was a record low for the nation.

The teen birth rate has been declining since the early 1990s, and this decline accelerated after the Great Recession. A 2011 Pew Research Center study connected the decrease in teen births to the economic downturn of the recession. The rate has continued to fall even after the economy’s recovery.

Evidence suggests that the declining birth rate is also partly due to more teens abstaining from sexual activity, and more who are sexually active using birth control than in previous years. Still, the CDC reports that U.S. teen pregnancy rate is substantially higher than other “western industrialized” nations.

DoSomething.org states that three out of 10 American girls will become pregnant at least once before the age of 20. About 25 percent of teen moms will have a second child within two years of their first baby.

Data shows that there are racial, ethnic and geographic disparities among teen pregnancies in the U.S. From 2016 to 2017, birth rates among 15 to 19-year-olds decreased 15 percent for non-Hispanic Asian teens, nine percent for Hispanic teens, eight percent for non-Hispanic white teens, six percent for non-Hispanic Black teens, and six percent for Native American teens. In 2017, the birth rate of Hispanic teens was 28.9 percent and of non-Hispanic black teens was 27.5 percent for non-Hispanic Black teens. These were both two times higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white teens, which was 13.2 percent. Among the different racial and ehtnic groups, Native American teens had the highest rate of 32.9 percent.

From 2007 to 2015, the teen birth rate was lowest in urban communities with 18.9 percent, and highest in rural communities with 30.9 percent— as reported by the CDC. During the same years, the rate among teens in rural communities had only declined 37 percent in rural counties, while large urban counties saw a 50 percent decrease and medium and small counties saw a 44 percent decrease. State-specific birth rates from 2017 were lowest in Massachusetts (8.1 percent) and highest in Arkansas (32.8 percent).

Socioeconomic disparities also exist among teen pregnancy rates. Teens in child welfare systems are at higher risk of teen pregnancy and birth than other groups of teens. Those living in foster care are more than twice as likely to become pregnant than those not in foster care. This then leads to financial difficulties for these young families. More than half of all mothers on welfare had their first child as a teenager, and two-thirds of families started by a young mother are considered poor.  

Teen pregnancy and motherhood can have significant effects on a young woman’s education. According to DoSomething.org, parenthood is the leading reason for teen girls dropping out of school. Only about 50% of teen mothers receive a high school diploma by the age of 22, while 90% of women who do not give birth during their teen years graduate from high school. Less than 2% of teen moms earn a college degree by age 30. 

Being a child of a teen mother can also have lasting effects on an individual. The children are more likely to have lower school achievement and drop out of high school. They are more likely to be incarcerated at some point in their lives and face unemployment as a young adult. They could also have more health problems and are more likely to become a parent as a teenager themselves. 

According to the CDC, teen fatherhood occurred at a rate of 10.4 births per 1,000 ranging from 15 to 19-years-old in 2015. Data indicates that these young men attend fewer years of school and are less likely to earn their high school diploma. 

A decline in teen pregnancy means an increase in U.S. public savings. According to the CDC, between 1991 and 2015, the teen birth rate dropped 64%, which led to $4.4 billion dollars in public savings for 2015 alone.

Global Teen Pregnancy

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 12 million girls 15 to 19-years-old and 777,000 girls under 15 give birth in “developing” regions each year. About 21 million girls aged 15 to 19 in these areas become pregnant.

Complications during pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death for girls age 15 to 19 years globally. An estimated 5.6 million abortions occur each year among 15 to 19-year-old girls, with 3.9 million of them being unsafe. This can lead to death or lasting health problems.

Additionally, teen moms face higher risk of eclampsia, puerperal endometriosis and systemic infections than 20 to 24-year-old women. Babies of these mothers face higher risk of lower birth weight, preterm delivery and severe neonatal conditions.

Across the globe, adolescent pregnancies are more likely to take place in marginalized communities that are driven by poverty, and lack of education and employment opportunities. In many societies and cultures, girls get married and have children while they are teenagers. In some locations, girls choose to become pregnant due to limited educational and employment prospects. These societies either value motherhood and marriage, or union and childbearing may be the best option available to these young women. 

Teenage girls in some areas may not be able to avoid pregnancy because they do not have the knowledge of how to obtain contraceptive methods or how to use them. There are restrictive laws and policies regarding provision of contraception based on age or marital status that prevent these women from access to forms of pregnancy prevention. 

Health worker bias also exists in these areas, as well as an unwillingness to acknowledge adolescents’ sexual health needs. These individuals also may not be able to access contraception due to transportation and financial constraints. 

