Posts tagged with "Medicine"

10 Books Every Nursing Student Should Read

When preparing for a new career, having up to date information is essential.

Whether you’re a seasoned nurse with mastery over a lot of skills or you’re a newbie just embarking on a new career path, these ten books are a must-read for every nurse.

They can play an instrumental role in helping you plan your career.

1. What I Wish I Knew About Nursing: Real Advice From Real Nurses on How Deeply Care for Patients While Still Caring for Yourself

This book details some first-time experiences of past nurses.

These real-life stories are both encouraging and inspirational and will reveal some of the lesser-known facts about the profession you won’t get in any of your classes.

2. The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype, and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age

In today’s modern age of digital devices, healthcare has changed in many surprising ways.

Before you start working towards getting your family nurse practitioner degree, it would be worth taking the time to take a look at the faster processes and streamline methods the digital world has to offer. 

3. Cooked: An Inner City Nursing Memoir

In this non-fiction book, the writer gives some details about the life of a nurse working in a clinical facility on the west side of Chicago.

She outlines her experience as a new nurse and how she dealt with the stresses of the industry to give you a rare insider’s view of this industry.

4. Care Coordination: The Game Changer – How Nursing Is Revolutionizing Quality Care

Dr. Gerrie Lamb discusses the importance of coordinating under the Affordable Care Act.

Written from a view of more than 20 of the nation’s foremost healthcare programs and professional institutions giving their perspectives, the reader gets valuable insight into what’s in store for new nurses entering the field.

5. Nursing Leadership From The Outside In

This book offers valuable tidbits of information from those who have to interact with nurses regularly.

Those in other disciplines give you their perspective on nursing leadership. While, as a nurse, you will have to master many skills, the interactions and relationships you develop with those you have to work with will be equally important.

6. Ross and Wilson Anatomy and Physiology in Health and Illness

In this book on human physiology, you not only learn about the anatomy of the human body, but you also get an inside look at what happens to physiology when the patient suffers through various ailments.

7. I Wasn’t Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse

Here, you get an inside view from a wide range of first time nursing experiences with frank and honest opinions on why they kept going despite everything.

These stories tell of the ups and downs that all nurses face and help you to find ways to deal with burnout, bureaucratic red tape, and how to balance professionalism with empathy.

8. Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis

Dr. Sanders of the New York Times and the genius behind the show Diagnosis, has compiled a collection of mysterious cases and what it took to diagnose them.

She explains how getting to the root of a problem doesn’t always involve technical equipment but sometimes only needs to listen to a patient’s details and match them with similar cases around the world.

9. Compilations: A Surgeon’s Notes On An Imperfect Science

Here, you get a close-up view of a surgeon’s experiences and interactions while working.

He points out the advantages and disadvantages he has to deal with, giving you a balanced view of what it’s like for anyone engaged in that particular field.

10. Operation Flight Nurse: Real-Life Medical Emergencies

In emergencies, acute care nursing is usually the first one in the case.

In the examples listed in this book, readers get a close-up view of what happens in real-life medical emergencies.

Dr. Kaniecki details examples from his own experience dealing with critical care conditions and experiences.

No matter where you are in your pursuit of a nursing career, head to the nearest bookstore to get these books to motivate yourself.

They will help you to see exactly what’s happening in your chosen profession, so you can get a real picture of what to expect when starting out.

Rice University on COVID-19

Rice U. experts available to discuss COVID-19’s wide-ranging impact

As the COVID-19 pandemic grows and impacts the lives of people across the globe, Rice University experts are available to discuss various topics related to the disease.

Joyce Beebefellow in public finance at Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy, can discuss paid leave programs.

“COVID-19 highlights the importance of paid (sick) leave programs to workers,” she said. “The issue is not whether we should have a paid leave program; it is how to design a program that provides nationwide coverage to all American workers instead of waiting until the next pandemic.”

Robert Bruce, dean of Rice’s Glasscock School of Continuing Studies, is an expert in online and distance learning, community education and engagement and innovative models for personal and professional development programs.

“The field of continuing and professional studies is uniquely positioned to help the public during a crisis that requires social distancing,” he said. “Our core mission is to empower people to continue to learn and advance, regardless of location or age or learning style.”

Utpal Dholakia, a professor of marketing at Rice’s Jones Graduate School of Business, is available to discuss consumer behavior and panic-buying during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Everyone is panic-buying, not just all over the country, but basically all over the world,” Dholakia said. “That makes the sense of urgency even more. Are all these suppliers going to be able to keep up with the demand?”

John Diamond, the Edward A. and Hermena Hancock Kelly Fellow in Tax Policy at the Baker Institute and an adjunct assistant professor in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss the economic impact on Houston and Texas, particularly unemployment.

Elaine Howard Ecklund, the Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Social Sciences, professor in sociology and director of Rice’s Religion and Public Life Program, studies the intersection of science and religion. She can discuss how these two entities can work together to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and recently authored an editorial about this topic for Time magazine. It is available online HERE.

Christopher Fagundes, an associate professor in the department of psychological sciences, is available to discuss the link between mental and immune health.

“In my field, we have conducted a lot of work to look at what predicts who gets colds and different forms of respiratory illnesses, and who is more susceptible to getting sick,” Fagundes said. “We’ve found that stressloneliness and lack of sleep are three factors that can seriously compromise aspects of the immune system that make people more susceptible to viruses if exposed. Also, stress, loneliness and disrupted sleep promote other aspects of the immune system responsible for the production of proinflammatory cytokines to overrespond. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine production can generate sustained upper respiratory infection symptoms.”

