Posts tagged with "planned parenthood"

Teen Pregnancy

By Cassandra Yany

Teen Pregnancy in the United States

In 2018, the birth rate among women aged 15 to 19 years in the United States was less than half of what it was in 2008, which was 41.5 births per 1,000 girls, as stated by the Pew Research Center.

In 2017, 194,377 babies were born to women in the U.S. between the ages of 15 and 19 years old, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The birth rate dropped seven percent from 2016, with 18.8 babies born per 1,000 women in this age group. This was a record low for the nation.

The teen birth rate has been declining since the early 1990s, and this decline accelerated after the Great Recession. A 2011 Pew Research Center study connected the decrease in teen births to the economic downturn of the recession. The rate has continued to fall even after the economy’s recovery.

Evidence suggests that the declining birth rate is also partly due to more teens abstaining from sexual activity, and more who are sexually active using birth control than in previous years. Still, the CDC reports that U.S. teen pregnancy rate is substantially higher than other “western industrialized” nations.

DoSomething.org states that three out of 10 American girls will become pregnant at least once before the age of 20. About 25 percent of teen moms will have a second child within two years of their first baby.

Data shows that there are racial, ethnic and geographic disparities among teen pregnancies in the U.S. From 2016 to 2017, birth rates among 15 to 19-year-olds decreased 15 percent for non-Hispanic Asian teens, nine percent for Hispanic teens, eight percent for non-Hispanic white teens, six percent for non-Hispanic Black teens, and six percent for Native American teens. In 2017, the birth rate of Hispanic teens was 28.9 percent and of non-Hispanic black teens was 27.5 percent for non-Hispanic Black teens. These were both two times higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white teens, which was 13.2 percent. Among the different racial and ehtnic groups, Native American teens had the highest rate of 32.9 percent.

From 2007 to 2015, the teen birth rate was lowest in urban communities with 18.9 percent, and highest in rural communities with 30.9 percent— as reported by the CDC. During the same years, the rate among teens in rural communities had only declined 37 percent in rural counties, while large urban counties saw a 50 percent decrease and medium and small counties saw a 44 percent decrease. State-specific birth rates from 2017 were lowest in Massachusetts (8.1 percent) and highest in Arkansas (32.8 percent).

Socioeconomic disparities also exist among teen pregnancy rates. Teens in child welfare systems are at higher risk of teen pregnancy and birth than other groups of teens. Those living in foster care are more than twice as likely to become pregnant than those not in foster care. This then leads to financial difficulties for these young families. More than half of all mothers on welfare had their first child as a teenager, and two-thirds of families started by a young mother are considered poor.  

Teen pregnancy and motherhood can have significant effects on a young woman’s education. According to DoSomething.org, parenthood is the leading reason for teen girls dropping out of school. Only about 50% of teen mothers receive a high school diploma by the age of 22, while 90% of women who do not give birth during their teen years graduate from high school. Less than 2% of teen moms earn a college degree by age 30. 

Being a child of a teen mother can also have lasting effects on an individual. The children are more likely to have lower school achievement and drop out of high school. They are more likely to be incarcerated at some point in their lives and face unemployment as a young adult. They could also have more health problems and are more likely to become a parent as a teenager themselves. 

According to the CDC, teen fatherhood occurred at a rate of 10.4 births per 1,000 ranging from 15 to 19-years-old in 2015. Data indicates that these young men attend fewer years of school and are less likely to earn their high school diploma. 

A decline in teen pregnancy means an increase in U.S. public savings. According to the CDC, between 1991 and 2015, the teen birth rate dropped 64%, which led to $4.4 billion dollars in public savings for 2015 alone.

Global Teen Pregnancy

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 12 million girls 15 to 19-years-old and 777,000 girls under 15 give birth in “developing” regions each year. About 21 million girls aged 15 to 19 in these areas become pregnant.

Complications during pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death for girls age 15 to 19 years globally. An estimated 5.6 million abortions occur each year among 15 to 19-year-old girls, with 3.9 million of them being unsafe. This can lead to death or lasting health problems.

Additionally, teen moms face higher risk of eclampsia, puerperal endometriosis and systemic infections than 20 to 24-year-old women. Babies of these mothers face higher risk of lower birth weight, preterm delivery and severe neonatal conditions.

