Posts tagged with "Purdue university"

mail by Purdue University and Adranos Inc. for 360 Magazine

Adranos’ Indiana Manufacturing Plant

Adranos Inc., a Purdue University-affiliated company that has developed a high-performance, solid rocket fuel called ALITEC for long-range missile and space launch systems, announced plans Wednesday (Feb. 3) to construct a facility in the Purdue Research Park of West Lafayette to manufacture ALITEC in support of various launch systems, including hypersonic systems.

The company has obtained $5.1 million in land, funding and tax credits collectively from Purdue Research Foundation and the Indiana Economic Development Corporation.

Adranos will use these incentives to construct its facility in the Purdue Research Park. Adranos expects to serve a broad customer base, including the major military branches and relevant aerospace and defense contractors. The facility will support ongoing efforts that Adranos is currently performing through its rocket motor research and development division.

Adranos plans to create up to 50 new jobs by the end of 2025.

“ALITEC’s performance benefits make it an ideal solution for any solid rocket system that is seeking to extend range, increase payload capacity or reduce rocket form factor,” said Chris Stoker, CEO of Adranos. “This facility will enable us to scale these solutions to the large volumes that will be required by our customers.”

Expansion of Adranos’s manufacturing capabilities aligns with the state of Indiana’s goals of increasing defense spending and becoming a leader in the development of hypersonic technologies. Adranos is currently performing work sponsored by the Department of Defense to evaluate ALITEC in both solid rocket boosters for hypersonic programs and in air breathing systems called solid-fuel ramjets, which use solid rocket fuel. As demand for ALITEC grows, so too will defense spending in the state.

“Indiana is committed to embracing disruptive technology like Adranos’s ALITEC to bolster its economic industries and position the state for long-term global competitiveness and economic growth in the defense sector,” said retired Major Gen. Omer C. (Clif) Tooley, IEDC President of defense development. “Indiana is ranked No. 1 in the nation in tech job growth among small firms, and as a state we’ll continue supporting innovative companies like Adranos and securing our spot as a top place to grow and innovate.”

Similarly, Adranos’s growth aligns with PRF’s mission of innovating and commercializing technologies developed at Purdue University. By supporting Adranos’s efforts to establish a production facility, PRF is enabling the transition of ALITEC production from laboratory scale to production scale.

“Adranos is another exciting example of an innovative company that touches many parts of the Purdue commercialization ecosystem,” said Brian Edelman, president of the Purdue Research Foundation. “We are thrilled that this new facility in Purdue Research Park will help further advance the Adranos technology and boost the state’s economy.”

Recently, Adranos won more than $3.2 million in government contracts, was named to Pepperdine University’s most fundable companies list, and took the grand prize at the Army’s inaugural xTechSearch competition.

Technology used by Adranos is licensed through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization, which patented the technology. Adranos is located in Purdue Research Park.

IEDC offered Adranos up to $525,000 in conditional tax credits and up to $200,000 in training grants based on the company’s job creation plans. IEDC also offered up to $500,000 in conditional tax credits from the Hoosier Business Investment tax credit program based on the company’s planned capital investment in Indiana. These tax credits are performance-based, meaning the company is eligible to claim incentives once Hoosiers are hired and investments are made. The company has also been awarded $75,000 in Small Business Innovation Research matching grants from Elevate Ventures, and received $20,000 in funding through the Elevate Purdue Foundry Fund.

Nadya Ortiz Parallels that of ‘Queen’s Gambit’ Character

She grew up in an economically depressed area, became a teenage chess star, and traveled the world as an international chess woman grandmaster.

Now she is a senior software engineer at Apple.

This isn’t the story of the fictional character Beth Harmon from “The Queen’s Gambit,” but rather of Nadya Ortiz, who received a master’s degree in computer science from Purdue University in 2014.

And although Ortiz’s story doesn’t have the pathos of Beth Harmon’s, it is every bit as inspiring. Her story, she says herself, is one of persistence.