And while this research has centered on different cold and upper respiratory viruses, he said “there is no doubt” that these effects would be the same for COVID-19.

Mark Finley is a fellow in energy and global oil at the Baker Institute.

“The U.S. and global oil market is simultaneously grappling with the biggest decline in demand ever seen (due to COVID-19) and a price war between two of the world’s largest producers, Russia and Saudi Arabia,” he said.

Bill Fulton, director of Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, an urban planner, an expert on local government and the former mayor of Ventura, California, can speak to both the short-term and long-term changes in city life and the way government works.

What will the effect be on transportation and transit? Retail and office space? Will people walk and bike more? How will they interact in public spaces in the future? How will government function and hold public meetings during the crisis, and will this fundamentally alter the way government interacts with the public in the long run? How will local governments deal with the inevitable revenue loss — and, in the long run, with the fact that they will probably have less sales tax?

Vivian Ho, the James A. Baker III Institute Chair in Health Economics, director for the Center of Health and Biosciences at the Baker Institute and a professor of economics, can discuss insurance coverage as families experience lost income and jobs during the crisis.

“Policymakers should temporarily expand subsidies for middle class workers who buy insurance through the Affordable Care Act marketplace,” Ho said. “Families experiencing lost income due to the pandemic shouldn’t have to worry about losing access to health care in the midst of a pandemic.”

“Hospitals in states that did not expand Medicaid coverage to able-bodied adults under the Affordable Care Act are bearing tougher financial burdens, which may damage their ability to respond to the current health crisis,” she said.

Mark Jones, a professor of political science and fellow at the Baker Institute, is available to discuss how the spread of COVID-19 is impacting elections, including runoffs in Texas.

“COVID-19 has already resulted in the postponement of local elections originally scheduled for May 2, with the elections now to be held in November with current officeholders’ tenure extended until their successors are confirmed in November,” Jones said. “It is increasingly likely that COVID-19 will affect the Democratic and Republican primary runoff elections scheduled for May 26, with a growing possibility that the elections will be conducted entirely via mail ballots or at the minimum will involve the adoption of no-excuse absentee voting whereby any Texan, not just those 65 or older, hospitalized or out of the county, will be able to obtain an absentee ballot and vote by mail.

“The emergency adoption of no-excuse absentee voting would change the composition of the May primary runoff electorate by expanding turnout among many voters who otherwise would have been unlikely to participate, as well as increase pressure on the Texas Legislature to reform the state’s electoral legislation to allow for no-excuse absentee voting when it reconvenes in January of 2021 for the next regular session.”

Danielle King, an assistant professor of psychological sciences and principal investigator of Rice’s WorKing Resilience Lab, is an expert on the topic of resilience to adversity. Her research focuses on understanding the role individuals, groups and organizations play in fostering adaptive sustainability following adversity. She can discuss how individuals can remain resilient and motivated in difficult circumstances.

“Though we are still in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic, we can begin to enact adaptive practices that foster resilience such as remaining flexible to changing circumstances, practicing acceptance of the present realities, seeking social support in creative ways while practicing social distancing, and finding and engaging with experiences and thoughts that elicit positive emotions during trying times,” King said.

Tom Kolditz, founding director of Rice’s Doerr Institute for New Leaders, is a social psychologist and former brigadier general who has done extensive research on how best to lead people under perceived serious threat. His work is widely taught at military service and police academies globally, and he did extensive work with the banking industry during the 2008 financial crisis. His expertise is in articulating what people need from leaders in volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous times and what leaders must do to gain and maintain people’s trust. His book, “In Extremis Leadership: Leading As If Your Life Depended On It,” teaches people to lead in crisis, when people are anxious or afraid.

“Leadership when people are under threat hinges far less on managerial principles, and far more on trust,” Kolditz said. “Whether in a company or their own family, people who lead in the same way now as they did two months ago will experience a significant decline in their influence.”

Jim Krane, the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow for Energy Studies at the Baker Institute, is an expert on energy geopolitics and Middle East economies and societies. He can comment on the effect on OPEC and its production decisions, relations between Russia and Saudi Arabia, and how low oil prices will affect policy inside producer countries.

Ken Medlock, the James A. Baker III and Susan G. Baker Fellow in Energy and Resource Economics at the Baker Institute, senior director of institute’s Center for Energy Studies and an adjunct professor and lecturer in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss COVID-19’s impact on oil prices and the oil industry.

Kirsten Ostherr, the Gladys Louise Fox Professor of English and director of Rice’s Medical Futures Lab, can discuss the representation of outbreaks, contagion and disease in public discourse and the media. She is also an expert on digital health privacy. She is the founding director of the Medical Humanities program at Rice, and her first book, “Cinematic Prophylaxis: Globalization and Contagion in the Discourse of World Health,” is one of several titles made available for open-access download through June 1 by its publisher, Duke University Press.

Peter Rodriguez, dean of the Jones Graduate School of Business and a professor of strategic management, can discuss the economic impact of COVID-19 in Houston, the state of Texas and around the world.

Eduardo Salas, professor and chair of the Department of Psychological Sciences, is available to discuss collaboration, teamwork, team training and team dynamics as it relates to COVID-19.

“We often hear that ‘we are in this together’ and, indeed, we are,” Salas said. “Effective collaboration and teamwork can save lives. And there is a science of teamwork that can provide guidance on how to manage and promote effective collaboration.”

Kyle Shelton, deputy director of the Kinder Institute, can discuss how the economic impact of COVID-19 closures and job losses can amplify housing issues, and why governments at every level are opting for actions such as halting evictions and foreclosures and removing late fees. He can also speak to some of the challenges confronted by public transportation, why active transportation like biking and walking are so important now, and how long-term investments in these systems make cities and regions more adaptive and resilient.

