Posts tagged with "tech news"

smartphones, cell, tech, app, illustration, 360 MAGAZINE, sara sandman

COVID-19 × Technological Change

COVID-19 Pandemic Will Force Companies Around the World to Radically Rethink How They Operate and Embrace Technological Investment

ABI Research Analysts share their thoughts on the likely short-and long-term impacts the global pandemic will have on technology and end markets

The Coronovirus outbreak and the worldwide reaction to the pandemic will force companies to radically rethink how they operate and embrace technological investment, states global tech market advisory firm, ABI Research.

In its new white paper, Taking Stock of COVID-19: The Short- and Long-Term Ramifications on Technology and End Markets, ABI Research Analysts look at the current and future ramifications of COVID-19 across technologies and verticals. Analysts also offer recommendations to weather the storm and strategies to help companies rebound and prosper after the pandemic has slowed.

“To effect change, there must be a stimulation of a magnitude that means companies cannot do anything but make bold decisions to survive. COVID-19 is that magnitude,” explains Stuart Carlaw, Chief Research Officer at ABI Research.

Bold decisions and technological investments could lead to outcomes such as:

-A more concerted and widespread move to lights-out manufacturing
-Increased usage of autonomous materials handling and goods vehicles
-A more integrated, diverse, and coordinated supply chain
-Investment in smart cities to support community resilience
-A move to virtual workspaces and practices…
…And so much more

“Before we feel this potential long-term impact, there will be some serious short-term implications. Contractions in consumer spending, disruptions to supply chains, and reduced availability of components will create a rough sea for all boats,” Carlaw says. “In the short-term, there will be a retrenchment in outlooks a reduced investment in modernization, as survival instincts trump the drive to prosperity.”

For a clearer picture of the short- and long-term global impacts of COVID-19, download the whitepaper Taking Stock of COVID-19: The Short- and Long-Term Ramifications on Technology and End Markets.

About ABI Research
ABI Research provides strategic guidance to visionaries, delivering actionable intelligence on the transformative technologies that are dramatically reshaping industries, economies, and workforces across the world. ABI Research’s global team of analysts publish groundbreaking studies often years ahead of other technology advisory firms, empowering our clients to stay ahead of their markets and their competitors.

For more information about ABI Research’s services, contact us at +1.516.624.2500 in the Americas, +44.203.326.0140 in Europe, +65.6592.0290 in Asia-Pacific or visit www.abiresearch.com

Cloud vs On-premise: What Does Your Company Need

If you’re looking for a new, efficient document management system, you’re probably noticing that many of your options are either cloud solutions or on-premise solutions.

In this article, we’ll talk about the differences between these two options. That’ll help you figure out which option is best for you.

Cloud Vs On-Premise: What Are My Needs

When considering your company’s needs, think about these five factors:

  • Functionality
  • Cost
  • User interface
  • How to share files
  • Integrations with other software

Let’s talk about each of these factors in more detail.

  1. Functionality

Cloud-based solutions earn their ‘online’ monikers due to the fact they can function in-browser on the internet, and this is important for several reasons.

Virtually any information device can gain access to the Internet these days, whereas, with on-premises DMS, access to organizational storage and collaboration features remain tied to the software’s point of installation/origin. Cloud vs. on-premise document management cannot be distinguished from each other without analyzing the functional limitations of on-premise solutions.

However, the cloud can transcend issues with desktop compatibility sometimes found in niche operating systems (niche meaning not within Windows).

Essentially, cloud-based, online DMS is, beyond any serious criticism, more functional than its on-premises counterpart, particularly because of its accessibility via mobile applications and consumer-grade laptops (such as Mac), which are becoming increasingly popular in the enterprise.

  1. Cost

Many know the up-front price differences between on-premises and cloud-based DMS, but few understand the differences in long term value. And, as always, value and price must be viewed hand-in-hand.

This is one of the most complex differences between cloud vs. on-premise document management solution.

Price is the most complex facet of these two technologies’ differences. On one hand, there are simple, bottom-line methods of measuring the expenses of each, and on the other hand, there are ‘benefits’ that are much more difficult to initially calculate as hard ROI.

Initially, the cloud costs less across the board from simple calculations, but both on-premises and cloud-based DMS will generate ROI for organizations because each technology helps organizations go paperless.

However, it should be noted that in general, organizations will have to spend more on electricity costs with an on-premises solution, and on-premises solutions are a better fit for rural offices as these areas have fewer Internet speed/access options.

  1. User Interface

On-premises solutions are typically easier for DMS newcomers to understand. But the cloud, as a web technology, offers a certain degree of customizability that can render the solution more intuitive to its user.

Despite the intuitiveness of the cloud, on-premises is a technology that’s been around for a while and can be likened to the intuitiveness of software comprising the Windows interface.

Despite these differences, both modes of DMS usage provide the software integration needed to make processes more intuitive with an existing tech infrastructure.

  1. How To Share Files

On-premises solutions are great if you only need to share documents across the office. On-premise software solutions usually rely on an office intranet to share documents from employee to employee.

The problem is, businesses oftentimes need to share documents with people outside of the building. There are different secure options for sending messages, but a cloud-based DMS will have that built-in already.

So consider who will need access to documents when making the decision.

  1. Integration

On-premises offers more control over how security is implemented, measured, and contained, whereas the cloud, although not as customizable, is arguably more configurable – meaning external components are more easily integrated into the system.

Cloud vs. on-premise document management provides insight on how much customizability is offered for on-premise over cloud-based alternatives.

