Posts tagged with "Research"

company communications illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

University of Maryland Announces MPower Professorships

Eight professors from the University of Maryland, Baltimore and the University of Maryland, College Park awarded $150,000 each over three years.

The University of Maryland Strategic Partnership: MPowering the State (MPower) announces the appointment of eight professors, four from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and four from the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP), as MPower Professors. The MPower Professorship recognizes, incentivizes, and fosters collaborations between faculty at both universities who are working together on the most pressing issues of our time.

To be considered for the MPower Professorship, faculty must demonstrate collaboration on strategic research that would be unattainable or difficult to achieve by UMB or UMCP acting independent of one another, and must embrace the mission of MPower — to collaboratively strengthen and serve the state of Maryland and its citizens.

Each professor will receive $150,000, allocated over three years, to apply to their salary or to support supplemental research activities. These funds recognize, enable, and support strong collaborations between faculty at both institutions in the joint research enterprise between UMCP and UMB.

“With this investment, we are accelerating the pace of our research and the pace of our impact on the lives of Marylanders,” says UMB President Bruce E. Jarrell, MD, FACS. “By supporting these MPower Professors, we are recognizing the commitment and drive they’ve already shown, and we are opening up new possibilities for their work, giving them the freedom to think big, tackle new problems, and achieve results much quicker than ever before.”

“This inaugural cohort of MPower Professors includes stellar leaders who have created significant collaborations across the University of Maryland, College Park and the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and each received extraordinary support in the nomination process,” says UMCP President Darryll J. Pines, PhD, NAE. “Our two campuses are strengthened by interdisciplinary research, and I congratulate and commend these faculty members for their initiative and dedication.”

The inaugural MPower Professors are:

Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, MS, is a professor in the department of Pain and Translational Symptom Science at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and the director of the Clinical and Translational Science Award TL1 Pre- and Postdoctoral Training Program. She also chairs the Pain and Placebo Special Interest Group for the International Association for the Study of Pain and serves as treasurer for the Society for Interdisciplinary Placebo Studies. She is considered a world expert in the fields of placebo effects and mechanisms of pain modulation, including virtual reality applied to pain management.

Dr. Colloca received her Doctor of Medicine degree summa cum laude from the University of Catanzaro Medical School in Italy. She earned a PhD in Neuroscience and a master’s degree in Bioethics, both summa cum laude, from the University of Turin Medical School in Italy. Afterward, she completed postdoctoral training at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and a senior research fellowship at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

Rao P. Gullapalli, PhD, MBA, MS, is a professor and the vice chair for research in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) as well as the administrative director of the Center for Advanced Imaging Research within the department. He is the director of the University of Maryland Core for Translational Research in Imaging at Maryland, and the co-director of the Center for Metabolic Imaging and Therapeutics. Dr. Gullapalli has expertise in developing novel magnetic resonance imaging techniques for clinical research and conducts research on developing new imaging biomarkers associated with traumatic brain injury. 

Dr. Gullapalli earned a bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Osmania University in India in 1981 and a postgraduate Minerals Engineering diploma from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1982. He earned a master’s degree in Chemical Engineering and a PhD in Instrumental Sciences from the University of Arkansas in 1986 and 1991, respectively. He went on to earn an MBA from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University in 2000.

Christopher M. Jewell, PhD, is the Minta Martin Professor of Engineering in the Fischell Department of Bioengineering in the A. James Clark School of Engineering at UMCP. He is an affiliate faculty member in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at UMSOM and a full member of the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCC). Dr. Jewell also is a research biologist with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. He has received over 50 awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from the White House, and authored more than 100 papers in journals such as ACS Nano, Nature Materials, PNAS, Nature, and Nature Biotechnology. Dr. Jewell is a fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. 

Dr. Jewell graduated from Lehigh University with high honors in 2003, earning bachelor’s degrees in Chemical Engineering and Molecular Biology. He completed his master’s degree and PhD in Chemical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin, then joined the Boston Consulting Group as a health care practice consultant. Dr. Jewell completed his postdoctoral work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, jointly appointed as a Ragon Fellow.

Deanna L. Kelly, PharmD, BCPP, is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UMSOM and an affiliate professor at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (UMSOP). She also is the director and chief of the Treatment Research Program at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. Dr. Kelly has led and been involved in numerous clinical trials involving schizophrenia and severe mental illness and has been active in psychopharmacology research for the past 24 years.

Dr. Kelly graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in Pharmacy and a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Duquesne University’s Mylan School of Pharmacy, and she completed a residency at UMSOP in 1997. She is board-certified in psychiatric pharmacy practice.

Cheryl L. Knott, PhD, MA, FAAHB, is a professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health in UMCPs School of Public Health and a co-leader of the Population Science Program at UMGCC. She also serves as the associate director of community outreach and engagement at UMGCC. She conducts research in social epidemiology and behavioral interventions aimed at eliminating cancer disparities. 

Dr. Knott graduated cum laude from the State University of New York at Brockport with a bachelor’s degree in Psychology in 1995. She attended graduate school at East Tennessee University, obtaining a master’s degree in general psychology in 1997, and completed her PhD in 2001 at Saint Louis University.