Across the globe, adolescent pregnancies are more likely to take place in marginalized communities that are driven by poverty, and lack of education and employment opportunities. In many societies and cultures, girls get married and have children while they are teenagers. In some locations, girls choose to become pregnant due to limited educational and employment prospects. These societies either value motherhood and marriage, or union and childbearing may be the best option available to these young women. 

Teenage girls in some areas may not be able to avoid pregnancy because they do not have the knowledge of how to obtain contraceptive methods or how to use them. There are restrictive laws and policies regarding provision of contraception based on age or marital status that prevent these women from access to forms of pregnancy prevention. 

Health worker bias also exists in these areas, as well as an unwillingness to acknowledge adolescents’ sexual health needs. These individuals also may not be able to access contraception due to transportation and financial constraints. 

Another cause for unintended pregnancy around the work is sexual violence, with more than one-third of girls in some countries reporting that their first sexual experience was forced. After pregnancy, young women who became mothers before the age of 18 are more likely to experience violence in their marriage or partnership.

The University of Queensland in Australia conducted a study that found children who experience some type of neglect are seven times more likely than other victims of abuse to experience teen pregnancy. They drew these conclusions by looking at data from 8,000 women and children beginning in pregnancy and moving into early adulthood.

According to News Medical, researchers found that neglect was one of the most severe types of maltreatment when compared to emotional, sexual and physical abuse. The study defined child neglect as “not providing the child with necessary physical requirements (food, clothing or a safe place to sleep) and emotional requirements (comfort and emotional support) a child should receive, as determined by the Queensland Govt. Department of Child Safety.”

CBS reported that an increase in calls to Japan’s pregnancy hotline since March indicates that COVID-19 has caused an uptick in teenage pregnancies there. Jikei Hospital in Kumamoto, Japan said that calls from junior and senior high school students hit a 10-year high back in April. Pilcon, a Tokyo-based non-profit that runs school sex-ed programs, said that it was flooded with calls from concerned teens after they used home pregnancy tests or they missed periods.

Global Citizen stated that 152,000 Kenyan teen girls became pregnant during the country’s three-month lockdown, which was a 40 percent increase in their monthly average. Data from the International Rescue Committee shows that girls living in refugee camps were particularly affected, with 62 pregnancies reported at Kakuma Refugee Camp this past June compared to only eight in June 2019.

In an online press conference, Dr. Manisha Kumar, head of the Médecins Sans Frontières task force on safe abortion care, said, “During the pandemic, a lot of resurces got pulled away from a lot of routine services and care, and those services were redirected to coronavirus response.” The growing economic, hunger and health crises worldwide due to the pandemic makes this an especially challenging time for pregnant teens. 

Both Marie Stopes International and the United Nations Fund warned that the new focus on the coronavirus in the medical field would negatively affect reproductive health. This included disruptions to family planning services and restricted access to contraception, leading to more unintended pregnancies.

Preventing Teen Pregnancy

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Evidence Review has identified a variety of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs. These include sexuality education programs, youth development programs, abstinence education programs, clinic-based programs and programs specifically designed for diverse populations and locations. 

Resources that focus on social health determinants in teen pregnancy prevention, specifically at the community level, play a crucial role in addressing the racial, ethnic and geographical disparities that exist in teen births. The CDC also supports several projects that educate, engage and involve young men in reproductive health. 

According to the CDC, research shows that teens who have conversations with their parents about sex, relationships, birth control and pregnancy tend to begin to have sex at a later age. When or if they do have sex, these teenagers are more likely to do so less often, use contraception, and have better communication with romantic partners.

A 2014 report by the Brooking Insitution’s Senior Fellow Melissa S. Kearney and Phillip B. Levine of Wellesley College found that the MTV reality programs like “16 and Pregnant” and “Teen Mom” led to a 5.7 percent in teen births in the 18 months after the shows first aired. This number accounts for approximately one-third of the overall decline in teen births during that time period.

In locations where more teenagers watched MTV, they saw a larger decline in teen pregnancy after the introduction of the show. The show also led young adults to educate themselves more on birth control. Research showed that when an episode aired, there were large spikes the following day in the rate that people were conducting online searches for how to obtain contraceptives.

Contraception and Reproductive Rights

According to Power to Decide, contraception is a key factor in recent declines in teen pregnancy. Yet, over 19 million women eligible for publicly funded contraception don’t have access to the full range of birth control methods where they live.