An organization with a lot of programming demands may want to consider this option. As with any new technology, there are always going to be somewhat limited integration capabilities with preexisting organizational structures.

However, the right document management software, whether on-premises or in the cloud, can offer software integration to mitigate the impact of customizing challenges.

Cloud Migration Challenges and How To Overcome Them

Firstly, one has to understand that migrating to the Cloud cannot be achieved with the push of a button. It would be wise for a firm or individual planning to make their move to the Cloud to seek assistance from a team that specializes in Cloud migration from on-premise to the Cloud.

Also, do not try to migrate everything all at once or try to pull off an “all or nothing” migration. When moving to the Cloud it is better to take a sub-set approach by uploading a bit at a time.

When all data has been migrated to the Cloud, the next step would be to train staff members in using the Cloud to its full potential. It should be understood that moving to the Cloud will give rise to new processes and procedures that will differ from what was used previously in on-premise systems. In other words, one has to ensure that their firm is “Cloud-ready.”

Last but not least is planning, planning, planning. Be sure to plan what data needs to be moved across to the Cloud. This is especially true with firms that have decades of data, some of which have become “stale.” Moving stale data creates stale data in the Cloud; however, migration can be used as an opportunity to clean up obsolete databases and files.

Is Rubex by eFileCabinet Secure?

We previously mentioned how Cloud security is generally more robust than on-premise, and eFileCabinet is no different. We take security seriously and offer security measures that are above and beyond that which can be achieved by local systems.

When using Rubex by eFileCabinet, all files are heavily encrypted to ensure that data remains safe and confidential. Also, Rubex files reside on SAS 70 Type II secure servers with a variety of physical barriers and intrusion detection systems to prevent unauthorized access.

Furthermore, all files are backed up regularly at multiple geographic locations to ensure that lost data can easily be recovered in the event of a fire, theft, natural disaster, hard drive failure, etc.

Going a step further, data that resides on our online systems is protected using SSL: Secure Socket Layer encryption as an added layer of security. Rubex spares no effort in keeping sensitive information safe and secure. Find out how you can keep your files secure today by filling out the contact form provided for a free 15-minute demo.

Andreas Rivera is a technology writer with experience in both reviewing and marketing tech services and products. His areas of expertise include writing about B2B, SaaS companies and how they best address the pain points of businesses. Since early 2019, he has been the Marketing Content Writer for eFileCabinet and has become well versed in how document management software helps businesses reinvent their manual processes and spur growth. Contact him at arivera@efilecabinet.com

tech, computers, illustration, 360 MAGAZINE

Facebook Enters Stage of World Politics

By Dr. Nick Oberheiden, Esq.

When political and military leaders from around the world convene this week for the annual Munich Security Conference, one attendee does not seem to quite fit the convention’s profile: Mark Zuckerberg. The CEO of Facebook will sit next to over 40 heads of state, intelligence officers, and military commanders at the world’s preeminent international security conference.

Zuckerberg’s visit marks a dramatic shift in world politics. Governments and law enforcement agencies have discovered the enormous utility of platforms like Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram to connect people, places, and events. China and Russia have expanded their definition of national security to include virtually any data set: from military drone footage to online tracing to consumer behavior. Zuckerberg does not wear a military uniform, nor is he an elected or appointed official, but Facebook plays a pivotal role on this intensifying cyberspace battlefield.

With over 2 billion Facebook users, Facebook controls an unimaginable amount of digital data such as user contact information, physical whereabouts, cell-site locations, email addresses, IP addresses of websites visited, and records of interpersonal communications. Zuckerberg is the king of information. Facebook has transformed into a hybrid platform where commercial businesses and political activists spread messages, inform (and misinform) to influence politics, the economy, and society. The few publicly available numbers confirm this heightened political dimension of Facebook. Year over year, Facebook reports an increase of FBI National Security Letter (NSL) requests pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 2709 (Section 201 of the Electronics Communications Privacy Act of 1986).

In this war of information, the United States is at a crossroads. While some lawmakers support consumer activists who attack Facebook for its criticized handling of privacy rights, too many American politicians still overlook the strategic value Facebook plays in what Zuckerberg himself called an “ongoing arms race” with Russia and China in his 2018 congressional testimony. Others hesitate to introduce legislation that could be seen as infringing on the First Amendment rights of speech and association – which apply to corporations as well as natural persons.

When governmental agencies begin to depend on commercial businesses for information, it’s time to rethink national security in this country. For example, how should U.S. companies respond when a foreign country that is considered an enemy of the United States requests sensitive economic information from such a private company? Revised legislation may be needed to capture the geopolitical threats of our time. Congress may need to step in to define how much intel U.S. companies may share with foreign governments and whether the dissemination of certain national security data to non-NATO partner countries may be penalized. Checkpoint Charlie does not exist anymore. Today’s files are carried digitally, no longer by spies with a suitcase. The need for prevention and deterrence, however, remains. Traitors and defectors tempted to cash out by offering critical data are the spies of our time.

Zuckerberg knows that he is holding the oil of the 21st century: sensitive information. Coincidence or not, Zuckerberg’s journey takes him from Munich to Europe’s capital Brussels to negotiate Facebook’s tax and antitrust deal with European lawmakers, many of whom will fawn over him at the Munich Conference. Zuckerberg will enter these negotiations from a position of strength.

Dr. Nick Oberheiden is the founder of federal litigation and trial law firm Oberheiden P.C., which is largely comprised of former Justice Department attorneys.