Donald K. Milton, MD, DrPH, is a professor of environmental health at UMCP’s School of Public Health, with a secondary appointment in UMSOM’s Department of Medicine. An internationally recognized expert on the aerobiology of respiratory viruses, Dr. Milton developed the concept of using indoor CO2 to directly measure rebreathed air and airborne infection risk. He is the principal investigator of the UMD StopCOVID study (investigating SARS-CoV-2 transmission) and the newly National Institutes of Health-funded Evaluating Modes of Influenza Transmission (EMIT-2) study, a five-year, $15 million UMCP-UMB collaboration to perform randomized controlled trials that will define the modes and mechanisms of influenza transmission.

Dr. Milton graduated from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County with a bachelor’s degree in Chemistry in 1976 and obtained his Doctor of Medicine degree from Johns Hopkins University in 1980. He went on to obtain his Master of Occupational Health and Doctor of Public Health degrees from the Harvard University School of Public Health in 1985 and 1989, respectively.

Joseph Richardson, PhD, MA, is the Joel and Kim Feller Professor of African American Studies and Anthropology in UMCP’s College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and serves as the executive director of the school’s Transformative Research and Applied Violence Intervention Lab. Dr. Richardson also is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at UMSOM. His research focuses on gun violence, violence and trauma among African American boys and young men, incarceration as a social determinant of health, and parenting for low-income African American male youth. He utilizes the busiest trauma centers in Maryland as his research labs to investigate gun violence, trauma, and the effectiveness of hospital-based violence intervention programs. 

Dr. Richardson earned a bachelor’s degree in African and African American Studies in 1990 from the University of Virginia. He obtained a master’s degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice and a PhD in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Rutgers University School of Criminal Justice in 1992 and 2003, respectively.

Yihua Bruce Yu, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the director of the Bio- and Nano-Technology Center at UMSOP. Dr. Yu’s expertise is in biophysics and bioengineering. In 2019, Dr. Yu joined the joint Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research in Rockville, Md. His lab advances the development of analytical technologies for characterizing complex drugs and vaccines. He holds multiple patents, including noninvasive analytical technologies for biologics production and inspection. 

Dr. Yu received his bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry from Peking University in 1987 and his PhD in Biophysics from Johns Hopkins University in 1996. His postdoctoral training was in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at the State University of New York at Buffalo and protein engineering at the University of Alberta. In 2007, he received a U.S. Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

About the University of Maryland Strategic Partnership: MPowering the State 

The University of Maryland Strategic Partnership: MPowering the State is a collaboration between the state of Maryland’s two most powerful public research institutions: the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP). It leverages the sizable strengths and complementary missions of both institutions to strengthen Maryland’s innovation economy, advance interdisciplinary research, create opportunities for students, and solve important problems for the people of Maryland and the nation. Working together, UMB and UMCP achieve innovation and impact through collaboration. The University of Maryland Strategic Partnership Act of 2016 strengthened and formalized the structured relationship between UMB and UMCP, which began in 2012. The law deepens the alliance and enables UMB and UMCP to pursue even greater transformative change and impact, far surpassing what each institution could do independent of the other.

Art by Maria Solomon for use by 360 Magazine

The Future of Travel

By: Rebecca Rosbourgh

Travelers are dusting off their passports, getting ready to hop on flights and itching to explore new destinations, but the world is a much different place now than the one we remember from 2019. With the holidays around the corner, travel planning is in full swing. The behaviors we saw and knew from consumers before the pandemic can no longer drive the way we think about consumers. Everything has changed and while the future of travel looks promising in the post-pandemic world, the mindset for marketers has to shift. 

Here are the top 5 insights we found from our research about the future of travel: 

  • Travel research has changed drastically among globetrotters 
  • Safety and distance now top the list of travel concerns 
  • Consumers want to travel domestically and want luxury experiences 
  • Road trips made a comeback and are sticking around
  • Travel marketers should use these changes to find the right audience 

Research and then research some more 

When planning a trip where do you usually start? Maybe you begin by searching for the most interesting destination with a beach or the best prices for a hotel. That’s the way we used to go about planning for a trip and that’s also how advertisers found us. But these considerations have changed drastically as a result of the pandemic and a deeper dive into these new behaviors is needed.

So, what are people searching for now when they decide to plan a trip? They are looking at a completely different set of parameters, the first big one is distance. How far from home are they willing to venture? According to the data in MiQ’s latest report, The Unlocked World? travelers are choosing to stay domestic. We found that 70% of travelers from the US, China and Australia are opting to not leave their home countries. That’s a lot of people that are looking to travel short distances but still explore a new-to-them locale. 

Trip planners are also researching categories that are very pandemic-focused. We see people looking for vaccination rates in the areas they will be visiting, searching for safe accommodations, and requesting flexibility for bookings. The possibility of a refundable booking if the trip needs to be cancelled is a top priority now. Offering piece of mind to a worried traveler can be a great way to attract them to your brand. 

New travel trends 

A big pandemic travel trend that seems to be sticking around is the road trip, especially for travelers in the US and Canada. Over the past six months, we saw a correlation between the vaccination rates and interstate travel. If people are to continue their vacationing domestically and by car then marketers should plan to put their focus on reaching these road-trippers. 