Another cause for unintended pregnancy around the work is sexual violence, with more than one-third of girls in some countries reporting that their first sexual experience was forced. After pregnancy, young women who became mothers before the age of 18 are more likely to experience violence in their marriage or partnership.

The University of Queensland in Australia conducted a study that found children who experience some type of neglect are seven times more likely than other victims of abuse to experience teen pregnancy. They drew these conclusions by looking at data from 8,000 women and children beginning in pregnancy and moving into early adulthood.

According to News Medical, researchers found that neglect was one of the most severe types of maltreatment when compared to emotional, sexual and physical abuse. The study defined child neglect as “not providing the child with necessary physical requirements (food, clothing or a safe place to sleep) and emotional requirements (comfort and emotional support) a child should receive, as determined by the Queensland Govt. Department of Child Safety.”

CBS reported that an increase in calls to Japan’s pregnancy hotline since March indicates that COVID-19 has caused an uptick in teenage pregnancies there. Jikei Hospital in Kumamoto, Japan said that calls from junior and senior high school students hit a 10-year high back in April. Pilcon, a Tokyo-based non-profit that runs school sex-ed programs, said that it was flooded with calls from concerned teens after they used home pregnancy tests or they missed periods.

Global Citizen stated that 152,000 Kenyan teen girls became pregnant during the country’s three-month lockdown, which was a 40 percent increase in their monthly average. Data from the International Rescue Committee shows that girls living in refugee camps were particularly affected, with 62 pregnancies reported at Kakuma Refugee Camp this past June compared to only eight in June 2019.

In an online press conference, Dr. Manisha Kumar, head of the Médecins Sans Frontières task force on safe abortion care, said, “During the pandemic, a lot of resurces got pulled away from a lot of routine services and care, and those services were redirected to coronavirus response.” The growing economic, hunger and health crises worldwide due to the pandemic makes this an especially challenging time for pregnant teens. 

Both Marie Stopes International and the United Nations Fund warned that the new focus on the coronavirus in the medical field would negatively affect reproductive health. This included disruptions to family planning services and restricted access to contraception, leading to more unintended pregnancies.

Preventing Teen Pregnancy

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Evidence Review has identified a variety of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs. These include sexuality education programs, youth development programs, abstinence education programs, clinic-based programs and programs specifically designed for diverse populations and locations. 

Resources that focus on social health determinants in teen pregnancy prevention, specifically at the community level, play a crucial role in addressing the racial, ethnic and geographical disparities that exist in teen births. The CDC also supports several projects that educate, engage and involve young men in reproductive health. 

According to the CDC, research shows that teens who have conversations with their parents about sex, relationships, birth control and pregnancy tend to begin to have sex at a later age. When or if they do have sex, these teenagers are more likely to do so less often, use contraception, and have better communication with romantic partners.

A 2014 report by the Brooking Insitution’s Senior Fellow Melissa S. Kearney and Phillip B. Levine of Wellesley College found that the MTV reality programs like “16 and Pregnant” and “Teen Mom” led to a 5.7 percent in teen births in the 18 months after the shows first aired. This number accounts for approximately one-third of the overall decline in teen births during that time period.

In locations where more teenagers watched MTV, they saw a larger decline in teen pregnancy after the introduction of the show. The show also led young adults to educate themselves more on birth control. Research showed that when an episode aired, there were large spikes the following day in the rate that people were conducting online searches for how to obtain contraceptives.

Contraception and Reproductive Rights

According to Power to Decide, contraception is a key factor in recent declines in teen pregnancy. Yet, over 19 million women eligible for publicly funded contraception don’t have access to the full range of birth control methods where they live.

Between 2011 and 2015, 81 percent of females and 84 percent of males between the ages of 15 and 19 who had sex reported using a contraceptive the first time. This number increased for females since 2002, when 74.5 percent used contraception. 

A sexually active teen who doesn’t use contraceptives has a 90 percent chance of becoming pregnant within a year. 

NPR reported that a challenge to the Affordable Care Act could reach the Supreme Court in the near future, which would significantly affect reproductive healthcare. This could make contraceptives unaffordable and unobtainable for some Americans, which would in turn affect the number of teenagers having unprotected sex.

Some also fear that the recent death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg will jeopardize women’s reproductive rights. If her replacement is opposed to abortion, it will most likely turn the court in favor of increasing restrictions on abortion, and could even go as far as to overturn Roe v. Wade. This would have the potential to increase the number of unsafe abortions among pregnant teens, or increase the number of teen births.