Between 2011 and 2015, 81 percent of females and 84 percent of males between the ages of 15 and 19 who had sex reported using a contraceptive the first time. This number increased for females since 2002, when 74.5 percent used contraception. 

A sexually active teen who doesn’t use contraceptives has a 90 percent chance of becoming pregnant within a year. 

NPR reported that a challenge to the Affordable Care Act could reach the Supreme Court in the near future, which would significantly affect reproductive healthcare. This could make contraceptives unaffordable and unobtainable for some Americans, which would in turn affect the number of teenagers having unprotected sex.

Some also fear that the recent death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg will jeopardize women’s reproductive rights. If her replacement is opposed to abortion, it will most likely turn the court in favor of increasing restrictions on abortion, and could even go as far as to overturn Roe v. Wade. This would have the potential to increase the number of unsafe abortions among pregnant teens, or increase the number of teen births.

According to Kaiser Health News, there is a case waiting in the lower court that involves federal funding of Planned Parenthood in both the Medicaid and federal family programs. Ginsburg always sided with women on issues such as these, so her absence could mean a lack of access to education, family planning and contraceptives for teens.

Sundance 2018

Actor Issa Rae (‘Insecure’) among the celebrities to attend The Blackhouse’s Killer Creativity: A New Breed Panel, sponsored by BET Networks, at Sundance 2018, seen here with BET Fellows 

(photo credit: Eric Umphery Photography) 

 John LegendIssa RaeDebra Lee and Bevy Smith were among the guests in attendance for the first two days of programming at The Blackhouse during the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. 

 

Filmmakers and industry insiders packed into the Blackhouse’s Sundance headquarters to listen to their peers discuss topics ranging from diversity and inclusion in filmmaking to discussions around the premiere of one the biggest films at Sundance, Monster, all before jamming to the sounds of Grammy-nominated DJ/producer Vikter Duplaix at the official Blackhouse Party.  

 

Attendees mixed and mingled while enjoying wine and hors d’oeuvres, but the Blackhouse’s co-founder, Brickson Diamond, made it clear that while having a good time is important, Blackhouse means serious business, “It’s not about a party. It’s about the mission of expanding access and opportunity. It’s about getting our stories told, distributed and our artists heard again and again.” 

 

The Blackhouse Foundation, an organization whose mission is to create a community for black content creators, is in its 11th year at Sundance and will be at the 2018 festival from January 19-22. Programming highlights this year include a conversation with Grammy-and-Oscar-winner John Legend and Tonya Lewis Lee about film Monster premiering at Sundance and a discussion about ways in which black women are leading the revolution featuring activist and commentator Angela Rye and sponsored by Color of Change and Planned Parenthood. 

 

The Blackhouse Foundation welcomes and thanks the following sponsors for their continued belief and support: Comcast NBC/Universal returns as a full-year sponsor. BET sponsors the Blackhouse Fellows Program bringing 10 Howard University MFA students to the festival and serve as a Creative sponsor. Official sponsors include AT&T Hello LabFacebook, and 21st Century Fox Global Inclusion. Supporting sponsors include NETFLIX and HBO. Creative sponsors include CAA, Planned Parenthood/Color of Change, SAG-AFTRA, The Will and Jada Smith Family FoundationStarz, UMC – The Urban Movie Channel, Eos and more. 

Grammy and Oscar-winner John Legend, Producer Tonya Lee Lewis, and SAG-AFTRA Diversity Advisory Committee Chair Jason George, along with the director, writers, and cast during “The Making of ‘Monster,’ presented by SAG-AFTRA” (photo credit: Eric Umphery Photography) 

 

 

ABOUT THE BLACKHOUSE FOUNDATION

The Blackhouse Foundation works to expand opportunities for Black content creators by providing pathways to opportunities within film, television, digital and emerging platforms. Blackhouse provides opportunities for minority creative to learn about the financial, production, marketing and distribution resources that will raise the profile of their content, while also providing participants with a nucleus for continuing support, community and education. 

KEEP UP WITH THE BLACK HOUSE!