Travel interest is growing, and growing very fast. We found that 42% of people around the world plan to travel in the next six months and that rises to 60% in the next 12 months. Asian and European travelers are looking to spend more and make those vacations luxurious. More people have confidence that the pandemic risk is less and they are looking to opt for premium travel experiences. Marketers can expect spending to be higher to create memorable experiences. 

With a resurgence in interest around travel, we found that over a third of audiences are still waiting to see how things are playing out with the pandemic even though they have started to plan vacations. They haven’t booked anything yet but are likely to continue their research, looking for a great deal. Marketers need to be aware of this longer term of decision making. 

Know where your audience is— and where they want to go

Planning a trip is not something that happens with one internet search. You’ll have many chances to reach your audience when they are planning a trip, but you have to know where they are located.  Understanding where they are starting from is the key to a great travel campaign. If your customers are in a big city and are looking for deals for a mountain getaway, you need to know that. Understanding preferences and identifying the audience can benefit your campaigns. 

As the end of 2021 approaches and holiday travel ramps up, marketers can benefit from understanding these trends to reach the right consumers. Programmatic omnichannel advertising can help advertisers to offer personalization and insights to help boost the chances of conversion for their travel campaigns. Working with a partner can help you to identify your audience in this new world of travel planning. 

Women Who Rock Benefit Concert Presented by Gibson Gives

Women will rock Stage AE Pittsburgh on Saturday, October 16 as the 4th annual Women Who Rock Benefit Concert Presented by Gibson Gives returns as a live, in-person concert event. Women Who Rock connects through the power of music and helps educate, support and fund women–centric health research. This year’s annual Women Who Rock Benefit Concert on October 16 will feature performances from singer-songwriter Rita Wilson, Lauren Monroe with Rick Allen of Def Leppard, Orianthi, The Vindys, and DJ Femi. Legendary singer-songwriter-drummer-percussionist and philanthropist Sheila E. will be on-hand to receive the 2021 Women Who Rock Impact Award. Host of IHEART RADIO 102.5FM WDVE Michele Michaels will return for the fourth year in a row as the emcee. All proceeds from Women Who Rock support the Magee-Women’s Research Institute (MWRI)–the nation’s largest research institute dedicated solely to life-saving women’s health research. Tickets for the 2021 Women Who Rock benefit concert are on sale now.

The legendary Sheila E. often referred to as the Queen of Percussion, will be honored with the 2021 Women Who Rock Impact Award presented by Peoples, an Essential Utilities Company.  “I am honored and humbled to be recognized for the Impact Award,” says Sheila E. “Thank you to Women Who Rock and Magee-Women’s Research Institute for the incredible and life changing work you do. When I think of impact, I think of all the women–mentors, my mother, my grandmother, sisters, colleagues, new and lifelong friends–who have lifted me up throughout the years and continually inspired me to pay it forward.”

Rita Wilson has officially released the third and final EP in her Trilogy series titled “Trilogy 3.” Rita continues to demonstrate her evolution as a dynamic singer, songwriter and performer who successfully straddles the worlds of pop, country, and folk. The lead single “Thin Air,” is a sparsely beautiful and ethereal collaboration with Sleeping at Last.

Women Who Rock concert attendees will experience an interactive Beauty Bar offering free beauty perks and giveaways, social sharing Photo Booth, Silent Auction offering a chance to win one-of-a-kind experiences including the VIP Lounge, pink carpet entrance, and a performance from the winner of the Women Who Rock Rising Star Contest, Graciela.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Women’s health overall is underfunded and understudied. While most health research has sidestepped sex differences, Magee-Women’s Research Institute (MWRI) a 501c3 is the nation’s largest research institute dedicated solely to women’s health research. In addition, MWRI currently offers 192 studies enrolling 162,000 women in clinical trials all over the world. Researchers at MWRI are working on chemotherapy resistance for the most common form of breast cancer, finding a more effective treatment for triple negative breast cancer, and running more than 20 clinical trials to develop new, personalized treatments for women.

For fans that cannot attend the concert can support groundbreaking Breast Cancer and Women’s Health Research, Women Who Rock has debuted a new merchandise collection. Items include the signature Women Who Rock lightning bolt pin, a Gibson X Women Who Rock guitar strap, guitar picks, T-shirts, onesies, tanks, and one-of-a-kind handmade jewelry. A portion of all proceeds from the Women Who Rock collection will fund the life-saving breast cancer and women’s health research at Magee-Women’s Research Institute (MWRI).

Doctor illustration

Dr. Jerome Adams × Purdue

Dr. Jerome Adams, former Indiana state health commissioner and the 20th U.S. surgeon general, will join Purdue University on Friday (Oct. 1) as a Presidential Fellow and the university’s first executive director of health equity initiatives, professor of practice in the departments of Pharmacy Practice and Public Health and a faculty member of the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering at Purdue.

The appointment was announced Thursday (Sept. 30) by Purdue President Mitch Daniels.

“Dr. Adams represents the highest level of excellence through decades of caring for patients and service to the nation in public health,” Daniels said. “He has consistently demonstrated commitment for health equity prior to, during and subsequent to his time as surgeon general. We are thrilled to have him provide leadership at Purdue and represent Purdue globally in this important strategic area.”

