Posts tagged with "data"

Violence Spikes in Major Cities

By Eamonn Burke

Last month, 65 people were shot in New York City and 87 in Chicago over the course of the 4th of July weekend. Six children were killed that weekend as well. The holiday may have been a peak in homicides, but numbers of shootings and deaths have been trending upward as the nation handles a pandemic and a historic recession. The amount of shootings in NYC from January to July exceeded the total for the entire year of 2019. Other major cities are experiencing high rates of gun violence as well, such as Philadelphia, where more than 240 people have been killed this year and which now has the 2nd highest homicide rate in the nation. Chicago saw a violent July, with 584 shootings and 105 deaths. Even smaller cities like Pheonix and Omaha are seeing rises.

As a whole, homicides are up 24% in the nation since last year. Data shows homicides and shootings trending upward sharply since late May in major cities across the US. However, as a national study shows, gun violence was creeping upward even before the pandemic began.

President Trump blames the rise in violent crime to “radical” Democratic politicians , such as Major Bill DeBlasio, despite signs that this is a bipartisan issue. DeBlasio himself blames the shootings on the virus, among other factors such as the BLM protests and faults in the criminal justice system that have recently been exposed. The Council on Criminal Justice also concluded that the virus is the root issue, and that it must be stopped first in order to reduce homicides. A chart of homicides in Chicago does in fact show a major spike after the beginning of the protests, and the BLM protests in 2014 and 2015 had a similar effect on gun violence. However, further analysis of police data instead points to a decrease in gun-related arrests as a potential cause, as well as the increase in gun purchases in recent months.

Police say that many of these crimes are gang related, and a shortage of staff due to the virus have made it harder to crack down on crime. DeBlasio was adamant about getting back on top of the gun crisis through the courts: “Our courts not only need to reopen, they need to reopen as fully and as quickly as possible.” Chief administrative judge Lawrence Marks fired back, saying the blame of courts was “false, misleading and irresponsible.”

A strange finding amongst this gun crisis is that rates of other crimes such as burglaries have not followed the same trend, and have even decreased in some cases. As this is extremely odd, it’s possible that it’s a matter of what is getting reported given the complications of COVID-19 and the BLM protests on policing.

Book illustration

Purdue Commercialization System ranks 3rd in US

Purdue University technologies have generated 300-plus startups, helping millions of people in 100-plus countries and continuing Purdue’s commercialization ecosystem on a fast-paced upward trend to move inventions to the global market, where they can improve lives and advance the economy.

In fiscal-year 2020, two pillars of Purdue’s commercialization ecosystem, Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization and Purdue Foundry, generated record growth with the highest numbers ever reported in a single year for patent applications, issued patents, technology disclosures, licensing deals and startup creation.

During FY20, Purdue generated a record 55 startups in West Lafayette, Indiana. Of those, 22 originated from Purdue-licensed intellectual property and 33 from company-based entrepreneurs including Purdue students and alumni.

“The numbers are important, but even more important are the lives that are changed by the research of Purdue’s outstanding faculty and students as the results of this research are moved through the commercialization process and made available to people around the world,” Purdue President Mitch Daniels said. “There is much happening in the world today, and one of the most important contributions we can make to our society is to educate tomorrow’s leaders and involve them with the world-changing research of our faculty.”

Purdue’s FY20 ended June 30 and results include:

· Technology disclosures – 408, compared with 360 last year.

· Signed licenses and options – 148, compared with 136 last year.

· Technologies licensed – 225, compared with 231 last year.

· Startups from Purdue intellectual property – 22, compared with 17 last year.

· Issued patents – 252, with 180 U.S. and 72 international. Last year, the figures were 141 U.S. and 68 international patents issued.

· Total patent applications filed ­– 721, compared with 671 last year.

Click on technology commercialization data and/or Purdue-affiliated startups for a full list of each set of metrics.

Purdue is ranked third in the U.S. for startup creation in a report, compiled and reported by IPWatchdog Institute. The data used in the study was collected by AUTM over the period of 2008-18. Purdue also is ranked 13th in the world among universities granted U.S. utility patents for 2019 by the National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association.

