Posts tagged with "Rutgers university"

Vaughn lowery interviews nft vip speakers Nicole Buffett and Jesse Dylan in nyc via 360 MAGAZINE

NFT-VIP RECAP

After two jam-packed days, NFT-VIP proved to be a major success. Thanks to its close-knit team of organizers, professionals, involved in press groups and discussions about the impact an NFT, many had an enjoyable experience.

Below are some of our intimate conversations with some of the speakers as well as participants at NFT-VIP.

Warren Buffett's Nicole Buffett is interviewed by Joseph Lowery's grandson Vaughn Lowery of 360 Magazine at the NFT-VIP series in nyc

Listen to ‘NFTs for Impact’ on 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

360’s Vaughn Lowery had an impromptu dialogue with a list of enthusiastic humanitarians: Jesse Dylan, Co-founder of Snowcrash; Sarah Porter, Director of Business Development and Strategic Partnerships at Hope for Haiti; Fabiola Coupet, Since Eve Collective; Nicole Buffett, NFT Artist; Morgan Carroll, Field Marketing Manager for The Giving Block; and Daphne Darbouze, Since Eve Collective.

Listen to Darryl Scipio on 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

Darryl Oliver Scipio is a graduate of Rutgers University and Rutgers Law School.
He began his professional career in the dot-com industry and then onto finance news, launching CNN Money.

After law school, he organized the Racial Justice Program at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey
(ACLU).

Today, Darryl is a proud father to twins and happily married to his beautiful wife Erika. Over the past few years, he established the Newark Chess Club — a youth advisership platform which teaches life skills for future milestones by applying the game’s rulesets. Lastly, he helms a boutique real estate and contracts law firm Downtown Newark.

picture of Adam Anderson via Adam Anderson for use by 360 Magazine

Listen to Adam Anderson on 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

Adam Anderson, the author of Fire Yourself, the Entrepreneurial Endgame and co-host of the Two Stones, One Bird podcast, is a cyber security and space entrepreneur who has been the advisor, founder and/or primary investor in over 30 startups.

As a cybersecurity venture, Adam is responsible for the cyber economy by reporting cybercrime and researching companies to ensure they are trustworthy.

He is also a venture capital walking alongside startups from the beginning stage of the business to the final launch and production.  He is now serving as the Chair of the Board for Hook Security and as Managing General Partner for Ansuz Capital

Listen to Wayne Scot Lukas on 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

Wayne Scot Lukas is a former celebrity wardrobe stylist for Janet Jackson as well as TLC’s co-host of the makeover reality series, What Not to Wear. As of late, he dropped by 360 Magazine’s kiosk during NFT-VIP in NYC to chop it up with Vaughn Lowery about Nipplegate, Janet’s b-day bash and Teyana Taylor.

Listen to Carrie Taylor on 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

Ms. NFTy, also known as Carrie Taylor, is an Asian American who attended the Harvard Business School for Disruptive Marketing. As an NFT architect, she wants to continue to create a space for underprivileged young people to learn about cryptocurrency with unique digital identifiers. Last week, she served as a keynote speaker at the NFT-VIP and NFT.NYC.

Official NFT-VIP Press Release HERE.

Listen to CEO Julie Lamb of NFT-VIP HERE.

Child with phone illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Children and Screens Announces Grant

­CHILDREN AND SCREENS ANNOUNCES $100,000 GRANT SUPPORTING NEW RESEARCH INTO DIGITAL MEDIA USE AND BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development is pleased to announce that it has awarded a grant of $100,000 to Marc Potenza, Ph.D., MD, Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University, Yihong Zhao, Ph.D., member of the Center of Alcohol and Substance Use Studies at Rutgers University, and their interdisciplinary, interinstitutional team, in support of their research exploring the associations between screen media activity and brain development in school-aged children. 
 
“It is vital to investigate what ever-increasing digital media engagement means for developing brains, especially in middle childhood when children’s devices and brains are working on overdrive. Technology is advancing rapidly, and we hope to do our part to help science keep up; we are delighted to create opportunities to advance scientific research on this topic through the Institute, which I founded 13 years ago.” Dr. Pam Hurst-Della Pietra, President and Founder, Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development 
 
Drawing on longitudinal data from the NIH’s landmark Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development Study, Dr. Potenza, Dr. Zhao, and their associates intend to utilize state-of-the-art statistical methodology and predictive modeling to investigate the relationships between digital media use and changes in brain structure and function, as well as the associated clinically relevant behaviors. The study, which was proposed following the Institute’s March 2020 Digital Media and Developing Brain Research Retreat, will examine the effects of a variety of specific media-based activities and will focus on children from ages 9-12. The results of this research will yield benefits and insight not only for the research community, but also for families, clinicians, and policymakers.
 