Eric Barker, dean of the Purdue College of Pharmacy, and Marion Underwood, dean of Purdue’s College of Health and Human Sciences, said Adams’ leadership will bolster Purdue’s efforts to be a leader in public health and health equity as he works alongside colleagues across multiple colleges and units at Purdue, around the state of Indiana and beyond to elevate the awareness and impact of Purdue’s science-based public health programs, research and engagement.

“We know there are many societal determinants of health that transcend a person’s biology,” Underwood said. “Our efforts both in terms of urban and rural health can address many of these factors. Culture, family backgrounds, socio-economic status, and education all influence health and wellness. The College of Health and Human Sciences is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of individuals, families and communities. We are eager to work alongside Dr. Adams to expand HHS research and outreach in the areas of public health, HHS Extension and beyond.”

Barker added, “Through the extensive learning, research and engagement missions of our College of Pharmacy and, broadly, across the Purdue system and our extensive networks, we have a chance to really study these issues and continue our vital work on initiatives that will improve the health of populations of our state and our nation.”

Pavlos Vlachos, director of the Regenstrief Center, said he expects Adams to be a catalyst to translate Purdue’s research to the health care systems and communities and to ultimately and positively impact population health.

“Often, some of the best health care technologies, scientific contributions or interventions fail to impact society because they are disconnected from the exact needs of the communities and what is needed for their successful implementation,” Vlachos said.  “Jerome’s long experience and deep understanding of the complex U.S. health care landscape and the current population health challenges will help us best navigate these challenges, and position Purdue as a national and global health care innovation leader.”

Adams, who comes to Purdue after having served as the 20th U.S. surgeon general from September 2017 through January 2021, said he intends to help amplify the efforts of the Purdue Extension program to promote health equity through Indiana and particularly in rural communities, as well as work specifically with the business community to make the case for health equity as workforce and economic issues.

“Purdue is a storied institution that has the legacy, the talent and thanks to President Daniels, the commitment to being a national leader in the promotion of health equity,” Adams said. “Never before in American history has the need been greater or the community been more desirous of such an effort. I’m excited to combine my experiences in public health and public policy with the resources and opportunities afforded by Purdue to help coordinate, amplify and innovate in the health equity space.”

Before his service to the nation, Adams served as Indiana state health commissioner from 2014 through 2017. In that role he oversaw the state’s response to Ebola and Zika, as well as an unprecedented HIV outbreak in southern Indiana and a lead contamination crisis in northern Indiana. Dr. Adams also has served as an associate professor of anesthesia at Eskenazi Health in Indianapolis, where he still sees patients and helps train residents and medical students.

Adams received his Master of Public Health with a focus on chronic disease prevention from the University of California, Berkeley, and his medical doctorate from Indiana University School of Medicine. His postgraduate internship was at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Indianapolis and he completed his anesthesiology residency at the Indiana University Department of Anesthesia in 2006.

Hobamine: The Game Changing Discovery for a Long Life

By: Greg Macpherson, biotechnologist, author, “Harnessing the Nine Hallmarks of Aging.”

Free radicals are much-maligned molecules, blamed for causing many of the diseases we suffer from and even the aging process itself. We are regularly reminded of this in the fruit and vegetable isle at the supermarket and by supplement brands promoting antioxidants to counter the effect of free radicals. 

But dig a little deeper and you will discover that free radicals have an interesting little secret. It turns out that we need free radicals to be healthy. Free radicals are harnessed by our cells to send messages around the cell and between cells. Our immune system uses free radicals as part of its initial immune process (imagine free radical “bullets” being fired at an intruder) to slow the bugs down while the rest of our immune system jumps into action to fight off the infection.  

It turns out, for optimal health that we need to live in a “free radical goldilocks zone.”  Too many free radicals and we shift into something called oxidative stress and if that persists for too long then we are on track to get a disease.  But, if we have too few free radicals then it is equally harmful as our body loses the ability to mount a healthy immune response or to transmit messages that might notify the cell that something has gone wrong triggering a process where the cell removes itself for the health of the tissues that surround it.  

However, science is now telling us to go a little easy on antioxidants and not over do it. The clues have been there for a long time. A large study many years ago found that smokers, who create a burden of oxidative stress in their body with every puff, that took a vitamin E supplement had an increased risk of death. In another study, older adults that took antioxidants alongside exercise didn’t get the same level of muscle growth as their peers who went to the gym without taking antioxidants. In each case the antioxidants interfered with the healthy free radical signalling process creating a problem larger than the one it was aiming to solve. 

So how do we deal with the challenge of reducing oxidative stress whilst not over doing it and causing ourselves a serious health problem? Two strategies are coming to the fore. First, if you are going to take an antioxidant then take natural antioxidants that are derived from our diet such as curcumin, fisetin or pterostilbene. These bioactive molecules support the natural levels of antioxidants that our cells make to balance the levels of free radicals in our cells to keep us in the “goldilocks zone” and also have secondary health benefits, such ascurcumin, which is well known to reduce inflammation; fisetin, which is becoming well known as a senolytic, a molecule that helps remove senescent cells from the body; and pterostilbene, a molecule that activates key genes responsible for cellular repair and energy generation.  