Cumulative commercialization results include $400 million-plus in startup investments and funding, 400-plus jobs created and nine Purdue startups that have been acquired by international companies for $2.3 billion-plus. The research concentrations reported in the disclosures include numerous sectors in sustainability, health, space and artificial intelligence.

“I could not be more proud of Purdue’s researchers who have dedicated their lives to creating technologies to help others and our team of technology transfer professionals, who work diligently to move Purdue’s inventions from the laboratory to the public,” said Brooke Beier, vice president of the Office of Technology Commercialization. “Everyone involved in this process understands and appreciates the important work that is being done to help our global society.”

Wade Lange, vice president and chief entrepreneurial officer of the Purdue Research Foundation, said, “The Purdue commercialization ecosystem has developed into one of the most effective technology-based startup and licensing machines in the world, and these annual results reflect its success. From researchers to students to administrators to alumni and to our Greater Lafayette community partners, we are working together often and collaboratively to create and advance startups. We anticipate the next year will garner even more life-changing results.”

Resources available through the Purdue entrepreneurial ecosystem include the Purdue Foundry, Purdue Research Foundation, Office of Technology Commercialization, the Burton D Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship, the John Martinson Entrepreneurship Center and the Anvil.

Assistance for startups include mentorship, networking, marketing and funding programs. JUA Technologies International, a Purdue-affiliated startup that is developing solar-powered crop-drying devices, has received assistance from the Purdue Office of Technology Transfer Commercialization and Purdue Foundry. The startup was co-founded by husband-wife team of Klein Ileleji, a professor in agricultural and biological engineering at Purdue, and Reiko Habuto Ileleji, a Purdue alumna who earned her Ph.D. from Purdue’s College of Education.

“I am part of the research team that developed our crop-drying innovation at Purdue, and my wife and I founded JUA in 2016 after licensing the technology through the Office of Technology Commercialization. We continue to work closely with the Purdue Foundry,” Ileleji said. “I don’t believe we would have pursued a startup without Purdue’s strong entrepreneurial assistance programs.”

JUA has received funding, including a $100,000 Small Business Innovation Research Phase I grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a $50,000 match investment from Elevate Ventures through Indiana’s 21st Century Research and Technology Fund. The company also received $50,000 through the Purdue Ag-celerator Fund, a research advancement initiative created in 2015 and managed through Purdue Ventures, Purdue Foundry and Purdue College of Agriculture. Purdue Moves supports Ag-celerator fund.

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Covid and health illustration

COVID Collaboration Reducing Cases

A collaborative program developed at UVA Healthto work with local long-term care facilities to control COVID-19 is saving lives and offers a model for communities across the country, a new scientific paper reports.

The program has helped prevent COVID-19 infections and reducedmortality when outbreaks occur, its creators say. Of the first two facility outbreaks that the team has worked with, there were lower mortality rates than seen in previous outbreaks – 12% and 19%. That’s compared with a 28% mortality rate reported at a long-term care facility in Washington state.

“Developing this program has been a wonderful collaboration amongst many sites of care and types of care providers,” said UVA Health geriatrician Laurie R. Archbald-Pannone, MD, MPH, the program’s lead physician. “We call the program GERI-PaL – meaning Geriatric Engagement and Resource Integration for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Facilities – and it has been a great opportunity to bring together hospital and community-based resources to assist our local facilities in preventing and responding to COVID-19 outbreaks.”

A Practical Approach to Controlling COVID-19 Archbald-Pannone and her colleagues describe the program as a “practical approach” to controlling COVID-19 in long-term-carefacilities. Such facilities have been hard-hit by the pandemic because of the vulnerable health of many residents and the intensive nature of the care provided.

In their new paper, the UVA team highlights five key components of the program:

Infection advisory consultations: UVA Health infection-control experts worked hand-in-hand with the long-term care facilities to develop effective infection-control policies and address issues such as staffing needs and access to personal-protective equipment (PPE).