According to Kaiser Health News, there is a case waiting in the lower court that involves federal funding of Planned Parenthood in both the Medicaid and federal family programs. Ginsburg always sided with women on issues such as these, so her absence could mean a lack of access to education, family planning and contraceptives for teens.

Gashi inside 360 MAGAZINE.

Gashi Livestream Event

In celebration of the release of Gashi’s highly anticipated sophomore album 1984, Gashi presents a one-of-a-kind livestream in collaboration with YouTube this Thursday on Gashi’s Official Artist Channel.

The 1 hour event will feature the first livestream performance from Gashi ever as well as the worldwide premiere of his documentary “Gashi: Now You Know.”

The livestream will take place on Thursday, August 6th at 3:00PM PST/6:00PM EST HERE. Net proceeds raised during the livestream event will be donated by Gashi to Global Citizen.

On Friday, August 7th, Gashi will release his sophomore album, 1984 via RCA Records. The 16-track 1984 album sees GASHI exploring and harboring new sounds that will bring you back to GASHI’s favorite time — the 80’s — and features already released tracks, “Paranoid,” “Mr. Ferrari,” “Upset” ft. Pink Sweat$ and Njomza and “Lies.”  A special collaboration with Sting on the track “Mama” will also be featured on the album. 1984 also features Pink Sweat$, Njomza, Rose Gold, Diamond Café and Devault.

Listen to tracks from 1984: “Paranoid” | “Mr. Ferrari” | “Upset” | “Lies

About Gashi:

Born in Libya, Gashi spent much of his young life as a refugee, moving from country to country.  His family eventually settled in Brooklyn, NY, where he was introduced to music at a very young age.

Gashi absorbed a melting pot of musical influences throughout his youth, resulting in the formation of his own unique sonic palette that blends together different genres of music.

His dynamic sound has allowed Gashi to collaborate with a wide range of talents ranging from Chris Brown to Travis Scott.

In the last couple of years, he released his self-titled debut album, sold out venues all across the globe, and has accumulated nearly 550 million streams with over 90 million video views worldwide.

 

Follow Gashi: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube

Dove Cameron × BIA – Remember Me

DOVE CAMERON SHARES NEW SINGLE “REMEMBER ME” FT BIA

LISTEN HERE 

WATCH LYRIC VIDEO HERE

Dove Cameron has released her latest single “Remember Me” featuring BIA today via Columbia Records/Disruptor Records. Dove’s sonic soundscape takes a dark turn as she coo’s about how she wants to be remembered over a strong bassline and shiny synths.

Produced by the Futuristics, Dove’s song “Remember Me” follows songs by Camila Cabello, Halsey and Bebe Rexha that have all come from the multi-platinum duo.

In speaking about the track, Dove says: “I’m so excited for my new single “Remember Me” to finally be released! I’ve been waiting for what feels like years to finally have this track and this new sound be out in the world and available to my fans, and I can’t believe that day is today! I also couldn’t be happier to be working with an artist like BIA, I’m such a fan and the tone and energy she brought to the track is magic.”

Dove took part in Global Citizen and the World Health Organization’s #TogetherAtHome concert series, where she debuted “Remember Me” for the first time and had over 200K viewers. Watch her performance HERE

Dove released her first few musical flavorings “Waste” and “Bloodshot,” which Cosmopolitan calls “a dreamy heartbreaker that might keep you up at night” late September. She later released “So Good,” which E! News called “an absolute stunner,” and “Out of Touch” shortly after. Collectively, the songs have accumulated over 30 million streams and video views to date and have received praises from Rolling Stone, Billboard and Refinery29.

Stay tuned for more from Dove Cameron coming soon!

INSTAGRAM / TWITTER / FACEBOOK

Sheléa × Global Citizens

R&B/SOUL ARTIST SHELÉA PERFORMS LIVE FOR GLOBAL CITIZEN’S TOGETHER AT HOME SERIES THIS MONDAY, APRIL 13 AT 3PM PST

R&B/Soul artist Sheléa, a protégé of Quincy Jones, who stars in a Lifetime biopic based on iconic gospel group The Clark Sisters airing April 11, will perform live to support Global Citizen’s #TogetherAtHome series this Monday, April 13 at 3 p.m. PST  from her Instagram account @sheleamusic.

Sheléa will release a new single “You Are Enough” next month (date tbd). The unparalleled songwriter/pianist is intent on bringing back organic singing and songwriting, blending traditional pop, jazz, r&b, and soul, as she evokes the sultry energy of Whitney Houston and the piano chops and writing prowess of Alicia Keys.