As another chess grandmaster once said, no one ever won the game by resigning.

Streaming on Netflix, “The Queen’s Gambit” became the surprise global cultural television touchstone of 2020. The story of an orphaned girl who rises to become a world chess champion seems like an unlikely premise for what is at its core a sports movie. The program was the No.1 show in 63 countries, and in the top 10 in 29 more within a month after its October release.

In some ways, the story of Ortiz parallels that of fictional Beth Harmon. Both came from less-than-privileged backgrounds, Harmon in rural Kentucky and Ortiz in Colombia. Both endured discrimination by being women in a male-dominated sport. Both became national champions and went on to become professional chess players traveling through Europe at a young age. There was one minor difference: Ortiz says her tournament attire would not have been considered high fashion.

“In terms of the clothing, that’s more fictional. As you can imagine, chess players are more on the nerd side,” she says with a laugh.

Ortiz is a fan of the program because it triggered worldwide interest in the game. She also appreciates the care the filmmakers took to faithfully reproduce the action on the boards.

“As a chess player I was amazed at how the chess positions were so accurate. I would pause the show and look at the player’s move and ask, ‘Is this correct?’ As a professional chess player, I was really amazed to see such brilliant positions. You know [former world champion] Garry Kasparov was a consultant, and the chess moves were real. I liked that.”

Ortiz learned the game from her chess-enthusiast father, she says, when she was 6 or 7 years old. She grew up in the city of Ibagué, in the center of the country in the Colombian Andes, an economically depressed region where the average annual income is less than $5,000 U.S. per year.

“Like in many other poor areas of the world, sports is one of the few economic opportunities, so my parents encouraged me to see chess more as a sport, an opportunity,” Ortiz says. “And when I was a teenager, I wanted to just play chess, and that meant I needed to be out of Colombia. And you can imagine the tension that caused with my parents.

“But even though I grew up with all of these economic and social challenges, my parents had given me core values. And they supported me.”

By age 14, she had become the national champion of Colombia. At 16, she won the Central American Championship in Barbados. Soon, while still a teenager, she was a professional chess player, playing on an international stage. Eventually she competed in more than 30 countries, becoming an international woman grandmaster at the 2010 World Chess Olympiad in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia.

“I played tournament after tournament. I was in heaven,” she says. “After four years I didn’t have the world title. But I was like, that’s it. I tried.”

Her life took a turn when at age 20 she received a surprise offer from Juliet Garcia, the president of the University of Texas at Brownsville (now the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley). The university sits at the southernmost tip of Texas, in an area with one of the highest poverty rates in the United States. Garcia wanted to form a university chess team, in part as a means to help the children of the area become more engaged with their education, and she wanted a woman on the team. Garcia offered Ortiz a chess scholarship, but something was blocking her next move.

“It was a dream,” she says. “I wanted to study. I wanted to play chess. But I didn’t speak English.”

She asked if she could delay her start at the university by six months, and she spent the time learning the language.

“I passed the English admission exams, but when I arrived, I could barely understand the instructors in my classes. But I love math, and so for the first two years I mainly took math classes and continued to learn English. Then, I began studying computer science. It’s about reasoning and implementing, and in that way, it is like a kind of game.”

She graduated summa cum laude but was concerned that she would not be able to get the job she dreamed of with just an undergraduate degree from a small, largely unknown college. Her chess coach at the time was an international grandmaster, and he mentioned that he had met people around the world who were Purdue graduates and that the university seemed to have many international students. Ortiz applied and received a scholarship to work on a master’s degree in computer science.

At Purdue, she quickly began to fear that she was in over her head; her classes were more rigorous and competitive than her undergraduate classes. After her first exams, she began to panic and thought she might lose her scholarship.

She was able to recover, thanks to the encouragement of her advisor at Purdue, Jan Vitak, who now is a professor of computer sciences at Northeastern University, whom she calls “my angel.”