Bob Stein, the Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and a fellow in urban politics at the Baker Institute, is an expert in emergency preparedness, especially related to hurricanes and flooding. He can also discuss why and when people comply with government directives regarding how to prepare for and respond to natural disasters, and the political consequences of natural disasters.

“Since God is not on the ballot, who do voters hold accountable before and in the aftermath of natural disasters?” he said.

Laurence Stuart, an adjunct professor in management at Rice Business, can discuss unemployment in Texas, how people qualify for it and what that means for employers and employees.

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,962 undergraduates and 3,027 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 4 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance.

covid-19, coronavirus, sara sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, health

Coronavirus × Weather’s Impact

Daily coronavirus briefing: Global mortality rate for COVID-19 is 3.4%, WHO says

Weather and its potential impact on how COVID-19 behaves has remained a consistent focus since the outbreak erupted.

Coronavirus, officially recognized as COVID-19, took less than three months to travel around the world. After surfacing in late 2019, the virus has spread to more than 50 countries and claimed thousands of lives. After weeks of slowly spreading around the United States, the first American fatality from the virus occurred outside Seattle, Washington in King County just before the calendar flipped to March. As of Wednesday, nine deaths were blamed on the COVID-19 in the U.S., all in Washington state.

While the World Health Organization (WHO) has avoided deeming the virus a pandemic, WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, “This virus has pandemic potential.”

Weather and its potential impact on how COVID-19 behaves has remained a consistent focus since the outbreak erupted.

Spreading Coronavirus
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization, speaking at a press conference on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, alongside Maria Van Kerkhove, an infectious disease epidemiologist and the MERS-CoV technical lead for the WHO Health Emergencies Programme. (WHO)

Hong Kong University pathology professor John Nicholls said that he suspected three factors would potentially kill the virus, according to the transcript of a private conference call in early February.

“Three things the virus does not like: 1. Sunlight, 2. Temperature, and 3. Humidity,” Nicholls said in remarks that were leaked on social media. “The virus can remain intact at 4 degrees (39 degrees Fahrenheit) or 10 degrees (50 F) … But at 30 degrees (86 degrees F) then you get inactivation.”

The CDC has cautioned that not enough is known about the virus to say for sure that weather will affect the spread, but a spokesperson said, “I’m happy to hope that it [the threat] goes down as the weather warms up.”

As experts work toward a better understanding, the world shudders in fear of the unknown, a worry that has rocked global financial markets. In what was the worst financial week since 2008 in the U.S., jitters sent the Dow Jones, S&P 500 and Nasdaq all plunging on Feb. 23. The markets rebounded a bit on Monday, March, 2, but volatility remained high through Tuesday’s trading session.

Here are the latest updates, listed in eastern time, and the most important things you need to know about coronavirus.

** March 4, 12:16 p.m.
During a press conference on Wednesday morning, officials declared a state of emergency in Los Angeles county in response to the coronavirus. This will help to open up funding from the state to combat the virus. This announcement came shortly after six new cases were reported in the county. “I want to reiterate this is not a response rooted in panic,” L.A. County supervisor Kathryn Barger said, according to The Los Angeles Times. “We need every tool at our disposal.”

** March 4, 11:29 a.m.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state has risen to six.

Cuomo said the four new cases are tied to a 50-year-old man from New Rochelle, a New York City suburb about 20 miles northeast of Manhattan in Westchester County. Officials said on Tuesday this was the second confirmed patient in the state.

The patient’s wife, two of his children and the neighbor who drove the man to the hospital are the latest confirmed to have the virus. The man remains hospitalized while his family is quarantined in their home.

On Tuesday, officials said the man, a lawyer who works in Manhattan, had not traveled to any of the countries where the number of COVID-19 cases is the highest, indicating this was a case of community spread.

Cuomo also said students with the State University of New York and the City University of New York that were studying abroad in China, Italy, Japan, Iran or South Korea were being transported home. Upon arrival they will be quarantined for 14 days.

“Remember: We have been expecting more cases & we are fully prepared,” Cuomo said. “There is no cause for undue anxiety.”

** March 4, 9:55 a.m.
Confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. climbed past 125 on Wednesday, with 9 fatalities blamed on the virus — all in Washington state. It’s not time to panic, but being vigilant is always wise. Here’s a reminder on what coronavirus symptoms to look out for, according to the WHO.

Fever is a symptom in 90% of COVID-19 cases

70% of cases include a dry cough as a symptom

Symptoms usually do not include a runny nose

** March 4, 9:41 a.m.
The COVID-19 global mortality rate is 3.4%, WHO Director-General Tedros Ghebreyesus told reporters at a press conference in Geneva on Tuesday. “Globally, about 3.4% of reported COVID-19 cases have died. By comparison, seasonal flu generally kills far fewer than 1% of those infected,” he said.

** March 4, 9:20 a.m.
Italy’s government will close all of the country’s schools and universities from Thursday until mid-March as a result of the virus, according to a report from Italian newswire service ANSA.

Italy has reported more than 2,500 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and the death toll in the country stands at 79. Only China, South Korea and Iran have a higher number of cases.

** March 4, 8 a.m.
After being closed for three days due to fears about the spread of COVID-19, Paris’ famed Louvre Museum reopened on Wednesday.

According to The Associated Press, museum employees voted to return to work on Wednesday after the museum’s management presented several new “anti-virus” measures. This includes wider distributions of disinfectants and more frequent staff rotations so employees can wash their hands, the AP said.