The second strategy and is one of the most promising I have seen for a long time is taking a molecule called Hobamine (also known as 2-HOBA). Hobamine is an extract from the humble Himalayan Tartary buckwheat. It is an interesting molecule that protects our cells from the downstream effects of free radicals whilst leaving the healthy free radicals alone to do their work. How Hobamine delivers its health benefits is fascinating. It is a member of a new class of natural molecules called reactive carbonyl scavengers. While that is a bit of a mouthful you could also call it an antioxidant 3.0 or a smart antioxidant. It is so cutting edge that it is hard to find in most supplements. In fact, my company SRW is only the second company in the world to offer it in our Cel1 Stability supplement.

Hobamine works to mitigate the damage that free radicals cause in our cells. If you remember from grade school, free radicals are molecules that are unstable and all they want to find and react with is another molecule to becomestable. They damage our cells because in the process of getting stable they steal a molecule from a part of our cell. Free radicals are not picky and damage whatever is closest to them: our DNA, our delicate cellular machinery, or our cell membranes. In the process the free radical becomes stable but whatever they damage becomes radicalised and reactive. Because we are carbon based the most common downstream effect of free radical damage is the formation of reactive carbonyl species. These molecules are highly reactive and only persist for fractions of a second. They are so short lived that you can’t measure them, but you can measure the result of the damage they cause. 

Reactive carbonyl species bind with proteins, DNA and cell membranes affecting their function and, in some cases, interfere with the cells ability to remove the damage. Over time this is where the real damage from free radicals and oxidative stress is occurring within our cells and what is exciting is that Hobamine gives you a way, for the first time to slow the damage down. Hobamine neutralises the reactive carbonyl species before they have a chance to cause damage to the delicate cellular machinery, membranes and our DNA. 

What makes this doubly interesting is that researchers have discovered that the immune system is activated by the end molecules that result from the process between reactive carbonyl species and our cell membranes and this may be part of the reason that we experience increasing levels of inflammation as we age. 

Reactive carbonyl species and how to mitigate damage from them is now an active area of research and medical researchers have identified the link between reactive carbonyl species damage and diseases like Alzheimer’s, autoimmune, heart disease and high blood pressure. The list will continue to grow, and it is looking like the discovery of this new class of bioactive molecules could potentially reduce the burden of damage across our cells that we all accumulate as we age and potentially lead to helping protect ourselves from a wide range of conditions or better, get ahead of the damage and slow the aging process itself down. Hobamine is an exciting new tool in the fight to extend our health-spans so that we all get the opportunity to be healthier for longer. 

Biography:

Greg Macpherson is a pharmacist, biotechnologist, cellular health expert and author of, “Harnessing the Nine Hallmarks of Aging: to live your healthiest life.” For more than a decade, he has been working in the biotechnology sector, specifically focusing on the aging process at the cellular level. This work led him to discover ways to harness the nine identified, scientific hallmarks of aging, which is the premise of his book that addresses the natural aging process, how to age more favorably and simple strategies to slow the aging process and build a functional healthspan. Beyond theory and concept, Macpherson has used his entrepreneurial spirit to further develop solutions to this new paradigm of aging, described in his book, by launching SRW Laboratories, a science and research based company that curates the latest biotechnology research to formulate natural products designed to help slow the onset of aging and disease, and develop evidence based solutions for those who are experiencing age-related health concerns or who want to improve their healthspan. SRW, which stands for Science, Research and Wellness, is Macpherson’s natural world laboratory that will develop the preventative formulas for cellular health from nature required to slow down the aging process based on the nine hallmarks of aging, which include mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere attrition and cellular senescence, to name a few. With aging being the single biggest risk factor for developing disease, Macpherson’s mission to slow the aging process at a cellular level could help millions of people delay the onset of diseases associated with advanced aging like Alzheimer’s and heart disease and increase healthspan.

Stephen Gilles image via Daphne Diluce at Roar Creative Media for use by 360 Magazine

Stephen Gillen Q×A

By: Emily Bunn

Stephen Gillen is an bestselling author and established entrepreneur who has gained success with his biopic “The Monkey Puzzle Tree,” alongside various business, media, and film projects. Looking towards the future, Gillen is soon to release his highly-anticipated book, “In Justice, Love, & Honour.” He also recently signed a worldwide TV deal with Film Volt, in which his The Stephen Gillen Crime Files channel will be broadcast on all major platforms. 360 Magazine sat down with the author to discuss the creation of his latest text and other upcoming projects.

What has working with someone so closely related to in the historic incident, namely Joseph Loney?

It was great working with Joseph to get a real human feel behind this story of what the real-life fallout and struggles translated to for everyone involved. It can be the small or big things, it’s all relevant in such a massive, emotional, historic and trauma-driven story. I want to know, feel and understand what it was really like, and to pinpoint the details and exclusive parts of the story not known or perhaps published. That [way] I can not [only] do justice to everyone involved and the victims, but [also] translate it authentically and with the right information and emotion for my readers. For me, having a real expert experience of what it is to live lives like this and what these characters would have been feeling, was a fascinating expose of everything that went on. I understood the ‘humanness, challenges and fears’ of the people behind this unbelievable story. It was always a great privilege and each had an amazing story in their own right.

Did you always have an interest in history, or did something about the incident concerning Fredrick Sewell and his band of robbers particularly pique your interest in the subject?