“I went to his office, and I told him, ‘Professor, I study Monday to Monday without a break. I’m afraid I’m going to lose this scholarship.’ He told me, ‘Look, we believe in you. That’s why we gave you this scholarship. If you keep working, your knowledge will accumulate and you will catch up and be fine.’

“I learned you can be in an amazing program and super smart, but you still need that humanity, and I found that at Purdue.”

After Purdue, Ortiz next move was to head to Apple Inc., where she now works in machine learning and data science.

She makes sure to mention the advice and support she received from her parents, her coaches and her professors. She now passes on her life lessons in part through a program in her hometown where she sponsors an instructor to teach chess in two schools.

“It’s small, but the goal is to expand and promote chess in the schools,” she says. “Not as a sport or competitive chess, but using chess as an educational tool, especially in low-income areas. I really hope the current spike of interest in chess will help to promote the game and support chess in schools around the world.”

When asked what advice she might have for young people who consider her a role model, she refers to the lessons she learned as a competitive chess player.

“Persistence, perseverance and hard work,” she says.  “These have been major qualities I have cultivated throughout the course of my life, and try to do so every day. Having persistence to accomplish the goals, persevering when the situation is not ideal and working hard regardless of the situation have helped me to keep fighting for my dreams.”

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 5 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at https://purdue.edu/.

Purdue Startup Fund Helps Move Technologies Across the World

A new funding option is helping provide support for Purdue-affiliated startups looking to gain traction and improve the world through innovative technologies.

The Purdue Startup Fund was started in 2020 by Purdue Ventures, an arm of the Purdue Foundry. The Foundry is an entrepreneurship and commercialization hub whose professionals help Purdue innovators create and grow startups.

“This fund is a partnership between the Purdue Research Foundation and Purdue University to maximize the university’s commitment to serving others through the commercialization of innovations,” said Wade Lange, vice president and chief entrepreneurial officer of the Purdue Research Foundation. “This is another crucial source of early-stage capital for our startups.”

The Purdue Startup Fund is designed to provide support for startups across all industries. Four startups have been selected so far for funding:

  • Umoja Biopharma – a startup focused on drugs using a patient’s own immune cells to kill cancerous cells.
  • Novosteo – a company that is developing an injectable drug to accelerate bone fracture repair.
  • ClearBlade – an industry-leading Edge Computing software company.
  • GoGig Jobs – an anonymous professional networking platform.

“These startups were selected based on their potential to make an impact on the world

through their technologies,” said John Hanak, managing director of Purdue Ventures.

The Purdue Startup Fund was created to provide support for early-stage companies with direct ties to Purdue intellectual property, alumni or other university connections. Like the Foundry Investment Fund, the Purdue Startup Fund is a sidecar funding that requires the existence of a significant institutional investment in a startup against which it can match a percentage.

“PRF has a mission to support Purdue and take the research, technologies and other work done here to the world,” said Riley Gibb, director of business development for Purdue Ventures. “The Purdue Startup Fund is another strategic way for us to make that happen. Capital can be a scarce resource for startups, so we wanted to offer another option.”

Startups interested in learning more can contact Gibb directly at rtgibb@prf.org.

Purdue Ventures directs three other funds: Ag-Celerator, Elevate Purdue Foundry Fund, Foundry Investment Fund, along with the Purdue Angel Network.

About Purdue Foundry

The Purdue Foundry is an entrepreneurship and commercialization hub whose professionals help Purdue innovators create and grow startups. The Purdue Foundry is housed in the Convergence Center for Innovation and Collaboration in Discovery Park District, adjacent to the Purdue campus. The Purdue Foundry has been involved with creating more than 300 companies. The Purdue Foundry is managed by the Purdue Research Foundation, which received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. In 2020, IPWatchdog Institute ranked Purdue third nationally in startup creation. For more information about involvement and investment opportunities in startups based on a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Foundry at foundry@prf.org.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 5 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at purdue.edu.

Andrew Exner, a graduate research assistant in Purdue’s Motor Speech Lab, is working to help Parkinson’s patients during the COVID-19 pandemic as announced by 360 MAGAZINE.