The Louvre is said to be the world’s most visited museum and in 2019 attracted more than 9.6 million visitors. The museum’s website states that about 25% of its visitors in 2019 were French, with “visitors from other countries representing almost three-quarters of total attendance.” Weather in Paris for the next week will be mostly rainy and chilly, according to the AccuWeather forecast.

** March 4, 7:42 a.m.
An Amazon employee in Seattle has tested positive for COVID-19.

“We’re supporting the affected employee who is in quarantine,” a company spokesperson told Reuters. The company also said two employees in Milan, Italy were infected and in quarantine.

In total, Washington state has 27 cases of COVID-19, the most of any state in the U.S., and all of the U.S. fatalities have occurred in Washington.

** March 4, 6:40 a.m.
Here are the latest updated numbers from around the world according to Johns Hopkins University:

Total confirmed cases: 93,455

Total deaths: 3,198

Total recovered: 50,743

Tuesday’s 2,500 new cases was the largest jump globally in new confirmed cases since Feb. 14.

See the Full Story

About AccuWeather, Inc. and AccuWeather.com
AccuWeather, recognized and documented as the most accurate source of weather forecasts and warnings in the world, has saved tens of thousands of lives, prevented hundreds of thousands of injuries and tens of billions of dollars in property damage. With global headquarters in State College, PA and other offices around the world, AccuWeather serves more than 1.5 billion people daily to help them plan their lives and get more out of their day through digital media properties, such as AccuWeather.com and mobile, as well as radio, television, newspapers, and the national 24/7 AccuWeather Network channel. Additionally, AccuWeather produces and distributes news, weather content, and video for more than 180,000 third-party websites.

NFL, szemui ho, 360 MAGAZINE

Shango x Moreno Valley

Shango Is the City’s First Licensed Retail Cannabis Facility

The dreams of two Southern Californians will come true when the new Shango Moreno Valley recreational cannabis dispensary opens on March 5, 2020.

Shango founder and CEO Brandon Rexroad, and former NFL All-Pro offensive lineman Kyle Turley are the ownership group that is bringing the Shango brand to California.

Rexroad, a longtime resident of Orange County, is a close friend of Turley who grew up in Moreno Valley.

“Opening a dispensary in Southern California has been a personal goal of mine since I started in the cannabis industry nearly 24 years ago,” Rexroad said. “We’re excited to be the first licensed dispensary in Moreno Valley and we’re planning on making a positive impact on this community.

“Shango Moreno Valley has an exceptional location,” Rexroad said. “Shango will offer the best cannabis shopping experience in the Inland Empire. Our customers are going to be amazed.”

The official Grand Opening celebration for the public will take place on March 13, 2020 at 10 a.m. with a Moreno Valley Chamber of Commerce ribbon-cutting ceremony, featuring local government and business leaders and media. Representatives of Shango’s ownership group and management will be available for Interviews before and during the event.

The first 50 people in line for the Grand Opening will receive complimentary Shango merchandise and deep discounts on cannabis products and accessories. Other special offers and raffles will be available to all customers throughout the Grand Opening weekend.

The dispensary is located at 11875 Pigeon Pass, Unit C1 in Moreno Valley, in the Stater Bros shopping center at the corner of Pigeon Pass and Ironwood, near California Highway 60. Hours of operation are from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week.

Shango holds a total of 29 cannabis licenses in state markets across the country, including 10 for dispensaries in Oregon, Nevada, Michigan, California and Missouri. Moreno Valley is the first of several planned Shango dispensaries in California. The company will also be opening its first distribution facility in California in summer of 2020.

For Turley, being part of a business in his hometown, where he was a multi-sport athlete at Moreno Valley High School, is a highlight in his post-NFL career.

“I’m so proud to be bringing a game-changing business to my hometown,” Turley said. “It’s pretty exciting and it kind of feels like I was destined for this.”

As a high school and college athlete, Turley never used cannabis until he sustained painful injuries and numerous concussions while playing in the NFL.

“I had friends who lost their college scholarships because they tested positive for marijuana, but I never needed it,” Turley recalls. “It’s ironic that now I’m a huge cannabis advocate and living proof that it can change your life and even save your life. This plant is shifting the conversation from being on drugs to getting off drugs. This is supposed to happen.”

Rexroad and Turley are the ownership group operating as SMV GROUP INC. The Moreno Valley facility contains 5,000 square feet of retail space.

The Shango Moreno Valley phone number is (866) 4SH-ANGO, (474-2646). The email address is socal.info@goshango.com.

Shango Moreno Valley is a member of the Moreno Valley Chamber of Commerce.

For more information about Shango and Shango Moreno Valley, visit www.goshango.com.

About Shango
Shango is an established, vertically integrated cannabis brand offering a full range of award-winning products, including flower, extracts and cannabis-infused edibles, in Oregon, Michigan and Nevada. The Shango brand has multiple full-service recreational and medical cannabis dispensaries in Oregon and Nevada along with a medical cannabis provisioning center in Michigan.

Shango will soon open a provisioning center in Bay City, Michigan, and a state-of-the-art cannabis distribution operation in Southern California. In Q2 2020, Shango’s Michigan operations will add a provisioning center in Hazel Park, as well as two extraction facilities, a commercial kitchen and an indoor cultivation facility.

A recognized leader in the cannabis industry, Shango sets the standards for product quality, consistency and business conduct. Shango is committed to cannabis education and is a fierce advocate of the safe and responsible use of cannabis products. For more information, go to www.goshango.com.