Project ECHO: A geriatrician, pulmonologist, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse leader and nurse educator were all made available using a model based on Project ECHO, a program that offers training and support for health professionals. The group met virtually with their colleagues at the nursing facilities to provide the latest COVID-19 information, testing and treatment guidance.

Telemedicine consultations: UVA Health pulmonary/critical-care and geriatric and palliative medicine experts provided consultations via telemedicine on testing, monitoring and treating facility residents for COVID-19. The team also facilitated transfers to the hospital, when needed, and transfers back to the nursing facilities when the patients had recovered sufficiently. The team also worked closely with the primary-care physicians to assist in decision-making and treatment of these patients.

Nursing liaisons: A nursing liaison offered concierge-style service for each facility, helping to keep lines of communication open and ensure any needs were met.

Resident social remote connections: Volunteer medical students spoke with residents by telephone to combat social isolation and keep their spirits up.

“This program has really been a team effort and highlights the dedication of colleagues across the healthcare continuum – physicians, nurses, administrators, technology experts, local health officials and more – all coming together to support work with our local facilities amidst the challenges of COVID-19,” Archbald-Pannone said. “We have all faced many challenges over the past few months. It’s been an honor to help support our local facilities and their dedicated staff members in the care of these vulnerable patients. Many of the systems we’ve put in place and lessons we have learned will be value to improve care beyond even COVID-19.”

Results Published

The UVA Health team members have described their experiences in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. The team consisted of Archbald-Pannone, Drew Harris, Kimberly Albero, Rebecca Steele, Aaron Pannone and Justin Mutter.

Covid and health illustration

COVID Collaboration Reducing Cases

A collaborative program developed at UVA Healthto work with local long-term care facilities to control COVID-19 is saving lives and offers a model for communities across the country, a new scientific paper reports.

The program has helped prevent COVID-19 infections and reducedmortality when outbreaks occur, its creators say. Of the first two facility outbreaks that the team has worked with, there were lower mortality rates than seen in previous outbreaks – 12% and 19%. That’s compared with a 28% mortality rate reported at a long-term care facility in Washington state.

“Developing this program has been a wonderful collaboration amongst many sites of care and types of care providers,” said UVA Health geriatrician Laurie R. Archbald-Pannone, MD, MPH, the program’s lead physician. “We call the program GERI-PaL – meaning Geriatric Engagement and Resource Integration for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Facilities – and it has been a great opportunity to bring together hospital and community-based resources to assist our local facilities in preventing and responding to COVID-19 outbreaks.”

A Practical Approach to Controlling COVID-19 Archbald-Pannone and her colleagues describe the program as a “practical approach” to controlling COVID-19 in long-term-carefacilities. Such facilities have been hard-hit by the pandemic because of the vulnerable health of many residents and the intensive nature of the care provided.

In their new paper, the UVA team highlights five key components of the program:

Infection advisory consultations: UVA Health infection-control experts worked hand-in-hand with the long-term care facilities to develop effective infection-control policies and address issues such as staffing needs and access to personal-protective equipment (PPE).

Project ECHO: A geriatrician, pulmonologist, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse leader and nurse educator were all made available using a model based on Project ECHO, a program that offers training and support for health professionals. The group met virtually with their colleagues at the nursing facilities to provide the latest COVID-19 information, testing and treatment guidance.

Telemedicine consultations: UVA Health pulmonary/critical-care and geriatric and palliative medicine experts provided consultations via telemedicine on testing, monitoring and treating facility residents for COVID-19. The team also facilitated transfers to the hospital, when needed, and transfers back to the nursing facilities when the patients had recovered sufficiently. The team also worked closely with the primary-care physicians to assist in decision-making and treatment of these patients.

Nursing liaisons: A nursing liaison offered concierge-style service for each facility, helping to keep lines of communication open and ensure any needs were met.

Resident social remote connections: Volunteer medical students spoke with residents by telephone to combat social isolation and keep their spirits up.