“The advances in ‘big data’ approaches have led to an unprecedented increase in our understanding of how brain structure and function relate to specific behaviors. With the support of Children and Screens, we aim to apply novel and innovative big data approaches to ABCD data to understand how brain structure and function relate to, and importantly may be impacted by, types and patterns of screen media activity. Dr. Martin Paulus and colleagues used a portion of the first wave of ABCD data to identify patterns of cortical thinning associated with screen media activity. We hope to build off and extend this work by examining the full initial sample and subsequent waves of ABCD data to determine brain-behavior relationships with respect to youth screen media activity. We hope to communicate these findings in order to advance prevention and policy efforts that promote healthy childhood development in environments increasingly involving digital technologies.” – Dr. Marc Potenza, Grant Recipient
 
Bridging the medical, neuroscientific, social scientific, education, and academic communities, the Children and Screens’ interdisciplinary scientific research grants program was conceived as part of a larger research program to advance and support study, knowledge, and scientific collaboration. Developed in 2017, the grants program provides researchers with access to the early-stage financial support necessary to pilot worthy new projects studying the impact of children’s engagement with current and evolving technologies.
 
In addition to the research funds awarded as part of the retreat program and those granted to explore the impacts of digital media during the current health crisis, Children and Screens’ regular Tips for Parents newsletter provides evidence-based, practical advice for families coping with the unprecedented realities of the pandemic, including changed economic circumstances, health concerns, lockdowns, social distancing, remote learning, and working from home. Each newsletter features insights from world-renowned experts, who share tips and advice about managing screen time, social media use, gaming, technology addiction, privacy, parenting, and more.
 
In addition, our popular, bi-weekly Ask the Experts virtual workshop series features dynamic conversations among international, interdisciplinary experts in the field of digital media and child development. Each discussion explores a different digital media challenge associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and presents families with current scientific research, clinical advice, and practical, evidence-based advice. Panelists include leading parenting experts, former AAP Presidents, top child and adolescent psychiatrists, high-impact journal editors, leading researchers, well-known authors, and others. To date, the series has reached parents, researchers, educators, clinicians, government agencies, and public health professionals in over 30 countries and all 50 states.
 
About Children and Screens:
Since its inception in 2013, Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development, has become one of the nation’s leading non-profit organizations dedicated to advancing and supporting interdisciplinary scientific research, enhancing human capital in the field, informing and educating the public, and advocating for sound public policy for child health and wellness.

Green covid by Mina Tocalini for 360 Magazine

Tuberculosis Bacteria Paradox

TB-causing bacteria remember prior stress, react quickly to new stress

Tuberculosis bacteria have evolved to remember stressful encounters and react quickly to future stress, according to a study by computational bioengineers at Rice University and infectious disease experts at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

Published online in the open-access journal mSystems, the research identifies a genetic mechanism that allows the TB-causing bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to respond to stress rapidly and in manner that is “history-dependent,” said corresponding author Oleg Igoshin, a professor of bioengineering at Rice.

Researchers have long suspected that the ability of TB bacteria to remain dormant, sometimes for decades, stems from their ability to behave based upon past experience.

Latent TB is an enormous global problem. While TB kills about 1.5 million people each year, the World Health Organization estimates that 2-3 billion people are infected with a dormant form of the TB bacterium.

“There’s some sort of peace treaty between the immune system and bacteria,” Igoshin said. “The bacteria don’t grow, and the immune system doesn’t kill them. But if people get immunocompromised due to malnutrition or AIDS, the bacteria can be reactivated.”

One of the most likely candidates for a genetic switch that can toggle TB bacteria into a dormant state is a regulatory network that is activated by the stress caused by immune cell attacks. The network responds by activating several dozen genes the bacteria use to survive the stress. Based on a Rice computational model, Igoshin and his longtime Rutgers NJMS collaborator Maria Laura Gennaro and colleagues predicted just such a switch in 2010. According to the theory, the switch contained an ultrasensitive control mechanism that worked in combination with multiple feedback loops to allow hysteresis, or history-dependent behavior.

“The idea is that if we expose cells to intermediate values of stress, starting from their happy state, they don’t have that much of a response,” Igoshin explained. “But if you stress them enough to stop their growth, and then reduce the stress level back to an intermediate level, they remain stressed. And even if you fully remove the stress, the gene expression pathway stays active, maintaining a base level of activity in case the stress comes back.”