More About Brandon Rexroad
Brandon Rexroad has been dedicated to the cannabis industry since 1996 when California permitted the production and sale of medicinal cannabis. He is the Founder and CEO of Shango Cannabis, a recognized and respected leader in the cannabis industry and marketplace.

Rexroad leads the development and growth of the Shango brand in Oregon, Nevada and Michigan, as well as upcoming expansions into California, Arizona and emerging markets throughout the country.

In addition to his extensive cannabis industry knowledge and experience, Rexroad has more than 20 years of experience in all aspects of commercial, industrial and residential real estate, construction and
development.

He is responsible for building and managing Shango’s state-of-the-art cannabis cultivation facilities, as well as its cannabis research and development center. These facilities produce the full range of Shango medical and recreational cannabis products. They also produce flower, extracts and edibles for other select cannabis brands.

Rexroad also is the Co-Founder of Factory Direct Garden Supply, an importer and manufacturer of hoods, lamps, ballasts and other specialized equipment for the hydroponic gardening industry.

More About Kyle Turley
Turley played nine seasons in the NFL, selected 7th overall in the 1998 draft. He played five seasons for the New Orleans Saints and a year with the St. Louis Rams before a serious back injury sidelined him for the 2004 and 2005 seasons. He returned in 2006 as a member of the Kansas City Chiefs, where he spent the last two years of his career before retiring in 2007. He was All-Pro offensive tackle in 2000 and was invited to the Pro Bowl in 2001.

He has been involved in a number of player health issues post-retirement, particularly neurological problems resulting from his football career. He also is a board member of the Gridiron Greats Assistance Fund.

Turley was featured in CNN’s “Weed 4: Pot vs Pills” hosted by Dr. Sanjay Gupta, which focused on medical marijuana and CBD. He endorsed the use of cannabis and hemp products as a way to escape the addiction to opioids.

Diagnosed with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) as a result of more than 100 concussions he received during his 10-years NFL career. Turley struggled with an addiction to painkillers, violent thoughts and suicidal tendencies until he started using medical marijuana.

“It saved my life,” he says. “I wouldn’t be where I am today, I would not have my family, my kids, my house, everything I have right now, if not for cannabis.”

To help save other lives, Turley founded the Gridiron Cannabis Coalition to use his story and those of other players to advance the use of marijuana as a valid medical treatment for neurological conditions and other athletic injuries.

“This plant has to be set free,” he says. “We have people committing suicide in football and other sports. How far do we have to go? Cannabis has played an important role in allowing me to personally manage pain, cope with CTE, improve my overall health and eliminate the need for prescription opioids that nearly cost me my life. If we can allow players and veterans to recover naturally with proper dietary and organic therapies, we should be doing so.”

New Purdue Pharmacy Programs

Purdue pharmacy programs take innovative approach to saving lives

Programs designed to provide much-needed health care services to rural families in Kenya are leading to a new generation of medical professionals and innovators – who are helping save the lives of those facing financial and mobility constraints.

Purdue University’s College of Pharmacymhas a strong presence in Kenya, with multiple programs supporting the health care needs of families. Purdue is one of a handful of schools involved in the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) program, which promotes and fosters a comprehensive approach to address the multifaceted needs of the western Kenyan population AMPATH serves.

This program has helped to permanently change the trajectory of the millions of citizens it serves. One such example is Benson Kiragu, who was one of the first Kenyans the AMPATH program reached. Benson’s experience with AMPATH serves as a microcosm of the impact AMPATH and consortium partners like Purdue can have in unlocking the potential of vulnerable populations.

When Kiragu first met AMPATH staff, he was one of many street youth with an extensive list of health issues that impeded his desire to break the poverty cycle. He suffered from eye conditions, which could have easily led to permanent blindness, and life-threatening asthma that has nearly taken his life on several occasions.

However, through the support of a team of faculty from Purdue and Indiana University, Kiragu has been able emerge from his humble beginnings to become the leader of several initiatives that now prevent other Kenyans from being trapped in the same poverty cycle he once found himself in.

Now, Kiragu is leading programs focused on providing education to street kids and treating cardiovascular and other diseases in the clinic and in homes.

“I know from my own experiences that working together as teams has helped to dramatically improve health care in Kenya,” Kiragu said. “Western Kenya now has some of the best access to health care in sub-Saharan Africa and this infrastructure is being used to help people of all ages and incomes.”

Through Kiragu’s training as a pharmacist, he has been able to become a part of the transformation in the roles that pharmacists play in Kenya through the support of the Purdue’s College of Pharmacy, Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, and Moi University School of Medicine.

“Pharmacists are now seen as experts in providing health care support to patients,” Kiragu said. “We know how certain medications will likely impact patients and which ones are the most likely to improve their lives with minimal side effects.”

Kiragu said he was inspired by the work of Julie Everett, an associate professor of pharmacy practice from Purdue who was based full time in Kenya. Everett had suffered an unexpected health emergency and passed away in 2006 but was able to inspire individuals like Kiragu to follow in her footsteps and address the needs of the Kenyan population.

“Kiragu was determined to become a pharmacist and carry on the great work Julie had started with the people of Kenya,” said Sonak Pastakia, who was hired in 2007 to lead Purdue’s presence in Kenya. “I continue to be thankful that programs like AMPATH and people like Julie have been able to inspire vulnerable youth like Benson to become the change agents the country needs to prevent additional generations of Kenyans from succumbing to treatable illnesses or being trapped in the poverty cycle.

“It is because of AMPATH’s years of collaborative efforts that I have the good fortune of working alongside people like Benson who have a deep firsthand knowledge of the challenges Kenyans face and then work tirelessly to overcome them.”