Together At Home is a series of online performances hosted on artists’ social media platforms to fight coronavirus and promote social distancing. It is in partnership with Global Citizen, and hitting more than 120 countries and growing.

Sheléa joins Coldplay’s Chris Martin, John Legend, Niall Horan, H.E.R., JoJo, the Lumineers and Hozier among others who have hosted intimate live shows on their Instagram profiles.

Tune into Sheléa‘s live performance this Monday, April 13 at 3pm PT

For more information on Global Citizen, visit here.

About Shelea

Sheléa is a powerhouse vocalist that is the epitome of class and style. She represents a return to true artistry that has garnered attention from numerous legends in the music industry, including Quincy Jones, Stevie Wonder and David Foster, among others.

She has performed at the White House with Wonder for President Barack Obama, Library of Congress, Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center, to name a few. She’s also appeared on several PBS specials, including ‘A Grammy Salute to Music Legends’ paying homage to Tina Turner.

Sheléa’s debut album Love Fell On Me was released in 2014, featuring heavyweights Stevie Wonder, Brian McKnight and Narada Michael Walden. The single “I’ll Never Let You Go” hit #22 on the Billboard R&B charts and charted for 22+ weeks.

She began as a songwriter/vocalist with legendary producers Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis. Her early career experience led to writing and producing for Chanté Moore’s album Love the Woman and recording vocals on major motion picture soundtracks for Hotel Rwanda, Akeelah and the Bee and Be Cool.

In 2008, Sheléa teamed up with the Grammy Award-winning Take 6, singing “Someone to Watch Over Me” for their Grammy-nominated album The Standard.  She went on to compose and perform the theme song “Love Fell  On Me” for SONY’s Jumping the Broom (2011) starring Angela Bassett and wrote for the CW series Black Lightening.

DEMI LOVATO × GLOBAL CITIZEN

Demi Lovato announced as Global Citizen Mental Health Ambassador, with a special focus on vulnerable communities
 
As a part of this partnership, the two have joined forces with SAVE THE CHILDREN to bring the organization’s HEART Program to Iraq which will aim to create lasting change for a number of internally displaced children in the country and the surrounding region

At the 2017 Global Citizen Festival in NYC, multi-platinum recording artist and mental health advocate Demi Lovato announced her partnership with international advocacy organization Global Citizen as an Ambassador, championing mental health with a special focus on vulnerable communities.
 
In the initial phase of the partnership, Demi Lovato & Global Citizen will support the world’s leading child-focused humanitarian organization Save the Children by funding the expansion of their Healing and Education through the Arts (HEART) program to Iraq.

 
In an on-stage moment shared with Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children and Global Citizen CEO, Hugh Evans, Lovato said, “I am proud to stand with Global Citizen to call on governments around the world to prioritize mental health as a key agenda. Ending the stigma around mental health conditions and supporting internally displaced children to build physical and mental resilience through education and access to justice is not a choice, it needs to happen, and it needs to happen now. By supporting Save the Children’s HEART program in Iraq we can, and will have a life transforming effect for a number of children.”
 
Through an arts-based approach, Save the Children’s HEART pilot program will support the mental health and psychosocial care of internally displaced children affected by chronic stress now living in Kirkuk and Salah al Din, Iraq.

 
Since 2014, over 3 million people in Iraq were forced into displacement within their own country due to war and conflict. Recent research by Save the Children shows the pressing need to help heal the emotional distress of children in Iraq deeply scarred by memories of extreme violence.
 
Save the Children is extremely grateful to partner with Demi Lovato and Global Citizen to bring our HEART program to Iraq for the first time. Displaced children in Iraq are scarred from memories of extreme violence they’ve lived through. Some even suffer from vivid “waking nightmares” or are too traumatized to speak,” said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children at the Global Citizen Festival. “Through drawing, painting, music and other art forms, children can creatively express how they are feeling in a safe place and start on the road to recovery. The HEART program will allow them to process their grief, begin the healing process and rebuild their self-confidence and trust in others. After enduring such darkness, displaced children in Iraq will now be offered a glimmer of hope and a chance for brighter future,” said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.”
 
Demi first partnered with Global Citizen in 2016 when she performed as a headliner in New York City for the Global Citizen Festival. Since then, she has joined Global Citizen in Mumbai and in Hamburg for the organization’s first Festivals in India and Germany.
 
For more information about Global Citizen, please visit: www.globalcitizen.org

(Photo courtesy of Instagram— Demi Lovato)