“This program has really been a team effort and highlights the dedication of colleagues across the healthcare continuum – physicians, nurses, administrators, technology experts, local health officials and more – all coming together to support work with our local facilities amidst the challenges of COVID-19,” Archbald-Pannone said. “We have all faced many challenges over the past few months. It’s been an honor to help support our local facilities and their dedicated staff members in the care of these vulnerable patients. Many of the systems we’ve put in place and lessons we have learned will be value to improve care beyond even COVID-19.”

Results Published

The UVA Health team members have described their experiences in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. The team consisted of Archbald-Pannone, Drew Harris, Kimberly Albero, Rebecca Steele, Aaron Pannone and Justin Mutter.

Cell carrier, t-mobile, 360 magazine, illustration, rita azar, wireless carriers

T-Mobile Crash

By Eamonn Burke

Today (June 15, 2020) between 2 and 3 pm ET the cell provider T-Mobile had a major outage that affected customers across the country, although the full reach of the crash is not yet known. Down Detector has reported 93,000 reports of the outages.

T-Mobile users have reported an inability to complete calls, which would fail almost immediately, and unable to receive them as well. Many also had issues with data and text. Other providers have not been affected.

“Our engineers are working to resolve a voice and data issue that has been affecting customers around the country. We’re sorry for the inconvenience and hope to have this fixed shortly,” says president of technology Neville Ray in a tweet.

Covid and health illustration

Coronavirus 2nd Wave

By Eamonn Burke

As states are beginning to reopen from the months-long quarantine due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19, and summer approaches, hoards of people are going back in public in a largely relaxed manner in terms of the social distancing and protective measures. Restaurants, shops, and gyms such as Equinox are opening, and people are excited to get back to normal life. Another major source of the spread has been protests, as crowds gather in cities across the nation to fight racial injustices in the country. While most are seen wearing masks, the spatial proximity is still certainly cause for concern.

It should come as no surprise, then, that COVID cases have spiked in recent weeks. 19 states, mostly in the southern and western parts of the country, reported increases in average COVID cases in the past two weeks. Texas has been hit especially hard – hospitalizations have doubled since memorial day, and hit record highs for multiple days in a row. North Carolina and Florida have experienced similar peaks. The county judge in Houston is contemplating another stay at home order.

There is concern in the east as well, as New York Governor Andrew Cuomo warns against a comeback of the virus in response to a video of a large crowd of people in Manhattan with few masks in sight.

The stock market is reacting to these troubling signs, as the Dow Jones Industrial Average has plummeted, as has S&P and Nasdaq.

Recent projections put the U.S. at 130,000 total deaths by July 4, and over 100,000 more deaths by September. There is good news too – Dr. Anthony Fauci says that the progress in the search for a vaccine is promising, and we could have trials running by the end of this year.

360 Magazine

No Trust In Trump

Americans are getting information about the coronavirus pandemic from political leaders and medical professionals, but confidence in those sources varies widely. A recent national survey conducted on behalf of the Fairleigh Dickinson University School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences finds that Americans are more likely to trust information that comes from medical professionals than politicians, with President Trump seen as least trustworthy regarding the information he provides. This and other findings from the survey suggest that Americans are putting their faith in medical expertise when it comes to getting critical information on how to best protect themselves and their loved ones from COVID-19. There are, however, substantial differences in who and what they trust based on a person’s politics and race.

The poll interviewed 1003 American adults nationwide on landlines and cell phones from May 20 through May 25, 2020. Medical professionals top the list of those Americans say they trust most for information about the coronavirus. Fifty-eight percent say they have a “great deal” of trust in doctors and scientists, while government-run websites are trusted by around a third of all Americans (36%). However, once political leaders become the source of information, Americans are more likely to distrust than trust what they see, hear, or read. Around a quarter (27%) have a great deal of trust in statewide elected officials, including their governor, and barely a fifth (22%) fully believe what their president tells them. In fact, the president is the only source who a majority (55%) of Americans distrust rather than trust.