Pastakia and his team in Kenya have worked with the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization to patent some of their technologies and approaches. They are looking for additional partners as they work to take their proven approaches and expertise to other parts of the world. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization at otcip@prf.org

About Purdue Research Foundation

The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Established in 1930, the foundation accepts gifts; administers trusts; funds scholarships and grants; acquires property; protects Purdue’s intellectual property; and promotes entrepreneurial activities on behalf of Purdue. The foundation manages the Purdue Foundry, Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, Purdue Research Park and Purdue Technology Centers. The foundation received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities.

Alcoholism in the Family

Alcoholism in the family affects how your brain switches between active and resting states.

A family history of alcoholism affects a process that the brain uses when transitioning from a mentally demanding state to a resting state, researchers have found.

You don’t have to be a drinker for your brain to be affected by alcoholism. A new study shows that just having a parent with an alcohol use disorder affects how your brain transitions between active and resting states – regardless of your own drinking habits.

The study, performed by researchers at Purdue University and the Indiana University School of Medicine, discovered that the brain reconfigures itself between completing a mentally demanding task and resting.

But for the brain of someone with a family history of an alcohol use disorder, this reconfiguration doesn’t happen.

While the missing transition doesn’t seem to affect how well a person performs the mentally demanding task itself, it might be related to larger scale brain functions that give rise to behaviors associated with addiction. In particular, study subjects without this brain process demonstrated greater impatience in waiting for rewards, a behavior associated with addiction.

Brain-Reconfiguration
Multiple regions of the brain are involved in a “reconfiguration” that happens between completing a difficult task and resting. But for people with a family history of alcoholism, this reconfiguration is diminished.

Findings are published in the journal NeuroImage. The work was led by Enrico Amico, a former Purdue postdoctoral researcher who is now a researcher at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland.

How the brain reconfigures between active and resting states is like how a computer closes down a program after you’re finished with it. “The moment you close a program, a computer has to remove it from memory, reorganize the cache and maybe clear out some temporary files. This helps the computer to prepare for the next task,” said Joaquín Goñi, a Purdue assistant professor in the School of Industrial Engineering and the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering.

“In a similar way, we’ve found that this reconfiguration process in the human brain is associated with finishing a task and getting ready for what’s next.” Goñi’s research group, the CONNplexity Lab, takes a computational approach to neuroscience and cognitive science.

Past research has shown that a family history of alcoholism affects a person’s brain anatomy and physiology, but most studies have looked at this effect only in separate active and quiet resting states rather than the transition between them.

“A lot of what brains do is switch between different tasks and states. We suspected that this task switching might be somewhat lower in people with a family history of alcoholism,” said David Kareken, a professor of neurology at the Indiana University School of Medicine and director of the Indiana Alcohol Research Center.

The study defined a “family history of alcoholism” as someone with a parent who had enough symptoms to constitute an alcohol use disorder. About half of the 54 study participants had this history.

Researchers at Indiana University measured the brain activity of subjects with an MRI scanner as they completed a mentally demanding task on a computer. The task required them to unpredictably hold back from pressing a left or right key. After completing the task, the subjects rested while watching a fixed point on the screen.

A separate task outside of the MRI scanner gauged how participants responded to rewards, asking questions such as if they would like $20 now or $200 in one year.

Amico and Goñi processed the data and developed a computational framework for extracting different patterns of brain connectivity between completing the mentally demanding task and entering the resting state, such as when brain areas rose and fell together in activity, or one brain area rose while another fell at the same time.

The data revealed that these brain connectivity patterns reconfigured within the first three minutes after finishing the task. By the fourth minute of rest, the effect had completely disappeared.

And it’s not a quiet process: Reconfiguration involves multiple parts
of the brain at once.

“These brain regions talk to each other and are very strongly implicated in the task even though by this point, the task is already completed. It almost seems like an echo in time of what had been going on,” Kareken said.

Subjects lacking the transition also had the risk factors that researchers have seen to be consistent with developing alcoholism. These include being male, a greater number of symptoms of depression,
and reward-impatience.

A family history of alcoholism, however, stood out as the most statistically significant difference in this brain reconfiguration.

The finding affects research going forward.

“In the past, we’ve assumed that a person who doesn’t drink excessively is a ‘healthy’ control for a study. But this work shows that a person with just a family history of alcoholism may also have some subtle differences in how their brains operate,” Goñi said.

This research was funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (grant P60AA07611) and the Purdue Discovery Park Data Science Award “Fingerprints of the Human Brain: A Data Science Perspective.” The work was also partially supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants R01EB022574, R01MH108467, and R00AA023296).

About Discovery Park
Discovery Park is a place where Purdue researchers move beyond traditional boundaries, collaborating across disciplines and with policymakers and business leaders to create solutions for a better world. Grand challenges of global health, global conflict and security, and those that lie at the nexus of sustainable energy, world food supply, water and the environment are the focus of researchers in Discovery Park. The translation of discovery to impact is integrated into the fabric of Discovery Park through entrepreneurship programs and partnerships.

Mama Medicine’s “Multi-Sensory” Readings

The Spa at Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown welcomes Mama Medicine, expert in ancient multi-sensory Medicine Readings, as the latest addition to the iconic Resident Healers Program.

Mama Medicine, whose given name is Deborah Hanekamp, now joins the Resident Healer Program with a unique health and wellness offering known as Medicine Readings. Having previously been named “Fashion’s Favorite Healer” by Vogue magazine, her work integrates more than 17 years of experience and wisdom in the healing arts. Her Medicine Readings blends ancient knowledge from across a variety of traditions. At the end of every Medicine Reading, Deborah prescribes spiritual homework and a ritual bath. These beautiful baths (with flowers, crystals and herbs), along with her unique aesthetic and approachable personality, have garnered Mama Medicine tens of thousands of global followers. In a world of gurus and self-help, Mama Medicine helps us connect to the inner shaman within us all: the power of love.