Website: http://www.theblackhouse.org
Twitter: 
@the_blackhouse
Facebook: 
The Blackhouse Foundation
Instagram: the_blackhouse
Download: Blackhouse Festival App

Sundance Film Festival 2018

The Blackhouse at 2018 Sundance Film Festival Schedule 

  • Broadening the Lens: Perspectives on Diverse Storytelling (Sponsored by Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation)
  • “On One with Angela Rye” Presents: Black Women are Leading The Revolution (Sponsored by Color of Change and Planned Parenthood)

10:00 am – 12:00 pm                            

Sunday Brunch & How to Stay in the Game: John Amos from “Good Times” to Animation

Location: The Blackhouse (804 Main St) 

 

12:45 pm – 2:15 pm                                               

“On One with Angela Rye” Presents: Black Women are Leading the Revolution

Sponsored by: Color of Change and Planned Parenthood

Location: The Blackhouse (804 Main St) 

 

Since 2017, the resistance of women, specifically women of color, has been amplified worldwide though social media and Hollywood engagement. This panel will examine the alignment between the current culture, political, reproductive and gender-based justice movements. Highlighting how content creators, culture creators, influencers, and allies can inclusively use their platforms to sustain the revolution.

 

 

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm                                       

Facebook SEEN Program Panel                

Sponsored by: Facebook

Location: The Blackhouse (804 Main St) 

 

The Blackhouse Foundation joins forces with Facebook Creative Shop for the launch of SEEN, an inclusivity in film program for independent filmmakers. It kicks off with the “inclusivity in Film: How Facebook partnered with A Boy. A Girl. A Dream to be SEEN,” panel discussing the program with independent filmmakers Qasim Basir and Datari Turner, and star cast of Meagan Good and Omari Hardwick, ahead of their Sundance premiere of their shortlisted film A Boy. A Girl. A Dream.

 

 

4:00pm – 5:30pm                                                

Netflix in One Take Panel 

Sponsored by: Netflix

Location: The Blackhouse (804 Main St) 

 

A fireside chat with Black executives at Netflix about representation, “who kicked down the door” for each of them and why the company’s culture is unique. In addition, they will go through a project’s journey through the Netflix platform and how they find an engaged audience for each title.

 

 

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm                                              

Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation

Reception

Location: The Blackhouse (804 Main St) 

 

 

7:00pm – 8:00pm                                                

Broadening the Lens: Perspectives on Diverse Storytelling

Sponsored by: Will & Jada Smith Family Foundation

Location: The Blackhouse (804 Main St) 

 

Broadening the Lens : Perspective on Diverse Storytelling will examine diversity and inclusion in the industry today and how underrepresented groups can work together to widen the lens of storytelling include all voices. We will also explore what modern storytelling will look like in the digital and global landscape of the future. Panelists include iconic actress and philanthropist Jada Pinkett Smith, influential writer and The Chi creator Lena WaitheMACRO Senior Vice President, Development & Production Poppy Hanks, and in-demand television writer Radha Blank [The Get DownEmpireShe’s Gotta Have It, & Monster].

 

 

9:00pm – 12:00am

Smart, Funny and Black with Amanda Seales Panel and Party

Sponsored by: TBC

Music by: Amanda Seales

Location: The Blackhouse (804 Main St) 

 

 

ABOUT THE BLOCKHOUSE FOUNDATION 

 

The Blackhouse Foundation works to expand opportunities for Black content creators by providing pathways to opportunities within film, television, digital and emerging platforms. Blackhouse provides opportunities for minority creative to learn about the financial, production, marketing and distribution resources that will raise the profile of their content, while also providing participants with a nucleus for continuing support, community and education. 

 

 KEEP UP WITH THE BLACK HOUSE!

 

Website: http://www.theblackhouse.org
Twitter: 
@the_blackhouse
Facebook: 
The Blackhouse Foundation
Instagram: the_blackhouse
Download: Blackhouse Festival App