“These findings point to the immense level of distrust Americans have in the ability of elected officials to communicate critical information needed to manage the COVID-19 pandemic and the obvious lack of meaningful leadership at the federal level,” said Bojana Beric-Stojsic, director of MPH program and an Associate Professor of Public Health, FDU School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. “What is most surprising and very distressing is that only 58 percent of Americans have a great deal of trust in doctors and scientists in the midst of a health crisis.”

Americans do give doctors and scientists much higher marks than the president when it comes to evaluating the reasons for evolving and sometimes conflicting information. Almost eight-in-ten believe that doctors and scientists change their recommendations on how to prevent and treat the coronavirus based on newly discovered scientific evidence (77%) rather than bowing to political pressure (23%). The opposite is true when it comes to the president, as more than half (53%) say his recommendations often change for political reasons rather than newly emerging scientific evidence (47%).

There is, however, a significant partisan divide on these issues. Although clear majorities of both Democrats and Republicans say that changing recommendations from doctors and scientists are due to newly discovered scientific evidence, President Trump’s evolving statements are understood very differently. Eighty-four percent of Republicans believe science dictates the president’s statements, while virtually the same percentage of Democrats (86%) believe political pressures explain changes in President Trump’s public statements about how to prevent and treat COVID-19. A huge gap between Democrats and Republicans also characterizes perceptions of the overall trustworthiness of the president (3% versus 47%), with a smaller but still significant difference separating Democrats from Republicans on their willingness to extend a “great deal” of trust to statewide elected officials like the governor (36% versus 20%).

“It’s notable that not even among his own partisans and those who approve of the job he’s done in managing this crisis does the President get a majority to say the information he provides about the coronavirus can be trusted a great deal,” said Krista Jenkins, director of the FDU Poll and professor of government and politics.

There are also significant racial disparities in assessing Trump’s performance and trustworthiness. More black Americans (83%) disapprove of the President’s management of the pandemic compared to 43 percent of white and 62 percent of Hispanic respondents; and 70 percent of blacks have absolutely no trust that the President provides accurate information about the coronavirus, compared to 37 percent of whites and 44 percent of Hispanics. More black Americans (79%) also believe Trump changes his recommendations about the coronavirus due to political pressure compared to 47 percent of whites and 60 percent of Hispanics.

Limited COVID Race Data

Last month, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law sent two letters to Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), Alex Azar, requesting comprehensive national race and ethnic demographic data for tests, cases and fatalities related to COVID-19. The Lawyers’ Committee received a letter in response last week from the director of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Robert Redfield.

The director’s response, lacking in substance, indicates that it could be weeks, or even months, before HHS provides a true and accurate account of the impact of this devastating this virus.

The coronavirus has been circulating in major U.S. cities since January. And five months into this pandemic, neither HHS nor the CDC has provided a full and complete data set showing the number of African Americans, and other racial and ethnic minorities, who have been tested for, contracted, or died from the virus. However, the limited data that has been released shows communities of color are suffering disproportionately from the pandemic. Robust and comprehensive race and ethnic demographic data is critical to shape effective policy responses that direct resources to African American communities and other communities of color, and to stem community spread of COVID-19.

“How many African Americans have to die before either HHS or the CDC can provide substantive data on the true racial impacts of COVID-19 and provide a clear plan to address the existing disproportionate impacts on African Americans and other communities of color?” said Kristen Clark, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “This is a public health emergency that requires a strategic response that directs resources to hot spots and towards African American communities that are suffering at higher rates. We cannot properly address a growing problem if the nation’s top health agencies will not adequately report useful data. Everyday there is a delay costs more lives and causes suffering.” Read the CDC response letter here.

smartphones, cell, tech, app, illustration, 360 MAGAZINE, sara sandman

IAITAM: Cybersecurity Risks for Companies

IAITAM: TOO MANY COMPANIES, AGENCIES WITH VULNERABILITIES “WIDE OPEN TO ATTACK”  FROM BREACHES DURING COVID-19 STAY-AT-HOME SHUTDOWNS

After Issuing Repeated Warnings, IAITAM Highlights 4 Biggest Problems Happening Now.

