Posts tagged with "health sciences"

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Dr. Jerome Adams × Purdue

Dr. Jerome Adams, former Indiana state health commissioner and the 20th U.S. surgeon general, will join Purdue University on Friday (Oct. 1) as a Presidential Fellow and the university’s first executive director of health equity initiatives, professor of practice in the departments of Pharmacy Practice and Public Health and a faculty member of the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering at Purdue.

The appointment was announced Thursday (Sept. 30) by Purdue President Mitch Daniels.

“Dr. Adams represents the highest level of excellence through decades of caring for patients and service to the nation in public health,” Daniels said. “He has consistently demonstrated commitment for health equity prior to, during and subsequent to his time as surgeon general. We are thrilled to have him provide leadership at Purdue and represent Purdue globally in this important strategic area.”

Eric Barker, dean of the Purdue College of Pharmacy, and Marion Underwood, dean of Purdue’s College of Health and Human Sciences, said Adams’ leadership will bolster Purdue’s efforts to be a leader in public health and health equity as he works alongside colleagues across multiple colleges and units at Purdue, around the state of Indiana and beyond to elevate the awareness and impact of Purdue’s science-based public health programs, research and engagement.

“We know there are many societal determinants of health that transcend a person’s biology,” Underwood said. “Our efforts both in terms of urban and rural health can address many of these factors. Culture, family backgrounds, socio-economic status, and education all influence health and wellness. The College of Health and Human Sciences is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of individuals, families and communities. We are eager to work alongside Dr. Adams to expand HHS research and outreach in the areas of public health, HHS Extension and beyond.”

Barker added, “Through the extensive learning, research and engagement missions of our College of Pharmacy and, broadly, across the Purdue system and our extensive networks, we have a chance to really study these issues and continue our vital work on initiatives that will improve the health of populations of our state and our nation.”

Pavlos Vlachos, director of the Regenstrief Center, said he expects Adams to be a catalyst to translate Purdue’s research to the health care systems and communities and to ultimately and positively impact population health.

“Often, some of the best health care technologies, scientific contributions or interventions fail to impact society because they are disconnected from the exact needs of the communities and what is needed for their successful implementation,” Vlachos said.  “Jerome’s long experience and deep understanding of the complex U.S. health care landscape and the current population health challenges will help us best navigate these challenges, and position Purdue as a national and global health care innovation leader.”

Adams, who comes to Purdue after having served as the 20th U.S. surgeon general from September 2017 through January 2021, said he intends to help amplify the efforts of the Purdue Extension program to promote health equity through Indiana and particularly in rural communities, as well as work specifically with the business community to make the case for health equity as workforce and economic issues.

“Purdue is a storied institution that has the legacy, the talent and thanks to President Daniels, the commitment to being a national leader in the promotion of health equity,” Adams said. “Never before in American history has the need been greater or the community been more desirous of such an effort. I’m excited to combine my experiences in public health and public policy with the resources and opportunities afforded by Purdue to help coordinate, amplify and innovate in the health equity space.”

Before his service to the nation, Adams served as Indiana state health commissioner from 2014 through 2017. In that role he oversaw the state’s response to Ebola and Zika, as well as an unprecedented HIV outbreak in southern Indiana and a lead contamination crisis in northern Indiana. Dr. Adams also has served as an associate professor of anesthesia at Eskenazi Health in Indianapolis, where he still sees patients and helps train residents and medical students.

Adams received his Master of Public Health with a focus on chronic disease prevention from the University of California, Berkeley, and his medical doctorate from Indiana University School of Medicine. His postgraduate internship was at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Indianapolis and he completed his anesthesiology residency at the Indiana University Department of Anesthesia in 2006.

Lacking Self-Discipline?

5 Ways To Develop It And Reach Your Goals

Americans are known to overeat, abuse credit cards, marinate for hours in social media, and break New Year’s resolutions before the end of January. Self-discipline doesn’t seem to be a national strength.

And achieving self-discipline – and the success that can come with it – may never have been harder than it is in this instant-gratification age, says Dr. Rob Carter III.

“Self-discipline is an undervalued trait in a modern society that wants everything now,” says Carter, co-author with his wife, Dr. Kirti Salwe Carter, of The Morning Mind: Use Your Brain to Master Your Day and Supercharge Your Life (www.themorningmind.com). “Self-discipline is the ability to motivate and coordinate our efforts to improve our quality of life, but unfortunately most people are not taught it.

“It is, however, a skill that everyone can learn. Self-discipline is the skill that will allow you to reach any goal you set.”

Carter offers five ways to develop self-discipline:

Be aware of your resistance. Resistance, Carter says, is the biggest obstacle to developing self-discipline, and it often comes in the form of discouraging internal self-talk such as, “I can’t do it” or “Why should I have to change?” “The next time you embark on a new project that causes resistance,” Carter says, “fight it by asserting or writing down your intended goal and the benefits it will bring.”

Plan for every outcome. Plans go awry when people let excuses get in the way. “An example is having a goal of running in the morning for 30 minutes, but you have bailouts such as it’s raining, cold, or you don’t feel like it,” Carter says. “Developing self-discipline is recognizing and planning for these self-created obstacles and actively choosing to work through them. So when you set a goal to achieve, have chart in place listing “Even ifs.” List the potential obstacles to achieving your goal and counter each one with a promise to yourself that you’ll achieve your goal even if these challenges arise.”

Prepare to give something up in order to gain. Carter suggests compiling a list of the pros and cons of sacrificing for a certain goal. “To reach your goal, Carter says, “you will more than likely have to impose certain limitations on yourself in order to gain something. These limitations could be less free time, socializing, money or television. The upside is that seeing the rewards of the sacrifice on the pros list will keep you motivated and disciplined.”

Reward yourself with self-compensation. “Rewards are an incredibly powerful tool for motivating yourself to reach your goals,” Carter says. “Consider them the carrot on the stick. Have a reward in place for when you achieve a goal or part of a goal, and make sure it’s appropriate.”

Break your goal down into manageable steps. “If you break your goal down into bite-sized steps,” Carter says, “you’re much more likely to stay disciplined enough to complete every sub-goal. Each step accomplished gives you an encouraging boost. Consider using SMART goals — specific, measurable, attractive, realistic, timed. This makes the goal more definitive and puts the steps in tangible action.”

“Self-discipline includes structured planning, organization, delayed gratification, and the willingness to step outside your comfort zone,” Carter says. “These things can appear scary, but don’t worry, you’re not alone. And once you take the first step, you have ventured onto a beautiful path that offers many rewards.”

About Dr. Rob Carter III and Dr. Kirti Salwe Carter

Dr. Rob Carter III and Dr. Kirti Salwe Carter are co-authors of The Morning Mind: Use Your Brain to Master Your Day and Supercharge Your Life(www.themorningmind.com). Rob Carter is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army, an expert in human performance and physiology, and has academic appointments in emergency medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, in public health and health sciences at Los Angeles Pacific University, and in nutrition at the University of Maryland, University College. He holds a PhD in biomedical sciences and medical physiology and an MPH in chronic disease epidemiology.

Kirti Carter was born in Pune, India, and received her medical education in India, where she practiced as an intensive-care physician before moving to Texas to complete postgraduate training in public health. She is a Fellow of the American Institute of Stress (FAIS), has more than 18 years of experience in meditation and breathing techniques, and has been facilitating wellness seminars for the past decade.