The story actually came to me through Joseph Loney, who contacted me because of his great love of the story I wrote about my life, “The Monkey Puzzle Tree.” We started talking over time and the more I understood about his journey and his father’s journey linked with Fredrick Sewell and the history surrounding it, I began to see what a massive narrative it was. Not just because of the historic angle and what actually happened, but [also] how the journeys of the main characters were incredibly linked in paradoxical and emotional ways. There were unbelievable links in this story – like Fredrick Sewell, Joseph Loney Senior, and Gerald Richardson (the policeman killed) were all the same age, but [each] ended up in a way you would never imagine. Fact really is stranger than fiction, and as I crafted this story, I cared very much about [what] all the characters went through and how they all ended up. This is one of the many elements that makes it an un-put-down-able read, which at the moment is being highly desired by the world’s top publishers.

What has it been like signing with Global Aggregate Film Volt for your channel?

It was a great moment. We have always worked so hard, and I have such wonderful people around me, like Daphne, my partner, and the rest of the team. It was good to then be invited in to do the awesome work … together at Film Volt. Mark is a cool guy, well respected, and very influential in the industry. He has a very strong and talented work ethic. We’re very similar in ways, so for all of us involved in the partnership with such a connected and influential worldwide distributor, it offers us great opportunities for the future to do the fantastic work we are all focused on together.

I have a very unique history, skill set and experience/profile, so [I] am [an] individual in this space and for what we are shaping on the Crime Channel. My crime channel, called ‘The Stephen Gillen Crime Files,’ is now in the process of being on all major TV platforms around the world. We aim to consistently deliver raw, highly produced and coveted content that will really add value and make the difference to audiences and people’s lives around the world. We have a world class team behind us now to make that happen and [are] committed to really raising the bar in content creation. With such a massive reach to such vast audiences, the future is very exciting.

What do you plan to discuss on your worldwide crime channel? Are there any specific cases you want to shed more light on?

We have many great and riveting formats under development, [that are] really out of this world and well-formatted. I’ll be continuing interviewing my YouTube model ‘The Big Shift,’ which interviews big name global crimes [and] many high-ranking organized crime figures and mobsters. But, we have other out of the box enthralling shows [too]. They are being released very soon so can’t say too much. But what I can say is [that] they are very professional throughout and crafted to entertain a wide scope of audiences in the genre, [the show is] very gripping and appealing to all. Most are really emotionally charged, which will really pull in, shock, and excite audiences. Other are focused on redemption and atonement, real hard-hitting, true stories that are amazing. [These stories] aim to be targeted, [and] to bring light, learning, closure and information to people so [that] these awful events may not happen again and there is improvement [for the] next generations. Other formats will be cliff hangers and work with viewers ‘outside the box,’ in the way this genre usually works. We want to thrill, shock, inform, improve and entertain as much as possible, focusing on the unbelievable stories that people really want to watch and hear about. It’s going to be content not to miss, I promise you.

How long did the process of researching for “In Justice, Love & Honour” take?

Research for ‘In Justice, Love & Honour’ took around six months to research, but possibly longer as even when I was writing, there was other important bits of information I needed. It was a real emotional journey… My family tell[s] me [that] when I’m writing not only do they not see me, but [also they] can’t talk to me I’m just so immersed in the characters, story arcs, plots and narrative. It’s how I write and why the writing is always so powerful, it’s a[n] emotion process that is finely woven and really burned, translated and detailed in a masterful and human way on the page. I also feel a lot of responsibility, and really work tirelessly for it to be as cleverly-crafted as possible for my audience and readers.

What do you anticipate reader’s reaction to “In Justice, Love & Honour” will be like?

I know they’ll be blown away by the detail of the characters, the emotion, the masterful weaving and moving plots, the descriptive and well written writing structures and the burning humaneness carv[ing] right through it. It is not just a massively historic, true story, but an amazing and riveting character study as you are emotionally gripped by these unbelievable characters that jump from the page. Part of the allure and uniqueness of this book is, of course, I live deep in this world and [have] travelled through most of the things these characters did from a very deep angle. So, I have great value as experience [in] the internal things going on as a person goes through these unbelievably crazy and breathtaking events. It certainly is a path less trodden and my main goal was to go to the heart of it in a way no other author could as we can only go as deep as we have been before. This certainly adds a massive uniqueness to everything in this unbelievable story. The world’s top publishers seem to think so too, as they are excited and pushing hard for the chance to be the one to publish and bring it to mass audiences. It is a great privilege to do it and I’m sure it will be a roller-coaster ride for all.

Find out more about Stephen’s story and the opportunity to get a signed copy of his book HERE.

*Photos and book cover design: Daphne Diluce

Image of Telescope via Gabrielle Archulleta for Use by 360 Magazine

New Report Underlines Importance of Science and Tech Funding

Investments in science and technology research are vital to the United States’ economic growth and global leadership, according to a new report from Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.

The Biden administration has made science and technology (S&T) a centerpiece of its early policy agenda with ambitious targets for federal investments in research and development (R&D). There are also growing concerns in Congress about the United States’ global leadership in S&T-focused industries, especially in relation to China.

“As the high technology sector (e.g., advanced computing and communications, social media platforms and other web-based services) becomes an increasingly large part of the overall U.S. economy, federal funding for early stage R&D, which has been at the root of much of the technological progress of this past century, is more important than ever,” wrote the Baker Institute’s Kenneth Evans, a scholar in science and technology policy, and Kirstin Matthews, a fellow in science and technology policy.