Today, the International Association of IT Asset Managers (IAITAM) is warning that breaches of corporate and government data appear to be running at a level even higher than experts had feared going into stay-at-home orders due to COVID-19.

Last month, IAITAM repeatedly warned of “nightmare data risks” for unprepared government agencies & companies, especially as end-of-the month billing procedures were being carried out remotely.

IAITAM President and CEO Dr. Barbara Rembiesa said: “We anticipated that things would get bad. Companies and agencies may be hoping and praying they are safe, but the work-from-home environment has created a multitude of opportunities for leaks. Too many organizations have left themselves wide open for attack. Understanding the pathways for access within a company’s data network is a valuable lens for businesses and agencies to avert leaking their own assets.”

Based on its preliminary analysis of early published reports, IAITAM is breaking down the biggest problems into four categories:  

1. Assets left unsecure  –  An intentional decision to make devices less secure to allow for work from home (WFH) use.  One example would involve removing admin permissions so that employees can complete the task without administrator oversight. Another would be allowing the use of “unpatched” business computers that allow hackers to load malicious files with admin privileges.  In some cases, companies with high-end virtual private networks (VPNs) pre-loaded on business computers are allowing people to work from home on personal devices either with no VPN or with a lower-end virtual private network that may be less hacker resistant.

2. “New” assets created –  More and more reports are emerging of companies purchasing new devices or technology to account for employees working from home.  In one case reported directly to IAITAM a national health care company ordered 9,000 new laptop computers from a major online company and gave its IT department less than a week to prep the new machines and deliver them to users, who had little or no time for training and other security-related instructions. The concern:  The more corporate assets that you have, the higher risk of intrusion. Each asset becomes a doorway or entry point for a breach, particularly when it (or its user) are underprepared. IT Asset Managers help with this by providing the data necessary for corporate security teams to know what exists, where it exists, and what is on the device.

3. Assets now unsecure in at-home environments –  Many company devices were deployed into a WFH situation quickly, leaving little time to ensure that they would be secure via a virtual private network (VPN) or other means. Just last week, school districts in Oakland and Berkeley, California unwittingly became an accomplice in their own data breach by accidentally making Google Classroom documents public, which contained access codes and passwords for Zoom meetings, as well as student’s names and comments.

4. Employees unwittingly inviting in the intrusion –  Human error allows for mistakes and creates a vulnerability (i.e. clicking on phishing emails or downloading malware). Google reported last week that it is stopping 18 million coronavirus scam-related emails every day, many of them targeting cash strapped businesses looking for loans or other capital. An internal memo from NASA on April 6th revealed that increased cybersecurity attacks had been directed at their employees working remotely. These phishing attempts were disguised as appeals for help, disinformation campaigns or new information about COVID-19, to gain login credentials or install malicious software. This is a prime example of how an employee could unwittingly invite in an intrusion. IT Asset Managers are at the forefront of education and communication campaigns within organizations to help teach end users what they should and should not be doing.

Even companies that do not make a mistake themselves could still find themselves the victim of a coronavirus-related breach. Earlier this month, The Small Business Administration experienced a glitch with a coronavirus loan relief fund platform that publicly leaked the personally identifiable information of business owners across the nation.

The good news is that most or all of these issues can be mitigated with proper IT asset management (ITAM). Professionals in the ITAM industry facilitate corporate asset protection. Uncovering the vulnerabilities now, and then putting an action plan into place will save companies money in the end. If companies and businesses act now, they can turn today’s crisis into tomorrow’s opportunity.

IAITAM President and CEO Dr. Barbara Rembiesa recently went on camera
to share more about what companies and government agencies should be doing.

ABOUT IAITAM

The International Association of Information Technology Asset Managers, Inc., is the professional association for individuals and organizations involved in any aspect of IT Asset Management, Software Asset Management (SAM), Hardware Asset Management, Mobile Asset Management, IT Asset Disposition and the lifecycle processes supporting IT Asset Management in organizations and industry across the globe. IAITAM certifications are the only IT Asset Management certifications that are recognized worldwide. For more information, visit www.iaitam.org.