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE

ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE

A Group Exhibition Curated by Indira Cesarine

A Portion of Proceeds to Benefit ACLU Foundation

OPENING RECEPTION January 16th

Press + VIP Preview 4pm – 6pm // Opening Reception 6pm – 9pm

More events to be announced

EXHIBITION ON VIEW

January 17–  February 4, 2018

THE UNTITLED SPACE GALLERY

45 Lispenard Street Unit 1W NYC 10013

This January, The Untitled Space gallery is pleased to present ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE group exhibition, curated by gallery director and artist Indira Cesarine, featuring the work of more than 80 contemporary artists responding to the political climate in America since the election of President Donald Trump. Opening January 16th, and on view through February 4th, ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE marks the one year anniversary of the inauguration of one of the most controversial presidents in American history. In a follow up to the gallery’s critically acclaimed group show “UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN,” which opened during the week of the 2017 presidential inauguration, exhibition ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE features artwork across all mediums addressing the issues our society has faced since the election such as immigration rights, women’s rights, transgender rights, health care, climate change, white supremacy, gender equality, gun control, sexual harassment, as well as countless other issues which have given rise to mass protest throughout the United States and abroad over the past year. ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE celebrates art as activism, giving voices to contemporary artists from all backgrounds, ages and genders. Through works inspired by the controversial policies and practices of our current president, the exhibition sheds light on the challenging issues of contemporary culture in the face of the current presidential political agenda.

EXHIBITING ARTISTS 

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alfonse Pagano, Alison Jackson, Alyson Provax, Ann Lewis, Anna Rindos, Annalisa Iadicicco, Annika Connor, Anya Rubin, Cabell Molina, Camilla Marie Dahl, Cara De Angelis, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, Desire Moheb Zandi, Desdemonda Dallas, Dessie Jackson, Diana Casanova, Dolly Faibyshev, Domenica Bucalo, Eleni Giannopoulou, Elisa Garcia de la Huerta, Elise Vaselakis, Elizabeth Wentling, Erin Victoria Axtell, Fahren Feingold, Gabriela Handal, George Lorio, Grace Graupe Pillard, Haley R Hatfield, Hannah Stahl, Indira Cesarine, James Hsieh, Jamia Weir, Jamie Martinez, Janet Braun-Reinitz + Sarah Maple, Jen Dwyer, Joanne Leah, Joel Tretin, Joyce Ellen Weinstein, Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface, Kate Hush, Katya Kan, Kiley Ames, Kristin Malin, Kristin O’Connor, Leah Schrager, Leslie Kerby, Leslie Sheryll, Linda Bond, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lola Jiblazee, Lola Ogbara, Manju Shandler, Marne Lucas, Mary Tooley Parker, Michael Reece, Michele Pred, Nichole Washington, Olga Filippova, Olive Allen, Panteha Abareshi, Parker Day, Rada Yakova, Rebecca Goyette, Rebecca Leveille, Rosary Solimanto, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Rute Ventura, Sarah Dillion, Signe Pierce, Stephanie Hanes, Tatana Kellner, Tommy Mitchell, Touba Alipour, Valerie Carmet, Valery Estabrook, Vanessa Teran, Vittorio Ottaviani, Yuri Murphy

“This is an important time to reflect upon the last year and how Trump’s presidency has impacted our society. Since the election, we have been faced with extremes living in a country which has become increasingly divisive and threatening to civil and human rights. We live in a country facing sexism, racism and discrimination across all fronts. Last January, I was honored to partner with the ERA Coalition to present exhibition UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN, one of the first exhibitions of the Resistance movement. Now, one year later, it is important to show continued solidarity in light of the issues our society continues to grapple with. It is impossible to sit back and watch as our rights crumble before our eyes. In the past year, our culture has dealt with continuous turmoil, mass shootings, increasingly disturbing accounts of gross sexual misconduct, threats to the rights of immigrants, reproductive rights, transgender rights, threats against our rights to health care, against gender and racial equality, against the protection of our environment, of internet neutrality, as well as attacks against Planned Parenthood, the EPA, the NEA and global organizations such as UNESCO. It is extremely disturbing that our cultural foundation is being rocked by the very platform that is meant to protect and serve our nation. The exhibition ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE give voices to artists from all backgrounds, genders and ages in light of these controversial issues that have brought millions to the streets in protest. Throughout history, art has always played a significant role when it comes to representing the sentiments of the populace. It is crucial for the voices of the people to continue to be heard. The Untitled Space is honored to raise funds through this exhibition for the ACLU and support their mission to uphold civil rights and liberties in accordance to the constitution of the United States.”

– Curator Indira Cesarine

Official Exhibit Website: http://untitled-space.com/one-year-of-resistance-group-show

The Untitled Space

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www.untitled-space.com

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ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE:

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2014 by Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of “Women in Art” as well as special events aligned with our creative vision