While President Biden’s first budget proposal aims to authorize historic increases to federal R&D agencies, the authors argue that significant challenges remain to ensure long-term, international competitiveness across scientific disciplines and advanced technologies.

According to their report, shifting priorities between administrations, changes to the ideology of Congress and broader economic conditions in the U.S. at large have resulted in inconsistent funding for R&D. 

“Traditionally, federal funding for R&D receives bipartisan support in Congress, particularly for health and defense-related research activities,” the authors wrote. “However, since the mid-1990s, government spending on basic research has declined or stagnated as a share of the U.S. GDP, in part due to the intrinsic uncertainties about the ultimate impacts of basic research.”

Science and technology R&D is essential to creating new knowledge and tools, the authors argue, because it ensures the development of new products and technologies that can drive domestic and global economies. Economists estimate innovations stemming from S&T accounted for more than 60% of economic growth over the last century. 

Yet scientists have placed relatively little value on evaluating and communicating the broader societal impacts of basic research to the public and especially to policymakers, the authors argue. The authors encourage researchers, especially academic scientists driven to action by anti-science rhetoric during the Trump administration, to continue to engage in public outreach during the Biden presidency. 

“Universities should encourage and incentivize avenues for public engagement through increased support of existing programs or funding new activities for interested faculty, postdocs, graduate students and research staff,” they wrote. 

“Building public support for R&D, strengthening trust in scientific institutions and expertise, and increasing scientists’ participation in decision-making related to S&T issues are critical to ensuring that scientific discoveries and innovation benefit the broader public and that increased investment in R&D serves the public interest,” they continued.

The report was a collaboration with two Rice undergraduate students and research interns in the science and technology policy program—Gabriella Hazan and Spoorthi Kamepalli.

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

What Will Happen To The Gates Foundation?

Commentary by Samy Dwek, Founder and CEO, The Family Office Doctor

and White Knight Consulting  

We’ve seen in the press today articles about the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It was a foundation that they started with a very clear purpose and focus on helping third world countries, eradicating certain diseases, and researching diseases such as Parkinson’s, HIV, and others. It’s phenomenal in terms of what they’re trying to do.

Unfortunately, Melinda French Gates and Bill Gates have decided to separate. How does this impact the family foundation? Yes, they’ve grown apart. They’ve decided to separate their ways amicably. Clearly, their focus points and their desires of what they want to accomplish are different.

The problem is, in most family foundation trusts, people don’t plan for what happens in case of divorce. That’s not in the planning and maybe it should be. Maybe it’s something we need to think more about and discuss more openly. Not that we are preempting or provoking; we should be planning in case of such an eventuality.

The Gates Foundation currently has close to $50 billion. It’s not an insignificant amount of money, and they’re talking about adding another 15 to $20 billion. So again, these are significant amounts of money that can have a major impact on the focus points that these two individuals have.

So how do they go forward? What’s been very interesting is that Melinda French Gates has decided that she’s going to stay on for two years. Let’s see whether they can make this work or whether they fail to get along or see eye to eye on the objectives of the foundation.

Bill Gates has agreed in principle that they will set aside new money into a new foundation controlled by Melinda French so that they can then continue their missions. What does that mean for family foundations? I think they need to have those discussions. They need to put planning in place.

What would happen if this eventuality should occur in your family? How would it impact your family foundation? What mechanisms do you have in place so that you could separate those funds? It doesn’t have to be just in the case of divorce. It could be brothers or sisters decide that they want to go in different directions.

So what mechanisms have you put in place? It’s something to discuss with legal counsel, something to think about because at the end of the day, we’re human beings. We have different ideas and we grow in different ways. But if we’re creating a family foundation, if we’re trying to help benefit others and pass on the goodwill, let’s make sure anything that happens to us doesn’t negatively impact them.

By Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE

IDTechEx Shares Unexpected Trends in Electric Vehicle Data

Unexpected Trends from IDTechEx’s EV Data & Tools Portfolio

2021 is cementing the electric car’s dominant position in the future of the auto industry as OEMs have increased electrification targets, announced more battery-electric models, and planned new technology adoption strategies. To properly understand these trends, granular, high-quality data is essential. IDTechEx’s portfolio of electric cars and powertrain materials research is driven by data, and includes two new spreadsheet-based products: Electric Car Sales, Models & Technologies Database and Scenario Forecasting: Materials for Battery Cells and Packs. Both underpin two IDTechEx research reports Advanced Electric Cars 2020-2040 and Materials for Electric Vehicle Battery Cells and Packs 2021-2031, and form part of a wider portfolio which can be found at IDTechEx’s website.

IDTechEx’s New Electric Vehicle Model Database

IDTechEx’s extensive Electric Car Sales, Models & Technologies Database is spreadsheet-based and covers unit sales for popular BEV and PHEV cars in China, Europe, and the US between 2015–2020 (containing data on 145 distinct models plus variants). Alongside sales data, IDTechEx also reveals battery capacity, cell format, battery supplier, cell chemistry, cell and pack energy density, thermal management method, motor technology and power output. The granular nature of the data, split by model, enables technology trends to be analyzed in detail in addition to an industry-level overview.