Created by Spa Director Tara Cruz, the Resident Healers Program launched on International Women’s Day 2018 to highlight three exceptional women with diverse offerings within the health and wellness space in New York City. Each of the three Resident Healers provide unique, mindful experiences for guests during one-one-one private appointments at The Spa. Deganit Nuur is an acupuncturist, herbalist and clairvoyant; Rashia Bell is a crystal healer and mediation master; and Snow Shimazu is a travel wellness expert, advanced body work educator and all-around wellness guru. In 2019 the Program once again expanded in time for International Women’s Day, with the addition of Michelle Pirret, International Sonic Alchemist. Each of these leading women offers guests seeking something greater than the traditional spa service.  

In-Person Medicine Readings

Mama Medicine will offer in-person Medicine Readings for in-house guests, residents and local clientele.

A Medicine Reading is a healing modality created by Deborah Hanekamp designed to empower people to be their own healers. It involves the combination of conversation, an aura reading, and a healing ritual. It’s a very collaborative experience – the client shares what they are calling in or clearing out of their life, and then Deborah, based on what she sees, shares hidden talents, gifts or blocks that are coming up. In the ceremony, Deborah uses crystal singing bowls, song and scent to cleanse, bless and protect. During the session the client will lay on a heated bed of amethyst and black tourmaline crystals. 60 Minutes / USD 555

Mama Medicine is available for private appointments through March, April, May and June.

To book an individual consultation with Mama Medicine or any of the Resident Healers, contact The Spa at Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown at 646-880-1990.

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Which CBD Product Is the Best? 

Cannabidiol (or CBD for short) oil is derived from the cannabis plant. Although CBD is from cannabis, it does not get you high. It does have many therapeutic benefits and can be used to ease the symptoms of conditions such as anxiety. Different people have different responses to CBD oil, so it’s essential to try the oil for yourself to see what positive or negative effects you get. The following guide gives you some options to consider to choose the best CBD product for you.

What Are the Most Common CBD Products?

The CBD industry is growing by leaps and bounds. There are many preparations and products on the market, but CBD oil taken sublingually is one of the most popular CBD products. Vaping CBD is another common CBD product with its popularity growing as CBD becomes more mainstream. CBD products for animals are also becoming quite common. 

Aspects That Determine the Efficiency of a Product

The CBD industry is almost entirely unregulated to date. So it’s up to the consumer to ascertain what they are buying and using. Dosage amounts that are too low will not achieve the ‘optimum’ level for an individual, and they may subsequently feel no effect at all. Finding the correct dose of CBD to achieve your optimum results can take trial-and-error. Most proponents recommend starting with lower dosages and increasing the dosage if needed. 

You can find a range of concentrations available, from 100 mg up to 3,500 mg, which are recommended for a dosage of between .5 ml and 1.0 mil under the tongue. You may find that it’s easier to get a controlled dosage with edibles like gummies or capsules than with oil, which is delivered by a dropper. Users also find that more product is delivered by ingesting than via vaping.

Sublingual Consumption

There is a vein under the tongue called the sublingual gland. When a substance is administered under the tongue to the sublingual glands, it gets absorbed directly into the bloodstream, which is referred to as sublingual consumption or sublingual administration. Common sublingual consumption methods include CBD tinctures, CBD lozenges, and CBD sprays.

Bioavailability

Bioavailability refers to the proportion of a substance that enters the circulation when introduced into the body and thus will have an active effect. It’s basically the rate at which a substance is absorbed into the bloodstream. Bioavailability is an essential measurement tool since it determines the correct dosage administration of a substance. Sublingual CBD products generally have high bioavailability. 

Duration of Effect

It typically takes 15–30 minutes to feel the effects of a CBD tincture, and the effects are known to last between 4–6 hours, though it is partially a factor of how potent a dose is taken. 

Ingested CBD, either using edibles or capsules, takes a bit longer to have an effect, but the results will also last longer, compared to other methods of taking CBD. This is because when CBD products are ingested, it takes a while for them to be digested and then processed by the liver before making it to the bloodstream. Once they are in the bloodstream, you can start to feel their effects.

Convenience

Finding a CBD oil product that is convenient for you to use will determine its effectiveness. You needn’t make a trek to the store to buy CBD oil, as there are a plethora of online retailers with all the products at your fingertips. 

CBD edibles are one of the most convenient ways to use CBD oil, as you don’t need to worry about a cream, which requires time to apply, or vaping, which requires equipment. CBD capsules are often considered the most convenient, but CBD gummies are increasingly popular and very convenient. 

The market is so large that there are now CBD products for any indulgence, including CBD-infused soaps, bath salts, lip balm, eye cream, and other ways to take part in CBD’s benefits according to your fancy. Note that some products available in one state or country are not guaranteed to be available in the next.

Cost

According to HuffPost, price is often a marker of purity. They advise that if you see a CBD oil that claims to have a 100-milligram potency for less than $40, it’s likely that the CBD is not pure.  According to another source, a 1-ounce, or 30-milliliter, bottle of CBD oil may cost anywhere from $30 to over $200. What makes the discrepancy? Well, the potency of a bottle can greatly affect the price, as well as where it is manufactured. When trying to decide if a CBD product is priced right, you can ask the following questions: 

  • Is it grown organically
  • Is it grown domestically? 
  • What are the product reviews?