AI Technology Helps Parkinson’s Patients During COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic is leading a Purdue University innovator to make changes as she works to provide new options for people with Parkinson’s disease.

Jessica Huber, a professor of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences and associate dean for research in Purdue’s College of Health and Human Sciences, leads Purdue’s Motor Speech Lab. Huber and her team are now doing virtual studies to evaluate speech disorders related to Parkinson’s using artificial intelligence technology platforms.

Huber and her team have been working to develop telepractice tools for the assessment and treatment of speech impairments like Parkinson’s disease. They received a National Institutes of Health small business innovation and research grant to develop a telehealth platform to facilitate the provision of speech treatment with the SpeechVive device, which has received attention at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

In the current study, Huber and her team are collaborating with a startup company, Modality AI, which developed the AI platform that will be used in the study.

“The application of the technology we are evaluating may lead to far-reaching insights into more standardization in assessments, earlier diagnoses and possibly an easier way to track discrete changes over time to guide interventions,” said Andrew Exner, a graduate research assistant in the Motor Speech Lab. “My personal research passion, and the mission of our lab, is to find ways to improve the quality of life for people with Parkinson’s and other related diseases.”

Exner is leading the virtual study for participants across the country to evaluate an AI platform that can collect and automatically measure the speech skills of people with Parkinson’s disease. The need for AI platforms is increasing as the use of telepractice explodes as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“My interest in speech-language pathology actually started during my training as an actor and opera singer,” Exner said. “I saw the effects of pathology on the voice and wanted to extend that interest into speech disorders.”

SpeechVive Inc. is an Indiana startup company based on Huber’s research. The company has developed a wearable medical device to improve the speech clarity of people with Parkinson’s.

Anyone interested in learning more about the virtual studies or taking part, can email Exner at exner@purdue.edu.

Image courtesy of Purdue University.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Food and Travel Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Purdue alumna × Stovetop stuffing

If Stove Top stuffing makes an appearance at your Thanksgiving dinner, you can thank a Purdue University alumna.

The late Ruth Siems, a 1953 home economics graduate, is credited with the invention of Stove Top stuffing. The product hit shelves in 1971 as a dish appropriate for Thanksgiving but also for everyday meals. The secret behind the dish is the dimensions of the bread crumbs, which General Foods patented in 1975. Siems is listed first among the inventors, followed by Anthony Capossela Jr., John Halligan and C. Robert Wyss.

Siems’ invention came at a time when there was a high demand in the U.S. for convenience foods. She worked on developing Stove Top stuffing while working at General Foods, and the invention quickly became a Thanksgiving staple.

Siems grew up in Evansville, Indiana, and died in 2005 in Newburgh, Indiana, according to her obituary in The New York Times. She worked at General Foods almost 35 years. Kraft Foods now owns Stove Top stuffing, which sells about 60 million boxes a year. The dish comes in a variety of flavors.

Purdue Archives and Special Collections has information about Siems’ work on food inventions as part of the Gertrude Sunderlin Papers. Sunderlin was an early foods and nutrition professor at Purdue.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 5 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at https://purdue.edu/.

Therapies Developed to Reduce Lung Fibrosis

A new treatment option for lung fibrosis is being developed by Purdue University scientists. Lung fibrosis has been a concern for COVID-19 patients.

People with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have a life expectancy of fewer than five years. Fibrotic diseases cause organ failure that leads to about 45% of all deaths in the United States. Existing therapies do little to slow progression.

Now, Philip S. Low, Purdue’s Ralph C. Corley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Presidential Scholar for Drug Discovery, has led a team to develop two targeted therapies for people with IPF. The two different therapeutic approaches are published in Science Translational Medicine and EMBO Molecular Medicine.

“This is a horrible disease that claimed the lives of my next-door neighbor and a good friend’s wife,” Low said. “We developed two targeted therapies that allow us to use powerful drugs with high toxicities because we specifically deliver them to diseased cells without harming healthy ones.”