Considering battery chemistry, it is well known that manufacturers have been trending towards higher nickel content cathodes such as the 811 variant of nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC). Perhaps less expected is the significant resurgence in lithium-iron-phosphate, or ‘LFP’, batteries. The lower energy density of LFP batteries saw them fall out of favor with Chinese policymakers and rapidly lose market share up to 2019, but in the past year, BYD announced the Blade with LFP prismatic cells and Tesla introduced the Chinese manufactured Model 3 with LFP. The trade-off comes down to price, raw materials, safety, and supply-chain dynamics with regional specificities.

Moreover, the Electric Car Sales, Models & Technologies Database also looks at electric traction motor trends. Many have voiced concerns around the supply of rare earths for the magnetic materials used in most electric car traction motors. However, China controls the majority of the world’s rare earth supply chain, creating risk and potential price volatility. The database reveals the quiet adoption of non-permanent magnet-based variants – induction motors and separately excited wound-rotor motors – which are still being introduced in new models and may become essential technologies if permanent magnet prices spike.

This database underpins IDTechEx’s research on Advanced Electric Cars, which is further summarized in a report covering regional detail, powertrain technologies, and autonomous vehicles.

Example charts obtainable through the IDTechEx Electric Car Sales, Models & Technologies Database

Materials for Electric Car Battery Cells & Packs

Lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles present very different material demands at the cell- and pack-level compared with the internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles they replace. Whilst ICE drivetrains heavily rely on aluminum and steel alloys, Li-ion batteries also utilize many other materials such as nickel, cobalt, lithium, copper, insulation, thermal interface materials, and much more at a cell- and pack level. The IDTechEx report on Materials for Electric Vehicle Battery Cells and Packs 2021-2031 identifies and analyzes trends in the design of EV battery cells and battery packs in order to evaluate the materials used for their assembly and production. The report also provides granular market forecasts for over 20 key material categories in terms of demand in tonnes in addition to market value.

To complement this research, IDTechEx’s new Scenario Forecasting Spreadsheet: Materials for Electric Vehicle Battery Cells and Packs provides quantitative forecasts and assumptions in greater depth, and allows EV forecasts to be customized based on different scenarios. This is a spreadsheet-based tool that lists IDTechEx’s assumptions for several material intensities at a cell- and pack-level for BEV and PHEV batteries in the car market. It also provides a forecast for the multi-metal and other materials demand in tonnes from 2021-2031. In addition to these forecasts, this tool allows you to use your own forecasts for BEV and PHEV unit sales and battery capacities to see how these variables impact demand over the next 10 years. A scenarios tool is also included which allows for several sales forecasts to be compared simultaneously for individual materials.

Examples for the material demand for battery cells and packs segmented by material. Source: Scenario Forecasting Spreadsheet: Materials for Electric Vehicle Battery Cells and Packs

IDTechEx Electric Vehicle Research

For more information on the portfolio of data available on this topic, please visit their website. This research forms part of the broader electric vehicle and energy storage portfolio from IDTechEx, who track the adoption of electric vehicles, battery trends, and demand across land, sea and air, helping you navigate whatever may be ahead. Find out more at their website

About IDTechEx

IDTechEx guides your strategic business decisions through its Research, Subscription and Consultancy products, helping you profit from emerging technologies. For more information, visit IDTechEx’s website.

Breaking News illustration via Nicole Salazar for use by 360 Magazine

Life on Jupiter

By: Skyler Johnson

A scientific study originally aimed at testing the capability of life on Venus has now shown that there is a chance for life not on our sister planet, but on the gaseous giant, Jupiter. 

The study aimed to figure out whether Venus could maintain life based on water activity, which is measured on a 0 to 1 scale, with 1 being pure water and 0 being the complete absence of it. The minimum viable water activity for life on Earth was determined to be 0.585, with Venus being 0.007, but Jupiter just reaching the threshold at 0.585. 

Jupiter is also the perfect temperature to maintain life, being -40 degrees F, which is just survivable. Life can only survive at that temperature and above. 

While these statistics may be exciting, you’re not exactly going to be seeing E.T. coming from Jupiter. After all, it’s a gaseous planet. Life, if any at all, would be existing within Jupiter’s clouds, and would only be made up of a single cell. The planet has a lot of Ultraviolet Radiation and very little nutrients, so sustaining life may not even be possible. Nevertheless, life is possible for the gaseous giant.

The scientific possibilities of this finding, while it may seem relatively minor given we don’t actually know if there’s life outside of planet Earth, it does offer some interesting possibilities. After all, we have no idea what these creatures may look like and what biological adaptations they may have in order to adapt to living in the dangerous conditions Jupiter provides. What we could end up finding might lead us to find ways to adapt as a species. 

Interestingly, if Jupiter ends up being inhabitable, there’s also a chance that one of Jupiter’s moons, Europa, houses life beneath it’s under-ice ocean, which would be similar to Earth’s Deep Ocean hydrothermal vents, which are basically a volcano erupting underwater and spouting out life-providing sediments. While we have no idea what’s under Europa’s surface there have been some calls for a probe so we may soon get some answers. 

Nevertheless, only time will tell what may be found on other planets. But with more information like with the study released today, who knows what the future may bring.