You can look for certificates of analysis (COA), which have to be issued by a licensed laboratory, which tests for potency and safety. This certification is pricey for companies and may add to your cost.

Method of Consumption

To complicate matters, there is a wide range of methods to experience CBD oil. You can ingest sublingually (as in various terpenes) or use edibles such as capsules, gummies, syrups or CBD infused coffee or tea. You can deliver CBD products via inhalation with vaporizers, smokeables, or topicals on the skin. Topicals vary, too. You can select CBD topical cream or sprays. The effects of each method differ from one individual to individual. 

Conclusion

The best CBD product is the one that suits you for cost, convenience, and outcome. Remember that you can expect very different results, depending on dosing, the condition that needs treating.

Navigating Healthcare

Navigating our healthcare system can be challenging, especially when you are not feeling well.  One of the biggest questions that patients face is deciding whether their symptoms warrant a trip to a doctor’s office, urgent care clinic, or the emergency room.

For most health problems, your primary care doctor—usually a family doctor, internist, or pediatrician—is often in the best person to provide the first line of advice for health concerns.  These primary care physicians are equipped to handle most chronic health problems and minor complaints. Examples of conditions that can be managed by your primary care physician include muscle strains/sprains, joint and back pain, coughs and cold symptoms, minor burns and injuries, headaches, and stomach and intestinal problems (as long as the patient can drink fluids normally).

Many primary care physicians are able to perform procedures like joint injections and drainage of abscesses, dress wounds, and provide referrals to the right specialist if needed.  Most primary care offices can order blood tests, and many can perform immediate rapid tests for pregnancy, urine infections, strep throat, and influenza. Some even offer x-rays on-site.  

An advantage to seeing a primary care physician is that your regular doctor usually knows you and your medical problems best and is able to provide follow-up for your medical conditions.  If you’re having a hard time finding a primary care physician, you can ask your friends or family for recommendations, check with your insurance company to see who is in network, or search for your area on this physician mapper.  

Urgent care clinics include walk-in clinics which may be associated with a retail pharmacy or hospital system. They are most often staffed with nurse practitioners and physician assistants which means that you are unlikely to see a physician. Examples of complaints that can be managed by an urgent care clinic include straightforward conditions like colds, influenza, minor sprains/strains, minor skin cuts, and minor burns (not to hands/feet/genitals/face). Urgent care facilities often have access to an x-ray machine and can diagnosis and splint (but not cast) a fracture.  They may also have access to some of the more common blood tests. An advantage of urgent care is that they are often open on weekends and after hours when your primary care physician may not be available.

The emergency department (ED) should be reserved for true emergencies. Examples of

complaints that should be seen in the ED include chest pain, shortness of breath, stroke symptoms such as difficulty speaking or weakness on one side of the body, fractures where there is bone outside of the skin, fainting, severe headache, and inability to keep down liquids. EDs are always open but can be the most expensive option when it is not a true emergency. When you go to the ED, you may see a physician, nurse practitioner or physician assistant.  It’s important to be aware that not all EDs have physicians working on-site. When you or your loved one in sick, you should ask the credentials of the clinicians who are taking care of you and know that it is okay to ask to be seen by a physician.

Rebekah Bernard MD is a Family Physician and the president of Physicians for Patient Protection.

360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery, medicine

Top 4 Remarkable Benefits of Consultation with a Trusted Online Doctor

Introduction 

The advancement in modern medicine has made people live long. In turn, the demand for medical professionals is on the rise. Thanks to technology, one can consult a medical specialist in the comfort of their home. The transformation is slowly gaining ground. However, not everybody has embraced this change. Are you skeptical about online doctors? Below are some of the remarkable benefits that you are missing out on each time.

  • Prompt medical attention 

When you consult a doctor online, you are free from making long queues for the doctor to see you. All an individual has to do is decide on time as well as the health practitioner of their choice. You can achieve an in-depth consultation via a video chat or a phone call in real-time. Thus, you save money you would have used to travel to get to the doctor. It is quite beneficial when one is in dire need of consultation but lacks the transportation fee. It is also essential for people who have medical conditions that have reduced their mobility.

  • There’re no boundaries 

When it comes to telemedicine, the limits are limitless. You get to be in touch with a doctor beyond your region, state, or country. It’s very crucial, especially to individuals who are constant business travels. You can also use this chance to seek a second medical opinion from a specialist. Various online pharmacies have trusted doctors, and one includes Medzino online pharmacy. By contacting these online medical experts, you stand to benefit from adequate health care that’s convenient as well as confidential.

  • Medical history 

When you are consulting a trusted doctor online, there’s no need to keep repeating your medical history over and over. It’s because they capture your past the first time and store them securely in their database. It facilitates easier patient data management. You stand a chance to access all the test reports, check-up costs at any moment that you may require them. 

During this consultation time, you can get to learn more about your medical history and health in general. Thus, you get concrete scientific facts as opposed to basing your condition on superstition. It’s a time to be informed in a profound state.

  • Availability 

Some medical specialist work within stipulated business hours. However, when it comes to the online consultation, medical experts are present throughout. There’s no need to wait for the official business house to go for meetings. Once you feel unwell in the wee hours of the morning, you can quickly log online and get the appropriate medication

Conclusion 

Online medical consultation has made it possible for people to get in touch with a medical specialist quickly. The telemedicine industry is slowly gaining momentum. There are trusted online doctors who are offering their services. One of them includes a Medzino online pharmacy. Its time to move with the changing tides and experience medical consultation as its most exceptional state. Virtual medicine is soon following suit, and people are reaping their benefits. You ought to try it today and get the best consultation.