The first of the Purdue team’s novel targeted molecules is designed to slow fibrosis and extend life. The second IPF therapy suppresses fibrosis-inducing cytokine production.

The two therapies will be moving into human clinical trials within the next several months. The developments come as a number of people with COVID-19 or who have recovered from COVID-19 experience lung fibrosis or other related conditions.

The therapy technologies are licensed through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization and optioned to MorphImmune, a startup co-founded by Low. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Office of Technology Commercialization at otcip@prf.org.

About Purdue Research Foundation

The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Established in 1930, the foundation accepts gifts; administers trusts; funds scholarships and grants; acquires property; protects Purdue’s intellectual property; and promotes entrepreneurial activities on behalf of Purdue. The foundation manages the Purdue Foundry, Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, Purdue Research Park, Purdue Technology Centers and University Development Office. In 2020, the IPWatchdog Institute ranked Purdue third nationally in startup creation and in the top 20 for patents. The foundation received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization at otcip@prf.org. For more information about involvement and investment opportunities in startups based on a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Foundry at foundry@prf.org.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 5 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at purdue.edu.

Writer: Chris Adam, cladam@prf.org
Source: Philip Low, plow@purdue.edu

Suraj U. Hettiarachchi, Yen-Hsing Li, Jyoti Roy, Fenghua Zhang, Estela Puchulu-Campanella, Spencer D. Lindeman, Madduri Srinivasarao, Konstantin Tsoyi, Xiaoliang Liang, Ehab A. Ayaub, Cheryl Nickerson-Nutter, Ivan O. Rosas and Philip S. Low

DARPA selects Continuity Pharma to fund manufacturing technology

The COVID-19 pandemic has created supply chain gaps in critical drug products, especially those needed for the most critical patients in intensive care units across the country.

DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Project Agency) has selected Continuity Pharma, a Purdue University-affiliated company, to develop continuous manufacturing technology. The company was selected for a $1.5 million grant.

DARPA has established a competitive review process, awarding grant funding to companies presenting advanced manufacturing technologies.

Continuity Pharma’s mission is to apply novel continuous manufacturing capabilities to reshore generic drug products to the U.S., with specific focus on drugs in short supply.

“We are thrilled to be selected by DARPA to further our development efforts,” said David Thompson, a Purdue professor of organic chemistry and co-founder and chief scientific officer at Continuity. “We are one step closer to ensuring the availability of essential medicines to patients in need. It is an exciting time for Continuity Pharma.”

Grant specifics include development funding over the next 24 months, with additional funding for commercialization in the subsequent 12 months. Focus areas include capabilities for multiple API manufacturing in the Integrated Continuous Manufacturing System, with demonstrated efficiencies for rapid changeover and manufacturing efficiencies.

Continuity Pharma leaders are working with Purdue Research Foundationofficials to secure additional lab space in Purdue Research Park in West Lafayette.

About Continuity Pharma

Continuity Pharma was formed with the mission to ensure a consistent supply of high-quality essential medicines for patients in need. The company accomplishes this by applying analytical and process design expertise to create modular and portable continuous manufacturing systems for synthesizing essential generic medicines. Using high throughput methodologies, they identify the ideal reaction conditions for preparing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) to be manufactured efficiently in continuous flow. The result is a high yield of medical-grade API with the least toxic waste and the best opportunity for production on scale. For additional information or questions, contact the company at contact@continuitypharma.com or call 812-805-0038.

About Purdue Research Foundation

The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Established in 1930, the foundation accepts gifts; administers trusts; funds scholarships and grants; acquires property; protects Purdue’s intellectual property; and promotes entrepreneurial activities on behalf of Purdue. The foundation manages the Purdue Foundry, Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, Purdue Research Park, Purdue Technology Centers and University Development Office. In 2020, the IPWatchdog Institute ranked Purdue third nationally in startup creation and in the top 20 for patents. The foundation received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization at otcip@prf.org. For more information about involvement and investment opportunities in startups based on a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Foundry at foundry@prf.org.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 5 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at purdue.edu.