In later experiments, Gennaro’s team found no evidence of the predicted control mechanism in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a close relative of the TB bacterium. Since both organisms use the same regulatory network, it looked like the prediction was wrong. Finding out why took years of follow-up studies. Gennaro and Igoshin’s teams found that the TB bacterium, unlike their noninfectious cousins, had the hysteresis control mechanism, but it didn’t behave as expected.

“Hysteretic switches are known to be very slow, and this wasn’t,” Igoshin said. “There was hysteresis, a history-dependent response, to intermediate levels of stress. But when stress went from low to high or from high to low, the response was relatively fast. For this paper, we were trying to understand these somewhat contradictory results. ”

Igoshin and study co-author Satyajit Rao, a Rice doctoral student who graduated last year, revisited the 2010 model and considered how it might be modified to explain the paradox. Studies within the past decade had found a protein called DnaK played a role in activating the stress-response network. Based on what was known about DnaK, Igoshin and Rao added it to their model of the dormant-active switch.

“We didn’t discover it, but we proposed a particular mechanism for it that could explain the rapid, history-dependent switching we’d observed,” Igoshin said. “What happens is, when cells are stressed, their membranes get damaged, and they start accumulating unfolded proteins. Those unfolded proteins start competing for DnaK.”

DnaK was known to play the role of chaperone in helping rid cells of unfolded proteins, but it plays an additional role in the stress-response network by keeping its sensor protein in an inactive state.

“When there are too many unfolded proteins, DnaK has to let go of the sensor protein, which is an activation input for our network,” Igoshin said. “So once there are enough unfolded proteins to ‘distract’ DnaK, the organism responds to the stress.”

Gennaro and co-author Pratik Datta conducted experiments at NJMS to confirm DnaK behaved as predicted. But Igoshin said it is not clear how the findings might impact TB treatment or control strategies. For example, the switch responds to short-term biochemical changes inside the cell, and it’s unclear what connection, if any, it may have with long-term behaviors like TB latency, he said.

“The immediate first step is to really try and see whether this hysteresis is important during the infection,” Igoshin said. “Is it just a peculiar thing we see in our experiments, or is it really important for patient outcomes? Given that it is not seen in the noninfectious cousin of the TB bacterium, it is tempting to speculate it is related to survival inside the host.”

Gennaro is a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. Igoshin is a senior investigator at Rice’s Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.

The research was supported by the Welch Foundation (C-1995) and the National Institutes of Health (GM096189, AI122309, AI104615, HL149450).

Diet and the Disease of Civilization

Adrienne Rose Bitar‘s new book Diet and the Disease of Civilization (Rutgers University Press in December 2017) draws a link between diet books and contemporary social movements. Are you interested in a review copy?

Diet books contribute to a $60-billion industry as they speak to the 45 million Americans who diet every year. Yet these books don’t just tell readers what to eat: they offer complete philosophies about who Americans are and how we should live. Diet and the Disease of Civilization interrupts the predictable debate about eating right to ask a hard question: what if it’s not calories—but concepts—that should be counted?

Cultural critic Adrienne Rose Bitar reveals how four popular diets retell the “Fall of Man” as the narrative backbone for our national consciousness. Intensifying the moral panic of the obesity epidemic, they depict civilization itself as a disease and offer diet as the one true cure.

Bitar reads each diet—the Paleo Diet, the Garden of Eden Diet, the Pacific Island Diet, the detoxification or detox diet—as both myth and manual, a story with side effects shaping social movements, driving industry, and constructing fundamental ideas about sickness and health. Diet and the Disease of Civilization unearths the ways in which diet books are actually utopian manifestos not just for better bodies, but also for a healthier society and a more perfect world.

SHAKIRA BARRERA

Shakira Barrera is a New Jersey native, from Englewood, NJ. By beginning to dance at age 3, a love for the arts was obvious at an early age. Shakira graduated from ‘Rutgers University’ at ‘Mason Gross School of the Arts’ with a BFA degree. Since moving to Los Angeles, she has become a bilingual actress, proudly representing her country of Nicaragua. 

She has been on shows such as “Rosewood“, “Faking It,” “East Los High,” “Those Who Can’t” and has done movies produced by James Franco as well as Mario Van Peebles. Her favorite role to portray was for Warner Brother’s new digital media platform, Stage 13, entitled “High and Mighty” where she portrays a caring, hard-working Latina. Shakira was a part of the 14 participants of the 2016 ‘ABC Diversity Showcase’ and was chosen out of 7,000 actors. Shakira is now filming Netflix’s, “Glow,” the 1980s-set female wrestling comedy. She has joined the cast for the 10-episode Season 2 playing Yolanda aka Yo-Yo, a a Mexican American dancer/stripper and out-and-proud lesbian who joins the team.