Purdue × Abu Dhabi work on cybersecurity of drones

By Jim Bush

Abu Dhabi has intentions of making the city a leading hub for technology and innovation in the Middle East.

Part of that evolution is utilizing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, to assist with as many tasks as possible, from delivering packages to aiding in police operations to helping investigate crashes on highways to delivering high-value transports, like organs for transplant.

With autonomy, though, comes risks of hackers and complications between interacting agents.

A group of Purdue University researchers have been tasked to make sure drones and their systems could operate securely, safely and efficiently in the United Arab Emirates capital. Inseok Hwang, a professor in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, is principal investigator on a three-year, $2.3-million grant from the Technology Innovation Institute in Abu Dhabi to study the application of secure drone swarms in urban environments.

The project requires expertise in autonomous vehicles, control, sensing, virtual reality and security. James Goppert, a visiting assistant professor in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics and managing director of the UAS Research and Test Facility, and Dongyan Xu, the Samuel D. Conte Professor of Computer Science and director of CERIAS (Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security), Purdue’s cybersecurity research and education center, are co-principal investigators on the project.

“We will address this problem in a highly integrated, interdisciplinary way,” Hwang said. “We will consider it from the program level to the high-level network of systems, so we accomplish the hierarchic way from the very detailed lower level, the software and hardware level, to the large network of vehicles and from the single vehicle to multivehicle. So it’s multidimensional. That’s one of the unique pieces of this project.”

The project will utilize one of Purdue’s unrivaled assets, the UAS Research and Test Facility. The 20,000-square-foot, 35-feet high facility, located at Hangar 4 of the Purdue University Airport, features the largest indoor motion capture system in the world and offers unique capabilities for novel research.

Goppert will build a mixed reality environment, combining a virtual reality urban environment with a scaled physical model of the city. The drones will fly and navigate the city, and the environment can be programmed to simulate a wide range of settings, including weather, traffic and urban development, to test the drones’ applicability and agility. The testing will be done with single vehicles as well as swarms, which could include 10 drones.

Hwang said he hasn’t seen any research done using mixed reality to this scale. Neither has Goppert.

“Our unique capability is that we have such a large environment to do it,” Goppert said. “Just running so many vehicles at once is going to be a challenge. In the past, several vehicles have been used. But if we’re going to be running swarms where each vehicle needs a rendered virtual mixed reality image, that’s going to be really computationally challenging. That’s what we’re pushing forward.

“We thought we could try to bring it as close to real-life as possible to get as many of the bugs worked out before they actually deploy such a system. We can do it all in software, but there’s an added advantage in bringing it closer to reality by making some of it actual robots.”

Hwang and Xu will have a multitiered approach from the cybersecurity and robustness standpoint. Xu will investigate from the cyber perspective of security, encryption, authentication and peer-to-peer communications. Hwang will develop a mathematical model and use the control theoretical solution approach, assessing potential cyberattacks on the systems and working to design a controller in such a way that the system becomes more resilient to attacks.

“This project reflects exciting synergies between two areas of technical excellence at Purdue: aeronautics and astronautics, and cybersecurity,” Xu said.

Ultimately, all of the research will be integrated and pieced together around the state-of-the-art test bed, which could happen toward the end of the second year of the three-year grant.

With a variety of drones tasked with different assignments, “how do we make sure they play well together?” Goppert said. “We’re trying to simulate that within our facility.”

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 5 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at https://purdue.edu/.

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Eamonn Burke illustrates a rock music video article for 360 MAGAZINE

Innovators create flexible, printed coil for stringed instruments

The wires inside an electric guitar to help produce quality sound can stretch for miles – even the length of a university campus. The copper wire, with the diameter of a human hair, is wrapped around magnets inside the guitar via a tedious and time-consuming process.

Now, Purdue University innovators have developed a solution to cut down that process and make the finished products better for players and manufacturers.

The team created a flexible, printed circuit board that imitates the conventional wire configurations inside an electric guitar. Existing guitars can be retrofitted with this innovation. The technology also has applications for other stringed instruments.

“We came up with a new approach to the electric guitar pickup – the magnetic transducer that helps create the musical sound,” said Davin Huston, an assistant professor of practice in engineering technology in the Purdue Polytechnic Institute. “Our circuit boards can be printed in large quantities and fit inside just about any electric guitar, which simplifies the manufacturing process but keeps the sound quality and reliability.”

The other members of the Purdue innovation team include Mark French, a professor of mechanical engineering technology in Purdue Polytechnic, and Kathryn Smith, a former graduate student in Huston’s lab.

The Purdue team’s circuit board works in the same general way as a conventional electric guitar pickup – string vibrations cause the electromagnetic field to oscillate and induce a voltage in the stationary coil. The electric signal generated is then carried to a power amplifier and speaker.

“With typical pickups, the wire coils often produce undesired feedback and need to be potted with wax or a polymer,” French said. “Our circuit board provides an alternative that is easier to produce with manufactured consistency.”

The team worked with the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization to patent the technology. A U.S. patent has been granted on this technology.

The creators are looking for partners to continue developing their technology and license it. For more information, contact D.H.R. Sarma of OTC at dhrsarma@prf.org and reference track code 2013-HUST-66596.

About Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization

The Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization operates one of the most comprehensive technology transfer programs among leading research universities in the U.S. Services provided by this office support the economic development initiatives of Purdue University and benefit the university’s academic activities through commercializing, licensing and protecting Purdue intellectual property. The office recently moved into the Convergence Center for Innovation and Collaboration in Discovery Park District, adjacent to the Purdue campus. In fiscal year 2020, the office reported 148 deals finalized with 225 technologies signed, 408 disclosures received and 180 issued U.S. patents. The office is managed by the Purdue Research Foundation, which received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. In 2020, IPWatchdog Institute ranked Purdue third nationally in startup creation and in the top 20 for patents. The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Contact otcip@prf.org for more information.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 6 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at purdue.edu.

book, reading, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

Purdue Ranks Top 20 For Patents

Purdue University ranks 13th globally for receiving U.S. utility patents during the 2019 calendar year in a report published annually by the National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association.

The distinction marks the sixth straight year that Purdue has ranked in the top 20. Purdue ranked 12th in the rankings in 2018, 17th in 2017, 15th in 2015 and 16th in 2014. Purdue is among only a dozen U.S. universities to be rated in the top 20 in each of the past five years and one of only a few in the top 20 without a medical school. The rankings are based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

“Purdue’s ranking in the top 20 in issued U.S. patents for the sixth straight year recognizes the renowned researchers at Purdue and their contributions to improving lives around the globe,” said Brooke Beier, vice president of the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, “It also demonstrates Purdue’s robust research and development ecosystem and ability to turn ideas from the laboratory into patents that are of interest to industry and the entrepreneurial community.”

The Purdue Research Foundation, which manages and licenses Purdue’s intellectual property through the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, received 136 utility patents in calendar year 2019 after receiving 126 utility patents in 2018. Arizona State is listed 12th with 137, Harvard is 11th with 156 and Michigan is 10th with 158 utility patents in the report. A complete list of the report’s Top 100 is online.

Graham Cooks, the Henry Bohn Hass Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, holds 100 patents. He also catalyzed the foundation of several companies to commercialize his innovations including Griffin Analytical Technologies and Prosolia Inc.; international companies acquired both.

“I am not surprised that Purdue does so well in the receiving utility patents. The recognition is reflects of the entire process, the support system and all the resources that the university provides for researchers to do their work,” Cooks said. “It’s a special place.”

The National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association have published the report annually since 2013.

In 2017, the Milken Institute ranked Purdue 12th in its list of best universities for technology transfer, ranking Purdue No. 1 in the Midwest and No. 1 nationally among public institutions without a medical school.

Purdue received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities for its work in entrepreneurship and technology-based economic development.